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isPABEs-nTTTJTTH EVENING HER 





TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR TUESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 17, 1907. 



(ON TRAINS, F^aCtttrENTS.) TWO CENTS. 



THE GREAT BAHLESHIP FLEET STARTS FOR 



PACIHC 



THE BATTLESHIP FLEET. 

CYM>I,\M1ER.lN-rniKF. liOlJI.F^Y D. EVANS. 

8Iiipv. Toniiaiic. C'oiumaiKlcr. 

Coiiin«tkj:t 16.000 Ion* . Capt. Hugo OserhauR 

L«Mil>-i>iiia 16,000 toii'^ C'a|»t. Itl liaid Walinvilj'lit 

Kansu!. 16.000 t«ms Ca>pt. Cljiurlts E. \ rerlaiul ¥ 

Vernunie . . 16.000 toii.s t apt. William V. rotttr ^ 

bEroM) DIVISION — Hear .Admiral William H. Ei u.ry. CommaiHkr. * 

firorjrla 14.918 tons C'ajtt. Henry MeCrt-a "^ 

Virginia 1 1,948 tons C'apt. Sraton Schro«dt'P 

N<%\ J«rs, V 14.9 18 tons* C iipt. AVni. 11. II. SmluTland 

Itliodf Island 14.918 tons t:ipl. .Fanus B. Murdock 

TIIIKI) I>l\ 1SU»N — Koar Adiniral t. M. Thomas. C <imniand«>r. 

Minnesota 16.000 tons Capt. John lluhhard 

(ihlo 12..">00 tons I'apt. Charlfs W. fJarth-lt 

Elaine 12.500 tons Capt tiilos B. HarlMT ^ 

>ll.ssourl 12..">00 tons Capt. Circnlirf \. Marriam 

FtH'HTIi I>I VIRION — Hear .\iiniiral V. S. Spen y. C'<»mmander. 
Alaiiania 11.525 tons ...Capt. Samut I Tt myck Veeder 

IH'iu.is . ... 11.525 tons C apt. .lohn .M. B<»\vyer 

Kearsarge 11.525 ton- Capt. H iniilton Ilntol'.liw 

K» nfurky 11.525 tons Capt. W. C. Cowles ^ 

FLEET AIXIUAKIES. 

C ul"na (siipph sliip) 5."25 too.s lilent.-Cxmi. .lohn B. Patton 

Cihuirr (-up|>iy ship) 7.000 tons . . . C'otnniander AViliam S. HoKg 

I'antlu-r (impair shi|i) 3.:J80 tons Conunand. r W. s. Nelson 

^aitkdin (tiiulert 973 tons Lieutenant V alter K. Ciherardi * 

iurrH navaTmilptia 

TO HAVE THE IJ.S.S. ONEIDA 
TO REPLACE THE GOPHER 

Converted Yacht of Steel'THF PFPORT 
Conslruclion Built in ""^ M-rUKI 





THE CONNECTICUT, 

The Flagship of Admiral "Bob" Evans, Commander-inChief of the Battleship 

Squadron, Enroute to the Pacific Coast. 



REVIEWED BY PRESIDENT 
FROM YACHT MAYFLOWER 

Magnificent Spectacle as Steel Monsters 
Salute Executive With Heavy Guns. 

Thousands of People Line the Shores and 
Cheer Departure of Naval Squadron. 



it ^^ 

Cape Heni^. Va., Dec. i6. — ^ 
The president's yacht, May- % 



1896. 



OF RIDGELY 



Formally Turned Over ^^^^^^ Establishment of 
to Commander Eaton ^^^^^^ ^^^^ j„ ^j^jj^^, 



on Saturday. 

be Repaired and 
Come to Duluth in 
Spring. 



TT .- gt<n. Dec 16.— (Special lo The 
H. i ... . It h:i»-- b€'en (Ifcitied Un' I'n- 

luth is •' :i'€ ^'"i" ^^ S-.at-s 

which h;i- ' ■ 



States 

With Main Offices in 
Washington and Num- 
erous Branches. 



TTulUl.. 

H. H.. 

mlliti., 

Vv . . . - . 
Stt 



...-.:. T,,i. r .-.r t:,. I ■ 

X'Tfolk. 

; . .,: : - .. . :■: ,\,.^-ht of 

...... r riKK*.: 

:im of IS 

:(■(<: 

• ■rfolk navy yard aiiil i. liii; 
■liud lt> I'uiut.'.. 



W 
tht 



: I ! 1 1 ! 



C"arr« .i> 
triadi 



I , ;r,,— Con.j ■ . • r of ; 
Knulty. in his aimuiil rv- | 
tfKiay. <ii.>'tus.-e(l the j 
Can kg were tear- j 
'.r t.^»i\. v^ ,i, lii would break down. I 
111 i( u.-it-MUc-n t it hrokt down. Thvy 
-i f: I till tiiat not suffitlt-nt cur-. 
;.. s ifirliid to m»et the dc- 
• irrency famine. 
;.st:ivt; Kisu'iii II. List •, ;,^rrovPd. 
syttum I '- given • 



ROBLEY D. EVANS, 
In Command of the Battleship Squad- 
ron. 



NEVER VOTED ON 
W ALSH LOANS 

Director of Bank Says 

Matter Was Never 

Discussed. 

(hicnjfo, Dec. 16. — Maurice Rosenfeld, 
who was a director of the Chicago Nat- 
ional bank, testihed. today, in the trial 
of John R. Wal^h, for miSJipplication of 
the funds of the bank, that as a director 
he knew that the funds of the bank were 
Invested m companies in which Mr. 
Walsh was inter* sted. The investments, 
however, he said, wer* never discussed ' 
at the meeting of the dirtctors, nor did \ 
he ever vote for them. He did not know j 
of any "memorandum notes," btinK held | 
in the bank. Ht had no knowUdge, he i 
said, that Mr. Walsh's checks were tar 
ried as cash. 



FOUR NEW 
CA^NALS 

Created by Pope Pius 
at a Secret Con- 
sistory. 

Pontiff Makes Reference! Soon Lost to View Be 



TRINIDAD 
FIRSr^STOP 

Warships Head Course 

for Eastern End of 

West Indies. 



% flower, the dispatch boat Dol- $ 

^ phin and the torpedo boats ^ 

^ Stringham and Tinsley, an- * 

g chored together off the Tail of ^ 

% the Horseshoe. | 

^ The fleet passed in review of % 

% the president, who was standing ^ 

% on the bridge of the Mayflower, ^ 

^ at 11:15 o'clock. The fleet passed ^ 

y out by the Virginia Capes short- ^ 

^ ly after noon. 



7^^ 



to Recent Attacks on 
Catholics. 



.' . n 



satlsf 



currcnr:, 



ill t.iri; 

■;t t.y 

... I\i !.k ft 



. .-I ill ¥ir..t)l'. changes, ' 
Ridgely. can be b -st ■ 
;ci. thty can only be • 
:in'lit'heU— throuKh the 
111- government of a [ 
-lit and reserve. Thi^ 



FIRE AT TROY. N. Y. 
Troy. N. Y . Lxc. 16.— Fire early to 
day destroyed the four-story building . 
of tht Harmony Knitting mills here. 
Loss $150,000. 



Rom<>. Doc. 16.— Pi UK X today held a 
secret consistory in the Valicaji. in 
which he created four new cardinals 
and preconiztd several Wshops. 

Tfie n^-w cardinals are Monsignor 
Pit-tro Gasparri, sc d'ctary of the ccm- 
grc-gation of extraordinary ecclesiasti- 
cal alTairs; Mpr. In L.ai, secretary of 
the congregation of tne council; Mgr. 
Ludovio Henry Lucon, archbishop cf 
Rhflms, and Mgr. Paul Pierre Andrieu. 

archbishop of Marseille*. 

The popt deliverfd an allocution In 
•which he made reference to the perse- 
cution of the Redeemer, and said that 
His church had been attacked from all 
sides In a warfare open or dissimulatei. 
The rights and laws of the church hai 
been trampled on even by those Wii • 
should safeguard them, and the im- 
pious and vulgar press had fought hor 
even to tht extent of dlBturhing the 
public quiet. 

Attnck of Moflernlsts. 

The pontiff cited the recent disorders 
in Italy. To this must be added, he 
continutd. the disastrous propaganda 
in the bosom of Catholicism Itself, 

(Continued on page 12, sixth column.) 



yond the Virginia 
Capes. 



Old Point Comfort, Va.. Dec. 16.— The 
backbone c>f tlit Americaji navy, six- 
teen fir.st-class battleships, uri4er com- 
jnand of Rear Admiral Robley D. 
Evans, Bet sail today for the Pacific 
ocean — a 14.000-mJie cruise, which has 
8et all the world to talking. Parading 
in review for the president of the Unit- 
ed States, and sfilutirg as they went, 
the stately white ve^ssels drew anchor 
from the rende2Vous ground of Hamp- 
ton RoadB, steamed out of the famous 
old Virginia Capes, and were lost to 
view on the southeastern horizon, filmy, 
tell-tale columns of bla<jk coal smoke 
being the last visible vestige of the de- 
parting fleet. At 10-knots speed they 
went, turning their backs on the coast 
which so long has been their home, and 
headed for the eastern end of the West 
Indies. 

After threading their way among the 
rer-fs of thcvse islands, the fleet will 
bring up at Trinidad on Christmas eve 
— th*; first stage vf its journey at an 
end. On a mission as p.^ciflc as the 
name of the waters it will soon be 
ploughing, the Hf^t was sent away 
prepared In every detail for any duty. 
President Arrives. 

President Roosevelt, accompanied by 



(C't'ntinued on page 12, third column.) 






DISTANCED. 



* 



- VSf I Ml 



vv iKh has been adopud ,,.^,.Jt^^;t^'il^e^Jf-,lt****<¥«*^^ 



Liii' ■ 
Marg.. 
a; I.'.. 



\V(IM.\N (ONVKTKD 

Of Murtler of Husband. (Jets His 

!^2.5(K> InMiiJiiHf. 

X- ■(■ I'M. I.;.— Mrs. Lena 

\ a^ ii! ti:.. (H.'-'trict court 
(,'..<:. .; judgment for 
$2, SIM) ag.f.n.'-l iln- Supreme Tribe of Ben 
Hur, on u I'oliey on the life of her di ad 
husband in her favor. With iiit.i.-'. 
tlie jvidgnient amounts to $3,t»ri(i. 
The hearing was comparatively bri.!. 

Jjf.jl ■ t . J .1 1 •.. liTVlfl • \'-|^ ll.-l.lf tl\ ,1*- 

t, ■ ;:.< V...-' 

Mil, l'< .il'I't .li' u. 

I'nusuai interest vva.« at;..-:.. ! t( '):• 
trial i ■ Mrs. Liliie, the beueficiary 

i^ tht ted slayer of the man who 

held liic: poi.cy and In th*. same district 
court rtom the woman was found 
guilty of Miurd'jr and sentenced to im- 
l>ris«.nmenr for life, being pardt-ned just 
.. ; .;; ;:*.'< t'> Governor Mickey. Mr.-^. 
1... ii, *.■- now ,1 siileswoman in a Un- 
v'j;!i di i.':irtnieni <;ort. 



n nil' 



thiid column.) 



insRlPT SWEDISH OPERA. 



Basso and Haiitone Quarrel and the 
Manager Resigns. 

St< ikholm. 1 'f . 16.— Royal Chamber- 

iiii:. Kurt!), ii.i.i; ger of the Royal opera 

1 lias rtslgned, and Arthur Thiel has 

been TV"' '1 in his place. Seliergren, 

'.i,c im- tillowed the lead of the 

I'i'i niiiiiai;' • ■ ;»f- i it is feared that oth- 
i IS < f the .sing rs are contemplating 
h.!i! .ii! movts. The resignations are 
tiaceil directly to trouble that ha;? been 
brewing for we« ks between Seliergren 
and the bariton ■. John Forsell. Their 
quarrel has been bitter, but neither has 
ever been induce d to lay bare the cause 
of tht difficulty 



O'LEARV WANTS TO 

WALK VVITH WESTON. 

New Y'Tk. Wc 16.— I'ts, ( > Letiry, the 
pedestrian, who recii.i > walked a mile 
at the beginning of ( vii y hour for l.iioO 
hours, hfus issued a challenge to Ed- 
ward Payson Westi-n for a 8ix-<l;i\ 
walking- contest. Tlve challengf . - 
cludesi Henry Schmeii of Chicago and 
Charles Rowell of Englai.d. All of the 
men are old-time pedestrian.^ and havt 
king been prominent in walking mat- 
elM«. 



WALKER STILL AT LARGE. 
San Diego. Cal.. Dec. 16.— It was 
learned that, in spite of reports to the 
contrary. William F. Walker, wanted 
for embezzlement of $565,fiOO in securi- 
ties, the prop<rly of the New Britain, 
Conn., Savings bank, is still at large. 
Frtun ;i dispatch heceived from Ensen- 
ada. it is learned that Walker was not 
In that city, had not been arrested 
there, nor was he in Tia June, as was 



HIDES $1,000 IN (LOTHINfi. 

Hunpy-Lookinj Tramp Has \Aealth 
Secreted in Rap<. 

Taconia. Wasl ., lire. It,.— When the 
police arrested John Omig for ste.iling 
coal from the (irp. they supposed that 
they H.tii tlie poitrest sort of a devil In 
the t. ..s The judge even felt sorry for 
(.tniiy. .s" iJisrepiitable was his appear- 
uuce. The officers had only found $4.60 
on liis ei«)thes, 1 ut when the court de- 
i id»d tliat Oinig ought to go to jail the 
man wanted to pay his fine. With a 
knitt he cut a b it in his coat and dug 
up a 11(10 bill. T.ie surprise of the 
c'<furt and offiC'-rs was grater when 
Oniig noticinf. their ainazeinent. 
startluMl uroiind and found nearly >1,000 
in bills among I is rngs. 



TO ORCiANIZi: HIGHES 

(LI B IN NEBRASKA. 



1 VV » ' M K S K S D LI V ES. 
Milwaukie. Dec. 16.— Two young men. 
Hub»'rt Schmit of Milwaukee, and 
Thomas M. .Stanton of Chicago, were 
found d*ad in one rwim at the Plan- 
klngton Hou^e late la-st night. Schmit 
had apparently cut his throat with a 
razor which was lying by his side and 
Stanton had shot himself. Both were 
Btark naked. They had come to the 
room at 2 a. m. Sunday and had ntit 
left it after that time as far as known. 



Lincoln, Ntb.. 
TotM^y. formerly 
Senator BarkUt, 
ganlz.ition of a ! 
tor Burkett as t 
presidency. Follow 
work. The deleg; 
ly pledged to Taf 
platform ctmvent 
La Ft.lUtte mei 
il*l»gat*s at the 



Dec. 16.— George E. 
private secretary to 
today began the or- 
Iiighes club with Seni- 
le aspirant for' the vice 
*ers of La Follette are at 
(turn h.xs been praclical- 
: by the last Republican 
on but the Huifnes and 
. will contest for the 
next primary. 



ISHPEMINli MAN 

( OMMITS SUKIDE. 

M.injuttte Dec. 16.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— Ole R. >ien. aged 58. a resident 
ot Ishpeming ever since arriving from 
N«>rway, thirty-five years a*o. ccirnmltied 
suicide last night. He was despondent. 
A wife and levei. children survive him. 




Old Point Comfort, Va., Dec. 16.— The 
Mayflower swung around the water 
battery of Fortress Monroe and into 
Hampton Roads shortly after 8 o'clock. 
The salutiJig guns o^ the army post 
were the first to signal the arrival of 
the president and his party. Twenty 
one times the cannon overlooking the 
picturesque moat of this famous eld 
army stronghold voiced their notes of 
welcome. The white naval yacht kept 
silently on her way, accepting iht .sa- 
lute as her due and as requiring no 

outward form of recognition. 

Aboard the sixteen warships at anchor 

a mile further up the roads, lugies had 

already begun to summon otticers and 

crews to quarters. Most of tht men 

aboard the vessels had been called 

several times in the past to welcome 

the president, but there was a special 

significance to today's ceremony. it 

was not a time simply to look pretty on 

parade, but coupled with it was a note 

or "good bye and good luck," whu.ii 

'they felt hd^d a woriu of meaning to ii. 

! President Scot Fleet. 

! It was not until tiie Mayfiower liad 

'nearly reached the Old Point pier that 

the president had his first view of '.hi 

splendid fieet. On either side of h 

I veritable marine boulevard the shipc 

! were disposed in two long lines, Uu 

'fiagships Connecticut and Alinnesola, 

! standing respectively at the head of 

I the shore and outbound columns. Like 

players at borne giant game of "London 

bridge," the twin battleships stood 

!With figurative arms overclasped wuit- 

I4ng for the Mayflower to pass be- 

' neath and down the lane to meet tin; 

other ship:? which were paired on op- 

iposite sides and reached fully two miles 

j away. 

j Each ship was gaily dressed from 
jack start to flag post, the long lin^s 
I of vari-colored bits of «rgnal buntiiig 
[fluttering in the early morning breeze 
'first in an almost perpendicular ri^e 
!from the sletn to the signal yards sur- 
I mounting the forefighting top, then 
' reaching straight back to the after top 
and down again to the stern rail of tlu» 
; quarter deck. Black smoke pouring 
trom every funnel indicated mat the 
engineers' forces were building up 
steam for the first step in the memor- 
able voyage. 

Connecticut Speaks First. 
The Connecticut, flying the flag of 
Rear Admiral Evan.«, commander-in- 
chief of the expedition, was the first 
to speak to the president. Her star- 
board and port saluting guns began al- 
ternately to proclaim their respect and 
duty to the nation's chief. Following 
the motions of the flagship, as it is ex- 
pressed in the navy, the other ships 
took up the firing and in less than two 
minutes' time 336 guns had boomed. A 
play at mimic warfare by the finest 
' fleet the American navy has evei boast- 
1 ed could not have produced a mor<-: 
; spectacular effect. The smoke of bat- 
tle for a time enveloped the fleet and 
the smell of gun powder filled the air. 
Again without formal recognition of 
the honors bestowed, the Mayflower 
1 entered the warship lane and proceeded 
i slowly to a point about midway of 
the a.ssembled fleet, let go her anchors 
j and swung around partly, to face the 
flow of the ebbing tide. 

No sooner had she done so than the 
torpedo launch of the Connecticut, with 
' Admiral Evans and his staff on board, 
I was darting swiftly to her side. 
KvHng Pays Respcct-s. 
Making the after gangway, the offi- 
cers, in all the regalia of special full 
dress uniform, repaired on board the 
yacht to pay their respects to the presi- 
( dent. He received them on the quarter 
; deck and the exchange of greetings was 
; more hearty than formal. Following 
; the Connecticut's lead, the launches 
! from all of the other ships weri? soon 
[swarming about the Mayflower. From 
[the Minnesota came the steam barge 
I of Rear Admiral C. M. Thomas, com- 
j mander of the second .squadron; from 
■ the Georgia there was the barge of 
! Rear Admiral William H. Emory, com- 
mander of the second division, and 
from the Alabama came Rear Admiral 
C. S. Sperry, commanding the fourth 
division. Each admiral was accompan- 
ied by his staff. The captains com- 
I manding the sixteen ships followed the 
flag cifficers to the Mayflower and with 
their arrival the reception reached its 
j climax. The ceremonies were few 
land within half an hour after Admiral 
Evans had flrst stepped upon the 
quarterdeck of the yacht all of the 
: officers were once more in their danc- 
'' ing launches, returning to their ships. 
The last good byes had been said, the 
president's last wishes of good luck had 
been uttered. 

Si{;nal to Get Vnder Way. 
Suddenly the signal yards of the 
Connecticut flashed the message: 

"Get under way immediately, follow- 
ing the motions of the flagship." 
Orders volleyed from each vessel's 



bridge. They were conveyed by wam- 
iiig bells to <-ngiine nxims. through the 
musical notes of half a score of bugles 
and the shrill whistles of the "tao'sun's" 
pipt^. Dressing lines w^re hauled In, 
and as they tumbled to the dt-ck the 
ships were robbed of gala attire. Every- 
thing was m cruising trim now, and 
the timo for play v. as p.ast. 

With the departure of the fleet offi- 
cers, the Mayflower proceeded tc get 
under way almost at once, so as to 
take her place at the head of the for- 
midable column and lead the way to 
the reviewing waters, off the Thimble 
shoai lighthouse, ten rniit^ out in Ches- 
appiik bay. or two-thirds of the way 
from Hampton Roads to the sti^tch ol 
oce^.n O'Utside the Virginia Cai>e8, 
Henry and Charks. As the Mayflf-wer 
retreated down the warship lane, each 

(Continaed on rage 11. first column.) 

SEVENfY-FIVE~ 
MAYBE DEAD 

Terrific Explosion Occurs 

in Yolande Mines in 

Alabama. 

Birmingham, Ala., Dec. 16.— Seventy- 
five men are reported entombed in a 
mine explosion at Yolande, northeast- 
ern part of Tuskaloosa county. 

The explosion occurred below the 
second lead. Eight incn crawled out 
of the minf. Women and men gathered 
around thfe mine, and all the fans be- 
gan working. Rescue parties entered 
at once. It was feared that fifty to 
seventy-five men had lost their lives. 

The Yolande mines are operated oy 
the Yolandt Coal & Coke cc>mpany. of 
which Dr. G. B. Crowe Is president. 
The mines are located thirty-five miles 
south of Birmingham. 



J. J. niLL SEES 
SILVER LINING 

Says That Gain Has 
Come From the Re- 
cent Flurry. 

Chlcagro, Dec. 16.— William E. Curtis- 
of the Record-Herald has secured one 
of the best interviews that James J. 
Hiil ever gave out. In pari, he says: 

"Now tliat the ghost dance is over it 
is time for the wnole country to sober 
down and think out the problems be- 
fore it, which are serious enough tO' 
call for its most earnest efforts and- 
vital enough to invoke the most gen- 
erous patriotism. 

"This country has become the moat 
prospe'.ous in the world by the co-oper- 
ation of all its people and all its forcea 
in our national development and tiiat 
co-operation will be even closer here- 
after than it has been before. It is- 
an old adage that there ie no loss 
without some gain. The most import- 
ant result of the recent ghost dance 
is to bring into the list of stockholders 
of our great national highways and our 
great national industries hunreds of 
thousands of peoi)le of sniali means 
who have taken advantage of the low 
prices to buy a few sharees of gilt edge 
stocks, which will give them a perma- 
nent and profitable return upon their 
money. 

"There were in round numbers 2,800 
stockholders in the Great Northern- 
railway a year ago. In other words, 
that property was tlien owned by about 
2,800 persons. Today the number of its 
ow-ners exceeds 10,000, and is still In- 
creasing very rapidly. Applications for 
as many ae 800 certificates of small- 
blocks of stock has been received at 
our transfer office in a single day. 

"New investors are very largely peo- 
ple who live along the line of the road^ 
people who know by personal observa- 
tion the value of the property and the 
amount of business it is doing. They 
see tralTic go by their own doors. Farm- 
ers of the Northwest are full of money 
and are not afraid tc buy railroaa 
stocks. I know of one little town on 
our line of 3.500 inhabitants where $100,- 
000 lias been invested in railroad 
stocks in the last few weeks, and the 
demand for stocks of the Great North- 
ern railroad in other towns along its 
line is so great that we are helping 
them to gel it." 



ANOTHER MISSOURI 

I BANK REOPENS DOORS. 

t Kansas City. Mo.. Dec. 16.— The Union 
I Avenue Bank of Commerce, one of the 
■small banks affiliated with the National 
Bank of Commerce, which closed when tho 
parent institution failed ten days ago, re- 
sumed busine.ss this morning. All of the 
banks affected by the commerce failure 
have now reopened. James T. Bradley, 
receiver of the National Bank of Com- 
merce, expects to have the report of the 
condition of that bank ready for the 
comptroller of the currency within & fevT 
days. 




If 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD*- MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



WEATHER— Partly cloudy tonight 
lo«t»st temporatureif tonight 5 to 10 
dejjs. abovo zero. 

Home of the Knox Hat. 




•31-333-335 W. Superior %% 

The Christinas Store 

that ladies look to for Men's 
and Boys' Holiday Gilts. 




LAKESIDE 



GETS GAS 

New Systen Completed 

— Water and Gas 

Available. 



Hillside System Will Get 

Service in a Few 

Days. 



Men's Bath Robes 

Made of an exceptional ciuality 
ini;)"rie(i Eiderdown and blan- 
ket cloth, in attractive color- 
ings and designs, careful cut 
and well made. They make de- 
ciiledly useful i^ifts that are 
certain to be appreciated. Val- 
ues that in all probability will 
not be duplicated. 

$3.50 to $17.50 

Smoking Jackets. $5 to $20. 

Neckwear 50c to $3-00. 

Soft Hats $3.00 to $5.00. 

Opera Hats $7.50 to $10.00. 

Derbies $3.00. $400. $5.00. 

Silk Hats $8.00, $10.00. 

Gloves $1.00 to $5.00. 

Umbrellas $100 to $20.00. 

Handkerchiefs, Mufi'lers, 

Suspenders, Hosiery, Pajamas, 
Silk Underwear. 



( 1,1 > ni ■. 

!i-'V\ :!ia;n.- i- i—iivc. 

,1 I- u ilays, the san 

(lort-d through the I 

This morninsr tt 

iiiitin !u [•"lis; aU< 
coniplf!.;.! ciiuntH'lk- 
wt'St and Seventh 
SupeilMr street gas r 
aiian.»jriii»iit slves t 
direct high jtressui 
it-utral part of thi 
itiriiuiualiinn to the : 
no .servi':>' pipes it 
Frimlle main was 
purpi'Sf and this w 
gas has been turn, 
siiu'e tliey were 1, 
The water and Hgh 
ooniplrud the con 
old Priiidle main ai 
teedi-r friain. 

It will probably i 
tl:ii' aiiij ji hiUl' lor 
air out of the pip« 
of this week the L 
gas service, wherev 
tions have been mn 

The l^akeside sy^l 
for the laying of 
F' >rt y-seventh and 
east on Superior si 
be done in the spi 

This afterniKm w 
the liOiidon road 
Twenty-second ave 
road. 

.\U ' p. -pi. 

connect !■ ins on tha 
water by this even 

It was stated at 
I Ills aiternoon tha 
t Is pruclically coniti 
1 ami Kas will be tui 



lie turned into the 
id'- today, and within 
le service will be ren- 
lilslde system 
e gas was turned 
i Gas company's old 
y. with Us recently 
tia at Eighth .ivenue 
ivenue east with the 
eeder main. The new- 
he Lakeside system a 
e main through the 
> town, wiil.i>ut any 
jressure, as there are 
I that district. The 

purchased for that 
ts the lirst time that 
il tiirough the pipes 
id many years ago. 

department has just 
lei -tions between the 
id the Superior street 

ik • from a day to a 
the gas to drive the 
4. but by Wednesday 
ikesidera sliouid have 
jr the service connec- 
de. 

■m Is complete oxc' pt 
the mams between 
Forty-se^^ond avenues 
reet. This work will 
tng. 

Uer was turned into 
iialn to Lake.side at 
me east and London 

vvl'.o have servico 
line will have the:r 
riK. 

Uie water department 
the hillside .system 
eted. and that water 
led on very shortly. 



For 



Snitthes, Puffs, (urls, 

Christmas ; t Miss Horrigan's. 



A MONOPOLY IN 
ITS WC RST FORM 

So Lawyer Characterizes 
the Railroad Secur- 
ities Company. 



FOUR MEN SCALDED. 
Boone. lown, Doc. 16.— Four men 
were badly <■ iM' 1 !'y tlie tipping over 
of a vvreok<-jr on the Chicago & Xorth- 
westein railway. G. H. Brannberg is 
perhap-? fatally injured. 



l> K. if., Dec. IQ. 1W7. 
-■'n .v^'lvome as .i nu.se^ay. 



dldA^fUAZ 




HOLIDAY 
HANDKERCHIEFS 

A proverbial Xmas 
present that never grows 
old-fa.sliioned. 

Linf-n oneg with iiiitiaL-j at 25c 
nn-I ".'tc. 

Si< .; them in a fancy b.jx, $1.40 
and §::."). 

Canibrir Handkerchiefs with 
initial 15c. 

Six of these In a Xmas box, 75 

cents. 

Silk Handkerchiefs with Init- 
ials. 50c. 

Plain white liiun hemstitched 
Han<tkerchi> fs. with iieins of dif- 
ferent widths, lTx . 

A '•■>>c with six •>•■ th»'se. $1.*\ 

i:''.-r grades i-f linen up to 
$1.U0 f'-r each. 

Fancy silk or silk and linen in 
all the lolors fashionable this 
season, at 50c. J I, $1.50 and $2. 

BOYS' 
HANDKERCHIEFS 

Pack' <i in odil novelty boxes, such 
a.s niiniuture suit cases, trunk.s, 
purses, grandpa chnks. and other 
fancy designs; L'5c and oOc for 
box with fi handkerchiefs, 

Thiep Initial Handkerchiefs 
for bo\s, pa<'ked in fancy box, 
Uiv l'-tt> r. ISc a box. 



Chicago, Dec. 1 
the case of Stuy 
Edward H. Harri; 
matter of voting c 
at the postp<jned 
i stockholders of 
I Railroad compan\ 
I day before Judge 
! court. 

Edgar H. Fan 
Fish, devoted his 
to the Railroad .S 
New Jersey, whic, 
Harriman wants 
urged that the cl 
ation connects thi 
monopoly in its 
he said, the Nort 
pany, not confined 
corporations, but 
vvhicii spreads iJ 
.state and terrltoi 
contended that su< 
not some into II 
vote stocks in th 
porations of thi.s 
would be In con 
policy laws of th 
had eighty-four Ic 
near him and he 
these volumes to ; 



. — The arguments in 

vesant Fish against 

n\\x\ Investigating the 

rtain shares of stock 

nnual meeting of tha 

he Illinois Central 

were continued to- 

Ball in the superior 

ar. coun.'^el for Mr. 
tttention particularly 
jcurities Company of 
1 holds the stock Mr. 
to vote. Mr. Farrar 
arter of this corpor- 

power and germs of 
worst form. It was 
hern Securities com- 

to the control of two 
I securities company. 
% wings over every 
y in tlie union. Ho 
h a corporation could 
llnois and own and 
e public service cor- 
state. since to do so 
lict with the public 
e state. Mr. Farrar 
w books on the table 
luoted liberally from 
ortify his position. 



COPPER STOCKS 
CLOJEJWEAKER 

Amalgamated is Heavily 

Pounded and Leads 

in Decline. 




£Uyth ^ 



TWO .^ToitKS 

DCLUTH AND SMPBRIOR. 

Every Columbia article is absolute- 
ly guaranteed. If not satisfactory. 
It may be brought back at any time 
and exchanged for a new one. 



The copper stoc 
by Amalgamated 
pounded, almost i 
lost several poin 
Others on the lis 
a weaker feeling 
market. 

Amalgamated o 
vanced to $4fi.25, v 
closed at l-ia.Hi'H 
ctpeiud at %M. dec 
at $37.iT bl<i and 
Gr'*en>-C"ananea 
to $-"i.sV^i and dos 
asked. Butte Co 
advanced to $13.5' 
bid and $13.50 asl 
zona opened at V> 
closed at $93.5() bii 
conda open»-d at } 
:uid went off to $. 
bid. 
I Superior & Pitt 
I clinetl to SS.o:;'*: a 
I ami $S.T5 asked, 
at $3.5(». advancer 
at iS.ST'w bid an« 
sold at $6.1::M! an 
$r, bid and $ii.l2»-2 
perior sold at $! 
hid and $1.37^ a 
Sonora at $4.75 a 
and $4.75 asked. 

Rlaek Mountal 

closed at $4.J5 biO 

• 

Walker's coppe 
Boston (.'onimerc 

"Copper is du 
prices. Lake is 
and moderate sa 
being made at 
'I'he buying dema 
has very little s 
money market i; 
barrier to busin 
manufaeturera ; 
very few orders 
stock up with t 
prices is curbed 
money on it. T 
is small and q 
The largest pro<; 
per on hand, a 
be' n shipped abi 
ried there. Latej 
deliveries made 
ain and Europe, 
producers have : 
uct up to the en 
a period of wai 
tnate almost an^ 



its sold off today, led 

Thl.s was li.-aviiy 

roni the opening, and 

Is during the day. 

wre depres.sed and 

pervaded the entire 

pened at $45.S7>4. ad- 

ent off to $13.12Vi and 
bid. North Butte 
Ined to $:J7 and closed 
$;}7.75 asked, 
opened at $«j. ilecllned 
ed at $5.75 bid and $6 
ilition opened at $13. 
» and closed at $l.!.2o 
:ed. Calumet & Arl- 
declined to $93.5») and 
t and $a4 asked. Ana- 
1%. advanced to $_'s.37Vi 
\.\l\z, closing at $26.12^3 

burg sold at $8.75, de- 
Ul closea at jN.tJ^Va bhl 
Denn-Arlzona opened 

to $3.t}2^ .nnd closed 
! $3.»;:;»4 aske.l. Globe 
I ti;.37^ and closed at 

aske.l. Butte & Su- 
25 and closed at $1.25 
-tked. and <'alumet & 
nd closed at $4.50 bid 

I sold at $4.37*^ and 
and $4.37Va asked. 

• * 

r letter In Saturday's 
al said: 

II at slightly lower 
low 13'/4 to 13*4 cents: 
les of electrolytic are 
I3H cents p^r pound, 
id is so limited that it 
gniflcance. The tight 

i an Insurmountable 
^ss progress, and the 
re therefore getting 
Tiieir disposition to 
letal at this level of 
r»y inability to borrow 
he surplus of copper 
lite well distributed, 
ucers have some cop- 
portion of which has 
oad and Is being ear- 
on it will be sold and 
rrom it In Oreat Brit- 
Several of the smaller 
old their entire prod- 
1 of this month. It is 
ing which may term- 
time, and which will 

















Do your Christmas shopping now. It in- 
sures satisfaction and is a mercy to those 
behind the counters. 



•Cr \.IM 



Duluth 




Cincinnatu 



^ Beginning Wednesday, Dec. 1 8, this store 
will be open evenings for the convenience 
of Christmas shoppers. 



WHAT A WOMAN WANTS 

FOR XMAS IS SOMEfHTNO TO WEAR ! 

And the place to g^et it is where she, herself, would make the selection. Put a number of these articles on your gift list. 




Furs Which Will Gladden 

the Heart of the Woman 

Dear to You. 

The showing includes everything from 
the inexpensive Persian Paw and Squir- 
rels to the luxurious Sables and Mii,iks. 
Every skin has withstood our rigid ex- 
amination, and the styles are the' nTrrst 
exclusive. Separate piece.s — $5.00 to $150. 




Jeweled Trinkets, Auto Veils and Leather Goods, make pretty 
presents. 

Auto, Shopping and Hand Bags, in the new Fifth Avenue styles 

Nobby Traveling Cases and Grips. 

Hair Ornaments and Combs. 

Bracelets, Brooches and La Vallieres. 

Gold and Silver Vanity Cases. 

Ear Rings, Scarf Pins, Cuff Links, Dog Collars, Colkr Pins, etc. 

Dainty Head Scarfs. 

Opera Bags, Ruffs and Marabout Sets. 

Nifty Neckwear. 



FUR GARMENTS in all of the sanc- 
tioned furs— Blouse, Box, Semi-Fitting 
and Long Loose styles — 

$50 to $575 

Fur Neckscarfs at $3.75, $5, 
$6.75 and $7.50 

In Natural or Blended Squirrel and 
River Mink — Collar or Throw styles. 

Muffs from $6.75 up. 

Silk Skirts. 

A Special Line at $5.00. 

Bath Robes, Kimonos, 
and Dressing Sacques 

Comfortable and pretty garments for 
the home — rich imported Japanese Ki- 
monas. with wide sashes, (|uiltcd Jap 
Robes, serviceable Blanket Robes, creji^s, 
eiderdowns, velours, flannelettes, in ^olid 
colors, handsome figures, delicate §h»des 
and rare Jap designs. 

Prices, $3.00 to $25.00 




^^^ 




;-^? 





KID GLOVES 

FOR GIFTS. 

Our Glove stock is ready to withstand 

the Christmas rush. Included are all lengths 

from one to IG-button, in the staple colors 

and pretty pale shades to match the street 

suit or dainty ball room gown. 

GLOVE BONDS are a convenient form of gift, as 
they are exchangeable for the number of pairs stated on 
the face, and the holder chooses her own size, color and 
length. 

CHRISTMAS HANDKERCHIEFS. 

Domestic, convent made, Maderian and Duchess 

Lace, Armenian Hankderchiefs, in clever designs — pure 

white, barred, lace trimmed, or with dainty touches of 

)lor to match the gowns.From 25c to $12.50. 



($xt^Sfr^->*y^Sy^'^^'^>'^.i.^fS:i3th&:>cS^ :> 



HIGH GRADE 

UNDERMUSLINS 

Both imported and domestic, in beautiful combinations of lace and 
embroidery or dainty hand-worked designs — or La Grecque "Tail- 
ored" Underwear — make pretty gifts. 

"Christmas comes but once a year, and when it comes it brings 
good cheer," especially if it brings the girls warm and stylish 
"togs," like our nobby Furs, Coats, Suits, Dresses, Sweaters, Caps 
and Leggings. 

A Fine Line of 

Holiday Umbrellas 

FOR LADIES OR GENTS. 

Taffeta and Serge Silk, in black or colors. 

Prices, $3.00 to $18.00 



Pre-Christmas Sale 
of Hats. 

Beautiful Pattern Hats Now on Sale 

At Half Price ! 

This is a golden opportunity to procure 
a handsome Hat at less than wholesale 
cost. 

As we have but a limited number, those 
who come early will get the choicest bar- 
gains. 

Also Liberal Reductions 
on Ordered Hats. 



ALSO A LARGE LINE OF 

Fancy and Elaborate Silk 
Petticoats. 



We are Offering Handsomely 

Tailored Suits 
At $25.00 

Ones and twos of broken lines, which 
have been selling at from $35.00 to $55-00 
— (alterations charged at cost). 



Cozy Fur Lined and Fur Trimmed 

COATS at $35 to $175 

Very Complete Stocks of 

Long Loose Tight-Fitting 

COATS at $15 to $75 
Fascinating Waists 

Chiffon, Net, Lingerie, Taffeta and 
Woolens. Trimmed in effective combina- 
tions of plaits, tucks, folds, lace, medal- 
lions and fancy trimmings. 

In all of the plain colors and shades, or 
all the pretty stripes, checks and plaids 
imaginable. 

Prices $3.50 to $25.00 



Hosiery Suggestion 

Beautiful Silk Hosiery, plain or em- 
broidered, in pretty designs of daisies, 
rosebuds, forget-me-nots, dots, tigures 
and other clever ])atterns. 

Prices $2.50 to $1000. 

Also the more commonplace lisles, 
gause lisle and silk lisle Hose. Plain, 
hand embroidered or lace. Black and 
pretty colors. 

50c to $1.50. 



«< 



T>ulutb 




"CORRECT DRESS FOR IVOMEN" 
First Avenue West and Superior Street 



Cincinnati 











be followed by an advancing market 
for the metal. 

"The announcement of a further cur- 
tailment by the AmalRamated com- 
panies in Montana i.s likely to mlslo:id 
one. A.s a matter of fact, the Bo.ston 
& Montana company will produce al- 
most as much copper monthly here- 
aftf'r a.s all of the companies in the 
district did during the monih.s of Octo- 
ber and November. Until the tirst of 
this month there wa.s no curtailment in 
the production of refined copper. From 
now on. however, the output of the 
retlnerlea will be much smaller because 
of the curtailment whi<h be^an at 
the mines and ameltins; plants in Sep- 
tember and October. Ther.' is reason 
for the belief that more copper wa.s 
sold durins October and November than 
was produced." 



him the degree of doctor of philosophy. 



THOSE WHO HAVE 
PASSED BEYOND 



St. Ix)uis, Pec. 16.— Col. O. Simons.m. at 
one time owner of the Mount Vernon. 
Ind.. Republican, a prominent politician 
and organizer of the EiRhth Indiana resi- 
nunt durine the Civil war. died laie 
Sunday afternoon at the home of his 
son. W. A. Simonson. 

Id. S.McKAY SELLS 
SOME REAL ESTATE 

Gets $18,000 for City 
Property and Acre- 
-. .age. 

For a cofllde^atlon claimed to have , 



county, Minn. The transfer of one of 
the properties included in the sale was 
recorded a few days ago. 



Chicago. EVec. 16.— Rev. Thomas E. 

Judge, editor of the New York World, 
died yesterday of heart failure, brought 
on by bronchial troubles. He was pro- 
fea.Hor of philosophv at Maynooth. Ire- 
land, and Uter was one of the faculty 
of St. Paul's seminary. St. Paul. Minn. 
The University of Chicago conferred on 



been In the, Jiel|^borhood of $18,000. D. \ 
S. McKay tf tjfc city has sold to Jo- j 
seph BarcvJie^f Chippewa Falls, a' 
; property at .tho» corner of First avenue 
\ east and M*Phi!?aJi street, a half inter- ! 
lest in two Tfits ftt the corner of Twen- 
' ty-thlrd avenue west and Michigan 
street, and some acreage In AJtkln 



LABORERS TO JOIN ARMY. 

Indications Point to Men in Lumber 
Camps Enlisting. 

Lieut. Albert Hall, in charge of the 
local United States army recruiting of- 
fice, says that a large number of labor- 
ers will join the army after the Christ- 
mas holidays. He returned from a trip 
to Bemidji and the lumbering district 
ye.sterday and says the indications are 
that many of the men employed in the 
camps will enlist after the holidays. 

Agents in this district state that In 
the lumber camps the talk among the 
men Indicates that after they get a 
"stake" they will .seek service in the 
army. Recruiting in the lumbering and 
range districts has shown a falling off 
lately. Locally the conditions are bet- 
ter. Most of the enlistments are a 
very good class of men, who, becausfc 
of wage reductions are entering the 
army. 

SAVED BY THE FAMINE. 
London Telegraph: A remark mads 
nearly twenty years ago is still num- 



bered among the gems in the king'.s' 
\ collection of Irish bulls. ] 

It was a time of famine, and Miss' 
Balfour, the sister of the former 'ore- , 
mier of f:ngland, Arthur Balfour, then 
chief secretary for Ireland, was one of 
the noble hearted band of men and 
women who were helping with food anl 
clothes the victims of those black 
dais. 

i As she sat In a cabin one morning 

an old man called down blessings on 

the head of all those who had minis- 

j tered to the wants of the poor. 

I "And sure, me sweet leddy," he saii, 

' "if it hadn't been for the famine, it's 

starving we'd be this day," 

HOW TO WIN BATTLES, 
other things being equal, good shootin^j 
is the determining factor in war. Poorly 
drilled and hastily organized bodies of 
men can give a good account of them- 
selves If they know how to shoot and hit 

wliat thei' shoot at. 

In our war for independence, .says Army 
and Navy Life, the colonists were woods- 
men. They carried and used their arms 
to supply their homes with food and to 
protect them from the savage. As mai ks- 
men they vastly outclassed the British, 
and that more than anything else gave 
Washington the final victory. 

Again. In our great Civil war. mark the 
effect of a general knowled.ije of firearms. 
In the South were sporting i>eople; they 
were fond of riding and hunting, ebooting 
at target and at game entered into their 



sports and pastimes. The North was com- 
mercial. 

lis men knew little or nothing of fire- 
arms, save the flintlock.s of thfir grand- 
fathers, objects of curiosity in th<-ir shops 
or homes, exc<'pt in the Far West, where 
the life of ll'fi wa.s still being liv.'d. The 
result was that in the Ea.st the Southern 
troops were generally victorious for a 
couple of year.s until the Noriliern troops 
learned to siioot. What little .succe.s.s the 
North had was in th^ West, where they 
were little better than a standoff. 

REPAIR SHIP WITH CONCRETE. 

Iron Age: Concrete has come into use 
in connection with steamship repairs. 
It has been successfully employed to 
patch up the hull of a steamer. It 
struck on a jagged rock and several 
holes were made in the iron hull of 
the vessel. 

The largest one was about eighty 
feet from the bow and it measured 
about thirty-five feet in each direction, 
and through this great gap came the 
rock, projecting for nearly eleven feet 
into the hold. Tho.se responsible for 
the salvage operations managed to 
patch up the breach by means of con- 
crete, and. although leaks developed, 
the water was pumped out of the hold 
and thes hip was towed forty miles to 
a dry dock. 



i If it Is absurd to ask you whether yo'J 
, ever receive a telegram and forget to 
open it; and equally as absurd to ask 
'■ you whether you read The Herald want 
I ads., why, you'll do! 



\^ 



\ 





-i 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



4- 



Tlrtists* Goncert 
Tonight at 8sl5. 



our 



You are cordially invited to attend 
Artists' Concert this evening in our beau- 
tiful music rooms. 

Concert promptly at 
and come and bring your 

Miss Mary Bradshaw, Soprano; 
Oliver Colbentson, Violin, will assist. 



8:15. 

friends. 



B 



e sure 



Mr. 




HOTELS ARE 
CROWDED 

Duluth Hostelries Unable 

to Accommodate All 

Their Guests. 



Dyspcplct^ll 

dlFO(^fnrt"i I'f liuligestiongf '" 
coatbJ Ub!eU. 10c. or Zfidr 

Catarrlets 



Qnlrkly r(i1|ev« Sont 

iiia<'h, Heartburn, 

i-'^i'A. and all other 

dlFO(^fnrt>i I'f liuligestioTwmd j|y«;i«'psia. Stigar- 

r. orZM: DroctjiiJis or by mail. 

<5ive itislAnt relief in 

Na»al ("ntarrh — allay 

i n fl n m ni a t ion. heal 

innoon<i membrane, RweetCTi brr.ith. Host cnrgl* 

Boro Hiroat. "iOr. <'. I Hood Co., Lowell, ill 

It Made by H» 'kI Ifa GootU 



-r 



Duluth Only City in 

Country Where This 

is the Case. 



Samaritan degree this evening at Samari- 
tan hull, corner Twtnlieth avenue we.st 
and Super or street, a^jB p. m. After the 
election, there will be an entertainment 
and smoker for the good of tht ordtr. 

Ctii*c Is Disniissdl. 

The Buit of John Honnula against the 
Commodore Minlnc company was dis- 
w.lssed from the district court this morn- 
nig, by Rtiap:ilation of the parties, 
through their attorneys. 

Porter Will ProhatcMl. 

The will of Alexander S. I'orter, who 
died recently, was admitted In probate 
court this morning. The will was 
executed Aug. 10, 1905. The decedent 
bequeathed all hie personal and real 
property to his wife, Jessie M. Porter, 
and appointed her executrix of the 
estate, wltnout bond. 



At the present time every one of the 
Duluth hotels is doing a business that 
tests its capacity. During the past 
week some of the hotels have been 



Seek Torrens* Titles. 

Four applications for initial registra- 

' tion of title to land under the Tor- 

I rens law, were sent by mining com- 

I panics to the clerk of the district 

court, for identification today, from at- 



FAMILY IN 
SADWANT 

Sezbczynskis Have Saved 

Nothing From Wreck 

of Their Home. 



Three in Hospital Suffer- 
ing and Unable to 
Aid Themselves. 






WANICAS 

Pure Straight Whisky, 

'•i:i. LOWED BV AGE O.VLY. 

is It conies from Distillery, Is 
t>ly gauriiiittfd the very best 
y purpose. 

Any HOTEI,. CIA B, 
€ir SAI-OOX, 

the.r sails fy using 
continuously. It retails 



rtl- 



Prr CSnllov 9-1.00 

Per iliiart ^iJSi 

IVr I'lnf 75c 

Prices. ti> I lie I rade Are Kiaciat. 



WALL'S 

FAMILY LIQUOR STO.'tS. 

S'O W EST SIPERIOR ST. 



Ki^^^SB^^^^BB 




YOV KNOW 


■ 




the excellent e of our work. 
Now IS the unusual oppor- 
tunity to iivait yourself of any 
Suit, Overcojit, in fact, any- 
thing withou reserve in thi.s 
wt-11 i-^tl.cted stock at 2A P*r 
( ent OiT. 


1 




MlCS, 


1 




1IO-1I4 Tlilrl \vcniie \\>«t. 
WoU-lit BuildiRK. 


I 


m 


g jiwwuMum UJ^MtiliJiMUl 


■ 



i forced to turn people away because of 
lack of rooms. The large number of 
out of town visitors, who have come to 
Duluth to do their Christmas shopping 
and the large number of commercial 
travelers, accounts for the crowded 

conditions of the Duluth hotels, when 
j maiiy of the hotels of the country are 
; finding it difficult to make both ends 
meet. 

\ A local hotel man who returned this 
■ morning from the Twin Cities says 
that the St. Paul and Minneapolis ho- ! 
tels are not doing nearly tlie heavy i 
business of the local houses. He says | 
that you can always secure a room an.l 
brith down there, while here the knight | 
\ of the grip or the visitor seeking ac- 
commodation is fortunate If he secures 
a room without the "next to godliness" 
attachment. 

\ Twice last week, two of the promi- 

'nent hotels were obliged to inform 

peojile that they did not ~have a 

room left. S. K. O. sign was hung 

lout early in l>oth case.s and 



appllca- I 
been passed on by the ref- | 
The Minawa Iron corn- 
er ' 



( torneys at St. Paul. All the 
I tions have 
eree of titles 
! pany has made application for the 
I initial registration of its lands in 58-15, 
i assessed $3,3<*: the Fillmore Iron Min- 
: Ing company has asked the same for 
I its lands in 58-17. assessed at $51,923. and 
1 in 59-18 assessed at J4,342; the Tyler Iron 
'Mining company has asked for Initial 
registration of its lands in 57-21. as- 
sessed at $34,500. 



Mii8ic After the Tlieater. 

Flaaten's orchestra tonight In the 
Flemish room at the Spalding from 11 
to 12. 






MMkL 



J 



y. B. ERD, 

Gold and Silversmith, 

2g East Superior St. 



! seeker after the shelter of four walls 
land a roof was obliged to hunt for 
' lodging elsewhere. 

Traveling men. who come from the 
E^ast, are surprised when they en- 
counter any difTicully in securing a 
room. Down in the •. ffete country 
they say the hotel trade is dull and 
that you can easily secure any kind 
of a room. Here the gen:al hosts 
are all ymiles and the tingle of the 
merry ca.sh register tells stronger 
than pen, the tale of heavy busi- 
ness. 



O. T. Olson, F. Li. P«arl and A. G. 
, Gunderson of FarKt> were in the cUy yes- 
I tcrday on their way to Ely. where they 
j will look up some timber lands. 
the Mr and Mr-s. W. F. Kinp 1825 Jefferson | 



r 




TESSMAN BET 
GOESJ^EGGING 

Cullum Supporters Fail 

to Show Up With 

Their Money. 



I. 



mi ilRDIEFl 



=^ 



street, left Sun>1nv for New York and | 
other Eastern points for a visit. Later i 
fhev will go to Palm eBach. Fla. I 

Martin E. Pijrco Wiis a passenger on 
the Lu;;itlannia. which sailed from New 
York Saturdav for a trip to Ireland. He 
ixpccts to Ik gone about thre months. . 



Team Ferry 

Discontinued for the Season 
JEFFREY BROS. 



■J 



Miusic at the Spalding Cafes. 

Flaaten's orchestra will piay Sat- 
urday Sunday and Wednesday even- 
ings during tne dinner hour. 



Christmas Cigars. 

Billy Eden's, ;io West Superior street. 

Open N'iftiits. 

Askin-M.arine will be open every night 
until Christmas. 



tCll. fli 



Fiiulinfi:^ in Divorce Ca.<4e. 

Judgf Dibell has filed findings in the 
divorce action bmught by Flo.se Sullivan 
against James F. Sullivan, in which he 

pl.iintiff p.irt 

fjgjj alimony in the amount of J2<X». together 

I with $12.50 Per month, also $20.76 for her 

ihird term candida;e. ! disburstments In the ac-tion and $25 at- 



Te.«prnn bets a. even money went 
begging along Superior street today, finds tha't Sullivan paid th< 
Cullun. y ;i i :;. ; - refusing to 
their 



GIVES AUTO 
TO THEPOOR 

Duluth Man Turns Ma- 
chine Over to Elks 
for Sale. 



Sympathetic friends have taken up 
the case of Stanislaus Szybczynski and 
family, who lost their home and 
its contents by fire last Friday morn- 
ing, and are bringing it to the atten- 
tion of the public in an appeal for aid. 
Szybczynski, his wife, and their Utile 
daughter, Mary, aged* 9 years, are lying 
at St. Mary's hospital suffering unt >ld 
agonies from numerous burns sus- 
tained in their attempt to save them- 
selves from death in the ruins of their 
home. 

The Szybczynskis had nothing but 
their home. The lather was a steady 
man, working on the coal docks for 
small wages, and having nothing but 
the little home to show as a surplus 
after paying for the provisions for his 
family. There was very little insurance 
on the littlo house, and nothing on the 
furniture. The people escaped from 
the house in their night clothes, leav- 
ing their furniture, clothing and other 
belongings to the ravages of the flames. 

Their condition is pitiable. The little 
girl's hands', face and lower limbs aio 
frightfully burned. The father will ba 
unable to work for many weeks to come 
on account of the burns on his hands 
and face. The right hand may Le 
practically useless for the rest of his 
life. The mother's hands are deeply 
burned and it will be months before she 
will be able to take up her household 
duties again. 

With their home gone, not a particle 
of clothing to cover them when they 
leave the hospital, not a cent of 
money to start life anew, the Sezbc- 
zynskis are dependent upon the bounty 
of their friends or other kind-hearted 
people, who may take pity on them in 
their sad plight. Their friends would 
gladly help them, altogether, but they, 
too, are none too prosperous and they 
havfc taken it on themselves to bring 
the case to the attention of the 
charitably inclined that somMhing may 
be done to relieve the oppressive situ- 
ation. 



Saturday evenit g one $ulKi bet was i tiirney'g 



ZENITH CAFE 



30c 
25g 



Our Specialties for Tuesday Dinner 

Spring Lamb, Mint 

Sauce 

New England Boiled 

Dinner 

Including tea. ( offee, or milk, soup, 

two vegetables :in<l pudding. 

Ori N NH.IIT \M» I>.VY. 

2tit» We^t Superior Street. 

1>. 31. WllITK, Pr«»p. 

CONGRESS TO ADJOIN DEC. 21. | 

Washington, Dec. Ifi. — The house tc- ! 

day passed a concurrent resolution pro- ] 

vlding fi-r ad,journmeri! 

21, un- t' fer • ' 



made betwten t\ o prominent figures 
in the campaign, with the understand- 
ing that aiiother $'»00 was to be wagered 
today at niun in the St. Louis hotel. 
The Tessman supporter was on hand 
early this mi-rnini^ with the addition. tl 
$fi(M), but the Cu lum money had lot 
appeared'at 1 o'cl<ck this afternoon, al- 
itiough i:; o'clock was agreed upon as 
the hour. The Cullum supporters cvi- 
Idently could not risk the additional 
: J.'iW, or preferred at tiic last moment 
I not to risk it upon their candidate. 
j The mayor's oigan, the News I'ri- 
' bune, stated yes erday morning that 
the report that from $2,000 to $3,t>00 
('f Tes!--man mon- y was ready for 
t iliir.x along Superior street, resulted 
I ii, a rush to loc; le it on the part of 
tiu Cullum enthudasts, but they claim 
th. y \vt re unable to discover the coin." 
, The ■ I'uUum enthusiasts" must have 
'.valked along the street car tracks 
\ looking up at the trolley wires, for the 
'$:>00 in the St. Louis hotel found lo 
taker?, after it w is seen that the $5o0 
wagered Salnrdaj night failed to back 
the Tessman betters off the boards. 



fees. Tlie SuUivang w» re mar- 
ried In Brooklyn. N. Y.. in 1886. Mrs. 
Sullivan wa.e recently granted a divorce 
for iruel and inhuman treatment. 



Conditions Improving. 

Wallace H. Hopkins, the Chicago brok- 
er, is in Duluth. He says that in Chicago 
I tne effects of the financial stringency 
i are disapp;arlng. and that condition.'* are 
I fast getting back to a normal basis. He 
(declares that conditions in the Middle 
I West are particularly encouraging. Mr. 
Hopkins expects to see the copper mar- 
ket show a great improvement before 
very long. 

Will Pa.ss on Plans. 

The members of the county board com- 
mittee on courthuu.=e and grounds are | 
meeting this afternoon to pass on the ; 
plans for a 30x40 ftet addition to the 
auditor's office In the old courthouse. If | 
the plans are satisfactory it is likely 
that the auditor wl':l be as'Ked to adver- ; 
tise for bids to be opened at the next 
meetlns of the board in January. The 
addition contemplates additional vault 
room lor ihe county board. The old 
room used by th^- commissioners will be 
turned over to the auditor. 



s;.-itur-day, Dec. 

:.as heli- 



days. 



Red Dwarf PtMuib 



f< ar-'airi pc n. Tr 

S.'id in luilutii 

■ \\ V < Ji.liiiri.ir^^' ?tort , 



■i tf 



xe.'-- for sal- 



V.' 



MUHKiAN WOMAN IS 

KILLU) IN RUNAWAY. I It 



Crystal Falls, vlich.. Dfc. 16.— (Spe- 
cial to The H« raid.) — Mrs. Charles 
Backman. wife ( f a farmer living in 
the Lind sottlemt it near here, was fat- 
ally injured in i runaway Saturday. 
She xvs driving ic-nie -with a spirited 
horse, when thi- animal bolted. A 
■.vheel of the rip • truck a stump throw- 
ing the woman as id Injured her .so seri- 
: ; v that she tied soon after being 
• d honie. 



Court Tries Civil Causes. 

The trial of criminal 'cases w»ll not be 
taken up in th.' district court until 
! AVeiinesday. Judge Cant is holding court 
Two Harbors, and the other two 
judges are now sitting in the trials of 
some civil cases There are quite a num- 
ber of ptr.-'onal Injury cases remaining 
lor trial ih s month. 



J 



Pocket Knives 

25c to $7.00 

SKIS 

$1.00 to $15.09 

TOBOGGANS 

$3.50 to $8.00 

SNOW SHOES 

$4.00 to $7.00 

MOCCASINS 

$2.00 to »3.S0 

Shoe Pacs Red Coals 



Sox 



KELLEY HARDWARE CO. 



Vetorans Hoist Flag. 

Thf local camp of Spanish-American 
war veterans was among th«»se patriotic 
organizations thr<>ugh.«ut the ci'.untrv that 
observed the departure of the United 
States fleet of warships for the Pacific 
rcean todnv bv raising the national 
c )lors. Walt'r S. Hale. c.>mmand«.'r-in- 
chief of the organ:x.it!on. sent out a 
circular letter to all the camps in tht; 
counfrv. calling atleivtlon to the incident 
and a,sking them to participate in a pa- 
triotic demonstration. 

I Cassc* Tran?»frrif(l. 

I The personal iniurv suit i.f S. Sasich 
vs. th- Ur.i'rtc & Stratton comp tnv has 
been transferred from district tu federal 
court. 

i Forfeits «ail. 

Mrs. J.ames Murphy, wlio was charged 
; with running a disorderly house at 22S 
I South Lake avenue, forfeited her ball 
I of $15 by not appearing before the court 
j thiii a'ternoon. 

R. C. SU»an Dies. 

Robert C. Sloan of GOl Twenty-sixth 
avtnue west, died at St Mary's hos- 
pital. Sunday morning. The bo ly will 
be shipped to Norwood, Ont., Thursday 
afternoon, at 3 o clock. 

Mr. Sloan was unmarried and 49 years 
of age. He was a mechanical engineer 
by trade. 



Proceeds Will be Dis- 
tributed Among the 
Needy Families. 



The poor of Duluth will not suffer at 
Christmas time, if a certain Duluth 
mining man has his way. 

It is stated on good authority that he 
has turned his automobile over to the 
Elks to be disposed of in any way they 
think best for the benefit of the poor 
of the city. 

The man himself denies that he has 
given the machine away as yet. It is 
claimed to be true, nevertheless, 
though the matter may not have 
finally adjusted as yet. 

By rafflini? the machine off, the Elks 
can probably raise several thousand 
dollars, which should go a long wpy 
toward relieving any suffering that may 
be found in Duluth at Christmas time. 



NO FATHER; NO DOCTOR. 

Mrs. Ole Severson Keeps Lonely 
\> atch Over Sick Child. 

Henry Severson, age 3 years, died 
yesterday morning at 1830 East Water 
street, after a short illness, in which 
the only attention he received was from 
the mother, who kept lone vigil over 
the sick child. 

Ole Severson, the father is cut In the 
woods, his whereabouts unknown, and 
when the little boy was taken ill, the 
mother was placed in a distressing po- 
sition. She could not leave his side. 
No doctor was called, and his life was 
snuffed out by the dLsease, the nature 
of which is yet unknown. 

Efforts today to locate the father of 
the child were unsuccessful. He is in 
a camp and the woman cannot give di- 
rections as to how he can be reached. 
Coroner McCuen will make an examin- 
ation into the cause of the child's 
death. 

Your advertising is the supreme test. 
You stand or fall by it. You grow or fail 
by it. 



al- 
been 



Hearing on Asses.«;mcnts. 



The board of public works he-Id a hear- primary law." 



APPEALS TO 

REPUBLICAN 

Mayor Cullum Asks Them 

to Violate Spirit of 

Primaries. 

Letters to the Republican voters 
of the city are being sent ooit this 
afternoon by Mayor Cullum, asking 
them to call for Democratic ballots 
at the primaries tomorrow. 

The mayor is api>eallng to his 
friinds in the Republican party to 
come to his rescue. 

The move is evidently the last 
stand of the mayor in the present 
campaign, and he is trusting to the 
Republicans to save him from de- 
feat tomorrow. 

"It is rather desperate politics when 
a Democratic candidate will call on the 
j members of another party to aid him 
I at the primaries," said a prominent 
local Democrat this afternoon. "The 
man who appeal.s to a voter to leave 
his own party at the primaries is cer- 
tainly trying to defeat the spirit of the 



D E. H., Dec. 16, 1907. 
Full values — fully appreciated. 




ing this morning on aseossments. and the 
meeting nom was crowded with lax- 
payers anxious to see that the city treat- 
ed them proptrtv In the calls for funds. 
Spring assest^ments were considert-d. to- 
gether with different assessments for 
street and sewer work. There were no 
ontiible protests to anv of the assess- 
iments. which were confirmed. 



The letters are 
Reynolds. 



signed by Joseph W 




! liettor Carrier Honored. 

! I^ast Saturday Mr. and M:s. H. G. Mal- 
;Colm. 927 West Third street, wtre very 
i pleasantly surprised by about forty let- 
I ter carriers and their wives. It w.as In 
honor of their fifte. n:h wedding annlver- 
sarv and a tribut to Mr. Malcolm, who 
has been a letter carrier In this city 
I for the past fourteen years, and who la 
active in the Duluth Letter Carriers' 
associaton. Many pretty gifts of cut 
glass and silver were preesnted to Mr. 
and Mrs. Malcolm, show.ng the high re- 
gard in which their friends hold them. 



Moderate 
Price 



Samaritan Smoker. 

Beta council. Modern Samaritans, will 
hold their election of officers in the 



Gglumef 

Baking 

Powder 

fl.OOO 00 will be KWea for 
I an; rabstance iniurloa. to 
haaltli found Ik C«laBicit>f 



i**"^*-! 

><jj» 



In considering high- 
class presents do not for- 
get full-dress suits, full- 
dress overcoats, full-dress 
vests, full-dress shirts, 
full-dress ties, full-dress 
gloves, full-dress studs, 
full-dress shoes, silk hats, 
black hose, full-dress pro- 
tectors, etc. 

The best and most of these 
fine articles can be seen at The 
Columbia, usually for less than 
others sell the same high quality. 




TWO STORES 
DULUTH AND SUPERIOR. 

Every Columbia article is absolute- 
ly guaranteed. If not satisfactory, 
it may be brought back at any time 
and exchanged for a new one. 





Concerning Store Hours 



This store will not keep open evenings until it be- 
comes absolutely necessary. It's a matter of prin- 
ciple with us, in which we will not be governed by 
what any other store may or may not do. That's 
-what make.s this a "different" sort of store, always 
run on high and progressive lines, and always with 
due consideration for and appreciation of our em- 
ployes, even tho it may mean some material sacri- 
fice to us. 




Cnristmas Furs 



We have purchast for an unusually large fur busi- 
ness for the holidays and offer some exceptional 
value."?. 

Handsome mink pieces in shawl effect, with animal 
trimmings in front, and heads and tails on the 
shoulders. 

Other fancy pieces made of 10 to 12 skins in the 
natural head effect.s on shoulders and bodie.'* — trim- 
mings are tails and claws falling gracefully over 
back of shoulders. 

others made of 4 skins to be worn over shoulders 
or down the front, trimimed with heads. 

Natural Eastern Mink, one skin effect, with head 

and tail trimmings $22.50 

Four and five-skin effects, with animal head and 

tail trimmings $75.00 

Shawl effects, large over shoulders and back, with 
tapering front $75.00 to $165.00 

Large pillow Muffs — made plain $39.50 

Natural Mink Muffs, pillow styles, with head and 

tail trimmings $75.00 

Large Muffs, in Duchess style — head and tail trim- 
inings $87.50 to $150.00 

Six-skin Neck Piece and four-skin Pillow MufTs 

for $120.00 

Another handsome set is a two-skin animal effect, 
with head and tail on back, and heads in front — 
five-skin muff $200.00 



Dainty Waists 



Waists that stand in quality and style without a 
rival. The assortment comprizes pretty effects in 
liberty satin, me.«saline, gloria silk and chiffon over 
taffeta. All are beautifully designed and have two 
or three kinds of lace joined to make fancy yokes 
and collars, sleeves are Monte Cristo style — beau- 
tiful colorings of pink, light blue, champagne and 
white $16.50 to $o5.00 




Stylisk Petticoats of Silk 



Women are buying silk Petticoats here for Xmas- 
giving and well they may! Evejy garment shown is 
of the newest sort, styles and colorings in great 
varieties. We offer beautiful, full and HufTy silk 
Petticoats in yellow, pink, blue, purple, lavender and 
heavy brocaded satin of red and black or shades of 
lavender, at prices running frtm $12,50 to $85.00 

It's the age of utility! 



Kimonas and Bath Robes 



Let your gift have some element of helpfulness for 
the recipient. What would be more useful and com- 
forting than a Robe or Kimona? We're showing 
a complete line of Bath and Lounging Robes, 
Kimonas, etc., of silk, eiderdown and flannelette. 

Flannelette Robes, trimmed with bias bands of elik, 

for $2.7» 

Eiderdown, full sweep Robes, collars, cu.fs and 
pockets trimmed with bias bands of satin — colors 
are red, pink and blue $4.50 

Silk and Eiderdown Robes, in full sweep and empire 
effect, trimmed with wide satin bands $6.75 

Silk Kimonas in arti«tic designs, or Oriental silks, 
trimmed in contrasting shades $8.75 to $15.00 



Silk Head Scarfs 



We have ma<le unprecedented preparations for fhls 
holiday sea^^on's selling of silk for Head Siarfs, 
Mufflers, etc. — and well we did. People arc buying 
away beyond our expectations. Ju^t take this 
group as an example of the rich variety shown. 
Fancy Crepes, Radiums, Habutals and Marquisettes, 
In floral, figured, stripes and plain, with fancy 
borders. Handsome Plaids and plain Crepe de 
Chine — colors are absolutely fast — the yard 65c to $1.25 



•Linens for Gift Giving 



The linen store's stocks are broadly ready to sup- 
ply every need. The fancy lincn«, in particular, 
never were in such fine and elaborate showings. 
Following we quote some of the newer designs in 
fine pattern Cloths with Napkins to match. Maiden 
Hair Fern, Mar.«hall Neill, Vienna Empire. Edel- 
wiss, Narcls.>^us, Snowballs, Dresden Chin^t. Fuchsia 
George I, Le Roi Soleil, Emi.eror William the 
Great, Bridal Veil, plain satin in round and plain 
effects. Morning Glory, Thistle, Waterlily, Violet. 
American Beauty Rose, Fleur de Lis, Princess Wil- 
helmina, Louis XIV. etc.. etc. 

72-inch Beautiful Bleacht Table Damask most ex- 
quisite designs, soft finish — $2.00 yd. 

24-inch Napkins to match — $6.00 dox. 

36-inch Fine Plain Satin Damask Tea Cloths, with 

plain satin borders — $2.25 

24-inch Fine Ble'acht Napkin?, In pretty designs, 

extra heavy quality — $4.00 doz. 

20 and 30-inch Fine Bleacht Satin Damask Tray 
Cloths, new designs — $1.00 

15xlf;-inch Eleacht Satin Damask Tea Napkins, 
hemstitch: — $-l-50 doz. 



2 3x4 2-inch Beautiful Damask Towels, scalopt edges 



$1.00 



6x6-lnch Real Hand Made Madeira Embroidered 
Doilies, dozen — $2.50 

lSx54-inch Double Satin Damask Scarf.s, hand 
stitcht— $1.75 

45x45-lnch Round Tea Cloths, plain linen, hem- 
stitcht and scallopt — $1.50 

45x36-inch Embroidered Linen Pillow Cases — dainty 
deiiigns — per pair $2.25 



Gifts for Infants 



Hand made or machine made dresses, long and 

short $1.00 to $8.50 

Long and short petticoats, lace trimmed and hand 
made — $1.25 to $6.50 

Dainty little hand made bibs, real Val. lace trim- 
med, padded lining — $1.25 to $3.75 

Long Kimonas, Nightingales and short sacks of 
cashmere with pink, blue and white embroidery 
trimmings — $1.50 to $5.00 

Ribbon Novelties, Side Garters, Wristlets, etc., at 
various prices. 

Hand painted celluloid novelties, rattles, soap 

boxes, combs, brushes, vaseline boxes, puff and 

powder boxes, trays and teething rings. Prices 
range from 25c to $8.50 

Ho.«iery. shoes and bootie.s, all colors, sizes and 
prices. Bonnets and caps of bearskin, silk and vel- 
vet, in all colors. Prices 50c to $6.75 

Monkeys, bears, elephants and cats at from 

05c to $8.50 

Celluloid and cloth dolls at 25c to $2.00 



New Neck 



wear 

There's a varied showing In Embroidered Linen 
Turnover Collars at prices from $1.00 to $1.75 

Embroidered Linen Turnover Collars in daintily 
designed patterns, eyelet and blind embroidery — 

35c to 750 

Washable Mull Ties, with neatly embroidered ends, 

at 35c to $1JW 







r j 










1 








































— — 






«!•■ 



•la,. 



\ 



EVENING^' HERALD: MONDAY, DECEMBER 16. 1907. 



DEBATE AT 



Fpnger train just west of this city. Not- 
ing his suspicious actions, a trav UriK 
man foIl..w.^d him to the platform steps 
and seized him as le made the lean, and 
after a struggle » ot him back on tho 
platform, with the aelp ot others. 



PINE CITYlFIRE BREAKS OUT 

IN AURORA MINE 



Much Interest in Friday's 

Contest With Duluth 

Talkers. 



To Discuss Raising Money 
for Educating South- 
ern Negro. 



Fine City. Minn.. Dec. 16.-(SDeciaJ to 
The FferaJd.)— Interest is running high in 
the debate to be held here Friday nicht 
betwt-en a trio from the local high school 
and the team from the Duluth high 
•chool. 

The debate will commence promptly at 
t o'clock in Stekl'a hall, and after tho 
debate a banquet wiy be tendered tho 
visitors at the Hotel Agnes. 

The program follows: 

Bong— "The Way of the World" 

Pine City High School Quartet. 

Bong— "The New Hall Columbia" 

Pine City High School Glee Club. 

tvbite— •Resolved, that the federal 
«ovf' nnient should subsidize the Southi rn 
states for the education of the negro. 
Granted, that it would be constitutional 
and that Southern whites would not ob- 
ject" „ , „„, 

Affirmative, Oscar Heiam. Curtis Pills- 
bury. Robert Donaldson; negative, Ku- 
dolpu Wosmek, Bernard Vaughn, John 
Hum. 

Rebuttal— Nesatlve, Rudolph Wosmf-k, 
Bernard Vau«han. John Hunt; affirma- 
tive, Oscar Heiam. Curtis Pillsbury, Rob- 
ert Donaldson. 

Supt. Peter Olesen. in discussing the 
debate said: "Since Duluth has by far 
the largest school in the northern part of 



Miners Escape, But Dam- 
age is Expected to 
be Heavy. 

Ironwood. Mich.. Dec. 16.-(Speclal to 
The Herald.)— Fin broke out in the 
Aurora mine Frida/ night, raging rtercely 
for several hours. 

The tire original, d in some of the oli 
timbers In A shaft between the fifteenth 
and sixteenth leves. Its cause not being 
known. The firemen did their best 'o 
extingui.sii the fire but soon found that 
they could not re ich U, on account of 
the volumes of s Moke and gas es es- 
caping through shaft A and the adjoining 
workings. 

Th,. day shift .mployes had. shortly 
before the ouibrea t of the fire, a.s- ended 
the shaft to go home, and the night shift 
had :us» previously started work, when 
the fire .vas discov.red. but on account of 
no one working It that vUlnity, it was 
not discovered until the smoke began to 
permeate the whole underground work- 
ings. The men t 'led to get at it, but 
found this impos.'-ible, and immediately 
made go«>d their i scape through one of 
the adjacent sliafls, there being several 
outlets to these oM mines. 

The tire departn ent. finding it Imp.-s- 
sible to get at the fire with ho-se, began, 
with the assistan 'c of the miners, to 
smother it by blocking the mouths of the 
shafts in that vicinity. 

It is supposed tjiat the fire may have 
originatfd from what the miners call a 
"sniud^e," or a Hub of a candle left 
burning by one ol the men on the day 
shift. The tibmer in this p orlion of the 
shaft was as di-y us tinder, makmng it 
easy for ihe fire to start, with but vt-ry 
Utile smoke, but i pon coming In contact 
with the green tlnioeis. ! aiised the smoke 
to rush through ill parts of the mine, 
thus making the llsaster known to the 
employes. 

Tin- result of th( fire is not yet known. 



{verybody is Buying Xmas Presents 



jfpr Men and Boys at Tlie Big Dulutli 

The holiday sale is a strong inducement. All departments are now completely stocked with sensible and use- 
ful gifts for men and boys. You must come to the one store where all can choose with the knowledge that satisfaction is 
absolutely certain. 



SMOKING JACKETS, 
BATH ROBES, 
HOLIDAY NECKWEAR, 
XMAS SUSPENDERS, 
SILK MUFFLERS, 
FANCY HOSIERY, 
INITIAL HANDKERCHIEFS, 
FANCY VESTS, 
NEW JEWELRY, 
SUIT CASES, 
TRAVELING BAGS. 
PAJAMAS, 
SWEATERS, 
NEW SHIRTS, 
COLLARS AND CUFFS, 
CURLING COATS, 



SILK UMBRELLAS, 
SHEEP LINED COATS, 
NIGHT ROBES, 
BOSTONIAN SHOES, 
FINE UNDERWEAR, 

STETSON HATS, 

SEALSKIN CAPS, 

FUR BAND CAPS, 

FUR COLLARS, 

SHOE PACS, MOCCASINS, 

FUR DRIVING GLOVES, 

FUR LINED GLOVES & MITTS, 

FUR LINED COATS, 

FUR COATS, 

FUR TRIMMED COATS, 



NORTH STAR MACKINAWS, 
BOYS' HANDSOME SUITS, 
BOYS' STYLISH OVERCOATS, 
BOYS' WARM REEFERS, 
BOYS' MACKINAW SUITS, 
BOYS' SKATING SUITS, 
BOYS' SHOE PACS, 
BOYS' FUR GLOVES, 
BOYS' MOCCASINS, 
BOYS' SWEATERS, 
BOYS' NECKWEAR, 
BOYS' MUFFLERS. 
BOYS' SUSPENDERS, 
BOYS' SHIRTS. 



I^n/^^i;;; '^Th't^rcai^teim ^com%".^^^^^^ '•"' '^^ supp^.sed from present calcula- 

lent team. The local te.im. composea or ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^.jj ,^ ^ serious loss to the 

company. 



lent - - . 

John Hunt. Bernard Vaughan and Ru 
dolph Wosmek. Is also very strong. The 
faculty hius entire conrtdonre in the team, 
and knows that each .speaker will be at 
his beat. What the result of any contest 
Will be cannot be slated beforehand, but 
thp team has worked hard and deserves 
to win." 

AGED MOTHER OF 
SENATOR NELSON 

Hale and Hearty Has 
Celebrated Her Ninety- 
third Birthday. 



TWO LIVES LOST 



In 



at 



This store will commence to be open Wednesday evening. This will give all 

tienty of time to shop evenings before Christmas and will not give our 
elp unnecessary long evening hours. 



WILLIAMSON tfk MEMDENHALL. 



son; prelate. C. W. Lowrie; guide. W. 
W. WTieeler. 

There was considerable discussion on 
having the Royal L-eague convention in 
1908 held In this city, but it was finally 
decided to abandon the Idea until some 
future year, when they would be In 
better condition to receive the dele- 
gates. The convention will porbably be 
held at Cass Lake. 



JACK AT ALL TRADES. 



The 

Sta' 
•Ota, 



^rfteld. Wi.s.. Dec. 16.— (Special to 
Horald.i— Th,» mother .)f United 

!S .-v-.i i''->:- Kii'it^- N'-ls'in "f Minne- 
^uri'juudeAJ ).»y 'i^-'" -hrv; chUdren, 



has Just celebrated her 93rd birthda> 
ht»re at the home of her son, William. 
ine-ar here. l>-spite h*"r advanced age 
she retains all her faculties; is around 
her home dajly, sinking old Norwegian 
Bonics and hymn.s and reading her Nor- 
wegian liook.s and papere. She kt-^-ps* 
Bp«M-ial track of the "d'>ings" of her 
Bon. ih > seaiator. through all th.*? pai>ers 

Mucri of her time is still oicuplM In 
•I.iiu.iag. knlttmg, sewing and crochet- 
ing. She c.in rotiite on© after another 
occuv's ^t songs ind p^Hr'ms of Petei 
Duss. ThouuvM Kingo, Br»)r3on. Liderod 
an-d r>on>the-a Enpr!^hn>oht. 

Mrs. Ingelxjrg N.l.son was born in the 
village ')f Evanger. Vos-v. N Mway. on 
Nov. 18. 1H14. In 1S4S* -■i^^.. cam*' to 
Amt^rica. 3tt>pi>ed in Chicago ab«iut two 



Burning of Lar^e Sawmill 
>fani.st que, Mich. 

Manistique, Mi<h.. Dec. 16.— (Special 

to The Herald.)- Two lives lost and |Bgi.))^i>^ Justice of Peaee,Postinnster 

and Telephone Operator. 

Brandon. Wis., Dec. 16.— To be post- 
master, justice of the peace, telephone 
baiid mill of the Chicago' Lumber com- operator and barber at the same time 



property to tiie . xtent of over |100,M)0 
destroyed is the record of the most 
disastrous Are h. the history of this 
city, which totall./ destroyed the three 



pany here Satur lay night. 

The victim.s w -re: Henry H>»ni- 
melle. aged 52 y« irs. night foreman of 
the mill, who le ives a wife and two 
grown children, and Andrew NorDn, 
al.so employed nights, aged 65 ye.ira. 
who lives in So ith Manisthiue and 
leaves a wife an I four children, three 
sons and a daughter, all grown up. 

The fire started between band mills 
No. 1 and No. 2. It wa.s caused by Lho 
friction feed becoming overheated. The 
mill is one of the old landmarks of the 
city, having beei built in 1876, and Is 
one of the larges . of the sort in Upper 
Michigan. 

Over $500.0(M) w orth of lumber pllad 
In the yards wai .saved for the com- 
pany by the fin boat. 



GOPINT, AFTER HART. 

State Bar A.sso< lation Will >lake I* 
Warm for Mil neapolis .Attorney. 



Is an unusual feat for a man to per- 
form, but F. C. Brown of Brandon is 
all of these things. He is a barber by 
trade, but he performs the duties of 
his various other positions to the uni- 
versal satisfaction of his fellow towns- 
men. He says, "Wont you have a 
massage today?" "Whom God hath 
Joined together let no man put asun- 
der." "Number?" and "Twos or ones" 
with equal facility. His duties are ma- 
terially simplified by the fact that his 
various establishments are all located 
in one building. 



teracting the efforts of the foes to the 
liquor traiTlc. The oonferenoe will be 
held at Menominee next Tuesday. Tho 
association is composed of seventeen 
breweries. looattHi in varlovis parts of 
the peailnsula. Just what will be done 
at the Menominee meeting is not yet 
known. 



LIGHTHOUSES CLOSED. 



Houghton. Mich., Dec. lO. — (Special to 
The Herald. )-The light houses in the 
Copper countrj- district closed Sunday for 
the season, 'niere are two on Portage 
lake and one at each of the Keweenaw preparing 



the Bemidji Steam Laundry for a term 
of five years, from the owner of the 
laundry, John Graham. 




rounty harlx>rs, as well as on outlaying 
islands. Nearly all of the keepers live 
In other parts of the country and they 
will leave in a day or two for their homes 
for the winter. 



JOHN D. RYAN IMPROVES. 



Houghton. Mich., Dec. 16.— (Special to 
fflTht Herald.)— A letter received from 
John D. Ryan, managing director of 
the Amalgamated Copper Mining com- 
pany, by a Hougton friend, announces 
that he \n Slowly Improving In health 
at the Coronado Beach resort, San 
Diego, Cal. He says he expects to re- 
main there for some time. 



MINNESOTA IN BRI 



St. ("loud— Everyone of the L'<)0 people 
residmg near Freeport and through 
western Stearns county aftlloted with 
smallpox, are on the road to recovery, ac- 
cording to Or. Hewitt of Freeport. 

Little Falls— The Commercial club has 

moved into its new quarters over the 

Flr.st National bank and the Masons are 

to take up quarters in the 



in an acident last June. 

Luck— Fred Mortenson of Milwaukee, 21 
years of age. was killed at a logging 
camp by a log which fell on him. 
body was shipped to Milwaukee. 

Ashland — Judge Parish will leave for 
i Eau Claire. Sunday, where on Monday 
he will hold court for Judge O'Neil before 
whom the Security ijank case was recent- 
ly tried. Judge Parish will probably not 
liold court again in this county until 
the second week in January. 

Menomonie— The Fir.st National bank of 
this city has been succes.sful in getting 



OWNER OF SALOON 



QUITS TELEPHONE EXCHANGE. 

BemidJl. Minn.. Dec. 16— (Special to 

The Herald.)— (A. E. Harris of this city, 

who has acted as manager of the local 

exchange of the Northwestern Tele- 

Is Not Responsible for the Act of phone exchange for the past three 

i» I ' years, has severed hl.s connection with 

His Bartender. ; the telephone company, and has leased 

Appleton. W"i3., Dec. 16.— By sustain- 1 , ^- - _ ^- _- 

Ing Judge John Goodland's decision In I 

refusing to compel Mayor David Ham- 

mel and the city council of Appleton 

by mandamus to revoke the saloon 11- ^ 



St. Paul. Minn., Dec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Fiancis B. Hart, '.h« 
Minneapolis attorney, whose recent ' cense of Herman Bach the supreme , 

, 1 court has held that when the owner or 
communications to the governor andi^ ggjoon instructs his bartender not to 
the chief ju.-itlce, attacking the court's 'geii liquor to a minor, that he cannot, 

'he held responsible. 



methods of arrivi ig at decisions, stirr.jd 



^» 

main'^d until the sprisig of 1S53. when The board of go-ernors and the ehtics 



atworth ojunty, Wis. Th^ere she re- 



the bar of the state, will have to de- 
fend himself froi » disbarment charges. 



Bach was tried before the city coun- 
cil last spring on complaint of the 

. _ . , i Rev. A. H. Zechlel of the Antl- Saloon 

•he came to De«;rrleld. Dane county, committee of the Start Bar association j ig^gue. for selling liquor to Robert 

She h t.s had In all four children— three] has decided to^proceed^ a^gain.st ^ Hart i p^yg^ a student of Lawrence urilversity^. 

Bims and one laughter. Knute. the ' " ' " ' '~~ ""'■" ""■"' * ' ^ ' 

oldes*. i'S At .-Xlexandria. Minn.; 

Wlllia: . .... second son, is a practicing 

attorney at Deerfiekl. and Henry is a 

rettp'-d farmer, living at Whitewater. 

\ViJ Thi. daughter die.i in infancy. 

Mr-* Nelson's husband. Nels, died at 

the homeste«.id in tlie town of De-erfleld, 

In M u- li. 1^83. at the agy* of SI. 



with a view of having htm disbarred ' p^yg ^.^^ 20 years of age and appeared 
from practicing aw In this state ani - • — '- '^- -"- 

to expel him f n m membership in the 
bar association. 



D. E. H., Dec. 16. 1»07. 

A good in-vest-ment. 



MINER IS KILLED. 



SKIMS THIN ICE. 



ClauH lirandson Meets His Death in 
Cormorant Lake. 

Elbow Lake. Minn. L> ■ :'' —(Special 
to The Herald.) — Claus -irandson, a 
boy of 17, wa.^ drowned whiV^ skating 
on ' ■ '.' '. ik ■ H" w i>! In \-n\\- 

pany -.vuii Alfred Haugv-n, .ind the two 
came across 5i piece of thin ice. Haugen 
turnu'd sharply and escap«»d. but Grand- 
•on went down. The water wa.s not 
very deop. and his body was recovered 
an hour after the drowning by the use 
of a garden rake. 



Third Fatality in Qninoy Mine In- 
side o! One Week. 

Hari'-o.k. Mieh. Dec. 16. — (Special to 
The H»-ral<i.)— Th> third fatality in the 
Qiilm y mine, in dde of one week, oc- 
.iirn^.l Sarurday when Edward Karkon- 
en, who wns picking rock In level No. 60 
of No. 7 shaft v as caught in a fall of 
ground and crusled to death. 

A coroners Jur / rendered a verdict of 
aceldential death The dead miner was 
about IS years old and leaves a wife. 



SI HIDE FRISTRATED. 



Bt.smar.'k. N. D., I »"<•. Ifl— An ins.nie 
inan named John W. Johnston of Wine- 
hani, Ont.. en rout^' from Mos<'ow. Idaho, 
to Toronto, to vi.-iit his home, tried to 
commit suicide by Jumping off the piig- 



iLOaiET ROVAL LEAfil'E 

HAS ANNUAL ELECTION. 



Cloquet. Minn , Dec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)—! he annual election of 
officers of the R >yal League lod.ge, rio- 
quet Council Nu nber 224, occurred Sat- 
urday evening. The officers elected 
were: Archon. Fred C Johnson; vice 
archon. Clyde M Kutzner; orator. F. V 
Inskeep; scribe md collector. Leroy A. 
Fish; trea-surer, J. A. Fesenbeck; war- 
der. M. E. Davi 1. sentinel, H. H. Lam- 



Pianos at Your 
Own Price 

You have often heard of 5uch things 
but never got them — except at this great 
piano sale. You will be more than surprised 
at the high-grade pianos — and at the 
LOW PRICES — It seems impossible to 
sell them at so low a figure — \Vc are do- 
ing it though. 




to be of age. Bach was not In the city • 
at the time and his bartender denied 
that he had sold the liquor, but was ! 
discharged by the owner when the case , 
was filed against him. i 

The council refused to revoke the 
license on the ground that Bach had 
not violated the law and the case was 
taken to the circuit and then to the 
supreme court by Prof. Charles \V. ] 
Treat, vice president of Lawrence unl- j 
verslty. 

AMERICAN BRIUl ETTING CO. 

Is Doing Well With Property Near 
Williston, N. D. 

Williston. N. D.. Dec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Robert S. Stewart, presl. 
dent of the American Briquetilng com- 
pany states that the progress of the 
work is most encouraging. The mine 
two and a half miles west of Williston 
Is m full operathm, ninety tons of coal 
being taken out dally. The brlquettlng 
machinery is being set up and it Is ex- 
pected will be In operation In a short 
lime. Mr. Stewart is most enthusiastic 
over the progress and stated today that 
the company was looking elsewhere for 
the next plant. 

REACH THOUSAND MARK. 

That Number of Bankruptcy Peti- 
tions Filed at Fergus Falls. 

Fergus Falls. Minn.. Dec. 16.— (Speclai 
to The Herald.)— Bankruptcy petition 
N«>. 1.000 has been flleil In ITnlled States 
court here, being that of John Keenan. 
a hotelkeeper at Warren, who places 
his assets at $.325 and his liabilities at 
$822.67. The flUng of bankruptcy peti- 
tions under the provisions of the Nel- 
I son law began in 189S— nine years ago— i 
and the first petition was filed on Aug. 
23 of that year, by Charles M. Lowe 
and David Huggard, a Crookston Im- 
plement firm. Since then the petitions 
have been coming In quite regularly, 
and the number does not seem to either 
Increase or diminish to any great ex- 
tent. 




««*<«> ^.n t 



BRE>YERS^\\RED. 

Upper Peninsula .\ssoeiation Would 
Offset Temperance .Movement. 

Marquette. Mich., Dec. 16.— Because of 
the activity of the Antl-Sal<x)n league, 
and the apparently steady expansion of 
the temperance sentiment In the teni- 
tory north of the straits, a meeting of 
the l'PP''r Peninsula Brewers' asaocla. 
tlon has been called for the purp^iae of 
discussing ways and means of coun- 



Why not a Waist- 
coat for Xmas ? 

Fancy Ve.sts have be- 
come so popular a part of 
the gentleman's wardrobe 
that we have given them 
a separate department 
space, where in an elec- 
trically lighted glass case 
nearly every one of the 
beautiful patterns is pre- 
sented to view. 

A man can't have too 
many waistcoats for style 
tliis year, and nothing 
would prove more attrac- 
tive for a Christmas gift. 

They are here in an cndles.** 
variety of colors from white to 
blatk and at every price be- 
tween $1 and $8. Materials are 
either washable fabrics or French 
Flannels. The latter must be 
dry cleaned. 

To ascertain his size, take a 
rather snug measure around chest, 
or, if you wJsb, bring in his old 
vest. y I 



rooms formerly occupied by the Commer- 
cial club in the Tanner-Rhodes block. 

Staples— At the annual meeting of the 
Cass County Mutual Telephone company, 
held at Hazel Dell the following offlcors 
were elected for the ensuing year: Presi- 
dent, J. W. Bickford; vice president, J. 
O. Jeme; treasurer. G. E. Keenen; sec- 
retary. F. W. Deline; C. Wetherell, E. D. 
Denning and A. K. Hanson, directors. 

Buffalo— The case of the slate against 
Henry Kurtz, indicated for s<>lllng liquor 
without a license, occupied the attention 
ot the court for two days. Kurtz tesli- 
tled that he had not kept or offered for 
sale intoxicating liquor since license was 
voted out. 

St. Paul — The St. Paul Jobbers and 
Manufacturers' association has made ar- 
rangements for a banquet which is to 
be held at Carlin^'.s Uptown cafe Tues- 
day fvenlng, at 7:30, artd It is expected 
that there will be not less than laO per- 
sons present. 

Jackson — The 10-year-old daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Meyer, living two 
miles south of Jackson, was 
burned Friday afternoon while playing 
with fire around the kitchen stove. 

St. Paul — Hog receipts at South St. 
Paul, Saturday, made the record run for 
the year, tht- estimate showing 8.500 head, 
against the highest previous run of 8,150. 
last Tuesdav. The highest previous was 
9,2<«, made Jan. 5. 1*>4. 



pcooij worth of the Panama bonds Just i cution of shoplifters, wlio 

issued by the bnited States government I infegt the large down l- 
Ihe purchase represents an outlay of ,v,iB «pa<?on 



purer 
about $58,000. 




PENINSULA BRIEFS 



Houghton — Contractor John J. Michels 
is making excellent headway on the n.^w 
Haa.s building, Wt:st Shelden street, and 
it will In all probability be ready for 
occupancy by the Houghton Pure Food 
company by the first of the year. 

Baraga — John O. Maxey of L"Anse. 
who is promoting the Barag.a bank, has 
so far progressed with tlie work that 
it is believed the organization will tile 
articles of incorporation with the secre- 
tary of state this week. The Institution 
is to be a state savings bank. 

Calumet— Invitations have been issued 
for a social gathering of the Calumet 
lodge of Elks, No. 404, to he held In the 



lodge rooms In the Gately-WlgglnB' hall, 
on Wednesday evening. 

Calumet — General Manager James Mac- 
The Naughton of the Calumet & Hecla Min- 
ing company has been mentioned as lho 
prospective delegate-at-large to represent 
the upper peninsula at the National Re- 
publican convention to be held in Chicago 
in June of next year. 

Escanaba— For mutual protection during 
the Christmas shopping seas<jn. It is 
said that merchants of Escanaba are con- 
sidering seriously the idea of forming an 
a.s.sociatlon for ilie detection and prose- 

wlio it is claimed 

>wn stores at 

this sea!5on. 

Calumet— The annual ball of the 
Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, which 
win be held at the L.ight Guard armory, 
on the evening of Dec. 31, promise* to 
be one of the most pleasant and be»t 
arranged of any kind tlial have l>e«in 
held In recent years. 

Houghton— Prompt work of Adolph 
King saved the life of Fred Krjll. Jr.. 
of Houghton from an ley grave in the 
bottom of Portage lake. The young man 
was sinking for the third time whan 
King lassoed him with a tackle r^jpo 
and pulled him to dry land. 

Trimouiitaln— Fire Friday evening de- 
stroyed two houses In a portion of Tri- 
mountain, known as Sunny Italy, and 
but for the prompt action of the fire 
di-T>artmcnt, a more disastrous confla- 
gration might liave resulttxi. Two houses 
were destroyed, and the loss was al>out 
f2,i:oo. 



fatally iff) 






DAKOTAS IN BRIEF 



% 







TWO STORES 
DULUTH AND SUPERIOR. 
Every Columbia article is absolute- 
ly guaranteed. If not satisfactory. 
It may be brought back at any time 
and exchanged for a new one. 



Ihwils LAke. N. D.- Sheriff Helford has 
departed for Helena, Mont., armed with 
a requisition for W. R. Hill, the plumber, 
who is wanted here on a charge of em- 
bezzlement preferred by a MinnearoHs 
firm Hill is out under bond. He refused 
to return without requisition the last trip 
Sheriff Belford made for him. 

Grand Forks, N. D.-Saturday was one 
of the busiest days of the year in the 
office of Register of Deeds Hancock. 
Over lUty instruments were filed, and the 
list included many real estate transfers. 

Ambrose, N. D.-Fire early Saturdday 
morning destroyed the barn of Ciirtst 
Hugos at this lace. Two horses and a 
cow perished in the flames. j 

Deviia Lake. N. D.-M. H. Brennan 
has forwarded to President Roosevelt his 
resignation as register of the land office 
at this city, and as soon as his successor 
Is app<Jlnted and the affairs of the office 
have been closed up. he will retire, to 
devote his entire attention to his law 
practice. ^. 

Fanso, N. D.-Louis Albright of Cleve- 
land N. D., one of the dozen or more in- 
dicl«'d by the grand jury of the federal 
court during the past week, was anaUiied 
before Judge Amidon and pleaded guilty 
to the charge of miiiling obsc nt matter. 
He was sentenced to thirty days In the 
Cass county jail. 

Bismarck, N. D.— At the annual meet- 
ing of tlie Bismarck Commercial club, 
the following board of directors 
elected: Robert Orr p. H. U ill G. H. | ^' 
Russ, Jr., V. L. Conkhn, P. C. Reming- t^ 
ton. G. A. Rawlings, W. E. Butler, E. K. ^ 
Bull, R. L. Best, H. L. Reade, John , ^^ 
Yifen. R. D. Hoskins was elected treas- V 
uior I T^ 

Miiton, X. D. — Patrick McCabe, -•--'• 



** Get the Habit' 




DULUTH. 



SUPERIOR. 



Get Your— 



NEW SUIT 



FOR XMAS Now Offered io You 



was I V 



AT EXACTLY- 



HALF PRICE 



was sent to the county jail from here to j W 
await trial for blind pigging, will per- ►^ 



»5» 



haps not live to stand trial. He was in 
such a precarious condition that he was 
removed to the hospital at Hannah upon 
orders of the court. . ..,. 

Bismarck, N. D.— Gunder Auscart, the 
11-year-old son of Andrew Auscart, a 
farmer in the vicinity of Taylor, Stark 
county, was brought to the hospital in 
this city with a broken leg the result of 
a horse falling on him. ,» , ,.^ 

Grand Forks, N. D.-Thc University of £^ 
Minnesota Glee club will sing in this city ^ 
early in January. This onsanizatlon ap- -^ 
peared here last year and was enjoyed 
by the large audience that assembled to 
hear them. , ^. , 

Langdon. N. D.— The jury In the case of 
Carl and I^m»>^rt Frank, accused of ar- 
son disagreed Wednesday, after being out 
forty-eight hours. It Is said that the 
lury stood nine to three in favor of con- 
viction. The Franks were accused of 
burning a granary belonging to a 
neighbor. 

Mmoi N. D.— The case of the state of 
North Dakota vs. Hekel, a Russian farm- 
er accused of poisoning his neighbor s 
horses, was dismissed and the man re- 
arrested so as to clear the records. The 
case came up for preliminary hearing 
.some time ago, but on account of com- 
plications was granted a new hearing. 




WISCONSIN IN BRIEF 

_ ^ ■ m ^ ^ ^ ^ *" 






g 



f 

I 



i^^«^t^<^>^ 



Madison, Wis., Dec. la.— Allen B. Cal- 
houn of Milwaukee, cannot organize a 
corporation in Wisconsin to insure peo- 
pl,. again.st tlie lo.«s of their keys unless i ^, 
he makes the capital $10O.0<J0. This is the 
opinion given by the attorney g.-neral In 
response to a request from the insurance 
commissioner. Mr. Calhoun intended to 
capitalize his company at $1,000. 

Janesvllle— Hugh Miller, a well known 
character, who at one time was promin- 
ent in the city, committed suicide In jail 
bv drinking laudanum. He had been ar- 
rested on a charge of drunkenness. He 
was 48 vears of age. and leaves no sur- 
viving relatives. His brother was killed 




Get the Habit' 



Our Entire Stock of Foreign and 

Domestic 

MILLINERY 



^AT 



HALF PRICE 

— AND LESS — 






1 




•) 



'S.. 



i 


— 






i 









-i 





-^ . 






1 


































( 






























T 








^WM 


■■■■■ 


■'"■■^™ 




™"^"" 


- 




Hl^HBd 






""^■■l 


r 









THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD ^, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



u 



^^^^^^^^^^^'^ 







CHRISTMAS 
PURCHASERS 

Will find an unusual variety and (Excep- 
tional values in our stock this year. 

Cut Glass and Silverware 

Our superb stock embraces everything in individu il pieces, 

small sets, etc. 

In Watches, Rings and Gold and Silver Nov -Ities we 
show a selection that surpasses all former years. 

DIAMONDS 

We carrv a larger and finer stock of diam^-nds and 
fancy diamond jewelry than we have ever carrie 1 before. 
(ur holiday display is of more than usual beauty and im- 
portance. No other house in Duluth can present is exten- 
sive an assij«tment of single and combmed stone >, nor as 
large a variety of mountings. 

See our Bracelets, Rings, Lockets, Pins, Combs, Sterling 

Novelties. 

A Ring that comes from Gruesen's must be solid gold 
—we sell nothing else. 

J. GRUESEN, 

JEWELER, 

lag WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 




^ 
^ 

^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
« 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
# 
^ 
# 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 



CONCERNING 



i^An. 






INSANE AND 
PARALYZED 

Sad Plight of Wife of 
a Chisholm Home- 
steader. 



Mme. Shanna Cunning. goprano, 
Charlotte Gushing Child, contralto, 
John Barnes Well-s, tenor and Henri 
G. Scott, basso, the soloists who will 
sing in "The Messiah," before the Du- 
luth audience with the Duluth Oratorio 
club will arrive in the city Thursday 
afternoon or Friday morning. The 
singers will be the soloists at the pro- 
duction of "The Messiah" which will 
be given at Bay City. Mich., Wednes- 
day of this week. Mme. Cumming and 
Henri G. Scott are members of the 
same church choir quartet, one of the 
highest paid in greater New York. 
During Cliristmas week Mr. Scott will 
be the bass soloist for "The Messiah" 
to be presented at Minneapolis, St. 
Paul and Milwaukee. 

The interest in the presentation of the 
great oratorio by the Duluth club is 
great, and many guests from the ranges 
and nearby towns will be In the city 
for the affair. The sale of tickets is 
large, and It is thought that by Friday 
every available seat will be disposed of. 

HONOR VVHITTIER. 



Clubs Hold Exercises in 
Celebration of Centen- 
ary of Birth. 

Many of the clubs of the city are ob- 
serving with simple exercise the cen- 
tenary of the birth of Whittier, which 
falls tomorrow. The Lester Paik Lit- 
erary club, which will meet tomorrow- 
afternoon with Mrs. F. B. Hall of 
Fifty-seventh avenue east will devote 
the afternoon to a study of the poet's 
life and works. 

At the meeting of the Saturday club 
quotations from the Quaker poet were 
spoken in response to roll call and a 
small collection was taken to be con- 
tributed to the monument in honor of 
Whittier, which will be erected at Hav- 
erhill, Mass. 



Nfff's Bister. MissfcPji^ler. of Toronto, 
Can. 

Mre. James D. Kffbagh and daughters 
of St. Paul, are in the city for the 
holidays, the guests of Mrs. Keough's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Sweeney, 
of 127 West Fourth street. 

• • • 

Miss Grace Hinckley will leave the 
latter part of the week for her home 

in Chicago. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H Magie left this 
afternoon for a ffw days' visit at St. 

Paul. 

• • • 

Mrs. Frank Woodruff and son, who 
were the guests of friends in the city, 
returned today to their home at Min- 
neapolis. 

• • • 

MrS. W. H. Cookley of Baltimore, 
formerly of Duluth. wa« in the city to- 
day en route to Grand Rapids', where 
she will spend the holidays with her 

daughter. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Kre«s of 
Chicago, who were in th« city to at- 
tend the funeral of Mrs. Kre«s' brother, 

have returned to th^r home. 

• « * 

W. C. Brown will leave during the 
week for the West. He will spend 
Christmas with Mrs. Brown and Mas- 
ter Orrin Br^>wn at Ix»s Anpeles. 




Tuesday 
Morning 



^ Buy Gifts for Chrismas Morning— and Save Money. 



CHICAGO DEBUT. 



Husband Left at Home 

With Four Small 

Children. 



his wife is taken » 
where she can i< > 
may recover. 

Another case of al 
be brought before 
ernoon. Informatio 
been filed against 
single woman, aged 
in the West end. SI 
the local hospitals f 
ing the disposition 
cording to the pet 
Dhvsiiian the nation 
and h» r condition Ih 
n(.rvou.sn<«s. 



T 5ome institution 
. ■ proper care she 

eged Insanity may 
he court this aft- 
1 of insanity has 

Ragna Limrud, a 

31 years, residing 
e is now in one of 
or treatment pend- 

of her case. Ac- 
ition filed by her 
: fears bodily harm 

due to worry and 



T HE EVENING st ory] 

I fortunate"" 

ACCIDENT 

By William S. Rice. 



Ink Stands 



The entire line of fancy ink 

stands and desk novelties, in 

brass, bronze, glass, etc. — swell 

gifts for a man or woman's desk — range from ff / 

50c to $6.75, but Tuesday morning you get "^^ 

your choice of the lot for just / ^ 



Handkerchiefs 



Women's fine sheer lawn 
handkerchiefs, hemstitche;' 
and neatly initialed (all 

letters). Put up y2 dozen in a box 

and actually worth 50c box — 4 hours 

Tuesday, (limit 2 boxes), per box 



29c 



Silks 



You i ' any one when 

you ntfi .-uin, iiiii ; i.. rfgulate your 
sy.stcm. If your buvels are sluggish, 
your f I od di.'ttresses you, your kidneys 
pain, tak • Hillister s Rocky Mountain 
Tta. It always reli ves. S.i cents. Tea 
or Tabkt.s. Ask yu ir druggist. 



Deputy S!;.:'ri!T King of Tl.ibing 

br (li'un from the range this 

j: -. Mrs. Hannah Gustafson. aged 

lis, who was to have been exam- 

:,.r insanity in th* prolate court 

liiis afternoon. 

Tlie case i;? a pathetic one, the pa- 
tient being t»K- uif. uf J'.hn Gustafson, 
a hcnu-steader, residing near Chisholm, 
who is left at home with four small 

ciii:<i. >i()k after. 

Mi>. .,>!:-■•'• A as sick for some 
■.iiiif her illi. minating recently in 

1. . ■ ':ig: iha: rv^emliles a .«trokc of 
^\ Although aV'le t.> talk anil 

t, she ha.s not the least control 

C)\ muscular actions of her body 

and i.*^ .I'nipS't'ly help'.* .-'s. .<^he has to 
tf- i;!'--:.d abuut. K' .'tntly s^he has 
t, y irration. ^'-r talk and 

lii,. i..,.:;<.n for ii.- ::• was linaliy 

lcn]p.'t! apain her. 

It ■;.= hoptil I y Mr. Gustafson lliat if 



DANCE 

AVhilo you wait for Election Returns. 
Tenth Annual Ball, i?iven by the Cooks" 
find Wiiltfrs" Union, Local No. 53, Tues- 
day Evtning. l>eo. 17. at Folz Hall. 
La Brosso Orchfet^ti ,\. Admission, SOoj 
Ladles. Fro*. 



where are 
™birds? 

No Trace of the Carrier 

Pigeons Has Been 

Discovered. 






-Who 


Ctlt 


th.' 


V 


11 1 y s 1 1- r y 


< t 


tl'., [ 


1 it 


appropr 


iato 


title 


ol 


supp.-.^w. 


1 to 


liave 


h< 


Ill- 


■ !" 


V.ilc 


t 


thi.'- p'-T 


''. 1- 


di-ii wit 


— ;inil two i 


tirrif 


■ 1 





One package, 10 cents, makes one 
pint of wholesome Fruit Jelly. AJU 
flavors from true fruits. 



kill' wn. 

Ill \.ilii ili<y h.avf 
the homing birds ;« 
Tdti.linson, the vis; 
has bttri disi overei 
the tinployts of lh» 
thai in a spirit i 
Christy had the i 
Into a pot pie. Thi 
ter bonk on the pig 
son office. They 
straiglil a< ross the 
timid takers of ni 
to wager tven mi 
nt-ver see home ;i 
more retklfss plun 
of 2 to 1 that the pi 

The contingent t 
birds to show, rely 
which they b*>liev 
sptfd ot tiie carrl 
Is nlying on hu 
hii'-ky nppt'tltc. T 
soft-ty< d, feiithert 
have (lone the fare- 
decorated the boa 
and his hungry ni 
fail to put in an 
the office force w 
their furnishing tl 
menu card of the 
Ing small ch.T.nge. 



,-< on wing, or the 
i 1'.' might be the 
the drama that is 
• n enacted on board 
I I,! St boat to leave 
I wheat for Buffalo 
igeous, destiny un- 

awalttii news from 

t the office of G. A. 
el agency. No trace 
of tile pigeons and 
office have decided 
<f economy. Capl. 
ews carriers made 
y have made a wln- 
euns at the Tomlln- 
are being played 
board. Some of the 
ikers of odds want 
in< y that the birds 
gain. Some of the 
fers are laying odds 
geons fail to show, 
hat are playing the 
on stormy weatlier, 
e nas retarded the 
?rs. The other side 
rnan nature and a 
i» y believe that the 
d niessage carriers 
Veil shuffle and have 
•d of Capt. Christy 
■ites. If the birdies 
appearance some of 
lo have wagered on 
e big entree on the 
Yale will be collect- 



Mrs. McAuliffe to Sing With 
the Bunge Orchestra. 

The following item from the musical 
columns of the Chicago Record-Herald 
will be of Interest to many Duluth- 
ians: 

"Mrs. Lucia Judd McAuliffe will be 
soloist with the Carl Bunge orchestra 
this week. The program includes: Over- 
ture, and "Invitaiion xo the Dance," 
Weber- VVt-ingartner." 

Hostess at Dinner. 

Miss Rachel McLaren entertained at 
dinner Saturday evening at her home, 
1013 East Second street in honor of 
Miss Gi^ce Hinckley, who will leave 
the latter part of the week for Chicago 
to remain until spring. Beside the 
hostess and guest of honor, cover were 

laid for: 

Mes»r«. and Mesdame.s — 

Guy \Varren, Walter Hall. 

J. McGregor, ^ 

Mes.TS.— 

William Elder. E. L. Cheney. 

Club Meetings. 

Dr. Stella Wilkinson will be the 

speaker this evening at the meeting of 

the Young Ladies' club of the First 

Methodist church. The subject of the i 

lecture will be "Microbes* and the! 

friends of the members are invited to 

be present. 

• • • 

The members of the Greysolon du 
Lhut chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution will meet tomor- 
row afternoon with Mrs. H. L. Dresser 
of South Nineteenth avenue east. 

Bishop's Club. 

The regular meeting of the Bishop's 
club will be held tomorrow evening at 
the club rooms on West Fourth street. 
Mrs. C. E. Judd will give a talk on the 
Holy Land and a musical program will 
be presented by Mrs. E. Kreimer, Mrs. 
Leo Ball and Miss Katherine Fiebiger, 
Miss Fay Hobbs, Miss Teresa Lynn and 
Walter Smith. There will be readings 
by Miss Saravin. 



25 pieces of fancy stripe, check and bro- 
caded silks— ALL PURE SILK— and this 
season's best and brightest 

patterns; every yard worth regularly 

89c and $1— Tuesday forenoon only, yd 



Card Club. 



Do Not Be Amon^ Those 
To Be Disappointed 

By not securing one of those high- 
grade pianos that are being sold so cheap 
during the big piano sale. 

Our piano department is busy every' 
day getting out pianos for those who have 
taken advantage of this great sale. 



Dr. and Mrs. L. A. Sukeforth will en- 
tertain the Evening Card club tonight 
at their home, 1001 East First street. 

The Christmas Shop. 

It seems like "rubbing il in" but 
there remain just seven more shopping 
days until Christmas. 

• * « 
Poor thing! 

• • * 
One placard in a down town window 

says: "One of these natty suits or an | 
overcoat would just suit him." If 
your mind has entii-ely given way un- 
der the strain Just go and choose a 
suit or an overcoat for a full grown 
man. 

• • • 
Bengaline ties in ravishing colors of 

blue and pink and lavender and green 
are displayed for Just 50 cents each. 

• • • 
A basket of fruit would not be a 

cheap gift, but it would be a very 
gracious one. For some unexplainable 
reason $5 or JlO worth of flowers or 
fruit carries no sense of obligation with 
them, while a 50 cent handkerchief 
makes one feel under everlasting obl!- 
gation to the giver. Explain it, some- 
body. 

• • • 
If It is possible to make ~np your 

mind about the book you want before 
you go to the book department, do so. 
The poor clerk at that place of vague in. 
definiteness is almost distracted. That 
Is where the purchaser with glazed eye 
says "A book" and expects the sales- 
woman to produce "Alice In Wonder- 
land," for the 12-year-old or "Ghosts' 
for the 40-year-old without asking any 
more questions or making a mistake. It 
cant be done. Be definite when you go 
to the book department. 

Personal Mention. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bt-ntley P. Neff of Mun- 
ger terrace have as their guest Mrs. 



) 




A# # /V iV. 



There wajs a succession of raps upon 
the back door of Widow Rudisills prim 
residence early in the morning of tlie 
dav preceding Tlumksgiving, "and when 
Mi'ss Maria herself appeared at the door 
she was greeted by a sturdy, round- 
faced Penns-ylvunia German lad from 
Dellingcr'B cash store. 

•'Good morning, .Maria; this here's your 
turkey that yuii ordered yesterday," he 
smilingly said, as he lield aloft for her 
critical mspectioa a medium sized dress- 
ed bird. 

"It's most too big for mom and me, 
the replied, hesitatingly; but then, I 
guess wt can warm it over a couple of 
times." 

Tlie Rudisills car.ied for themselves 
among the townspeople the reputation of 
being "close," while others, maliciou&ly 
inclined, considered them miserly. But 
the truth of the matter was ilia»i it was 
iheir extremely small income that led 
them to live the narrow, secluded life 
together in the ways oi liie past and its 
memories. 

In this wav the daughter became pre- 
maturely old-fashlontd and unduly "sav- 
ing" in order to make the small income 
from their few shares of bank stock go 
as far as possible without landing them 
actually into debt; for debts were a 
nightmare lo both of the women. 

She was always considered shy and pe- 
culiar, especially bo in the presence of 
members of the steriier sex. notwith- 
standing the fact thai she had what was 
known in tlie community as a "steady, 
and had "set up with him Saturday 
nights for ten years alrea<ly. W liile 
George Becker seemed to have a steady 
idea of winning her to himself some dav. 
she on the contrary seemed to steadily 
ward off any such cli.Tiaxes by always 
saying: "Ach. Cheorche, my mom. she s 
always poorly and she nteds me." 

Only a week before, as they were 
coming home from Lovefeast. he seized 
the opp<.*rtun)ty for at least the twen- 
tleih time to press his suit with the 
usual reply from ine inexorable maiden. 

"Ach. Maria, that wouldn-t make a bit 
of difference. I could help to take care 
of you both." This indifference on the 
part of Maria was a puzzle to others be- 
sides himself. . , 

"Well. Cheorche, seem' you don t gl\e 
up ast;ng me 111 a«t Mom once; mebby 
shell say yes." . . .,^ 

He would wait longer, with his Pennsyl- 
vania German patience, even if it took 
another year to win her consent. He oc- 
cupied with his par€i»t» the ^^rick house 
just across the aXU^- from the Ruddl- 

sillS 

' (Je'orge was idly glancing out of the 
"setting room" window at the Hying 
snowflakes when presently the door or 
the kitchen opF>osite opened with a perk, 
and Maria briskly buetUd across the 
porch towards the pump and proceeded 
to pump a painful of water. She had no 
sooner lifted the pail from the pump 
spout and stooped over, when her foo. 
slipped on the snowy porch, and the un- 
expected happened. ^ ,. , 
For several months previous she had 
noticed that the portion of the porch dl- 
rectlv over the rain water cistern was in 
a dajigerous condition, and she had im- 
mediately communicated this fact to 
Samuel Fritz, the town carpenter, to re- 
pair the .same. Sam, as everyone knows, 
is habitually inclined toward procrastin- 
ation. , ,,, 

He had received orders from Miss 
Maria In early spring, but Sam forgot, 
and those treacherous planks over th.- 
cistern gavfe way with the sudden 
stram of Miss Maria's fall. A wide, 
vawnlng chasm apeared. into whose 
black depths she was precipitated like a 
ball shot trom a cannon. She was so 
badly frightened at first that she made 
no outcrv; but when she left the ley 
cold water gurgling and swishing aboui 
her she came to her sen.ses and gave a 
Ijsty scream that was heard clear across 
the "alley. 
Hatless, breathless with excitement, 
I George rushed wildly across the alley 
into the Rudls.ll yard and disappeared In 
the doorway of the woodshed nearby. 
Emerging with a 15-foot ladder, he made 
hasty preparation for lowering it into 
the dark abyss. 

Peering over the- ragged edge, he saw- 
to his intense relief that the water 
reached only to her shoulders, and that 
, she was in no immediate danger of 
I drownmg at least not so long as she re- 
I talned her held upon the slippery black 
I pump stock and did not lose her balance 
I and presence of mind. 

I "El. ei. ei: Maria! Holt on tight till 
j I leave down the ladder." 
; Her onlv response was a shiver and a 
' Iwk that was pitiful In the extreme. He 
knew that there was danger of her 
fainting or being cramped by the icj.- 
water, so he cautioned her to "holt on ' 
with all her might until the ladder de- 
scended. 

Clasping her in his brawny arms, he 
climbed the slippery ladder with his drip- 
ping burden and bore her tenderly to her 
mother's kitchen, where he deposited her 




Holly Boxes 



About 100 of those neat holly 
gift boxes — size 7>^7^7 inches 
— just he size for single pieces 

of china, cut glass, etc.— the regular 

price is 20c — Tuesday forenoon we will 

sell them (limit 2 to a customer) only. 



15c 



Suspenders 



A big line of men's fancy gift 

suspenders — all our regular 75c 

and $1.00 goods, plain and fancy 

webs and buckles, on sale in the 

men's department. Tuesday forenoon 

(limit I pair) at only, per pair 



49c 



Girls' Dresses 



Choice of girls' plaid, 
check and striped dresses, 
(also a few plain) in all 

the nobby styles — all sizes — plain and fancy trimmed; 

regular prices up to $2— and you get 

the pick of the lot Tuesday forenoon, 

(limit 2 dresses), at 



98c 







MalJ Orders JSSJ^f^d. THE GLASS BLOCK Store Hours S^^r^'tliiWiS- 



limp form in a huge wooden rocking 
chair, and then retired to "call his mom 

A sweet little old woman with snowy 
hair presently appeared and led the un- 
fortunate young woman to her roonri; 
then she briskly entered the kitchen to 
set the table and "made the dinner 
ready," for Maria's mother was too up- 
set to do anything. 

Just before serving the dinner, Mrs. 
Becker was called upstairs, when, after 
a whispered consultation with Maria, she 
went across the way, and she and George 
reappeared a few moments later, the 
mother carrying a small bundle under 
her arm. 

"I guess the dinner's ready, vonce, 
announced Mrs. Rudisill. "Amelia, you 
and Cheorche will stay and eat with 
us. ain't? This accident makes us have 
the dinner so late. I eruess things will 
be all cold when we set down at the 
table, vonce." 

"Well, being as we are both alone to- 
day. Cheorche and me, we might as well 
Slav." 

The trio seated themselves about the 
festive board .and George, while super- 
intending the carving of the turkey, sud- 
denly looked up as the door opened, and 
there In the doorway stood Maria. 

He was almost startled as by an ap- 
parition, for he knew tliat during all 
the ytars of his courtship ,he had never 
seen her appear more beautiful than she 
did then. 

What was that new light which shown 
In her eyes? A feeling of awe, hingled 
with a deep sense of resignation fell 
upon him. What did it all mean? 

"Maria!" he gasped. "Am 1 awake, or 
do 1 dream?" 

"Ach, no Cheorche. but I have had now 
such a troubled conscience this while 



past, already, and when I had this fall 
today and you saved me from drowning. 
It seemed like as though it was the hand 
of Providence. Besides," she continued, 
falterlngly, "I found out that it ain't 
right for mom and me to live alone by 
ourselves this here way. I—" 

"Maria!' interrupted George, ecstatical- 
ly, her meaning just dawning upon him 
with such a i-adianee as never before had 
come to his monotonous, slow-moving 
mental life. 

"Yes. Cheorche, I've give In at last," 
she softly said, as she laid her head up- 
on his shoulders, with a long-drawn sigh 
of relief. He pressed his Ups to her 
cheeks and led her to her chair at the 
table. 

Thanksgiving day had to their two 
happy lives a far different meaning than 
ever before as they partook of their 
meal with a silent blessing. 

"When we will get married?" stoical- 
ly asked George after the meal wa.s fin- 
ished. Her answer was evidently too 
gooil to realize. 

"I'll try," said Maria, not without col- 
oring deeply, "to make It suit for. some 
time next month." 

"All right," briskly responded her lov- 
er; "try to make it suit for Sunday, 
three weeks after next. Ain't you. will?" 
(Copyright.) 




WKat Retail Markets Offer. 



Tennessee persimmons, 13 cents 
quart box. 

Grape fruit, 12 to 20 cents each. 

Citron, 35 cents a pound. 

Lemon peel, 30 cents a pound. 

Orange peel, 30 cents a pound. 

Shelled almonds, 50 and 60 cents a 
pound. 

Calves' hearts, 10 cents each. 

Calves' brains. 10 cents a stt. 

A grown up calf's heart, 25 cents 
each. 

Oysters, 60 cents a quart. 

Tennesse persimmons are the one 
kind ot fruit that must be spoiled m 



order to be perfect. id least that is 

; what the market man Bays, and if you 

I are in the habit of believing him. 

I hasten to the store' aq^ you may get 

I the most perfect box ^ spoiled Te-n- 

; nesee persimmons that any one would 

ever want. The marketer is gulliitle 

and all that, but those persimmons are 

in the market yet. 

The citron and the lemon peel and 
I the almonds and all that sort cf 
thing are suggesting the Christmas 
plum pudding and you would better 
be getting at it if yon have not al- 
ready got. 



A Gift That Is 
a Gilt 

You can spend more 
money, but it won't buy a 
better gift for Christmas 
than a Columbia Grapho- 
phone. 

See and hear this "BQ" 
model — the new tone arm 
cylinder machine. Com- 
plete outfit, with 6 gold- 
moulded records, $34.65. 

On little payments if you 
wish. 

Other outfits from $10 up. 

Columbia 
Graphophone 




Columbia Phonograph Co., 

18 Third Avenue We«l. 

Open evenings till Christmas. 






There is only one grade of Hunt's 
Perfect Baking Powder and Extracts— 
the best that can be made; chemically 
tested and pure. 

FOREIGN WILLS 
ARE FILED HERE 

Wills of Marshall Field 

May be Probated 

Here. 

The foreign will of Ex-Governor 
Aaron T. Bliss of Michigan was ad- 
mitted in the probate court of this 
county this morning. Mr. Bliss, who 
died some time ago, was a prominent 
lumber man of Saginaw, and for somo 
years was prominent in the politics of 
his home state. Among his property 
holdings at the time of his death w-re 
some timber lands In St. Louis county. 
The laws require that the will of a per- 
son who owned real estate in this 
state when he died, must be filed in 
the probate court of all the counties i 
in which such property may be lo- 
cated. I 

It is understood that the will of the I 
late Marshall Field of Chicago will | 
also be offered for probate in this 
county very shortly. The deceased 
merchant prince is said to have owu'id 
about $8,000 worth of East end properly 
in this city at the time of his death. 

BRIEF MEETING 
IN PROSPECT 

Aldermen Busy in Wind- 

Up of of the Primary 

Campaign. 

The council meeting tonight Is expected 
to be a short, qu'et affair. The alder- 
men, who are mixing in politics, will be 
too busv putting the finishing touches on 
the primary campaign, and will probably 
not put in an appearance. There are no 
especially weighty matters to come up 
and It is probable that only ordinary 
routine matters will be disposed of. 

Joseph Kaziarek, 111 First avenue west, I 
and Joseph Burns, 1105 West Michigan I 
8tr**et, have been cited to appear and 
show cause v/hy their licenses should not 
be revoked, they having been convicted 
In municipal court of violation of the I 

H. M. Gerson, 

LADIES' TAILOR 

1^22 Jefferson St. Duluth. Minn. 

ZtniUi thont X(m Y, Old Fhon* a2U—L 



liquor laws. It is not thought anythlnsr 
will be done in the matter tonight and It 
will very likely go over for a week. 

The salary question, which has taken 
up nmcJi time and caused numerous 
bursts of oratory at the last two meet- 
ings, is due for another grilling thli 
evening, but will probably e.scape for (I 
week. Nobody will be inclined to talk 
much of salaries and prolong the meet- 
ing, when the rush of the campaign nn- 
ish waits to claim their attention, and n& 
action will be taken. The question Is a 
vexatious one, which requires careful 
consideration, and the aldermen are dis- 
posed to take plenty of time to It and aot 
intelligently. 

City Engineer McGilvary will make a 
report tonight on the proposed new out- 
let for the Woodland park eewer, which 
empties into Tischer creek. An outline 
of the plan was published a few days 
ago and it appears to meet with the ap- 
proval of the Woodland Park people, who 
are interested. The plan provides for aa 
extension of the pipe line about l,0(iO feet 
down the creek to a point near the old 
Vermilion road, the sev.age to be dis- 
charged into the creek through septic 

An estimate on the cost of paving Seo- 
ond stret, between Seventh and Thir- 
teenth avenues east, was sent to th« 
board of public works by tne city en- 
gineer, today, and will probably be pre- 
sented to the council tonight. It pro- 
vides for the regrading of the street and 
paving of a thirty-foot driveway with tar 
macadam, at a cost of $30,455.50. 



FELL INTO THE BAY. 

Louis Ruppreeht, Drenched and 
Nearly Frozen, is Rescued. 

An old man, who gave his name as 
Louis Ruppitcht, accidentally fell off the 
Singer dock on lower Lake avenue th'S 
mornins about 7 o'clock. A man, wiiojs 
name could not be learned, heard his ciy 
as he fell into the icy water, and h« 
hurried to liie spot. Rupprecht was 
clinging to the rudder chains of a ftshing 
tug, wintered at the dock, but was un» 
able to help himself lurther. The mad 
as.'isted him in retaining his frlp on the 
chains until more help arrived, and Rupp- 
recht was taken from the water uncon- 
sclous. 

He was hurried to the police station, 
where he was revived. Dry clothes were 
provided him and he proceeded on hit 
way, evidently none the worse for his 
drenching. 

2,000 Twin City grocers sell WHITBJ 
LILY SOAP. 



F.D.Day&Ca 

FASHIONABLE JEWELERS 



Open Nights 

This Week 

POR the benefit of our 
*patrons who are unable 
to attend to Christmas 
buying in the daytime, 
our establishment will 
remain open evenings 
from this time until 
Christmas. 

Evening buying at 
this store is made as 
pleasant as buying in 
the daytime. With an 
abundance of clear, 
white light under which 
to make your selections, 
and the largest and 
most critically selected 
Jewelry stock to choose 
from, this store is the 
logical one in which to 
buy Christmas Gifts. 

Look for our large 
announcement in to- 
morrow's Tribune and 
Herald. 






31S "Wtest Sxiperlor St 






-r-4- 







THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD": MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



I 



P 



What Time Is It IfHPKTIAN 

By YOUR Stomach ^"^^^ " "f^'^ 



If Your Stomarh I>(>os Not Strike 

••M»*al Tlnu'!" Tlir«M> Tlnu^s a !>«}. 

K LSually Moans Dy.spfi»si», 



HOW TO BE HAPPY-HUNGRY. 

An a rult> all hours of the day look 
*like. anil feel alike, to thu dyopeplic. 
Th»Tt> is no hankering for breakfast, 
no gnawing for lunch, and no 
mouth-watering for dinner. Dls- 

Sust takes the place of desire, and 
»e cl'><k itself at meal time re- 
flects the owner's grumpy face 



I 




If h.'for- breakfast, before ditiner 
aii.l h»-t'ore supper you do not feel 
A happy-hungry feeling and longing 
for food, and fe.l that you could eat 
alnio;-tt anything put b'fore you. you 
hav • ». symptom of dyspep.sia. 

If turing our m-'al.s you still have 
an »v>r.sioii to food, or feel hungry 
and n.»t-h,ungry at the same time. 
you h ive a very pronounced case of 
dysp--!'-:-!. 

If ii ■! your m-als y>u feel 
bli'sit-'i. or gissy. or you have heart- 
burti aid pains in your .stomach. 
or you f«'el gurgiy bra.sh rising In 
your- ' '. .• ', 
Ol' 

a : • < . . ^ I . ; 
liin^ it. 

For all 
8ur«> oiiro 

ITi.- 

th 



SCIENTISTS 

Lecture by Miss Brooklns 

on Tenets of the 

Church. 



Prayer and the Bible— 

The Position of 

Mrs. Eddy. 




i* K 



G^p.. Klein, Jeweler, 325 West Superior Street. 



>->•« 




uid you havr had it 

;. , probably without real- 

thi-se things llitTe Is a 

a cuTH that will make 

m awaitod pleasure, and 

i'.s-lt" ,1 soothing luxury. 

true — b''cause the cure. 



StuarfM Dyspepsia Tablets, contain 
Just the el.»ments which a good, 
•trong. healthy stomach has. 

p:acii littl" tablet, is enough to 
digest 3.000 grains of food, thor- 
oughly and well — just as though you 
had no stomach at all. 

Stuarts Dysp«>psla Tablets actual- 
ly do all the work of a healthy 
•tomach. Th-'y digest if your stom- 
ach cin't They digest everything. 

Tiik- 'ru> or two after each meal 
and kt'. 'u what it is to have the 
luxury of a perf-^ct dige.stlon. and 
Btop uritaUon. b'-lching, bloat and 
brash, and that "lump of lead" 
feelint: Th<-y cure dyspepsia, indi- 
gesti >:. j!;ii all .stiMnaeh troubles. 
They !?• niade of golden seal, dias- 
ta.se. i: i simil.ir dig. -stive agents. 

Try s.-v>ral today and let your 
Btoma. li be •■•)nvinc->d. let your mind 
be at .vase, and your lace be ro.sy. 

Stunts Kvsp.psia Tablets at any 
drug ..I >r- on earth, a')c a box. 

.Sen! us your name and address 
today tnd we will at once send y«T^ 
by ni'-: a sample package free. Ad- 
dress ;■ .V. Stuart Co.. 150 Stuart 
Bldg.. r.iarshall. Mich. 

At al! drugs?l^ts. .'.">c a box. 



E 



There was a hi rge audience at the 
Armory yesterday afternoon to listen 
to a lecture on Christian Science by 
Mi.-^s Mary Brook ns, C. S. B.. of Minne- 
apolis. Miss BroJkins is a member of 
the hoard of lectureship of the First 
Church of Christ Scientist. In Boston, 
and is a very pleasing speaker. She 
was Introduced by John Coventry In a 
brief address. In the course of her lec- 
ture. Miss Brookins said: 

We have nut to consider for an hour 
or more the iul)jfct of Chri3tian 
Science, and it I* my wish to present 
it to you in tht light of a practical 
religion and remedy, showing it to be 
at once true ( iiristlunity and true 
science, and that these two constitute 
one Intelligible a ad demonstrable expo- 
sition of th« I ature, purposes and 
works of C»od. 

More than Ihi.s. we have, as a race, 
reached a point In progress where we 
are no better satistied with a negative 

iou""Jv*iv..''''r".'hri'inic'*cas"el K'^'^^1 ^''•^" *'« '' '^^ *''^^ '* positive ill. 
you have a ^nroni. S^'^.^ I Through a still dlvinrr discontent we 

obj"Ct to a mertSy indifferent and pas- 
sive senst- of exi.'tenc*'. a life lived from 
day to day— like that of the mollusk or 
the polyp, simpl' to breathe and tread 
the narrow round of pliysical exi.stcnce. 
A life li\>-d witiiin itself and for itself, 
however exempt from pain or sorrow 
or loss It may b« , soon condemns itself. 
If all the desres, aims and aspira- 
tions of llff th: t are pure, and right 
and upward-tending should be collected 
together and «(■' n at once tiiey would 
be found all converging in one objec- 
tive point, all lo (king toward one com- 
mon goal— nami ly, harmony. Indeed, 
it has bt-en tht common habit to so 
summarize the leallzaltons of all good 
under liarmonyV synonym, heaven, and 
then to group around that name all 
s.atisfying conc< ptions of rest, peace 
and freedom, und health— of prayers 
answered, of hopes fulfilled, of life 
expanding into ^mortality. 

No one ever i bought of a.ssociatlng 
with his idea of heaven .such anomalies 
as limitation, wt fikness, want, sin, sick- 
ness or death "Flesh and blood cannot 
Inherit the kingiom of heaven." Hence 
none of their attendant Ills can be pres- 
ent there. 

Laboring under the seeming presence 
and power of t aese enemies of peace, 
mortals are in a constant state of un- 
rest and are ctntlnnally wishing and 
striving for belter conditions, putting 
forth every possible effort, as they sup- 
pose, to »»reak t le distasteful fetters of 
evil, and gain s miething of an experi- 
ence of man's rightful heritage of 
dominion. 

Tlic Hoal Hooven, 
But right her > mortal sense touches 
the limits of lis self-imposing bound- 
aries. It has I laced its heaven away 
off, somewhere in the distance; to be 
found and en joj ed at some future time, 
and while it ch 'rishes a hope of some- 
time, somewher. , reaching that b.atiflc 
state it is well assiir<'d that there is 
no siich possibi ity this side the grave. 
But heaven is not a place of abode 
merely where < ne may go and find or 
make "for hims If a home. Heaven is 
the presence of God. and God bemg 
present everyw here, heaven must be 
everywhere, toi . , ^. , 

According to the teaching of Cnris- 
tian Science heaven Is harmony itself, 
the absolute reign of spirit without a 
rival power— that condition of mind 
in whli h principle actually does gov 



e Fascination o f Quality 
a nd Liberal Assortment 

Brilliant, Resplendent Holiday Stock of Jewels, Unique and 
Novel Gift Articles in the Most Artistic and Effective Designs. 



<*• 



i\ 



YELLED TOO MH H. 



Insano Patii*nt in Jail Broke .VU the 

O'e* O . . i. vhose men- 

tal power b.as given way by reason of 
the brand and th-' amount of booze 
that he consum-^d. will be taken to the 

•tate h osj.iMl It F-rgiis Falls today. 



He has been In custody of the sheriff j ern and control ill with supreme and un- 

a few davs and divided sway. This definition has no 
,. ■ ^ \ reference to time or place. 

>f the j,i! will tioi bol When he taught his disciples to pray 



at tJv 

■orry 

won-j 

pow • ■ 

y- 

i 

Win 
Fi 



iufifv jaii I >r 



Stczirestions: 

BACK COMBS 

BRACELETS 

LAVALLIERS 

LOCKETS and CHAINS 

WATCHES 

SMOKERS' ARTICLES 

SILVER TOILET and 

MANICURE PIECES 

CUT GLASS 

HANDPAINTED 

CHINA 
CHIME CLOCKS 

SCARF PINS 
LINK BUTTONS 
SIGNET RINGS 
WATCH FOBS 
CHAIN PURSES 
CUFF BUTTONS 
WAIST SETS 
VEIL PINS 
BROOCHES 
HAT PINS 
JEWEL CASES 
CIGAR CUTTERS 
CIGARETTE CASES 
STERLING SILVER 
SILVER PLATE 
CARD CASES 
UMBRELLAS 

FLASKS 

DESK SETS 

OPERA GLASSES 

LORGNETTES 

NECKLACES 



Give 



In selecting: your Christmas 
gifts here, you have the bene- 
fit of assortments which 
for character and com- 
. pletdhess are not ex- 
celled by any jew- 
elry house in 
the West. 




}^^ 



Diamonds 

We show this season an exceptional collection of these and 
other gems, both monnted and unmounted, every one of which 
carries v/ith it the assurance that they are exactly as represented. 
That's what our guarantee means. There's also a satisfaction in 
knowing that the prices are as low as upright merchandising will 
permit. 

The purchasing of a Diamond or other precious 
stone is most judicious, as values are constantly rising 
and a pure gem always represents an intrinsic worth. 

Diamond Settings in 
Artistic Patterns. 



The name 

"Klein" 

on the 

box is a 

guarantee 
of 

excellence. 



i*i><^ 




Store Open 
Evenings 
UtiHl 
Christmas 



r^*l rw^ 1 1 Sterline Silver and high grade plate. Sets. Combination and Complete Chests. The 

Stiver 1 dUlCWCirC stock is especially well selected and we defy competition as to quality and prices. 



see him g>. Gunderson has | •Thy Kingdom -onuV' tt was to decl.are 

, ! the sre.it fact of Gods kingdom al- 
I'lnij !> >w r if weak in mental; readv come, ev» r present and universal. 



I- i ;.-j .. >;.is the record 
:r the ilistance at which 



lur' Thus the whole problem of human 
be' life res<»lves itself Into a question or 

. .... ............ „. ."^ 1^ _.;„„ Giv n the quality and ex- 

h-ard and the time during ^ kno^mfetiv^^^^^^^i^^^.^ *^.^^^^ j^^,,j_ 

in exercise his voice. | vldnalitv and your individual experl- 

deterinined. 




G. A. KLEIN, Jeweler 



325 West Superior Street. 



brought him down the oih-n- day 
tlie offlcr tias had ulghlmaies 



WARNS PARENTS. 



Street Railway Company (alls At- 
tention to Dani^erous Praotite. 

With a view of pr<»venting a repeti- 
tion 



nue c; 

Btreet ! 

vertls*--: 

makinii 

parent.^ 

childr-i 

sliding 

th ■ • at- iracks 

bee 

and 



i-slliig d' • i i- rl^^ at the ave^ 
Higs of th" car lines, 
.vay company, through ad 



^""^i monies into oar experience 
ever j^ovv let me : sk you: Are you satis- 
fied with tiie a nount of knowledge you 
havC Are vou content with your pres- 
ent conception of being? Are you not 
fearful, or at least doubt fill as 
whether mu<h :hat you suppose you be- 
lieve to be the present facts about God 
and luan and th<>ir mutual relations to 
be eternally trae? 

Yet truth is unehangeable and eter- 
nal Evervbody knows that. 

Thi'^ explain^ why preachers who ex- 
pound least Ol creed and dogma, and 
.K^'most of vital, .spiritual love of Goa 
'have the mos: numerous and ardent 
hearers and t i\e best success In thetr 
(,f reform. These better 




... ,1 ,nod works cf reform. Tnese nericr 

r>. th- daily papers. Is f^^^'hts loos, ning their hold upon the 

t .-.iKciil effort to awaken Grosser "conmiadities of the sense.s. 



to 



the danger to which their! ^re able to e -ho somewhat the finer 

u-M exposing themselves oy harmonies of the supersensible and 

i c.vn the steep avenues acro.?a ideal. But the highest point yet 

reached or that ever will be reached in 

" ■ human intel- 
ist 
Ine 



The motormen have 



. w i-iv. . ii..i.. ""■'", ^. unwird tll^ht of the human int 

n instructed to u.se great caution. ! he "P«^"--;f'Knt^ ..^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^. ^.^ 

I n'>w the company asks the parental |^*^"^j{.';,^j the west" from the divl 



to do their part and see to it that their j J^^pj^pViyslf's'^'^'^*"'""-^* mind, 
children an- pr .p.-rly w in, -d of tlie And here let us note, as we have seen 
danST. i before, that there Is that native quality 

A -ny ordinanc. expres.sly forbids of aspiration inherent In hmnan|^^>^^^ 

the pratci .f -o ...t.ng down hills ; will never. In^ Us ^ 

across the ir racks, but children *>•« f"." t *„ iutimto. the everlasting truth U- 
lieedle.ss and t>ay no attention to the ^^jf' 

law unl^.ss their p.arents take a hand | " One Sun* Way. 

In niikmg them understand it. Thei This being the case, there must be an 
onditiona for coasting down! exact and unm stagableway to this acme 



which is calculated to bring this knowl- 
edge within the reach of all who may 
wish to avail themselves of Us beneficent 
offices. -, 

This convlctlrn of truth came to Mrs. 
Ec-dv at the point of well-rounded wom- 
anhood, characterized by aiore than ord.- 
nary mental and spiritual endowments. 
Having received a liberal education un- 
der the careful guidance of well-qualifled 
instructors, her thoughts found ready and 
grateful expression in both prose tind 
poetry; and she was a frequent and 
valued contributor to the papers and 
macazines of the time. Born of deeply 
religious parents and reared in the at- 
mosohere of strictest morality, she was 



Christian Science teaches thai the two 
Christian office.^ of preaching the gospel 
and healing iha sick are so inseparable, 
so equal in importauce, and so Identitiea 
in purpo.se and muthod, that one's Christ- 
ian life Is Incomplete if either is omit- 
ted In a system wherein science and 
religion are one the meology must be 
curative. . •" " , ^ ... 

Christian Scientla*.8 have been called a 
prayerless people, but like many of IhtJ 
statements concerning them this one is 
quite the opiX)slte of the fact. Indeed, it 
is only thr jugh the teaching of this 
science tha.: we have foutid it possible to 
obev the scrip^ual injunction: "Pray 
' •• While n6 one can be 



anproa... . _ 

state of consciousnfss. through which ! all tear, 



ijT claims to 
the realm of 



surely has .stron 
are revealed infinUe" resources and bless- j recognition as a factor in 
ings of EWvine Being-always present and therapeutics. ^, . „^,^ _„,, c,„ 

ever operative for the consummaiion of 1 HealUig of Sickness and Sin 

the highest possible good 



I In all the nearly 9y«) organizations of 
Study of the Sci-li>tiires. I this denomination, weekly expenenco 



dy emancipated a multitude from the prayers assume less the form of petition 
- - • ^ — .-- . ^^^^ ^^.^j,^ j^^j .jf grateful acknowledg- 

ment and thanksgiving. 

Does your child appear at your well- 
filled table only to beg for brea«l? L»oes 
he ask you every day to love him ana 
care for him? LX)e3 he not rather thank- 



fetters of false and needless bondsige to 
sin and sufterlng. 

Attitude Towanl?* Mrs. Fkldy. 

Christian Scientists do not worship 
Mrs. Eddy, as some suppose. They sim- 



church service. _ 

gresutlon is privileged to participate, our 
pe<iple are turned to eioser and more 
general stady ot the Holy Scriptures. It 
would t>e impossible to find any cla.^s of 
people more devoted to the .study of the 
mble than the Christian Scientists are. 
lor they have learned to regard It not so 
much a history of the past nor a prophecy 
of the future as a revelation of eternal 
truth, which Is "the same, yesterday, 
today and forever." and which conse- 
quently applies with full force to the 
needs of the present time. 

" 1.^ religious because 
religion that is scl- 
unded upon eternal 
fac"t"Tnstead of fancy or blind faith, are 
Welded into one sound and demonstrable 
dacerine, whose verity is alested by 
".sljms following." "My doctrine is not 
mine." said Jesu.s. "but his that sent me. 



are heard at each session, of cases which 
cover every known disease of bo-ly and 
mind and morals, chronic and acute, or- 
ganic and functional. One can readily 
.see what a volume of evidence is thus all 
the time accumulating of the curative cfti- 
cacy of Christian Science. 

Though not much given to statistics, 
we can say without exaggeration that 
many hundreds of thou.sands of so-called 
incurable cases of disease have been 
healed through Christian Scien-^e. Not- 
with.standing this a.stounding statement, 
its worlt is by no mean.s confined to the 
cure of physical ills— rather is tlii.s inci- 
dental to the vastly greater mission of 
healing sin and leading in all matters 
of genuine reform. It reclaims the sinner, 
not through fear of punishmen«^ nor an- 
ticipation of reward, but by the suprem 



No wonder the thought that challenges 
each onward movement of its fellows on 
the lower plaine is capable only of dis- 
dain or ridicule, or malice, when a gleam 
of the eternal light breaks through Its 
cloudy sense and reveals its own impo- 
tence and absunilties. But even yet these 
wcjrds of loving tolerance re-echo from 
the croi58: "They know not what they 
do." It is human ignorance that incite.i 
most of the opposition and persecution 
that truth's advance guard always needs 
must encounter. The people opiwse and 
fight their own rnisconceptions of Chris- 
tian Science, not what it really is. Per- 
secution usually ceases when the healing 
touch Is felt and prejudice vanishes as 
it Is shown that Christian Science Is ona 
of the world's best friends. 

Christian Science has no quarrel with 
the medical fraternity. We appreciate 

and self-sacrl- 



" *• I and honor the sincerity and se 

' ficing love of human kind that has ever 
characterized that profession at a whole, 
and we would not underrate the honest 
endeavors of host.s of Christian physicians 
to serve and help the race. 

To Otlier Churches. 
To our friends In other churches we 
say We have not come into the field of 
religious labor for the purpo.se of multl- 
plving denominations ot- to intrude In any 
way upon your well earned domain. An 
untold Volume of holy zeal and conse- 
crated activity have been exercised In 
the upbuilding of God's cause as you 
have understood it. "Have wo not all one 
father? Hath not one God created us?" 
Christian Scientists are not your ene- 
mies. With all respect and honor due to 



acy 



of mind that is good, dispelling iiie , your devoted efforts and worthy achleve- 




„ ...in ^^ hi= xriii he shall illusion of his love of sin, and by so up- | ments. Christian Science comes as a later 
If any man will do his « ill. J^ ^^'^^'. | -"^fn°" uis sense of good and enlarging ; n^^sgage from the all-father, looking to- 

whetner u oe oi ; . . »_ .,_ ,._ ,. .^„, h.. ^,.a<es to i ^.^^^..^ ^^e fuller establishment of his 

kingdom on earth as it Is in heaven. If 
is tiie angel that troubles the waters of 
has never-failing Bethseda. that the way- 
worn and weary, the physically, mental- 
Iv an'l morally infirm may be r-^freshed 
and healed. Its mission is to bring to 
human Christ, the risen savior, reap- 
pearing now, not in person, but in idea, 
t) save and bless mankind. 



tion tv) the strong Vk)x was known only 
to Rathyen and William Gilbert. The 
main oiTice.s of the company are in Mil 
waukee. 



Assertion and that it may seem to many i Impulses of the heart were not In the ^.„ 

" nreoosterou- claim. But anyone who, ; direction of due appreciation and grate- Lq man-mada theories, that lay no claim 
h-ivine ears t< hear, or having eves, will , ful acknowledgment of benefits received | .^ exactness, but are indeed .self-con- 
u what we have to say, will ttnd thai and of Just recognition of obligations to | fessed systems of experimenting and 



ent goodness and love be made secondary follow his further demonstrations of con 
. .._-._.__ .w,.. ,».. — ^i..,m , ^^^j ^^^ dominion, until all personal self 

and 



hood of — , , ^. 

The immediate result is that human af- 
fection is purified and exalted alwve the 



HEADACHE 

"My father had heen a sufferer from sick headache 
for the last twenty-flve years and uever found any 



reai 
we ar 



•nable the benefactor; and naturally, the depth ,,ue..j3ing which oft-sn lack even tl 
reason for th • hope that^ls In us. jand ' of gTatltud.3^ and affccjlonaote regard 1 "ecming' feature of agreeing with 



e ready to give many a rei\8onable 



the re- 
each 



Can't afford 
Handicaps 

Change from Coffee to 

POSTUM 

You'll know 
"There's a Reason" 



that H Is simply and wholly out of de^p { ^^uj^j ^e c»>mmensurate with the «'xtent | yt^jjer"* 
interest in humanity's weal, and in loving q( the benefaction. Wno. then, shall lift 
solicitude for your contemplation. up his voice of pn>test when even a tithe 

be it known that Christian ^f the debt of gratitude and reverential 




First of all, _. - _ 
I Science Is not something that Mrs. txldy 
"has invented or manufactured in some 
storehouse or workshop of human con- 
jecture It b not a system of mental 
therapeutics i i which the muscles or or- 
gans or elemeats of mortal mentality ar.? 
manipulated f )r the benefit of the sick. 

Knowing is Unowledge. and real knowl- 
edge Is scienci ; and as truth alone can be 
known, the only absolute knowing, or 
knowledge, or science, must be that which 
pertains to tiuth and achieves the pur- 
pose to show that Christian Science is 
Just such Chr stly knowledge or Christian 
knowledge, lo us science. In order to be 
science at al. must be Christly. or 
Christian Science; and must always from 
everhistlng have been Christian Science, 
co-existent with the ancient of days. 

Then the advent of Christian Science at 
this time slxiiply means that the disuov- 



love due fov such full deliverance, such 
unbounded benefit, lias been discharged? 
When Christian Scientists, out of the 
slm-ple sense of the fitness of rendering 



CASTOR I A 

For Infants and Children. 

The Kind You Have Alwajs Bought 



Bears the 
Siguattire of 




^7^^ 



Is the wisdom or the skill (tt man more 
reliable than Omnis?lence. that we should 
give them preference in time of need? Is 
human power worthy to be weighed in 
the scales with Omnipotence In the hour 
of man's extremity? The best demonstra- 
tor of Gods power was wont to say: Of 
mine own self I can do nothing; the 
father that dweleth in me. he doeth the 
wjrks " Thus he repudiated not only 
all material remedies, but all hypnotic 
influence and control. An habitual declar- 
ation of man's unity with the divine and 
inexhaustible life, the real and Inde- 
omnipotent love, ig the effectual prayer 
•structible substance, the infinite and 
Omnipotent love, la the effectual prayer 
that avalleth much In that it heals and 
redeems the sin-sick and bodily Infirm 
.and casts oirt all manner of evil. To the 
extent that prayer ceases to be an at- 
tempt to lofonn Ounmsceut wisdom or 




ence 
part 
edly 
is a 

fact „ - ^ ^. 

continuance and completion of these di- 
vine works when done In Christ's name. 

Science eliminates the false supposition 
of an element of evil that cannot exist In 
the omnipresence and omnipotence of God, 
who is good; and restores the primitive 



A.S MVCH A.S YOV WANT. 

If you are fat and would like to be 
thinner, you may take off Just as mauy 
pounds of this superfluous flesh as you 
wish Ask your druggist to mix you up 
one-half ounce Marmola, one-half ounce 
Fluid Extract Cascara Aromatic, three 
and one-half ounces Syrup Simplex, and 
take a teaspoonful after meals and at 
This is a simple and safe borne 



guarantee 
peace. 

Friendly Attitude. 

"Truth Is sure and can afford to wait 
Our slow perception. • • • 
Her essence is eternal, and she knows 
The world must swing round to her, soon 
or late." 
Every advancing step, even along the 
most material Ihujs of discovery or inven- 
tion has to slowly work Its way into 
popular favor, and the more radically 
new and different it Is, the more preju- 
dice and opposition It has to encounter, 
until It has had sufficient opportunity to 
prove itself useful and indispensable to 
human need. What shal we say taen. of 



Best For 
The bowels 






CANOfV CATIIAfmc 



^ORKWrilLEtoU 



PleMant. Palatable, Potent. Taste Good. Do Gooe. 
Nerer Sicken. Weaken or aripe, 19c. ISc.SOc. Nerer 
■old in btUk. The genuine tablet atamped C C 0« 



human neea. » iiai. »»ai r*"."'^'"'^^ ';•,"„ lanamnteed to ear* or jour money back. 
^l;;:'hT"rec^e?a"tio"n^\? t^L^ ViaV^^m^n'd! Sterling Ec«edy Co.. Chicago or N.Y 5 J 

the coming of which Is marking so dls- ' ■■■"••■■ •■■■■ »ii»Bi ■■■•■■Jtii ■•!»=« 

I tinctive an era In the conception of truth 1 



posltlvel}' wlU not cause wrlnklea. 










•» 






' 


1 

1 




! 





-^^ 




THE DULUTM fiVENlNO HERALD i MONDAY, DECEMBER Id, 160?. 

i ii K! ■ K^ ii M il I I I II 



r 



i«M» 






u . 



^^-v:^^^ 



^ 



Our 

$29.20 

Victor 



-■i:^y 



Oiitfit^^ 

Consists of Victor ...acmne No. i, with horn and 
one dozen Victor lo-inch Records of your own 
choosing — this fine Victor plays any size Victor Rec- 
ord — is a most excellent reproducer — and has 
finelv finished case. 
TERMS: $5.00 Casti and $500 a 
Month. $1.00 a Week. 



\l 



Our $29.20 

Edison Outfit 

This special offer consists of Edison Standard Phon- 
ograph — a fine quartered oak ca'^e Machine — with 
fine nickeled crane and black Japanned steel Flower 
Horn — gilt trimmed — this fine Machine with one 
dozen Edison Gold Moulded Records — $29.20. 

TERMS: $5.00 Cash and $5.00 a 
Month or $1.00 a Week. 



Our $39.20 
7 Edison Outfit 

This special oflfer consists of Edison Home Phon- 
ograph — a fine quartered oak case Machine — larger 
and has heavier motor than Standard — with nickel 
crane and black Japanned steel horn and one dozen 
Edison Gold Moulded Records — complete — $3920. 

TERMS: $6 Cash and $5 a 
Month or $1 a Week. 




Complete HwMchirBiabcn 



Second Ave. W. 






>^Nsls^ 



.>,i^>v 



•l*-^* 



JZ.^.^/^ 



Complete BoBtctunUsIicn 



Scc«o4 Ave W. and FInt St 



\iK* 



Our $38.20 Victor 
Outfit 



^J.^ 



This outfit consists of Vic- 
tor Machine No. 2 — a 
handfome quartered oak 
Machine — with fine motor 
— pla/s any size record — 
has Japanned Flower 
Horn— complete with one 
dozei Victor lO-inch Rec- 
ords- -$38 JO. 

$6 Cish and $5 a Month 
or $1 a Week. 



<^ 



Our $47.20 Victor 
Outfit 



litre's a splendid outfit- 
consisting of Victor Ma- 
chine No. 3 — with Flower 
Horn — handsome Machine 
in fine quartered oak — 10- 
inch turntable— plays any 
size record — this machine 
an 1 one dozen lo-inch 
Kcc* 'Tils complete — $47-'0- 

TERMS: $7 Cash and $5 
Month or $1 a Week. 



A Phono^r^iph 

FOR CHRISTMAS 

Surely nothing could possibly be more appropriate and more sure to 

please the entire family than an Edison 
Phonograph or 

(^K\ Victor 

Talking 
Machine 

A musical entertainer of this sort in your 
home will give you any amount of real, good 
enjoyment — enjoyment that cannot possibly 
be derived from any other source. 

Think of these long winter evenings with no such home en- 
tertainer — think of them with one — don't you think a small sum 
spent for a Christmas gift of this character, money well and most 
.satisfactorily spent? We cordially invite you to call at any 
time and hear these machines. 



The Victor Victrola 

Price $a00. 



iktUf '• V« 



'AW., ^ 



;,%=> 



Our Stock of Edison and 
Victor Records 

I^ by far the most complete iti the city. We carry all sizes Victor 
—all Grand Opera and fonign Ke. ords— our stock is always com- 
plete—we are splendidly equipped to till your every Record want. 



The finest Talking Machine made — the cabinet is finest solid mahogany — 
all mountings are fine 14-K gold plate. The little doors in the front open 
and from this opening pours forth the sound. All mechanical sounds are 
entirely eliminated. You hear no grating sounds — no machine noise — and' 
no metallic sound as from the metal horned machines. It is a marvel — once 
hearing, you will certainly want one in your home — come in — hear it. 



$ 1 .00 A WEEK WILL PLACE A VICTOR OR EDISON IN YOUR HOME. 



-r?)" 



tc' 



M 



m 



THE COMING 
OKHRIST 

Dr. Campbell Coyle Says 

it Will be Personal 

Reincarnation. 

"The Crisis of the Age 

is Rolling on 

Is." 



JjBMt evcriintr Rt-v, r,,r,ipi,«.ii Coyle. pas- 
tor ot the Frit r : :an church, 

to an iiMusii..:'. : . ..ngr. c.TtJr.n. 

prea . ■!,•■! i his : ■u :-a ■ -s 

on ■ ~. i.'<i!Ul Co;i;illK >.t *"n: .-1, uis 

aul ilinff partciular'.y \v:;,4 wli.it 

Chr ^'If curirt-i-ninK his «'C- 

on.l ri.r.i u:J. :::,- :.xt lM;n>;. ■•! e.^ •-. n-- 



pari* a place f'-'i" i"-'U 



1 



.•.,^;,. «t;itea t!!;it :n thfs,- d.iys 
nu. I'rn preacht-rs preaclied that 

thi: 1 cominB of Christ should not 

hi ^u^•:l litrrully. , , 

1-j.ik: Himself, taupht and preached 
ni.i .second earning, he siiid: "They shall 



) 



l-i-i 

3-3-3 

5-5-5 

7-7-7 
9-9-9 



Can You? 



Add any six (tV) of these 
nurubers and have for 
the result twenty-one 
(21;? If 80, call and fret 
twenty- five (25) lOc Cl- 
ears free, 

Xii -IS, special brands by the 

box. - 20 Per Out Off. 

BLACKWOOD BROS. 

TWO ST<»RKS. 
2T aud 31.1 \\>«t Sii|M'rl<»r Street. 



see the Son of Mai 
of heaven with po 

Though Cliiist oil 
of His h-ceond c 
parables aiul signs, 
ly He would retui 
this earth, the sp« 

Christ. Himself, 
sieond coniinK, an. 
ii.s .surprise that 
i.tiis should prea( 
second cotoinK sho 
ally. His going W! 
t'oyle. and so will 
and thi.s should not 
for it is the t< sti 
Himst-lf. 

l»r. CoyU^ expres 
coniinp would be v 
liglitning out of a 
tlie people of the 
guests at the w 
cried "behold the 
He will come In si 
as havf never beei 
said that tens of t 
day are cultivatin 
looking for the c. 
He will conie as 
and at a time whe 
when, even the ch 
His personal conii 
little faith In the 
tr. "When in the 
came, all the gvi 
half of them were 
be the same wht 

"It will bo as 

•But a.* the days 

also the coming 

There were only 

Xoali. himself, 

I fleK>d's coming. A 

1 will be n»any sco 

land so dis*elievii 

j will be unexpectei 

! 'The Hi bit- .says 

'v!i' n til" se cone! 

i n \ ;i il. 

I "Again. He wll 
remote from the 

[ speaking in the 
groom tarried so 
many centuries, i 

1 when He will ec 
will expect him a 
Christ Himself sa 
until the gospel 1 
parts of the eai 
circumscribed th. 
would come at a 
tlure shall be sii 

I the moon and in 
the earth distress 
plexity: the se.a fi 
men's hearts fnll 
for looking aftc 
are coming on 
these things beg! 
andl 1ft up youi 
demption drawet 

"It will be a t 
We are consciou* 
preaching a cri; 
prevent. It Is a 
a great wave o 
Buchanan of Bos 
the age Is rapid 
.-ire on the ver; 
know not what. 



coming In the clouds 
ver and great glory." 
ly hinted at the time 
■ming, speaking in 

He taught very plain- 
n some day again to 
aker claimed, 
taught of a pers<^nal 
I Dr. Coyle expressed 
jreachers and Christ- 
fi that this personal 
t!d not be taken liter- 
s personal, argues I'r, 

be His coming back. 

be taken figuratively, 
nony of Je^us Christ, 

td the belief that this 
•ith th<' suddenness of 

clouded sky and that 
•arth would be as the 
tdding when it was | 

br.degroom cometh." 
ch power and splendor 
I witnessed. Dr. Coyle 
housands of saints lo- 
g an urw:ird gaze, 
ming of Christ. "But 

a thief in the night 
I He is least expected, 
irch will not believe in 
ng. and there will b? 
vorld." said the speak- 
parable the bridegroom 
'sts were asleep and 

without lamps. It will 
n Christ coiues. 
n the days of Noah. 
>f Noah were, so shall 
of the Son of Man.' 

eight souls, includmg 
hat believed in the 
« in future days thero 
ffers and disbelievers; 
g Christ's coming He 

it will be at a time 
itions of unrest will 

come at a time far 
time when He was 
flesh. As the bride- 
will Christ delay for 
)ut no one will know 
me. Each generation 
nd try to be prepared. 
Id He would not come 
lad been taught in all 
th and today It has 
' world. He said He 
time of unrest. 'And 
,'ns in the sun .and In 
the stars: and upon 
: of nations with per- 
nd the waves roaring: 
ng them for fear and 
• tho.ae things whJcfi 
he earth: and when 
1 to pass, then look up 
heads: for your re- 
n nIgh.' 

me of human unrest. 

that we .are now ap- 
ds which we cannot 
(Bovement rolling like 
/er the world. Prof, 
ton says "the crisis of 
y rolling on us.' We 
re of something, we 

Every one is looking 



toward the horizon as never before. 
From our open Bibles we learn there 
will be sadness and unrest. 

"The great Dr. Chalmers says 'this 
dispensjition Is going to close with a , 
crash." So hold up ycur hands and j 
watch." ' 



Take De Witt's Kidney and Bladder 
Pills: they are for weak back, infiamma- j 
tlon of the bladder, backache and weak 
kidneys. Sold by all druggists. 



WANTED 

Competent Carpenters, Plumbers, Electrl- 
c-a"s. Sheet Metal Workers, Roefers anl 
Plasterers; steady work; good wages: 
open shop. Apply Emp. I^<pt., Duluth 
Builders' Exchange, 501 Lyceum building. 

READY FOR 

BLASTING 

City Water and Gas Ser- 
vice Protected Against 
Accident. 

Water and gaa are Iteing suirplled 
through both the urulerground and the 
overland mains, between Eighth ave- 
nue west and Twelfth avenue ^"^si. 
The overland mains which have been 
completed within the past few days by 
the Wisconsin C"ntral Railway com- 
pany, aiv being tt-sted with a vie-w of 
determining their efficiency bffor* the 



underg-round mains through the district 
mentioned are cut off. 

It is expected that the railway con- 
tractors will b^gin in a few days to 
blast fur the tunnel under the street, 
between the avenues mentioned. While 
the blasting is going on, the water and 
gas supply will be sent through the 
overland mains provided by the rail- 
way company. The mains have been 
incio.sed in a frost box for the entire 
length of the expost-d portion, and every 
pr€>caution has been taken against any 
Interruption of the service. 

When it became known that the rail- 
way company inlendeu 'oiasting undei 
the street for its tunnel to the depot 
terminal, between Sixth and Seventh 
avenues west, Uie water department 
protested, becau-sse of the d.anper to the 
I water and gas mains. It was claime-l 
1 that the blasts might cause a .serious 
j break in the mains, and the water 
supply would be shut off from the 
western end of the city, and the eas 
j frckm the central and eastern portions 
; of the city. The company a.greed to 
; bear the expense of putting in tempor- 
ary overland main service, and to re- 
pair all breaks In the underground 
imains, should any occur. 



people and the discussion on the new 
theories of city government will, there- 
fore, be quite interesting at this time. 

The discussion will begin promptly 
at 8 o'clock. 



Y.. 
he 

up I 



Badly Mixctl Up. 

Abraham Brown, of Winterton, N. 
had a very remarkable experience; 
says: "Doctors got badly mixed 
over me; one said heart disease; two 
called it kidney trouble; the fourth, 
blood poison, and the fifth stomach I 
.and liver trouble; but none of them 
helped me; so my wife advised trying 
Electric Bitters, which are restoring 
me to perfect health. One bottle did 
me more good than all the five doctors 
prescribed. " Guaranteed to cure blood 
poison, weakness and all stomach, liver 
and kidney complaints, by all druggists, 
50 cents. 



Ing burned the bam on the George Miles 
place at Potato river. They were placed 
under arrest by Sheriff O'Rourke and ar- 
raigned before Justice Molander. They 
waived examination and were bound over 
to circuit court. Bonds were fixed at $50J, 
which they have been unable to furnish. 



OOI^EOTOI^Y ®F 
AiliyiiEiilEiT 



WHERE TO GO TO-NIGHT. 



GOVERNMENT 
BY COMMISSION 

Will be Subject Discussed 
Before the 



Club. 



Unity 



OVERCOAT 

If you order your Overcoat here 
you get qualltr, both Innlde and 
out a garment that will wear 
and become you while you Wear it. 

TALK 

is cheap, but we "make good" our 
talk, for we absolutely guaran- 
tee every garment made here. 
Remember a Made to Order at 
the price of a ready made. 

MORRISON— TaUor 

8 LAKE AVENIE SOUTH. 



The subject for discuBsion this even- 
I Ing at the Unity club w 111 be "Munic- 
ipal Grovernment by Commission," led 
by S. T, Harrison. 

"The subject is being discussed 
throughout the country and Is one of 
importance to all cities," said Mr. Har- 
rison today. "City government is of 
more vital Importance to residents of 
cities than any other government. We 
are confronted every day by municipal 
questions. State issues do not vex a 
city 60 frequently and national issues 
setm very much more remote. 

'The discussion this evening will deal 
largely with new theories of municipal 
government exemplified in the Galves- 
ton and Des Moines charters. Duluth is 
a progressive city with a progressiva 



LUMBERJACK JEWELER. ♦ 

J. N. Anderson Sets Out for Long 
Season in Woods. 

J. N, Anderson of Minneapoll!?, the 
lumberjack jeweler, left Duluth yes- 
terday for Bemidjl, from which place 
he will set out immediately for isolated 
lumber camps and towns, by dog team, 
In his packs will be a stock of jewelry, 
mostly watches, valued at several 
thousand dollars. 

Every winter Anderson spends In the 
' logging and mining camps of Northern 
I Minnesota, selling timepieces and trin- 
|kets to the men. To the men who have 
been working in this part of the coun- 
try for any length of time, he is well 
known and Invariably does a good 
business. 

Anderson is a great lover of the out 
of doors and walks a great deal. His 
dog team hauls his stock in trade. The 
jeweler will probably end his long sea- 
son somewhere near Two Harbors in 
the spring. He usually sets out from 
Two Harbors, but he reversed the usual 
order this season. 



LTCEUM-Otis Skinner. 
METROPOL,lTAN— Burlesque. 




CHARGED WjTH ARSON. 

Ontonagan. Mich,, Dec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — John Gerpln and Robert 
Tretline are in jail on the charge of hav- 



Temple Roller Rink 

Second avenue east and Superior street. 
Open every afternoon and evening except 
Sundays. Matinees Tuesday and Satur- 
day. La Brosse's band. Children's day 
every Saturday from 10 to 11 



Otis Skinner. 

Otis Skinner with a Frohman company 
In a dramatization of one of Balzac's fa- 
fous romances, should prove a drawing 
card of sufficient merit to pack the Ly- 
ceum, this evenmg. 

Miss Percy Haswell, who formerly 
starred In "The Darling of the Gods" 
and "The Royal Family," is Mr. Skin- 
ner's leading woman this year, and an 
attraction second only to Mr. Skinner 
himself. 

The engagement Is one of the most 
notable theatrical events of the season in 
Duluth. It Is for one night only, and the 
advance sale of seats has been heavy. 



The Mack-Leone Plajers. 

The Mack-Leone players will hold the 
boards all the rest of the week at the 
Lyceum, after tonight, playing "Friends" 
Tuesday and Wednesday and "Madam 
Satan" during the last half of the week. 



sort was generally necessary. Those who 
could produce sufficient proof as to In- 
tentions were admitted past saloon doors, 
many of which were otherwise locked. 
Some saloons closed entirely. 

Seven firemen were injured, Frank So- 
ve] perhaps fatally, in the burning of the 
Saginaw Pixjduce & Storage company's 
plant in West .Saginaw. Mich., Sunday. 
The profK-rty loss was about $4U.000. Five 
of the firemen were caught under a 
falling wall, and two were hurt by the 
explosion of an amonia tank. 

The storm, which has prevailed along 
the Pacific coast for the last few dayft, 
is, acccjrding to mariners, one of the 
most severe experienced In many years. 
Nearly all coastwise vessels coming into 
port have suffered more or le.ss in the 
gales which swept down from the north. 

Fire Sunday morning destroyed the Tu- 
lane Shoe factory at New Orleans, one 
of the largest in the south. The los« 
Is estimated at $100,000. 

News reached McHenry. Miss., of the 
lynching .Saturday night of Patrick Hu«- 
band, alias Pat Jones, a negro, about 
eight mile,« east of there. Husband was 
charged with assaulting two daughter* 
of Balton Rouse, a well known planter. 
About 100 armed men caught the negro 
and shot him to death. 



CARTERS 



VlTTL 

■ IVE 



ITTIE 

IVER 

PILLS. 



Genuine Must Bear 
Fac-Simile Signature 




REFUSE SUBSTITUTES. 



The Burlesqners. 



Campbell's Nightingales, fresh from 
triumphs at the Star theaters in St. 
Paul and Milwaukee, come to the Met- 
roproUtan this week with an entertain- 
ment that is likely to find great favor 
with patrons of the house. The usual 
matinee will be given, tomorrow, Thurs- 
day and Saturday. As usual, the Thurs- 
day matinee will be for members of the 
fair sex, as well as for men. 



BRIEF TELEGRAMS. 



Otto Schmlgler, a Hungarian laborer at 
Columbus, Ohio. Sunday, shot and fatally 
wounded Mrs. Caroline Webster, serious- 
ly wounded Miss Myrtle Spence, and then 
killed himself. The tragedy occurred at 
the home of Mrs. Webster, where 
Schmlgler had a room. 

The one hundredth anniversary of the 
birth of John Greenleaf Whlttier will be 
observed Tuesday with fitting com- 
memorate services at Amesbury, Mass., 
and will bo attended by many notable 
people from all parts of New England. 

To secure an alcoholic drink in New 
Orleans, Sunday, identification of some 



SICK HEADACHE 



CARTERS 




ITTLE 

IVER 

PILLS. 



regulate the Bowels. 



Positively cnred by 
these Little Pillft, 

They also reUere Dis* 
tress from Dyspepsia, I|i. 
digestion and Too Hearty 
Eating. A perfect rem- 
edy for Dizziness, Nausea. 
Drowsiness. Bad Tasto 
la the Mouth. Coated 
Tongue, Pain in the Bide, 
TORPID LIVER. They 
Purely Vegetable. 



SMALL PILL SMALL DOSE. SMALL PRICE| 




Genuine Must Bear 
Fac-Simile Signature 




REFUSE SUBSTITUnS, 



O .C-- 



1" 



m 



^mtmmi^ 




*"'. 






DULUTH EVSMIHG MSRALD: MONDAY, DECEMBER 



THE EVENING HERALD 

AX INBEPEXDENT NEWSPAPER. 



H()TliL«GOS553P. 



When you aM s^rviriK for the goofl 
thlnsB of life, wfien you are longing 



Published at Herald B\Ag.. First St.. Op- P. O. Sciuare 

THE HEH.VLD COMPANY. 
•Phones: Counting Room. 324; Editorial Rooms. 1126. 



TEN CENTS A WEEK 

EVERY EVENING— DELIVERl.D BY CARRIER. 

dally 



fiinsle copy 

One m )!. th 

Thre- rn mths (in a'lvance) 
Bix months (in advance).. 
One vear (In advance).... 

Entered at Duluth Postofflce a« Second-Claaa Matter 



$ .02 

.45 



eiit money order, which is troublesome to take out and 
bothersome to cash. 

There is need of such postal notes. Those who wish 

lb II 111^0 u 

to -send small amounts of money through the mails now I (^r QodH countr^wlth a fervent de- 
liiid it a good deal of a nuisance. It is unsafe to send Islre that has honiSlckness and measles 
silver, and it costs money and trouble to buy money lashed to the star^g post, as contend- 
orders. Stamps are sticky, and many houses do not 
like to be bothered with tlicm. 

If postal notes were provided, however, it would be 
a siniple and convenient matter to send them by mail. 
They would be made payable to bearer, so they would 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD. 



Per y't'ir 

Six r.\ mths. . . . 
Three months. 



,91 00 

. .50 

.25 



LARGEST CIRCULATION IN DULUTH 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

It Is Important when desiring the address of your 
paper changed to give both old and new addresses. 



VOTE TOMORROW. 

It is the duty of every citizen to get out to the pri 
mary election tomorrow and vote for the candidates ot 
his choice. Even if conditions are such that the votei 
has II) opposing candidates to choose between, a> the 
case wouM be with a Republican in the Third ward, h^ 
should vote anyway, because by doing so he register> 
for the <-nei-a! elect;- >n in February. In both partie> 
there arc c >: tc^ts i •! .cats in the city council, and in th» 
Democratic party liide is a cositest for tlie mayoralty 
nom!r.ati'"'n that is not without interest. 

Naturally this c 'inbat has attracted i^.^i of the in 
tcrc:>t. Emil A. Tc^-^nian. who seeks the Democrati. 
iioirinitioii against tlie incumbent, has made a clean, 
open, iiianiy and abi-ve board campaign. He has been 
handicapped by the lack of a •barrel" to open for the 
occa-.ion. if that is a handicap in a city contest wher, 
the record is open for all men to read, and where th. 
personalities of the two candidates are well and generally 
known. Wliat has been lacking in funds, however, ha ^ 
been :n>)re than male up by thp enthusiasm of his sup- 
porters, and tomorrow should record f'>r him an easy 
victory. 

Mr Tcssman is a popular and successful business 
man, wlio entered the campaign with a clcancut an<l 
straightforward declaration of principles that has com- 
mended Itself to all fair interests. Support has come to 
him troni all parts of the city and from all classes, eve;i 
thou..;!: t'.ie snggestijii that it was "the baser element' 
that s^ipp orteil him hinted that it was only the plaii , 
ordinary citizens who favored him. His ability to handle 
public alTairs has been proved in his seven years' experi- 
ence in the council, the last two years being spent as 
presiJuig officer, an office which he has filled to the sat- 
isfaction of liis a..> c ites and the people. He deserves 
the snpport of every member of his party who desires t > 
see tile better man nominated. 



crs In th« alltnenUs of life, twenty- 
seven miles on a rickety, puffy train, 
ill one day. that Is long drawn out and 
made as montuonous as a turnip lieid 
on a dark and rainy day. would try the 
patience of that saint who had the 
other members of llie godly order of 
checker players subviueu and asaamed 
by hla exemplajry. conduct. 

Flank Uotst«ii-t4>^ un Insurance man 
who was at tlio Lienox last week, trav- 
eled 2lK> miles to «et a square meal. 
Now in these days of comet Imitating 
stunts on the part of the railroads. JuO 
miles would seem a mere bagatelle. 
But when you are hitting out your lit- 
tle twenty-Seven miles per day the dia- 
taneo can be drawn out Into an In- 
rlniiely long llii^e. Mr. Botsford says 
that the passengers were given plenty 
of time to vlevf*" the sci-nery. riweet 
laced cows vied with Arkansas snuiT 
chewers to attract the attention of the 
sulTering passengers. But when you 
are hungry and suffering with exces- 
sive ennui, why even sweet faced bo- 
vlnes and the afore mentioned snulf 
chewers possess but little attraction 
for the Arkansas traveler. 

Mr. Botsford says he did not get a 

regular meal botore h*' emerged from 

the langour and strm-k Kansas City. 

Possibly it will turn out that the postal notes i He says that most of tiie people in Ar- 

... ij. .iiiiu- j»i..* kiinsas are too lazy to eat regular 

infringe upon somei)ody s established business, and that 



i'fj! i be readily negotiable, and would, indeed, pass from hand 
5.00 ; to hand to such an extent as to almost amount to mak- 
ing them a new form of currency. There would be no 
fee for issuing them, and they could be bought in quan- 
tities so as to be kept on hand by those who habitually 
send small sums of money through the mails. 

Ill short, they would be such a reasonable conveni- 
ence and would be so widely welcomed that it is pretty 
certain that congress will not provide them right away. 
That might look to the innocent and inexperienced like 
an inconsistent statement, but anybody who has noticed 
how hard it is to get congress to yield a public conveni- 
ence will realize that it is not inconsistent at all. 

Xo doubt the usual arguments against the extension 
of conveniences to the public by the government will 
be heard 



means a protest. It is quite certain that the old familiar 
alarm about "paternali:<in" will be heard, because that 
argument is available for use against everything that 
seems to savor in the slightest degree of increasing the 
usefulness of the government to the people. 

Perhaps the fact that the postal notes would form a 
new kind of currency will make congress suspicious of 
the suggestion, too. 

But the postal notes would be a real convenience, and 
it is to be hoped that congress will not look too hard 
for excuses for failing to provide them. 




HYPOCRISY AND BLUE SUNDAYS. 

The w'.rst thing about this country's views upon the 
observ;aion of the Sunday is their absurd hypocrisj-. 
Perhaps it would be more accurate to say that the hypoc- 
risy cKi-^ts in the laws themselves, though the laws are 
supposed to rctk-ct the public views, and much of the 
hypocrisy coine> ! r -m the fact tiiat they do not. 

For instance, take .\cw York's experience. A week 
ago y< -;crday and again yesterday the bluest of blue 
laws n jvcrned the metropolis. All sorts of entertaii - 
nients were absolutely forbidden. This included nit 
ti'.catf -il and vaudeville attractions alone, but everj - 
thniL^ The swccpuu character of the regulations is 
shown by the foil )wi:ig li.^t of "entertainments" th; t 
had t> be called 'ff a week ago because the "'lid" vvei t 
d^wn t: Sunday aiii.isements: Entertainment by Ger- 
man Ii'hcs for a children's charity; symphony conceit 
in Ca -.I'-i-e hall; illustrated boar.l of cduc.ition lectur« ; 



danciPfi ;)iaiiiicd for many wetlding> in liircl 'alls; mo\ - 
iiig i);.-r!rc sh »w iiy Brooklyn Y. M. C. .\. -ach as 
. >. 11 the prc\ ; >U5 Sinday; Educational All - 
■■,; Meti [•oliiai! and Manhattan opera con- 



had 
ancc 
certs 
wors 
East 
city. 
X 
bid (b 11 
such a 
in rci 
the ',' ! 



:i tl 



i\' 



ide, one ot tl;c 



Yiddisl; theaters, whose patrons 
•.; the "Children's theater" on tl c 
most beautiful undertakings in tic 



-c "an." -'nicnts" could not have been fof- 
I ;^s there was a law against them. There s 
law. Vet the ame law permits the sale of liquoi s 
i ,:a!its and ' ka ne's law hotels," where undi r 
:r .11 i-je of the "Sacred Sandwich" seekers after 
Sunday diversions could get .soddenly drunk. 

I' - on^f for a taking of stock on Sunday observation 
ir< :y. If the prevailing laws on the subject are 

out ot life utd not in accord with public sentiment and 
with niolerii idea.^ >f what is right and proper, thiy 
ou^ht to 1)0 changed. To have anachronistic blue lav\ s 
in effect when public sentiment does not approve of 
their cntorcement is to breed rankest hypocrisy aid 
silliest iiicor.>i^tcncy. 

It IS proper eu'iu^Ii to require that .Sunday be decent 
and orderly. Every day should be that, by all means, 
and Sunday especially. 

But !t IS as wr : ^, ' ' -\' /■!■' ni-.ldy l>:';e laws a; d 
attcir nijti-t tlier.i to nioderii ideas a^ it is t'j mal;e 

Sunii.t^. I lay for ri it and 'lebauchcry. 

We have the be-,t of a !lh >r;ly for saying that tlic 
Sabbath v. as made f >r man, not man for the Sabbath. 
The perpeluation i>i the dismal Massachusetts Sabbath 
serves jnly to coutituie the hpyocritical idea that religion 
is a black and gloomy cloak to be worn on Sunday and 
St VAC 1 away in a closet for the rest of the week. To say 
that tliere i^ a day in the week when honest and cheerful 
recreaiim ?.hall be jcal')usly barred out of the lives )f 
milii-'Hs who have but that one day out of their days 
of to. • ^ ek it in, is to make the religion in the name 
of winch sr.ch op;)!--^^: >n is done a thing to be hat 'd 
and shunned. 

Let us strip onr Sunday laws of hypocrisy, and wh le 
making Sunday an honest <lay of rest let us not make it 
a checrlcs day, too. Those who insist upon making it 
a day of dismal an(l melancholy depression in the nai le 
of religion sh<»w slight understanding of the spirit of t le 
Master who said that "the Sabbath was made for m; n, 
not man f')r the Sabbath." 



THE SUN BECOMES RABID. 

The hatred lor i'rcsidcnt Rcjosevelt that exists in 
certain quarters, which are sufficiently outlined by the 
statement that the New York Sun, the organ of special 
privilege and Wall street's most predatory elements, is 
the chief exponent of that hatred, has grown to the stage 
of insanity. 

A few days ago the Sun published a remarkable edi- 
torial, one of many on the subject of "Mr. Roosevelt," 
as the Sun calls him in its petty spirit of childish resent- 
ment. Here are a few choice phrases culled from a 
screed that proves pretty conclusively that hatred of 
Roosevelt in this quarter has grown until it now amounts 
to fanaticism if not to acute mania: "Of Mr. Roose- 
velt's proliciency in the arts of the politician in the 
worst signilicance of the word he has left us no room 
for doubt." "A more conscienceless or more reckless 
demagogue never afflicted this country." "By slow and 
insidious degrees he has upset the public confidence, 
arrayed class against class and fomented mistrust and 
hatred." "He has constituted himself the champion of 
every known extremity of labor agitation." "He has 
associated himself upon terms of closest intimacy with 
the worst and most sinister figures among those profes- 
sional disturbers of whom Orchard, Moyer, Pettibone 
and Haywood are the familiar expression." "He has 
steadily abused what he called swollen fortunes, and 
tixed public attention on abuses in corporate manage- 
ment in ways as subtle as irresponsible, but excellently 
devised t<j arouse and inflame the public mind." 

The only definite charges here that bear the remotest 
resemblance to the truth, such as the last one, will be 
viewed by the great majority of the people as occasion 
for congratulation and praise rather than for vitupera- 
tion; but that is not the way the Sun and its backers 
look at it. 

Concluding, the Sun congratulates the country that 
"Mr. Roosevelt" is "functus officio" — meaning that his 
finish is in sight— and adds that his message, "filled 
with warmed-over aspirations and shopworn alarms, has 
been received with indifference and contempt as the 
lucubrations of a mind unhinged." 

In short, the president of the United States, accord- 
ing to the Sun, is an irresponsible and conscienceless 
demagogue, a blatant exciter of class hatred, and a 
lunatic. 

Xo doubt this torrent of billingsgate has relieved the 
Sun's feelings, and now that all this bile is off its sys- 
tem it can sit up and take its nourishment from W^'lll 
street with better appetite. But so far as the country is 
concerned, nothing but amusement will be the effect. 
.Xmuscment. and real sorrow that one of the nation's 
most brilliant newspapers, a newspaper that has had 
power and intluence, a newspaper that was the vehicle 
for the ideas of one of the country's most honored 
editors, Charles A. Dana, has fallen to so low a state. 

When President Rooscvelt became president this 
same newspaper said: "He is the most sterling embodi- 
ment of contemporary Americanism; is of spotless 
honor and uncompromising fidelity to the loftiest and 
sternest ideals of public duty." 

The trouble with the Sun is that he has lived up to 
its former eulogy too literally and too vigorously. It 
had hoped for better things from a man wh<3 was f>>rced 
into the presidency by the corrupt interests of his state, 
which made him vice president to get him out of the 
way. with no idea that he would ever become president. 



meals. A poor substitute is good 
enough for them, he says. After he had 
been starved on the near-viands that 
greet the traveler down In the Arkan- 
sas belt, a longing for food that re- 
sembled at least In a remote respect the 
steaming stuff that mother used to 
bring in from the kitchen beset him. 
Mr. Bot.sford said the longing for rigu- Abilene 
lar foodstuff came on him with an In- Ashev.lte 
tensity that would not be denied. He Atlanta 
struggled valiantly with this mere cor- Bi.smarck 
poreal desire. Hi.s ethereal nature , Briston ... 
fought against giving way to a rrav- i Buffalo .. 

ing for mere food. But a gaunt feel- I Cairo 

ing slightly south of the solar ploxis. ! Calgary .. 
that for intensity of expression and Charleston 
fr<queney of repetition had the prusi- , Chicago .. 
denfs message beaten by lengths, Cincinnati 
fought down the ethical and ethereal Conconjia 
reproaches of th.> mind and sent the | Davenport 
starved traveler hiking toward Kansas i Denver 



Trie vveathek. 

A little thaw 
yesterday and a 
freeze-up again last 
night. when the 
thermometer drop- 
ped to 10 degs., 
making the walks 
slippery this morn- 
ing. The air was 
crisp and delight- 
ful. It was cloudy, 
and the weather 
man rather expect- 
ed a little snow to- 
night, though he expects tomorrow to 
be generally fair. Yesterday's high- 
est temperature was '>5 degs. 

A year ago today It was clear and 
sharp, the highest temperature during 
the day being U degs., and the night's 
lowest being 14 degs. 

The sun rose this morning at 7:48 and 
set tonight at 4:1». making 8 hours and 
31 minutes of sunlight. 

Says Mr. Richardson of conditions: 
••Light falls of rain or auow fell dur- 
ing Sunday or last night throughout 
most of the Northwest, lake region, 
Atlantic and Pacific states, due to the 
Influence of low pressure areas central 
this morning over the St. Lawrence 
valley and Arizona. High pressures 
overlie the Lower Mississippi valley 
and Western Canada, attended by 
colder weather In the Northwest and 
central valley states. The coldest 
temperatures reportt-d this morning 
averaged about 10 6ens. above zero In 
Northeastern Minnesota. Saskatchewan. 
Eastern Montana and Wyoming, while 
the southern limit of freezing weather 
Included Arkansas, Northern Texas, 
New Mexico and Utah. Indlcatlo^ns 
favor light snow flurries in this local- 
ity during this afternoon or tonight, 



TWENTY YEARS AGO. 

Taken From the Columns of the Herald of This Date, 1887. 



•♦•Offioerp ot the Duluth lod^e, A. O. the new Spalding hotel; the owner of 



U. W.. w«re elected la.st night as fol- 
lows: Master workmaji. A. J. Miller; 
ftreanan, H. P. Wieland; overseer, T. H. 
Pressnell; receiver. G. N. LaVaque; 
financier. E. Kugrler; recorder, W. G. 
Cressy. 



•••James Lee. a well-known young 
resident of the West end, was married 
on tho evening of Dec. 13 to the slstei- 
of Mrs. Robert C. Kennedy. 



•♦•At a meeting of Keystone Masonic 
lodge, last evcming, the following offi- 
cers were elcoted: H. P.. W. Q. Ten- 
brook; K.. J., E. Cooley; S.. Henry Van 
Brunt; C. of H.. T. W. Hugo; P. S. E. 
L. Pisoher; R. A. C. A J. Miller; trea- 
surer, W. E. Davis; secretary, H. P.. 
Armstrong. 



but Tuesday the weather will be gen- 
erally fair." 

Following were la.<5t night's lowest tem- 
peratures: 

32 Medcine Hat 

2< M mphis 



.20 



•••The following officers were elected 
at the last meeting of Lodge No 28, 1. 
U. O. F.: N. G.. A. Kelly; P. G.. L. 
Meining, Jr; P. a. W. D. Sharp; R. S.. 
William S. Stevens; physician. S. 
Speier; treasurer, Charles Scheller. 



•••Dr. Judd. who was taken down by 
a virulent attack of blood poisoning, 
and whose life was despaiivd of, is 



land a mile beyond the poor farm, aohl 
last spring at $110 per acre, has refused 
an offer of $2(» per acre within the jpaat 
few days, and adjoining acreage hab 
shown a similar rise; land in the EsLSt 
end. that was disposed of for $115 pec 
foot last March, has lately been »old 
for $200; a few daj-s ago the owner of a 
lot near the St. Louis hotel, paid $700 
to get out of a sale at $7»0 per foot 
that he had made a short time before. 

•••The Superior Improvemont ooni>> 
pany has filed articles of inoorporatlon« 
with a capital stock of $400,000. The In- 
corporators are Hiram Hayes. Petae 
Bradahaw and I. W. Gates, all old cltl- 
ens of Superior. It is the coinpany'a 
purpose to improve the harbor of Su- 
perior by means of docks, dredging 
etc., and also to acquire real estate. 



•••At a meeting of the Young Repul>- 
lican club, last night. Messrs. Haya, 
Tear, Wieland. Snively and M. O. Hall 
were appointed a co:ninittee to securd 
a membership of seventy-five, when 
the club will be formally organized. 



•••The following real estate transfers 
have been recorded: 
James L Gilbert to H. G. Cable, lota 



now much better. During an autopsy 9 and 10, block 101, Endlon division, $2,- 
he scratched his thumb slightly, and 000. 
poisoning quickly followed. 



.30 Milwaukee 

..IS MiniK^dosa 

, .Ji} Mo'lena ... 

.2fl M'jntRomerv 3S 

Mo<jrh<ad 1"^ 

N"w Orleans 40 

N'ew York 34 

Norlo k 3G 

Xorthfield "it 



•♦•There is much trading in real 
IS I estate at pre.sent. A few items of prop- 
ir, lerty values nvay l>e mentioned in this j street, First division. $3.3iX). 



000. 

M. K. Stuart to Hiram Kockwood, 
lot 8. bl'X>k 114, Portland division. $825. 

Anna S. Oswald to Rachel Mc Each- 
ren, south half of lot 1, East Fiftli 



2^ ! connection: $1,000 a foot was refused,} M. B. Harrison to Roger S. Powell, 
a few days ago, for the corner opposite lot 6. block 32, Endion division, $825. 



City in search of food. Twenty-seven 
miles a day. through a malaria racked 
country, on a dirty, dusty train, when 
it's food you want, is a trial that would 
put one into the proper mood for an In- 
tense appreciation of the vividness and 
artistic notions Dante was imbued 
with, when he drew that picture of the 
realm of daikness. 

But It Is a long lane that has no 
cans In It, and even the longest Jour- 
ney must end. The train di*! its little 
twenty-seven miles a day stunt— that is, 
most every day, and finally the wel- 
come smoke of Kansas City, Mo., hove 
In sight. Here at last food and the 
pleasures of men awaited tlie jaded 
travelers. Mr. Botsford's description 
of that meal is a dream— an exposition 
of mastication that might serve as an 
Introduction to Upton Sinclair's Jungle. 
It would make a first rate antidote for 
that appetite exterminator. It defies 
repetition through the medium of the 
printed page. Suffice It to say. how- 
ever, that Mr. Botsford lingered long 
over the steaming viands that were 
placed on the board, as per order. 
Through the odoriferous steam of the 
smoking dish the hideous nightmare 
of the twentv-seven-inlle-a-day train 
evaporated; life, with Joys playing the 
heavy pedal, again appeared In a rosy 
tinted hue; even Kansas City took on 
an appearance of beauty to the genial 
gaze of the thoroughly filled traveler. 
Slowly hel Ighted a Havana; luxurious- 
ly he stretched his limbs, while the 
panarama of mental visions slowly un- 
wound itself. Those sweet faced cows, 
those chalky snuff chewers. that drab 
country and the tortures of that 
twenty-*^ven-mlle-a-day train vanished 
with the departing dishes. Even If one 
is obliged to travel -.W miles for a meal, 
pernaps Imag^ation can really make 
the man who absorbs the meal think 
that he has not covered an excessive 
distance In accomplishing his end. Any- 
way to hear Mr. Botsford tell of the 
food' set before the horror struck eyes 
of the person who Invades Arkansas, 
and the longlpg that besets one as the 
days follow each other without the 
punctuation of a square meal, without 
the milestone of a Juicy steak or a suc- 
culent roast, then you wonld really i>e- 
lleve that 200 miles was merely a little 
exercise Jaunt when it came to getting 
a good square meal at the end of the 
journey. . . „ 

When It comes to the st.'tte of Kansas 
Mr Botsford says the farmers are rich, 
are doing very nicely, and each year 
are adding to little to what they have 
already got. He says that the big 
farm.-i are a thing of the past, most of 
them have been divided into small 
holdings which are worked by the own- 
ers Cattle are being Improved, and on 
the whole. Kansas offers a wholesome 
counterbalance to the enervated Ar- 
kansas. 

• * * 

At the l>.-nox: Fred .\lcoft. Minne- 
apolis; J. W. Vars, St. Paul; D 3. o»n- 
rh?d St. Paul; Frank Marehly, 3an 
Francisco; H. W. Lyman. Minneapolis; 
O. U-Clair. Two Harbors; A L. Ander- 
son, Ironwood; G- l-- Swaort. brie. Pa.. 
A H Swartzen.hnn. Staples; Lharles 
Brown, Crookston; T. K. Stare, \ ermil- 
lian iowa; C. J. Mead, Minneapolis; 
G^o^ge Br^sford. St. Paul; John Mc- 
rarthv St Paul, Harry Bartoot. New- 
York H J. Cat hng. St. Paul; A. Mc- 
.Millaii, Chlcxeo; Oscar D ^Vj li^"'«- 
i>ittMl.urE- T. bJ. Leonard, fat. Paul,, tl. 
F Chapln. Detroit; P. J- .^V^'?'^. Two 
Harbors- F. C. Wagner, Ely; John O. 
Mund Biwabik;. F. B. Jordan. Minne- 
apolis A. Craigie. Proctor; B. Moshre, 
Hyde Park, 111.. WiUiani A. Mahon, St. 
Ignace. , « • 

At tho St. I^Juis: C. R. Thompson. St. 
Puul; L. Helstein. Ribbing; Charles Le- 
vant, Eveleih; Harry S. Boutell, DeiroU; 
Kred A. Bill. Minneapolis; John H. 
Howe, 31. Paul; J. M. Dickey, St. Paul; 
H. Solomon. Chicago; O. K. Nelson, Min- 
neapolis, Mrs. Read, Aitkin; W . M. 
Shannon. Grand Forks; C. E. Smith. 
Minneapolis; O. S. Johnson. Cedar Rap- 
ids c, W Davis, Listx>n. N. D. ; Henry 
M Koon, l..lsbon; E S. Johnson, Mt. 
Vernon. Iowa; J. NV Sargent, Minne- 
apolis; Anna M Lekley. Mmneapolis. T. 
C: Papst. MnimutwUs; W. V\ . Watt. 



Detroit ... 

Devils Lake U 

Dodgre 

Duluth 

Edmonton .... 

El Pa.«o 

OE.«(canaba ... 

Galveston 

Grand Haven 
Green Bay ... 

Havre 

Helena 

Houghton .... 

Huron 

Jax:kon.sville 

KamlooDS 

Kansas Citv 

Knoxville 

La Crosse — 

Lander , 

LiHle R.5ok .. 
I.1OS Angeles .. 
Marquette 



1> 

10 

2ti 

32 

2G 

30 .Oklahoma 

14 , Omaha 

2S Phoenix ...• 

Pierre 

.20 ' Pittsburg ... 

10 Port Arthur 

, .11' Portland. Or. ... 

...30 Rapid City 

,...2t Reglna 

,...4') St. Louis 

,...2t) St. Paul 

IG S.m Antonio 

14 .San Francisco .. 

20 i Santa Fe 

....24 : Sault S. •. Marie 

24 -^hreveport 

42 3t)okane 

:j4 Swift Current ... 

30 Washington 

....34 j Wichita 

....2S I Wllllston ... 

.... 2 1 Winnemucca 

....30 Winnipeg .. 

54 I Yellowsion . 

....26 1 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 



North Platte IG | 

3:! 

42 

2ti [ 

30 

ID 

32 

14| 

S 

36 

3» 

:l; 

4'^ 

22 

..P> 
..34 
..2ri I 
..14 ! 
.34 
..30 
.10 



Princeton Union. It is a significant fact 



PASSING PLEASANTRIES. 

Puck: First Rabbit— Wli.ifs become of 
that during the financial disturbance, the j Bunny? I haven't seen him in an age. 
number of bartk failure^ iuis averaged no Second Ral>blt— Oh, lie got to running 
more than when the money situation around a good deal and went to the dogs. 

was normal. But at tlie .same time, these I __ 

failures have attracted wider attention! Baltimore American: American — OUT 

in consequence of tlie slringency. I senate is superior to the upper legislativ* 

houses ot any European nation, and I 



North Branch Review: Congressman 
Bede, the funny man in congress and 
incidentally a re^presentative from Min- 
nesota, drew chair "23" at the opening 
of the session, and some of his prjsp.^c- 
tive rivals up the line think their 
chances next year have been consider- 
ably strengthened. 



Elk River Star-News: Tlie innocent 
purchaser of securities that go bump is 
not always entitled to tlie sympathy the 



can prove it. 

Briton— How do you make that out? 

American— Because our upper house Is 
without a peer. 

Judge: "No," said the offensive pun- 
ster, "a girl who persists in hailing men 
can't be a reigning belle. She'll meet a 
good many frosts and soon hnd her nam* 
under a cloud. It won't dew." 



Department of Agriculture. Weather 
Bureau. Duluth. Dec. 16.— Local foreciist 
for twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Tuesday: Duluth. Superior and vicin- 
ity, including the Mesaba and Vermil- 
ion Iron ranges— Partly cloudy tonight 
and Tuesday; lowest temperatures to- 
night to It) degs. above zero; westerly 
winds becoming variable Tuesday. 
H W. RlCH.\RDSON, 
Local Forecaster. 



Chicago. Dec. 16.— Forecasts until 7 p. 
m Tuesday: Wisconsin— Partly cloudy 
tonight and Tue.sday; colder in west 
portion tonight. 

Minnesota— Partly cloudy tonight and 
Tuesday; colder In south and west por- 
tions tonight. 

JOHNSON OF MINNESOTA. 

Washington Herald : On the floor In the 
house yesterday there was much talk 
al»out the Gridiron club dinner Saturday 
night, and the two principle features of 
the various discussions Included the 
speeches by Governor Johnson of Minne- 
.sota and Senator Johnston from Ala- 
bama. 

"They were both fine speeches. ' re- 
marked one member "and you can rest 
assured that none ot the guest.-, thousht 
It was a case of too much Johnson." 



Philadelphia Ledger: "Why can't you 

give me a decent sum of money and not 

ribhle it lO.OW francs at a time?" 

Questioning? thus, the titled alien glared 

. - , - ..,,-. . . ••- his American wife, but she did not 

troubles it is not paracalarly interested , quail. 



.j^ i public gives him. If one gets stuck, the j^j 

J, best plan is to take one's medicine, and n 

i,> , not go wliining to the public with ..[ 



In. 



Austin Transcript: Congressman Taw- 
ney is against tho parcels p;)St. So are 
Tom Piatt and all tlie extortionate ex- 
press companies. 



It was distinctly understood." she re- 
turned, with firmness, •"that I bought you 
on the instalinieiu plan." 



Mankato Free Press: Coal Is reported 
found in the heart of a village in the ■ 
northern part of the state. We would | 
like to find coal right in the heart of 
our bin. 



Cleveland Leader: "Hear the story o( 
the shaky building?" 
"Nope. What l.s it?" 
"Oh, there's no foundation to It." 



Washington Star: 'Party lines havtt 
been largely effaced." 

"Yes," answered Miss Cayenne; "t 
don't know much about politics, but It 
Albert L.^a Times-Enterprise: John D. 1 seems to me that tlie argument Is now 
Rockefeller's denial that he h;us $KV),(W0.0O.) limited to two classes of people, one 
worth of government bonds laid away, 1 p.-^eaclilng prosperity and the other yell- 
will be accepted as the truth. John makes ing perdition." 

Tits dollars pay him more ilian 2 or 3 j — : .. 

oer cent Baltimore American: "Young man," 

■ I said the editor solemnly, ,ts he glanced 

Re.l r T.ke PalU Gazette- If the Prohibi- I ^^'^^ ^*^ poem presented, and then at the 
tionist^ge^ i^al busv^ln congre4lonal ^a^ high, pale brow of the author before hlra, 
fi^l^ V?,5f\.etl^ twl\^r^ M?,^..^ Rem^^^^^ bave missed your caUing. xou 

fairs next year, two or tliree Kepuoiic.an ' . ^ ,ir,>n nuetrv and c^et a l<.b as a 
uiembers from Minnesota may have cause M^ught to drop poctiy and gt.t a J-.o as a 
for uneasiness. For instance. Jim Taw- i *»^-'-'ian. 



ney will have trouble enough over the 
tariff issue without losing the votes of 
a couple of thousotnd Republican anli- 
saloonists. 



Brainerd Dispatch: Just to show what 
the anti-pass law is doing down in 
Kansas, the editor of a local paper In 
that state has cut out che time card. of 
'.he ri^ad and inserted in its place, "Trains 
are due whtn you see the smoke." 



Why do you say this?" demanded th* 
pt et. haughtily. 

"Because," replied the eilitor with con- 
viction, "you can do such wonderful 
things with the meter." 



International Falls Border Buds^t: 
Clarence MMler. the brainy young Du- 
Kansas City Times: The news 
great hit made by Governor J 
Minnesota in Washington is res 

through the land. Governor J . . _. 

quoted as saying that he did not wi.-ih ! the North country sent down to i'.t- ] wearing some of tii 
to make a fight for the presidential 1 p^uj last winter, and the mention ot his i^cket doesn't keep 
nomination against Mr. Bryan. But that j n^n^e h ■ ■- • - -' •' 

was some we.-ks ago. If. in the light of > i.,,agons 



Kefleotioiis of a BaclM'lor. 

New York Press: Th.- only good hiu- 
band is when he has a widow. 

A man hardly ever knows he has pro- 
posed to a girl till she has done it for 
him. 

A girl's beau goes up 100 per cent In 
value in her eyes men-ly by going down 




developments wliich may be loreshalow^d 
by the governor's rc.-eptlon at Washing- 
ton it may be deemed expedient to cliange 
the Democratic program, would it be fair 
or even expedient for Mr. Br>an to make 
such a fight necessary? 



has probably l>«''^n one of the main j catching cold. 
s for the rehabilitation of Bede s i 



how 

baby's hair In hla 
her husband from 



Budget. 



Tliv Draniutif Instinct. 



Bob 



Red Lake Falls. Minn.. Gazette 
Dunn's Princeton Union declares: 

"To be consisten*^, the Republican news- 
paners that are urging G>)vernor Johnson 
as a suitable candidate for the presidency 
must support him for a tiiird term as 
governor, provided he is a caiialdate. If 
Mr. John.son is the right man for presi- 
dent, he certainly Is good enough for a 
third term as governor of Minnesota. 
In the Improbable event of the governor 
securing the Democratic nomination for 
president, he ought to have the electoral 
vote of Minnesota. ' 

It l<=n't hard to follow this sort of 
reasoning. It Johnson is good enough 
for president, he is good enough for gov- 
ernor again. And as he ought to have 
the electoral vote of Minnesota in the 
event of his nomination for president, he 
ought to be given the popular vote for 
governor. The I'nion presents convincing 
proof that Governor Johnson has "made 
good." 



Crookston Tiiue.s- Governor Johnson ' Harpers: Prof. Brander Matthews. In a 
states on his return trip that he had a ; lecture on theatrical convention to a 
fine time 'n Washington, and that thaj class In dramaturgy, 
boys treated him right. The governor ; the following story 



the other day told 



may go a?.iin. Wiienever he faces a 
new crowd. Minnesota's stock goes up 
on the Jump, 



St. Cloud Journal-Press: As a Minne- 
sota Republican, we would like to seo 
Governor Johnson nominated for presi- 
dent, because it would liien be easy to 
elect a Republican governor in the North 
Star state— but we are forced to admit 



^ . „„„.. that he would undoub;edly be the stiong- 

si>ooner; W. H. Buckley and wife. Two^^t presidential candidate the Democrats 
Harl>ors; Mark Elliott, Virginia; Harry ^ould nominate. 




POSTAL NOTES. 

A rcc immendation by Po^tmaater General Mejer 
that i.s of considerable interest, though it has tot 
aroused so much discussion as his recommendations lor 
a parcels post system and a postal savings bank, is the 
one in which he adv>c.Ttes t!ie issuance of postal notes 
in small denominations. 

He suggested that congress should provide for the 
issuance of such notes in denominations of 10, 20, 25, \o, 
40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 cents, and $1, $1.50, $2 and $2. jo. 
They would, for such small amounts and to higl er 
multiples of these amounts, take the place of the pr js- 



■> 



IT IS THE CITY'S MOVE. 

The courthouse problem seems to be waiting now 
upon the action of the city. Evidently .the people of 
the county wish to see a grouping plan adopted, but that 
is impossible unless the city signifies its willingness to 
participate. 

It is time, therefore, that tlie city authorities should 
take action. The county officers must know what the 
city will do before they can determine their plans. 

Some time ago it was announced that the city had an 
attractive offer for its present city hall, accompanied j J^'u^^YeV. New "York; jdiss P.rey Haswell 
by the privilege of five years' use of the old city hall 
while preparing for a new one. This offer should be 
taken up and considered. If tt is a good one, and the 
city authorities believe it should be accepted, they should 
act, because the sale of the present site is necessary in 
order to provide funds for a change to the proposed new 
location. 

It is high time that the matter was being brought to 

a head. Xo further steps can well be taken until it is 

learned whether the city is able and willing to take part 

in the grouping plan. That determined, the county will 

know what to do. If the city cannot enter, the county 

will go ahead to build its courthouse on tlie site already ' neaDoUs. f"^'. Owens. Lakewood. J H- 

. J ir .1 •. 1 11 1 1 Riieber St. Paul; W. H. Burns and wife, 

purchased. If the city can and will take part in the ■ gY paiil; J. K. Ander.<on. Minneapolis; 

grouping plan, the county can make its arrangements 

accordingly. 

It is up to the city authorities. 



J. CVeorge, Virginia; J. S. Cherice, Eve 
leth- C F. Plrrung. Chicago, A. Wood 
and 'wife. Minneap<ilis; S. G. Iverson, St. 
Paul C C. Dinehari. St. Paul; C. E. 
Secord and wlf* •. Proeto/; A. G. Rut- 
ledge. Bemidji. A. U. &m th, Scanlon. 
Samuel Wain. Two Harbors: H G. 
Seeley. Blwablk; S. M. Fish. Rice Fi.>»h; 
H L Eliace. Hooland. .\. Carter, Mar- 
uiielte J B. Mitson, Marquette; C. R. 
Adams', St. Paul; J- E Bane St Paul; A. 
L McDonald, Chippewa Falls. 

• * • 

At the Spalding. Mrs. J. A. Harris, 
Foxboro H. H. Martin. Cass Lake. S. A. 
AmlersoA, St. Paul. S. J. Galvin, St. 
Paul G H. While, St. Paul; G. H. 
Jariti, Cincinnati;. W. Staumann, Mil- 
waukee; Otis Skinner, New York; Joseph 

New York; Miss P.rey Haswi 
New York; CharletJ B. Wooddsddoe. Chl- 
ciigo J H. Fleming. Chicago; Knox 
Baco'n St. Paul, C. J. Throne, Minno- 
apoUs D H. Taylor. Minneapolis; Walter 
B Scott' and wife. N 'w York, Harry 
Burkhardt, New York; S. W. Mason Chi- 
cago- Fred Sargent. New York. M. J. 
Greeiilng, Minneapolis. 

• • • 

At the McKay: M. J. Jackson, St. Paul; 
John Owens, St. Paul; S. E. Thompson. 
Tw>) Harbors; P. A. Jones, Mmne^iiwlls; 
J H Cummlngs, St. Paul; S Griggs, St. 
Paul L M. Shuts. Minneapolis; F. A. 
Burn's, Staple's; A. S. De Puy. Park Rap- 
ids H C. Lyons. St. Paul; George fi. 
Col'e St Paul; A. J. Small. Minnpapolls; 
T 'm MorrJU. Minneapolis; K. W. 
Brownell and wife. Two Harbors; J. D. 
Bullock. Madison; Peter Swan.son. Mi.i- 



Anoka Free Press: Whether Demo- 
crat-^ are willing to admit it or not, the 
fact stares them in the f.aoe that Gover- 
nor Johnson loom.s up as the only man in 
their party they can hope to elect presi- 
dent; becau.se of the men named, he is 
the only one who Is likely to secure 
enough Repul)lican votes in addition to 
his party vote to insure election. As for 
Bryan, much as we may admire the man. 
It may as well be conceded first as last 
that he will neither command the full 
Democratic vote nor any signlfieant por- 
tion of the Republican vote. 



Kamsas City Times: Governor Johnson 
of Minnesota might be very .satisfactory 
as a Democratic nominee for president, 
notwithstanding that the East takes so 
kindly to him. 



Attorney General Bonaparte has received a letter 
from a woman who wanted to know what bounty there 
is on being a mother of triplets. That inquiry should 
have gone to Hon P, E. Dowling of Evcleth. 



Mrs Mary Wisner, Two Harbors; Mr. and 
Mrs. Anderson. Two Harbors. 



Ru.sh City Post: Governor John A. 
Johnson made a great hit at the Gridiron 
dinner In Washington. He was congratu- 
lated by the big uns of both parties, and 
his presidential Iwom gained a very per- 
ceptible Increase. Bryan better "look a 
leedla oudt." 



Pointed Paragraphs. 

Chicago News; In polite society a snub 
is a sort of upper cut. 

A lot of so-called golden silence Is only 
til A t ^d 

When women borrow trouble they 
usually pay back double. 

By advertising your wrongs you will 
add to your collection. 

Some men are to be trusted and somo 
others are not in the trust. 

A. woman's idea of a smart man is one ' 
who always agrees with her. 

Opportunity knocks but once, tmt it s , 
different with the human knocker. | 

The man wiio attends strictly to hi.=i 1 
own business has a good steady Job. 

There is no need to hunt tor trouble; - 
everything conies to those who wait. 

After sizing up their husbands, we don l I 
blame some women for being fond ot | 
dogs. I 

Coiilideiice. | 

DJn't you bother, honey, | 

'Bout de things da white folks say; | 
If de sky ain't smilin' sunny 

'Twill be briglu s-jme other J^-V- 
Dey'll liave dis ol' world marked "O. K. 

In jes' a little while; 
Dem congressmen is on de way. 

An' now's de time to smile! 

You needn't worry 

TelUn' troubles, 'cause you see 
Dey'll tell 'em in a nurry— 
Better far dan you an' me 
Could ever hope t-j do It. 

You mu.s' wait a Uttle while 
But w^hen congress once ffi«,»-0 " 
will do .t up In style: 
wui uo *^_pitt3burg Press. 



'A little girl had dramatize.! a .sofa 
pillow into a horse, and had ridden on the 
horse to her motlier's knee. 'Horsey la 
thirsty, mamma.' she said. To humor 
her. the motlier brought a glass of wa- 
ter, but the little one carefully emptied 
the water in a jardiniere b« fore offering 
the glass Uj her pillow. 'A pretended 
horse ought to drink pretended water,' 
she remarked gravely," 



Dey 



San 



HI.S Wish Came True. 

Francisco Bulletin: Prof. 



Fairmont Sentinel: Governor Johnson's 
political opp.):ient3 gracefully concede 
that he Is "presidential size." Watch 
him grow. 



The Tnitli of It. 

'Twas the night before Christmas, and all 

through the house 
Not a creature was stirring, not even a 

mouse; 
They all had been shopping and spent 

their last red. 
And nervous pro-^tratlon had sent them 

to b«d. 

—Harper's Bazar. 



Mankato Free Press; Governor John- 
son's presidential boom appears to have 

got Its second Wli5d. 

Reverence. 

John Ruskin: In reverence Is the chief 
Joy and power of life; reverence for what 
Is pure and bright In your own youth; 
for what is true and tried in th? age of 
others; for all that Is gracious among tho 
living, great among the dead— and mar- 
velous in the powers that cannot die. 

They .\re On. .\11 Right. 

Washington Post: The gentlemen who 
h.ave been as.sertlng that congress does 
rot understand the money question would 
be surprised If they could see how well 
some congressmon understand what they j 
are ber« Cor. 



Edgar 

L.'^rkil.: Uie^otrd"a.stronomer, was |u^ 

^^rlCfsco"'^ prof :^ liVk^n tTeUs'lhaf I'J 
S cPhnlnal to continue for life marriages 
that are unhappy. „^„, 

"Why condemn," he said, with a grim 
laugh 'men and women to such misery 
as afflicts our mutual friends, the 
Blanks? We have all mutual friends In 
fh*' Blanks' position. 

'•At the height of their nightly quarrel 
the othei- day. Mrs. Blank choked back 
a sob and said reproachfully: . ^ , ^^ 

" I was reading one of your old letters 
today. James, and you said in it that you 
would rather live in endless torment with 
me than in bli.ss by yourself.' 

•• "Well I sot my wish. Blank 
growled." 

The Philosopher of the BIgfork. 

A. M. Greeley In Big Falls Compa.ss: 



AMUSEMENTS. 



LYCEUM i T0HI8HT ONLY, 

Charles Frohman Will PreHcnt 

OTIS SKINNER 

In a ISew Play. "THK HO\OR OF 
THE F.IIMII.Y." Vant IneliideM MIsa 
Percy Hmtwoli. KranoiM tarl>I», Al- 
bert CJarela, .Aiulrew.M and otbem. 
"The Skinuer Performane*« Have 
Been the Mont .\rU»««le Kver Seen In 
Dulutb." 2S<> to $1.S0. 



Deo. 17 to 21 — MAfK-I-EOXF.S. 
Det-. 2t»— "THK V ANKEK REUEXT." 



METROPOLrlTAN 

"The House of Mirth." 
ALL THIS WEEK. 

"THE NIGHTINGALES" 

Flftr Fair, Famoua Fllrta In 
THE BEST SHOW YET. 



Next Week — KEXTl fKV BELLES. 



It 
is easy for a lazy person to be conserva 
tiv«. 

The strict party man Is saved the bother 
of thinking. .^ ^^ 

Wisdom I3 esteemed most by the wise; 
•wit by the witless. 

The man who says he does not care for 
public opinion is a liar. 

The man who never disagrees with his 
wife Is either a freak or a bachelor. 

It require.s the highest type of a hero to 
follow duty when U ie»ds to drudgery. 

The man who tell» his plans should 
not complain when iMime other fellow 
steals the speciflcations. 

The people who hoard money In stock- 
ings are tempting burglars to play Santa 
Claus the wrong way. 



STAR lECTURE COURSE 

First M. E. Chorch, 
December 17, 1907 




MRS. FLORENCE E. MAYBRICK 



iMH«l 



zz:^ 




<** 






\ 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, IWT, 



9 



MAKE THE POLICE 1 1 
KEEP WALK1NG| 

P. Mainella Outlines His 
Stand on Some Munic- 
ipal Affairs. 

"I am for everybody. " sahl P. Mai- 
nella. candidate for the Republican 
nomination in the Fifth ward. 

ThtTf ia nothing narrow about Mr. 

Mainella. "i love everybody," he hx- 

S aimed, "and everyone will get a 
luare deal." which shows that he Is in 
nccord with the ideas of Congressm.in 
J. Adam Kede. 

Mr. Miiinella was a.sked to explain 
Vome of the broad, constructive policies 
Which he had planned for the better- 
ment of thf- ward, in case he w^re 
•let c ted. 

'"1 am for lower taxes," he said, "and 
tor making the police kt-ep walking." 

Mr. MalnelKv . m economist. When 



Quality Better or Prices Lower Than Elsewlierel» With a 




p. MAINELLA. 



s.lieved the chief of the 
ist should have rin auto- 

:ti>'i,l that lie u ;:u-; vigor- 
' ~ : '. I move. 

tiiel Republican 



fir. 

:m-. 
In 

Democrat.^ buv 
Voie> ui; , .<aid Mr. MainelU. 

"I il'tn't : If a man vote f >r 

me. Ill- vote fi.ir me -ir.ni;!it. •.)!• I don't 
H'lnt linn." 

Mr. M.iinei;a has been in bu-sineas in 
D'l' :■'- '■ >r ivveuly Vi-ar-. and i.s a 
hi xpayer. H- I; is recently re- 

tlr-'i ivnn active bu-siiie-ss and is pro- 
pared lo devote all his: energies to 
pt'l I to iiuiking the police "keep 



THE IIKPOKT OF HIIXiKLY 



H'lmtmiied froti. 



fi.1 
pi 
Cl 

01 

Vi- 

*.■ 

re- 
ft - 

at: 

Jk^ ■ 

W'li i^ 



inr 



h 

g 



•o 
or 

&" . 

I 

I; 

T 
1 

COtfi' 

OlliJ 

th"(^ 

a.- 



or: 






t 

ex 

t,. 

Th- 



l 

I:: 

t-? ■ 

6 ■ 

t:: 

d.' ^ 

or ■ 
Ti 

|a,. 

i 
t ' 

iiv.: ■■ 
tH ■ 
f • - 
Cr ■ 
Issue. 



0:v 



It 



I 



ies i;; 1 



work mosi yuii.'<[.tctorUy in 

m. r ial (•(uintrlest of Euiope. 

-;!v^^s the sure'St 

»l»» r.ition in this 

i.k w iu!d not only 

.•1>1> •m.-' of our bmk- 

.• '111! nl.-to provirti- the 

•inhftm!.; the Irt'Jisury 

. *o tlie banks 

Th- ctii.f 

ii.itional bink- 

lon in reg.ird to 

pile.s rest-rve on 

~ and central re- 

.iriiia- -i .■iufficlent 

On hand. 

i- •-rit cn-1.-;. 

; iU-y unties :;-■-■ re- 

r i;s at all. 

< ivei-truding for Yt^ar- 

: ! ■ i>{ all "tli wrMi.! t. , •■!, 

:\ ill till' 

I'll! Wil3 

:■ .si! able, but 
■ h^t'xt more 

liM riMi : , ■.. ,\ its 

' III our li., ■• - .Many 

■ ' d una pi >hably 

badly txtended 

' .: I. .-leculalivf loans 

U'f «hould have ha.d a 

, ..r.s:i,i,.raldf, redur- 

1 kinds of busl- 

!>''ri»ivl of t'l'un- 

:-■-: and trad- 

, . ia ihf end. 

i rfal !■•■- 

•'• ..f rh." 

■ fierly 

ondi- 

■ .? 



. \ !• ut!rl !:iit I 

that of all 

■ "^'urlied 

i -d to 

,■..';■. .' i*ys- I 
urrfncy and 
■vv!ii' h (■■■niUl I 



"Wii that ilit-re j 
-vrhanKing any 

i'.Lt>u!ii ..£■ vb'posit credits] 
::■ wlihicit 'I'-pletins cash 1 
• h.it ihr re- ! 
;•• .>n d.-p'.slt I 
..1 t.' imtai'diatfly and 
ill I tirreui y, tlu-ri- n»*ed 
• ■-; tlu-iti. There 
lity of eur- 
■ >: the donitwtic 
N ould have been 
inks nor among 

\ii I la>lic t ni renfy. 

Ilk-! If -irculation cnn 

! ,1 ! ./! L.li- flasiic by 

:." a fixed 

1 <'d rircu- 

"is uiii-overed by 

: - ill. St thtse notes, 

ir.-d lo t;iiry the .^ame 

i?ir deposits. It will pre- 

whlch Ls neri-s.sary 

; ?i and d epos if rreil 

■ ■ : fer-tly 

' over 

iiv times 

•d to re- 

ks, based 

• ur years. 

1 rati- of 

ilnjf with 

r(>a«-hinff 

iitioii iif -siicn 

[ (1.1 nmeh to 

not hi'iieved 

• '.r ::s satls- 

U th«* 

ink of 

Kept Out of Politicks. 

•■d for the 
ntral gov- 
•iiUal feature of 
.St V«- und>-r gov- 
' ~'. \ n«-"ver 
^ .nan or 
;i. i: : '>•• kv'jii out of 

T!if ni sen for its man- 

aid \y men of the 
ibility. whose du- 
,;,;,■:.,! v\. .J be for lhi» un- 





Greater Assortment of Dependable Furniture to Select From 



ITUl^E 



ALL CARS LEAD TO KELLY'S 



226-228 W. SUPERIOR ST. 



THE BEST GIFTS OF ALL! 

ET the gifts you give this Xmas be useful gifts — gifts of good furniture — and they will afford lasting pleasure. You can buy 
the handsomest furniture here at GENUINE ALTERATION SALE PRICES, and you can take your time paying, for 
what }'ou buy. Make your selection now, before the rush, and while the stock is at its best. GOODS WILL BE RESERVED 
UPON PAYMENT OF A SMALL DEPOSIT. Here are a few of the many bargains in just the sort of furniture you will 
want to give as Xmas presents. 






Dining Ml Tables 



A complete stock of dining room tables. 
Here you will find all the .season's 
newest design.^ and finishes, in round, 
oval and square tables. We have 

a solid oak dining table 
(vlth a six-foot extension 



$8.98 



Turkish Rocker 



Parlor Rocker 






Mission Rocker 



Turkish Chair 



.\ e"»od izi- genuine leather Turkish 
i: . k r. Has oak frame, fine steel 
.spnnss. y ell upholster- 
ed and worth $30. Al- 
tf--ration sale price .... 



$19.75 




Exactly like cut, Hea\'y frame, made 
to last; upholstered in genuine leather 
with tempered steel springs. They come 
in early English and 
mahogany finishes. Al- 
teration sale price 



$11.50 



Book Racks 

k fine Xmas pre.sent, made of solid 
3ak, with Inlaid effect on 7^#* 

ands, at i 9 V 



Similar to cut. Seat is covered with 
genuine Spanish leather. A hand- 

some rocker and a 
listing gift. Alteration 
gale price 



$10.50 



A luxurious chair, covered with gen- 
uine leather, tufted arms and back. 
One of the most comfortable chairs 
Imaginable. Worth at 
least $40.00. Altera- 
tion sale price 




Parlor Rocker 



Exactly like out. .^eat upholstered in gen- 
uin-^ ieatl er; heavy frame finished in golden 
oak, Early Engli.'^h or ma- 
hogany — . grand value at 
our speci il price of 



if^t 111 i^i^ittti'ii 

$9.98 



Library Tables 

A gift that is always appreciat-^d. We 
have them In Arts and Crafts. Fumed 
Oak, Weathered Oak. Golden Oak and 
Mahogany. See our showing of Library 
Tables first. 



STORE 

WILL BE 

OPEN 

EVERY 

EVENING 

UNTIL 

XMAS 





Book Cases 

A bookcase will be appreciated by 
the entire family. We are exclu- 
sive agents in Duluth for the famous 
Globe- Wernicke Sectional Bookcases 
and have a complete stock in all 
woods and finishe.s. We .sell them 
at FACTORY PRICES. 



Davenports 



Plain and bed davenports are here In all finishes. 
Upholstered in Tapestry. Velour and Leather. 
Davenport exactly like cut, up- 
holstered in genuine leather, 
mahogany finish, at 



$29.50 



We are exclusive ag'^nts in Duluth for the fa- 
mous Strrlt Davenport Ikds. We have a complete 
showing of them on our sample floor at present. 



Rockers for Children A Columbia Graphophone — An Ideal Christmas Gift ^ StCWdrt HCdtCF 



A complete Un-- of Rockers for the little folks. 
We have lh?nv in diff«'rent finishes 
and the i r'^^^'* are as low as 



39c 




HALL 
TREES 

A .splendid line of 
Hall Trees, all 
new designs — 
waved oak.weath- 
ered oak and gol- 
den oak, start- 
ing with a quar- 
tered oak Hall 
Tree, Fr e n c h 
plate mirror, 
l)ras5 umbrella 
stand, at — 

«6.75 



Columbia 
Cylinder 
Records 
25c 




The Columbia 
Graphophone is be- 
yond argument aho- 
gether better — me- 
chanically and musi- 
cally and artistically 
better than any other 
instrument which is 
oflfered for sale in 
competition with it. 

We have been 
proving this 
every day. Come 
in and hear them. 



All Graphophones Sold 

on Easy 
Terms 
to Suit 
You 



$1.00 PER WEEK. 




CYLINDER GRAPHOPHONE 



DISC GRAPHOPHONE 



Complete, with 12 records. Has oak cabinet, tandem 
spring motor, brass horn. A splendid 
machine In every way. On sale at .... 



$25.00 



One of the greatest values ever offered — graphophone has 
large flower horn, aluminum tone arm, oak 
cabinet — complete with six records at.... 



$28.60 



During our 
great Altera- 
tion Sale the 
prices on all 
Stewart Heat- 
ers are reduced. 
If you have not 
bought your 
heater, we urge 
you to take ad- 
vantage of this 
saving oppor- 
tunity. Remem- 
ber, a Stewart 
Heater will give 
one-fourth 
more heat with 
one-fourth 
less fuel than 
any other 
make. 




Many mothers instead 
of destroying the chil- 
dren's stomachs with 
candy and cake give the 
youngsters a handful of 
Grape-Nuts when they are 
begging for something in 
the way of sweets. 

The result is soon 
shown i n greatly increased 

health, strength and men- 
tal activity. "There's a 
Reason." 

Read the famous little 
book, "The Road to Well- 
ville," in pkgs. 



divided advantaj: 
bank. It would i 

plisli I ills »iid b 
vided between 
by the shareholn 
lier chosii-n by tl 

The bank shon 
a general or o 
should V>f confir 
th.- government 
crtdil notes, r- 
from the othvr 
their paper on - 
disf ounthiK note 
otluT bunk- T* 
lo d^a! in i"' 
b<jnd.s. .tn.l ;>: Jb 
and iniuiieipallti 
dh'>i'-''l '' >■'■'<■■ ''U' 
in exoha 

ac. .. ' gold 

port gold and bu 
re-serves. 

Main orti 

Thf ninm off 
should be m ihi 
suih tir.inohes t 
citif.s and subtr* 
necessary. 

Its note issue; 
the same a-* in » 
they should hav 
th« way of a 
the balance to 



P and interest of the 

lOt b« difficult to accom- 

/ havuig the control d>- 

ertain directors electeu 

ers and a certain num- 

e government. 

Id not be allowpd to oo 

►mmercial business, but 

•d to th« transactions ot 

business, the Issue of 

-ivinK reserve deposits 

banks, the discount of 

pproved s»-curity. or re- 

* of their customers for 

hould also have the right 

.'d Stal's gov.-rnmeni 

).ily th-* bonds of states 

'.s but not in stocks. It 

h" iuiihority for dvaling 

nge as will enable it to 

credits abroad and im- 

lli-m when needed for its 



ce at Washington. 

\' .>i" lii ■ oontral bank 

citv of Washington and 

*tahHshed in the reserve 

ftsury citiea as are found 

should be credit notes, 
iermanv and France, and 
} the same protection In 
/ery large gold reserve. 

Ihj covered by bonds 



of tho government or other approved Is- 
sues or by notes dSsc-Junted by it for 
other banks. 

The central bank, if given the exclusive 
right lo issue credit Jaank notes, aa it 
should have, could regulate the Issue of 
I notes in accordance with the demand, 
I which could be determined automatically 
' and with precision, through Its relations 
I with the other banks of the country. 
1 Such a bank would be little mor« than 
' a department ot the government. It 
] would greatly improve the efficiency and 
I value of thf> tre;isury d»partment. and 

I make it a means of assistance and benefit 

I I obusine53. Instead of a meance and a 
1 danger, and would make our currency 
j and banking system a s<juroe <jf Impregn- 
I able strength In times of financial stress. 

By the wise use of Its great powers and 
facilities it wuuld be able to absolutely 
prevent the recurrence in the United 
States of a widespread bank panic. It 
would add to the stability of our busi- 
ness in every line and give us a bank- 
ing and a financial system equal to any 
in the world. 



GOVERNOR DENIES 



Tellin;? Dr. Mayo He Was Candidate 
for Presidential Nomination. 

St. Paul. Minn.. Dec. 16.— Governor 
Johnson yesterday emphatically denied 
the statement sent out from Rochester 
Saturday to the effect that he had 
stated positively to Dr. Mayo of that 
place that he was a candidate for 
the Democratic nomination for presi- 
dent. The Rochester papers printed a 
long interview with Dr. Mayo In which 
the alleged statement of the governor's 
position was set forth. 

"I think Dr. Mayo must have been 
misquoted." said the governor, "for I 
told him that I am not and do nat 
expect to be a candidate. I told him 
that many of my friends had urged J.:e 
to be a candidate, but I have en- 
deavored to have them stop the agt- 
tatlon." 



TWO YOUNG MEN LOSE 

LIVES IN TRAGIC MANNER. 



MUST SHOW CAUSE. 



Kennedys Laxative Oough Syrup cau.-<es 
a free y^t gentle action of the bowels, 
through which the cold Is forced out of 
the system. Children like it. Ail druy^'i^ts. 



910.00 — (^lilcago to New York — $10.00. 

Th»« very low race Is in effect now via 
the Erie railroad. Full information from 
E. R. Porch. T. P. A.. St. Paul, Minn. 



Xew Orleans, Dec. 16.— Hawkins 
Norton, customs agent of the Illinois 1 
Central railroad, and Walter Grima, i 
a prominent young cotton broker, both: 
lost their lives in a tragic manner 
yesterday while members of a hunting 
party at the Rigoliets, twenty-flve 
miles from New Orleans. 

Norton was in a blind with Hariy 
S. Buckner, commercial agent of the 
Big Four railway, waiting for a shot at 
some wild ducks. Buckner says that in 
some unaccountable way his gun was 
discharged, blowing off the top of 
Norton's head. 

Grima. in company with Audley M. 
Post, commercial agt-nt of the Southern 
Pacific railroad, attempted to cross the 
Rigoliets when their skiff capsizei. 
Both were taken out in an unconscious 
condition and Grima could not be re- 
suscitated although the other members 
of the party worked ovfer him for a 
long tim«. 



Timber dealers Enjoined From Cut- 
ting Trees of Settlers. 

Judge Cant has ordered Peter Trader 
and Martin Bros., defendants in an ac- 
tion brought by Ulrlck .Samuelson, a 
settler, who Is endeavoring to have a 
timber conveyance corrected by the 
court, to appear Saturday, Dec. 21, and 
show cause why they should not be 
restrained from cutting from Samuel- 
son's land any timber but that 
suitable for saw lags. A temporary 
injunction is in effect until the matter 
is determined. 

Samuelson claims that through his 
mistake and Inability to comprehend 
the terms of the contract the defend- 
ants appear to have the right to cut 
and remove all the timber Instead of 
that suitable for saw logs. He claims 
; that the entire amount of timber ia 
\ worth much more than he was paid 
under the contract as it now stands. 




GETS SMALL VERDICT. 



Jury Awards Nick Rageeith Dam- 
ages in Sum of $500. 

A verdict of J500 In favor of Nlok 

Ragecich against the Shenango Furn- 

j ace company was returned late Satur- 

I day afternoon in Judge Cant's room 

after the jury had deliberated over the 

evidence about four hours. Ragecich 

I was employed as a miner In the She- 

I nango mine. 

; He alleged that while taking timbers 
i out of the timber shaft in the mine la^t 
1 April he slipped on some ice at the 
i edge of the shaft and fell a distance 
I of several feet, causing injuries that 
I prevented him from working. Regecich 
; claims the company did not properly 
[ safeguard the place. He sued for $1,999 
; damages. 

I Ragecich was represented by C. B. 
j Adams and J. W. Austin and the ds- 
I fendant company by E. C. Kennedy. 

I De Witt s Carbolized Wiich Haz 1 Salve. 
I Salve. Get De Witt's. Sold by drugglbta. 



r 



rms and back. I 
ifortable chairs I i I 

$29.50 I U 






THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY. DECEMBER 16, 1907. 




E3EC39 



FIRST OF 
COIJSNAP 

Hockey Enthusiasts Hope 

for Continuation of 

Zero Weather. 



OLD LEAGUE IBEAULIEU 



CurlingClub Again Forced 

. to Postpone Opening 

Festivities. 



The hockey enthusiasts rejoice. Cold 
■naps have cx>me and gone thus f^r 
this f"a-i. tut It is believed the present 
touch of Arctic weather 
article fti-tl "i'l Mi-k t'«'i' 



IS REVIVED 

J. M. Lamb is President 

of the tilorthern 

League. 

• '" '■ 

Meeting of Northwestern 

Baseball Men is 

Held. 



OUTOF CITY 

Will Meet Andrew Dan- 

ielson on Mat in About 

a Month. 



The old Northf-rn 1« ague, the organiza- 
tion which fed baseball to the funs of 
Is the clear I the Northwest befon the disastrous un- 
a few day's hon with the Copper country was made 



or long enough at leai-t lu form ice In 'two years ago. was reorganized yester- 
ttoe rinks. | day at a nietting h* Id in the St. Louis 

Tilt Duluth Curling club was to have 
opemd Its season ^^aturday night. The 
meml^ers were dotwned to disap-poinl- 
anent again. Tht warm weather Satur 
day left what ice there was in the rink 
tn wi-f-tchvd condition, and another 
postiK>!i*nKnt ni Vi\>; festivities to mark 
the c'p-nijig of the s€as»on was neces- 
eery. 

At Athletic park, where an open air 
rink has bten laid out for the North- 
ern £uid other amateur hockey teams 
of the city, some Ice was formed last 



hotel. Those present were: A. H. Pul- 
ford and J. M. LAnib of Winnipeg; W. 
B. Price, representln,? Fargo and Grand 
Forks, ;ind .\. W. h iiehnow of Duluth. 
Tlie f< ll.'vvii'.g ofl^ic rs were elected: 
Trtsi 1 ;.t and s?t crt t iry. J. M. Lamb; 
vice ["rcsultnt, W. K Frice, treasurer. A. 
VV. Kuehnow. 

The meeting was called here on short 
notice. Dr. Glass called oft the post- 
poned mecetlng of t lie Northern-Copper 



Wrestlers Talk Much. 

But There Are Few 

Matches. 



RAILROAD'S 
Ng^ IDEA 

Rock Island to Use Motor 

Cars on Indianoia 

Branch. 

Steel Cars With Speed 

Records for the Branch 

Lines. 



week, but ii nielted away in the high Country league, whlea was to huye been 
temperature of Friday and Saturday, held liere yesterday, i s there was nothing 



Flooding was begun again today, and 
the t<c»y!* hope to "be able to practice by 
the latter part of this wt*k. Games 
will probably be arranged for the holi- 
day season, and the boys hope to have 
a few days for practitie before Christ- 
mas. 

The unsea-sonable weather has been j 
tiho onlv drawback on the free public 



to come up for consideration. The Win- 
nipeg delegates started for Duluth, how- 
ever, picking up Mr. Price at Fargo, 
and the thr»e telepl oned A. W. Kueh- 
now of their coming Saturday night, so 
the metting was hastily arranged for 
yesterday. 

The circuit question Is still in the air. 
The organization wai thought necessary 
at this time, however, in order that 



skating rink, on the London road parki^^en the Northern league makes re- 
property at Twelfth avenue east. The'nuesi for permission to enter St. Paul 
ground has been laid out for well over j and Minneapolis, at the met-ting of the 
A week some ice was formed ai one American as-sociailon in Cnicago during 
time, but nothing could be done until I 'he holiday.^, it may . o so as an organlza- 
a continued cold snap should come. 



tlon. instead of as Individual team own- 
ers 



and It is believed that now the Nortel The chances are bilght for the North- 



Shure Skating club may go ahead withjern league gainln 



his arrangements for the opening. 
Toiiiffht a meeting of the Canadlanb 



Twin Cities. Mike 

Lennon aro both very agreeable 



g admittance to the 
C mtiilton and George 



to the 



of Duluth, who formtrly played hockey ; scheme, a.id are delng ♦^/^ry'*?^"^ ^P^' 

Y 1 S'Ible to have the other. American asso- 



In the Dominion, -will be held at the 
M. C. A. building on East Superior! 
street, to talk ovc-r the situation In 
Duluth, with a view to organize a team. 
There are a number of fcrmer Cana- 
dian stars In Duluth, and it is be- j 
Uevtd a seven of them would rank high j 
aniing the amateurs of the Head of thej 

- >w of last Friday was of little 
a> e to the ski club, as most of it 

melt<Ld away, and the remainder has 
frozen solid. The ski enthusiasts have 
plenty of time >"et, however, and are 
not worrying over a lack of snow. 
Tht y know there is ple-tny on the way, 
arid it will be here be^fore the club 
tourn<iunent, Jan. 12. 



elation magnates t ive their consent, 

which will probably be oblaln»-d at the _ . _ _ 

Chicago meeting. .'-everal other cities gether, tho little fellow has everything 
Northwest have made ap 



Andrew Danielson and W. H. Be«.u- 

lleu, the heavyweight wrestlers, will 
not get together for a time at least. 
Kid I'aul, who has been working with 
Bc-aulieu, called at The Herald to say 
that Beaulieu Is out of the city and 
wUl not return for three weeks or a 
month. The $2.i, whirti Danielson has 
posted a-s a forfeit and side tet for a 
.match with Beaulie^u will be taken 
down, but it will be reatly to go up 
again just as soon as Beaulieu re- 
turns. 

•Peaulieu will certainly take Daniel- 
son up as soon as he returns to tlie 
city," said Kid Paul. 'He has been 
koking for a match with Danielson, 
and Issued his challenge a few 
wf«ks ago. in all good faith, but 
he was forced to leave immediately 
afterwards. When he returns, if Dan- 
ileson is still willing and has the $2.=i, 
Beaulieu will go on with him at any 
time or place." 

The wrestlers of the city are work- 
ing their jaws like two old women, dis- 
cussing village affairs over the back 
fence, but as far as real business Is 
concerned, there's nothing doing. 
Mauritz Harris heroically stands to the 
front ami challenges the world at any 
weight, said world consisting of Duluth, 
Superior and Proctor. Harris is an all 
right wrestler at 131 pounds. He can 
throw anything in this district at that 
weight, hands down, but his talk of 
meeting ht-avyweights doesn't go. 

People will not pay money to see an 
ill-matched paJr wrestle. When a light- 
weight and a heavyweight get to- 



through the 

plication for membe f hip in tlie league, 

and a full eirrtiit will be possible. 

whiilur ilu- Tuiii t itits are entered or 
not. 



SKATE NEARLY 
HUNDRED MILES 

Two Men Make Trip 

From Grand Forks to 

Crookston on Ice. 



DATE FOR STATE 
BOWLERS' MEET 

Annual Gathering Will 

be Held in Twin Cities 

In March. 



to gam and nothing to lo.se. If he wins 
the people say, "Isn't he a wonder?" 
and if he losen, they pass It off with, 
•'Well, the big fellow was too heavy, 
anyway." Harris is undoubtedly out 
for a reputation, but he can't get any 
mc»re than he already has at the Head 
of the Lakes. Nobody cares to dispute 



Des Moines, Iowa, Dec. 16.— The tect 
of the Ganz steam motor car, on the 
Indaanola branch of the Rock Island, 
during the pa^t week. Is attracting 
much attention from steam and electric 
railroad men. While the car was tested 
aut to a limited degree on the Rock 
Island lines out of Chicago, a few- 
weeks ago. It is still in the experimen- 
tal stage. 

It is expected that the car now In Des 
Moines will be used permanently on the 
Indianoia branch, if it is a .success, but 
before it is regularly installed in the 
service here it v\ill be used on other 
sections of tlie Rock Island for experi- 
mental purposes. 

The car for the Indianoia service is 
the first l>ought by the Rock Island 
lines. It costs $16,00(1, and its makers 
ahippetl it on under a strong guarantee. 
The Ldll is not payable until all that Is 
claimed for the car is proven. And i 
what is claimed for it is t-nough to In- 
sure successful operation. 

The Dts Moines-Indlanola branch 
w-as chosen as the test route becau-se 
it contains a 1 per cent grade, and the 
■makers of the car placed great stress 
on the ability of the vehicle to negoti- 
ate such a grade at thirty miles an 
hour. In tests at Chicago, over practi- 
cally level track, the caj- made forty- 
five miles an hour, ten miles above Uie 
guarantee. 

Tlie First Car. 

Representatives of Ganz & Co., the 
German c-oncern that controlled the 
patent which found its solution in the 
brain of Rudolph Ganz, decided several 
months ago to open an American 
branch of the bu.siness. This Idea was 
carrie-d out and the Railway Motor Car 
company of New York was established. 
This car bought by the Rock Island is 
one of the first turned out at the new 
factory. 

The niakprs of the S'team motor car 
claim for it that it will prove economi- 
cal. They contend that the work of 
carrying a half hundred passengers 
can be aocojnplished at a much less 
expense tlian is entailed with the or- 
dinary methcKl. If this statement is 
verified unde-r tests, and comfort ap- 
pears also to be secured, the hint 
comes from Chicogo that more motor 
cars will follow. 

It Is to the credit of the Ganz cari 
that it is built of steel. This and its, 
weight of thirty-eighht tons should] 
reassure any passenger of unusual 
rafety. .Something greatly out of the 



M. HENRICKSEN JEWELRY CO^ Providence Bldg., 4th Ave. W. 

IDEAL GIFTS FOR 
CHRISTMAS 

7 Business Days Before Christmas 

Have you thought about it? Counted the 
shopping days before Christmas? There are not 
many days left — and there are also many pres- 
ents to buy. And you will probably recall how 
rushed and anxious you were as Christmas drew 
near last year — maybe had to make a selection in 
a hurry that was not as satisfactory as it might 
have been. This little notice is just a reminder to 
you that it is high time to begin planning. Let 
our store help— you will find many a beautiful and exquisite article here now that will oc 
gone later. We have prepared for a big Christmas trade, have bought courageously and 
must sell courageously. ^^^ 

WE BUY FROM MANUFACTURERS, AND SAVE MIDDLEMAN'S PROFIT. 




the fact that Harris Is the premier 

lightweight of this district. He's tackled j^rdlinVry 'woufd" have to" be e'nc'ounter>.Mi 
everybody with any pretentions of l>«- ! before such a coach would leave thej 
ing a wrestler, and has beaten themi^jjijg ^^ji should derailment occur the 
all. But he should be content to stick gja^^lllty of construction would com? I 
to his cla.«w«, and If he can't find anyL^ ^j^^ gjj ^f the occupants. There 
more worlds around Duluth to conquer, I ^.^,yj(j ^e much less danger than in 
there are a few wrestlers In the coun- jhe ordinary coach used on the short 
try who might be willing to pick up a'nnpa. 




112.00 
Gold Filleo. 
R!chly Engraved Hunt- 
ing Case. Guaranteed ?0 
Years. Finely Jeweled. 
Eljrln or WaJtham Move- 
ment. 








125.00 
14K Solid Gold. 
Engine Turned or Plain 
Hunlin;? Case. 15 Jev,?eled 
M'althaTi Movement. 



Polished 
Elgin or 



$17.00. 
14K G<ild Filled. 
Richly Engraved Hunting Case. 
Guaranteed i;5 yei^rs. 15 Jeweled 
Elprin r-r Waltham Movinent. 



EVERY WATCH HAS OUR PERSONAL GUARANTEE 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

Anything pictured here for- 
warded immediately, postage 
prepaid, on receipt of the price, 
and delivery guaranteed. 



Prices Are Irresislible— 
In Fact They Spell 

Economy 
in the Truest Form. 



Large \eiv Illusiratcd Catalog Free 

Send us your name and ad- 
dress on a postal card and we 
will mail at once our New 
Catalog. 



Every article sold is fully guaranteed, and we'll cheerfully refund money if any article pur- 
chased -"does not prove just as rejtresented^ 



OPEN 

EVENINGS 

UNTIL XMAS. 



M. HENRICKSEN JEWELRY CO^^, 

330 West Superior St., Avenue West and Superior Street. 



Christmas GUIs Bought Now Will be Laid Away Until You Want Them. 



*."■ 



IK 

few cents by taking a beating from 
him. Perhaps they can do the beat- 
ing. 



LIGHTWEIGHT . 
KNOWS GAME 



■iilay afternoon 
. of t!ie Grand 

i.i'iiiiK n. John 



Cr(;«7k.-.lc:i, [-tc. !*' 
T>:'-vikj!-e Ahlonh. !'< 
Firks Times, ami .. 
Jeii«b of tiif same p: 
Cr("« ki?t<.:,. '.rt^'ing skat^ . , ■ . 
tuij. (.' (.■: -fuur niiies up tiif Htd 

Lrf.k.. ru ii.« place, a feat that has 

not been accomplished within tiie n cul- 
lection of any rrsiiltnt of tins city. 

The two start* ■! :i..in Grand Forks at 
9 Ci'cl'"'»-k .<iHnl, ■. .■,'•: :ii!ipr. and .^toppfd 
at F' !■ dinner, arriving 

hert .iftt-rnoon. skating 

exiictiv .^.:'.»-:i iiu;ir^. cr an average of 
thirteen and one-half rtiilea an hour, 
which is v» ry last time. considerlnK tho 
diffjcultits which they faced. 

Tht-re wa.« m< >- "-■ 'f-^s s!;,.w :\V. the 
way, and ir. ■■■ ■ • - ':■■ ■'■'■■ ^'^ 

hori'iycombfrd. ... .- - r ^^ a.-^ (i. ii i:i 
»f»>:s all the way up, maklnR it an ex- 
trt Tiic-ly danE-'TOus feat to accomplish. 
AtFl;p"h*r. ci;izens tried to dls?.--'.!.!!'.. thcia 
from contiiiuiMK the journey. 

Btith men ar;v<d here in g*)e>d condi- 
tion, tiiough Jorit s was wet, having 
bn-I:<-n through tSi*' ice in shallow water, 
onr>. rhf'v took the evenlnK train bark 
to (Jrand Forks. A party of four starl»'d 
from Grand Forks Sunday mornliiK, t>ut 
the other two itave the trip up afttr 
■kaii-'isf ;ibuui ten miles. 



St. r.-iul. tK'c. 1«.- At a meeting of the 
executive committee of the State Bowling 
ass<tciation here ye st -rday. it was decided 
to hold the next state tournament during 
the wetk beginning March W. The place 
has not yet been elrcidcd upon, but an 
alley commiltc-o. c mslstlng of E. W. 
Hull and F. W. Fr- derickson of .Minne- 
apolis and He luy M irlin and J. N. Bell- 
er of St. Paul, was appointed to receive 
bids. It is practlc; Uy certain that 
tournament will be held in tlie Twin 
Cnies. It is undei stood that the Ar- 
< Ml], leople of Minneapolis and the Con- i 
i.id o: St. Paul wi I make bids for 

te;;inuunent. .^ v, i . .v,^ i he. is employed In the shops 

In order to Indue the beewlers of the ■ 3^1,^^ j^ ^ young man with a long rec- 
small towns to e:nt« r. special prizes will ' ^^^ p„ ^j,g j^^^^i Before coming to Min- 
he offered to teamj entering outside of nt.sota he was up in the Canadian North- 
St. Paul and Mlnr eapuiis. Duluth and 1 ^.^.gf^ a^j for two years, he held the 
Stillwater. A prize of not more than $50 ! iigiitwdght wrestling championship of 
will be given In the five-men event, while Saskatchewan. At the present lime, he 
$25 will be given f >r the double team, j j^ ^ot in the best of condition, but is 
Ttama competing f )r the special prjzcs v^f»rking out at the Y. M. C. A. gym- 
will al5<o compete f ir the regular prizes 1 nasium at Proctor and expects to get in 



PASSPORTS FOR 
IMMIGRANTS 



with Muritz Harris casting about for 
wrestlers worthy of his mettle and going 
sof ar as to challenge heavyweights, a 
the ' lightweight has appeared on the horizon 
and expressed a willingness to keep the 
champion busy for a few minutes some 
,v,, evening. He Is Charles Setter of Clcve- 
I land, Ohio, now located at Proctor, where 



the- same Jis the ether teams, 

The association jilans to make the 
next tournament tie biggest and most 
successful ever he d. Special induce- 
ments will be oft- Ted in the way of 
prizes and enterl linment. The next 
meeting of tlie coi imittee will be held 
there Jan. 5. 



Bemidji Defeated. 

The Foss'.on hifj;i school basketball 
team defeated the Itemldji team at Foss- 
te.n Friday, last. b\ a score of 20 to 13. 
The victory puts Fosston well in tho 
runnins: for the hisii school championship 
of Xorlhwestcrn Mmnesota. 




ust a grand old Beverage- 
or people who appreciate a 
mild stimulant that is at 
the same time nutri- 
tious and healthful. 

Always the Same Good Old Blaiz 





go* id shape In about three weeks 

When he has worked into wrestling 
form. Setter w-ill chalfenge the light- 
weights of the Head of the I>akes and 
there is no doubi that Harris will take 
him up. Setter weighs in at ISl and Har- 
ris at 1.31. The difference is not great and 
the match is a good pre.spect. That Har- 
ris knows the game, none of the light 
weights of the district, who have met 
him. will de-ny. and It is said that Setter 
is well wiseel up on the ethics nf wrest- 
ling and will give the champion a good 
go. 



lines. 

The car which the Rock Island has 
purchased Is Hfty-six feet long over 
end sills, and the car frame and body 
Is of steel plate. The car Is mounted 
on two four-wheel trucks, the rear 
truck being of the ordinary passenger 
car type, its only noticeable feature 
being an axle driven air compress 5r 
mounted In the truck and driven from 
! the rear axle. This is an idea of tho 
builders which is not approved of oy 
the railroad company, and a regul.ir 
steam driven compressor has been put 
on the car, so that If necessary It can 
be used. 

'riio SJejiin Motor. 

The forward truck is moditled to con- 
tain the steam motor, which is a com- 
pound engine of compact type, almoM 

wholly enclosed and protected. On tho amendments to our laws adequate pro 
engine shaft is a pinion which engages | vision should be made for the Issuance 

a gear on the rear ^le of the leading 

truck. The forwarffhxle has no driv- 
ing to do. but all eight wheels of tho 
car are used in the operation of the air 1 
brakes, which are of the latest type 1 
of automatic brakes. j 

There are large water tanks carried ; 
under the car, one on each side, these : 
tanks holding a sufficient amount torj 
a run of fifty miles. There are also un- ' 
der the car tanks for compressed air, 
gas storage, etc. j 

Passengers are to enter the car from ' 
there are convenient 



that country; or, if that cannot b« 
done, that the Mexican border be pai- 
trolled. 



Are Urged as Means of 
Keeping Out Undesir- 
able Aliens. 

Washington, Dec. 16. — In his an- 
nual repeirt, Frank P. Sargent, com- 
missioner general of immigration and 
naturalization, urges that through an 
international conference or through 



of proper passports to persons coming 
to America. By this means, such or- 
ganizations as the "Black Hand soci- 
ety" could not gaia a foothold here 
because the passport would have to 
boar the record of the alien. This 
system would put an end to the "white 
slave traffic." Among the recommen- 
dations made by Commissioner Sargent 
are the foHof^-ing; 

That a marine hospital surgeon 
should be stationed at the principal 
ports of embarkation abroad to ex- 
amine aliens before they start for, club, which met at the puhhc librai-y, 
America. jsaid that the people sliould have scme- 

That surgeons and inspector.^, males thing to say about the )?ervlce they 
and females, be placed on vessels f>f| received from railroads, inasmuch as 
the principal steamship lines to ex-! , . . t..,.,i« 

amine incoming aliens. j 25 per cent of the value of he r<..ed8 

That arrangements be perfected for ] were contributed by the public .n tne 
the detention of members of criminal ; way of land giants. He spoke of II19 



That a harmonious arrangement b« 
made v.ith the Canadian government 
respecting the enforcement of the im- 
migration law of that country and th« 
United States. 

Miller Scores Railroads. 

Clarence B. Miller, in an address da« 
llvered yesterday before the Question. 



claF.ses who seek to come to the United 
States. 

That a treaty be negotiated with 
Mexico respecting immigration through. 



improper discrimination shown by th«- 
roads in the matter ef freight rates to 
tho Twin Cities and Duluth. About- 
fifty people were present at the meetng. 



Blalz Beer may be on sale from the keg, or bottled— or 
both. You may be sure of the very cream of quality if you 
insist on BLATZ. In many places where Blat/. signs are not 
displayed, their bottled brands are on sale. Wliether in Club, 
Cafe or Dining Car, ask for "Blatz." 

Duiulh Branch, L«Kt dViHUE A^iD RA1LR010 ST. 

PHONE e2. 



VAL BIJ^t2 IREWIN C:CO.. MI LVWVUKEE 



CIRLEY AS CHAMPION. 



Joke in the Twin Cities. 

"The Dutch Uncle" of the MinneapolU 
Journal has an oft-expressed opinio.^ of 
Curley Ullrich's fighting ability, which Is 
anything but complementary to the pride 

of Superior. Every time Curley appears 
in Minnvapeilis, he cejmes in for a^ gt-ner- 
<jus iK.>rtion of anvil rings and* sleelgo 
dents, which keep him before the lime- 
light as a lime. The German relative of 
ti;e sporting world hands Curley the fol- 
lowing in his latest outburst of pent-up 
feelings agaln.«t the man, who mad*? 
trouble for Jimmy Potts: 

"The other night duwn at the Dewey 
one of ihf heavy tragedians made a great 
hit, just prior to the Jack Je)hns<>n- 
"Thunderbeilt" Smith exhibition by In- 
troducing Curley Ullrich, the Superior 
screamer as "champion of the Middle 
West.' 

•This was the greatest Joke panned 
out duriMg the evening. Curie y may have 
won a championship of the Middle West 
at bean bags or camera busting. Dur 
hardly as a boxer. Around town Tie is 
known as the 'Oil of Mustarel Man"— the 
chap who tried to bite a hole In the stage 
fU or ai Normania hall the night Benja- 
min Franklin Tremble gave him a dose 
out of the wrong bottle. 

""Curlcy"s tongue was so badly 1 urne d 



the rear, where there are 
step.s leading up to a rear platform, 
which is equipped with hand brake ati'l 
is lighted for night service. 

The interior of the car is handsomely 1 
finished in plain oak, with olive green ] 
h€<id lining. There are very large single j 
windows between each pair of seats. | 
the »eats being finished with rattan and 
placed for conve-nk-nt seating of as 
Superior Fighter is a Standing larg« a numljer of passengers as pos- 
*" ^ == sible, the main body of the car accom- 

modating thirty-six, while sixteen more 
can be seated in the smoking room, 
which is separated by a partition. There 
is also a baggage room of 7 feet 3 in- 
ches, which will be a great accommo- 
dation in branch line service. 

Steam Generator Tumps. 
Forward of the baggage room Is the 
compartment in which Is located the 
stoam generator pumps, the operating 
mechanism and appliances for the use 
of the engineer and fireman. The coal 
bunker is Just outside and aliead of 
this compartment, but opening into it, 
so that coal Is readily accessible for 
firing purposse. This bunker will hold 
a sufficient amount of coal for about a 
tifty-niile run. 

The passenge-r portion of the car is 
trimmed with brass continuous basket j 
racks with very handsome brass fit- 
tings for lighting by acetylene gas, 
this being gt^nerated on the car as , 
needed by the Adlake system, the ma- , 
chinery for which is placed In the toilet 
room. I 

The builders guarantee that without 
the traller.it will make and maintain; 
.». . w ., ... 11 V. .V a speed of thirty-five milts per hour. 1 

that he couldn't tell how good he was "■ ' , ' Y ...o^ir nnfl snpe^d nf twentv- 1 
for almost three days and he came near , on a level track, anel "^'^^ °' ^^^"^ . , 
choking to death with the pent-up in- I four miles per hour on 1 per cent grade, | 
formation. <''urley as a champ Is too fifteen miles per hour on l»,i per cent j 
good a crack to be sprung at the tall | grade; with a light trailer attached the 



Through 
Tourist 
Sleepers 



To 



California 



Via 



Burlington 
Route 




Regatta June 27. 

New York, Dec. 15.— The stewards of 
the Intercollegiate Rowing association 
have decided upon Saturday, June 27. for 
the intercollegiate regatta at Pough- 
keepslo In 190!S. 



i made at Chicago on this car seem to ^ 
demonstrate that It w ould be able to i 
carrv out this guarantee without any | 
question. As a matter of fact, consid- , 
erably more than the above speeds 
have been reached on level tracks. 



Law Leads Ames. 

Ames, Iowa. Dec. Ifi.— The Iowa State 
College Football team, Saturday night, 
elected as captain for 19<)8. Fred Law, the 
big left end. I..aw is a Junior classman 
of the veterinary department. 



Here's Good Advice. i 

O S Woolever, o-ne of the best known ■ 
merchants of Le Raysvllle, N. Y., says: 
"If you are ever troubK>d with piles, ap- 
ply Bucklen's Arnica Salve. It cured 
me of them for good 20 years ago."' 
Cures every sore, woiind, hum or abra- . 
tlon, 26c at aU drug stores. 1 



^Weekly, from St. Paul and Minneapolis via Omaha, Kansas City and 
the Santa Fe Route. 

f Daily from Omaha (with connections from Twin Cities) via scenic 
Colorado and Salt Lake City. Personally conducted tourist excursions 
almost every day. 

^These Tourist Sleepers are thoroughly comfortable and have all the 
conveniences of the Palace Sleeper at half the cost. 

Send for printed matter containing time table and tell- 
ing all about the route, Just drop me a postal to-day. 

F. M. Rugg, Northwestern Passenger Agent, Germania Life Puildiug, St. Paul, Minn. 

3984 Corrected 



Budintifon 






\ 



r\--i. 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



11 



MUCH GOOD 
TOJESULT 

The Local Harbor is 
Sure of Liberal Appro- 
priation. 

Capt. McDougali Returns 
From the Washing- 
ton Convention. 



"In my opinion there is n> i > ii; 
tl; It cunsrr*?j*s will grant an annual 
r" •- '■ ' harbors appropriation •»£ 
t a period of ten years, and 

1 im coiuldent that Duluth will gret a 
very fair share of this." said Capt. 
Atexandor MeDougrall this morning. 

Capt. McEk'Ugall has just return ci 
from Wu.-}hington. where, in company 
with <"K H- -Siinonds of Duluth. and a 
delegu - ; . r men. lie at- 

tended thf Ndlfual K'.Vcrs and Har- 
b.>r-. .ni.i r.n prf«>n) ting the needs 

the convention. 
* ■ 1 ! . I ii 1 i i.<-v made a very 

Bt; iiation of the facts before 

t! :~ '1 Governor J-ihn 

A J - J. Hiil, and It 

is . a-s a result, this Uar- 

b'l: '••11 when it comes , to a 

d; I appropriation. 

, . . ,. [larticular. nc- 

C" ; »rts received from Wash- 

iBi-: very .ihle and compre- 

toti he subject in 

hi*:.-. '.se attention of 

liJii h' marks came in 

f "" » '1 m.-cussion and c >in- 

J jun-son. Mr. Hill md 

very good talks,' >:~>n- 

' ! > lugall, and 1 am i"ur3 

htfore the nation.il 

. be ji: ■. e of splendid 

The fa ^ave them can- 

Itflling their attention and 

interest, and our side of 

pre.sented in such a coni- 

-'^" ■'■"' ivound that 

■rtainly fare! 

• ;.;•■.>* v a division of | 

i. Superior and the 
"ive.s tr.in \Visoon.iln' 
: a wot' I if praise for, 
"he cause. | 
- to uheth-er 
-ure providing tor an 
ttl'«n ot $:.t> Hui) iini) f,,r 

a , ig ovt-r t.-: .11 

'">•■ :;ter. bu' - ..... ..i.s 

.y will ' -n at ihe' 

"igre-^-, HI i there is 
: :y's mind but what 

i-sked for will be 
I 1 Supt-rior ha 1 a 

•T 

















by 








nada. 




. 




:o Jo 
■ rbors , 


,*,. .«, 


V. 




' -ft I 




in 




•-, , 








ni'-moer.-? ir"!i. ain-'f'.-nt 
c-ountry. I do not know 




jus: 




: "■ ' >ajmis.sion wdl * 




be. 


bii 


\ e that Minne- 

i\ ill be given a 








on it. It is im-' 
\\" .should be fairly rep- 

ihe more men we have m I 
>n, the better are our 

■-'"ing a lil>eral part of. 

■ ' ' 1* ff.ivern- . 

-!til.- vvej 

.4ioii. Kiiis Mr all liiiie' 

,T a centra! < anal being 

■ •■■ ■ - ■' ■• ■ '■:. While 

• . : Duluth 

lor in 




i 




•l-le -x, >t 




the 


ur 


I b' •■,ar :\\<y 



V'';ir,-i 



THE liKEAT BinLESHIP 



;,^ l.» 






■■■" 'III [n'ar'i 

iinif out and 

and run- 

.1 snugly 

. m the s;i- 

n th.'. era- .; 



\)n lior-< \r.- I.iftod. 

siiip.-i cLine the whirl 

am driven windlasses 

■ Ilk of lifting anchor 

v.* links were bent 

■^ \'.y fathoms of 

!■ on pjch ship. 

^ :.-\ •- -he 

fouling in the 

■ '■"' tide. With 

r up," the 

iOt.H uad begun al- 

> on each of the 

Liig atrea:ns of water 

ufw>n the climbing chain 

i and 
sur- 

• 'f "i.- ■■ >'iirnn, 

1 , ■ . 1 : - 



chors folded oa their bow«. T^en 
came for each nivigator and captain a 
bVt of- diftlcult mane'uvering at cloye 
quarters. The s -veep of the ebbing tide 
had turned eve*y ship's stem to th-e 
west, and it Wiis necessary to swing 
each vessel around to take position for 
the eastATurd »t trt to the oapes. One 
by on*-, th« oil er armorclada hoisted 
their position i-ennanta to the fore- 
truck, signifyint. that they were ready 
to ge-t under v* ay. The flagships of 
each of the thre? divisions subordinate 
to the first, dk not hoiat their pen- 
nants until the last anchor chains of 
the immediate ( ommand were stowed. 
The beat of giant copper bladed, twin- 
proptMlers churnt-d the roadstead waters 
to milky white as they maneuvered for 
the start. 

Ships in IVtsitiun. 

When at last all si.\teen ships were 

in position, in .single column •natural 

^ order and dista ice," 4(»<j yards apart, 

the engine room indicators, far down 

in the depths of the steel protected 

decks, showed 'full speed ahead." For 

the purpose of this cruise full spee«l 

means an easy pace of ten knots an 

hour, and it wa.< on this basis that the 

ships bade farewell to the great crowds 

gathered on tht Old Point Comfort 

-shore and mov.-d away from their 

familiar anchorage ground. As the 

j big vessels gained headway they one 

' after another pi *ked up their "bones" 

' from the furrov ed wake of the Hag- 

j ship. 

j The president', yacht was well down 

' the bay when he battleship column 

j began ti> move. > doming to «inchor near 

the "tail of th< horseshoe," as the 

water tormation aiwut Thihible shoal 

light is locally lUiown, the Mayflower 

again let go her anchors and stood by 

to rt-viciv the Paciiic bs-n,' •■M».radi». 

Ilevlfwf*! by Pre-*idt'nt. 

There was litt e time to wait bt;fore 
the wide-girthed hull of the Connec- 
! ticut. glimmering white, showed off the 
Quarter rail. Coi ling toward the May- 
Ilower. almost h n\ on. at the h<^ad jf 
far-Hung line, great clods of curllnj.? 
black smoke leaping from her tower- 
ing funntls, her rails manned with a 
half thousand si ilors in their nattiest 
suits of blue, w th marine guard, fuil 
uniformed and .^titT at ■attention" on 
the quarter deck, with the band play- 
ing the national anthem, with Admira: 
Evans on the after bridge, high ab->ve 
the main deck, with the Union Jack 
at the stem, the two-starred read ad- 
miral's ensign t.f blut- at the main 
truck and a si otless new American 
flag flutteiing fr >m theh tlagstaft" at 
the stern, the Connecticut presented a 
picture which fa riy thrilled those who 
saw it and set pitriotic pulses beating 
in quickening rl ythni. 

The president ifted his hat and tho 
spontant-ous chee- he voiced was quick- 
ly taken up by ot lers in his party. From 
his position on t le Mayflower's bridge, 
the president hid an untintirrupied 
view of the entire pageant. 

S«lu cs Be^in. 

Abreast of the presidential yacht, tlia 
Coiuiecucut begin her .series of sa- 
lutes. The mei at the rails, at thd 
word of command, raised their right, 
hands to their caps and h.-id thi m 
thus until the Maytlower was cleared. 
On the forward bridge Capl. Hugo Os- 
terhouse and tht fleet's navigation of- 
ficer, came to attention with a flourish 
if sword.«. Adi liral Evans and tne 
members of his itaft' .saluted similarly 
in turn from the after bridge, whila 
the marine guard, with p')iished 
rifles, stood mot onless at "preseat 
arms." Drums aboard the flagsnip 
were ruffling their tokens of respjc:, 
when at la.st cariie the strain.-^ of "The 
Star Spangled B mnr" floating acro3» 
the waves. 

Just bt-yond tht Mayflower the salut- 
ing cannona were brought into play and 
with twenty-one guns the flagship 
voiced her farew ;11 message, th^ wnlte 
globules of powtter smoke rising iikd 
filmy balloons f r )m either bow to be- 
come lost in the deep hued coal vapor 
whirling from tie glowing fires be- 
neath hissing bo lers. 

It was particularly fitting that the 
Connecticut should lead the greatest 
fleet ever .^ent f*om American shores. 
She is the product from stem to stern, 
from keel plate o fighting top, of the 
American naval establishment. De- 
signed at the navy dt-partnient in 
Washington and built at the Brooklyn 
navy yard, th,- "oniK-cticut represt»nts 
the highest- of fighting machine 

the navy ha., ^ .v . had. Her size meas- 
ured by the wat ;>r the great hull dis- 
places and not b/ carrying capacity la 
registered at 16, iW tons. The energy 
of her twin reciprocating engines is 
rated at 16.500 ho se-s and her estimated 
-peed of IS knol •« an hour was easily 
. xceeded on her trial trip. In armor 
ihe Connt-cticut is belted with eleven 
inches of wt-!l ii cb! invulnerable steel 
amidships '. er vital spots. 

This beh ^ .vay gradually to 

four inch*'- -m and stern. Her 

■ ■.-■mates at, pi >iected by seven inch- 
■ f hardened s eel. her main turrets, 
aiptical in form, are constructed of 
. .velvf inch steel, her secondary tur- 
rets by eight int hes of metal and her 
protective deck, bending over engine 
and ammunition rooms, has a three 
inch thickness. 

<;ivat lnfrea*e in natter>-. 

T;.. /atiery of he Connecticut stands 
IS a great increase in power over any- 
thing heretofore attempted on Ameri- 
can battleships. The latest pattern of 
45-calil>re i:i-lncl guns were mounted 
in her main turr* ts for the first time in 
the navy. In ad tiiton to four of these, 
carried twin shape in barbette turrets 
forward and afi. there are eight *5- 
callbre 8-inch gins in turrets on the 
broad.side and ai exceedingly powerful 
secondary battt ry mounted in case- 
mates on the main deck consisting of 
twelve 7-inch of 50 calibre. The cali- 
bre of a naval gun is the measure of Its 
length. The ln( rea.se of calibre has 
grown from 3.'> o 50 in the last few 
years. The 7-in:h guns on the Con- 
necticut and oth tr ve.i.sels of her type 
•re new In the n:.vy and are believed tj 
be the bf.st pieces of ordnance planned 
in a decade. 



IN winter no amount 
of warm clothing will 
make you safe if your vi- 
tality 15 low. Warmth inside 
is what you must have. 

Scotf s Emulsion 

of Cod Liver Oil supplies 
carbon to the blood and 
tissues and makes you 
warm and comfortable all 
over. It is a safeguard 
against colds and all the 
ills that follow them. 

Small, easily taken doses 
will do it. 

All DniraMls: SOc. aad $1.00. 



Reply to Alderman Moore. 

T.1 th.> Editor of The Herald: 

!' - -'v '■• V".'' m.in Moor-^'.s appall to 
•'nding Cf>rta'r. -.tiidi- ! 
i! : . allow me to .s.iv that 

il is most unfortouat»» for his candidate 
to he r-^oomniend' 1 by a man who !:as a 
rt'cord ag an '^ -t and unfair ani 

insulting to tb : ity of his f-llow 

iUz»-ns. A man . liu wants to bt* a lead- 
-r must Itf fair tnd just to his f«*liow 
iMin. Cheat met nevt-r were narrow- 
minded. A true dfsire. cominjf from th'> 
Njitom of the he irt. to help and uplift 
mankind will natirally not allow a man 
to wirk with untiir m<»ans. It will not 
allow him to coi tinually hint that the 
lawlfss eU-ment e eotfd the alderinf>n. as 
Ml Moore's res.^lntion insinuated, 

which wa.s viewe«i with suspicion by the 
■ ^ ■- ■•;' l.'-r sprint. 

1 not rlass the thousands of 
•;!►■!( wii.i .i'l not refuse to take a drink 
as drunkartJs aii« speak of them as a 
lawlfs.s elt-m.-nt vl.en. in fact, thev are 
-r>o,i law-abiding cltizt^ns. Our mayor 
.<!»ould not hint : t crimes he will com- 
bat in evt-ry possible way. when. In fact, 
our cit>- has hf-»-n one of the mo-^t order- 
ly for many yean as statUtics show us, 
and wh'-n the fa.-; remains that we never 
votf-d tur a man who would encourage 
crlm<-. L»n us be just and l«>t us admit 
that an offt-n.-e is sot a crime. Let us not 
damn all for a f.«w sinners. Tiier.» are 
many men amonK us who consider it a 
disgrace to sneak around like a thief to 
get a drink, l^et us not hrlnar our city 
info discredit by infamous actions and 
persecutions amoi gst ourselves, but let 
Us refl. .n and vot « for men who show a 
far more cultivate! sense of justice, such 
men as form the majority of our city 
council now. 

HANS SAX. 
Duluth, Dec. 1* 



THIS STORE WILL NOT BE 
OPEN TONIGHT, 

We do not wish to tire out our salespeople by 
needlessly long hours — you'll get best service here! 




1 ir-1 19 West Superior Street, Duluth, Miim., 



OPEN EV^ENINGS WEDNESD.\Y 
AND THEREAFTER. 

We will then, so far as possible, alternate shifts to 
keep our force In trim for the Immense day business. 



Seven More Days for Gift Buying ! 

The service of this store has never been so fine — the chances to make your Christmas money go far have never been so great 
as here now! That people appreciate it, is attested by the volume of business coming to us! 
Welfare organizations urge you to do shoppi ng early — and we urge you for your own good ; aside from humanitarian reasons, 
to shop early as you can. You'll get better service — ^better selections — and have richer choice of many unusual op portunities, 
such as are briefly hinted at below ! So do what you can tomorrow ! 



GLOVES 



The favorite gloves of Paris — 
the Centemeri and the TrefoXisse 
gloves, are here — also the mag- 
nificent Elite Mocha gloves for 
winter wear. 

Women know tliem and like 
them — pricfvs here $1.00, 
$1.25 and up to $4.25 |Hiir. 



Our Finest $1.25 and $1.50 Fancy Ribbons at 75c a Yard. .o.^K^'-':!* 



The finest of fancy ribbons — all the latest noveltle-; from 5 to 12 inches wide — ribbons that have sold up 
to 11.2.') and $1.50 the yard — you surely must have scan and admired them — go on sale tomorrow at 75c yard. 

Six Neck Ruches in Box. 25c. nULUTH'S Holly Ribbons and Novelties. 

Four hundred boxes dainty neck ruches — Christmas ribbons galore — all the latest 

six white or six assortec* LOVELIEST LACES novelties in all widths. 

Colors in liox— on sale ARE HET^E Baby Ribbons in holly 

here tomorrow 25c box. ^ * grceii or red. Ic and 2c yd. 



For men — for women — for 
children — there's no gift more 
acceptable than an umbrella. 
We've the kinds that give the 
most satisfaction. 

Children's Umbrellas, SOc to 
$2. Gift Umbrellas for wo- 
men and for men — at $2.50 
to $12.00. 



» A Pretty Silk Waist or Dress 
"^ Pattern Would Surely Please Her 




You'll be pleased — she'll be delighted 
If you get the pattern here — only tasty 
silks of merit find place in our stock — 
and they are priced lower than like Qual- 
ities are usually sold for! 

PACKED IN GIFT BOXES. 

You can get a wal«^t pan em of 
Wa^h .Silk for $1.50 — and It will 
l>o dainty and good — and from 
that, prices on waist patterns rl.se 
by easy stages up to $10. Ttie 
DrcHS Patterns range from $10 to 
$30 — no extra charge for the 
dainty box we put them in. 

Our line of the famous Haskell Black 
Silks is very strong just now — all the 
wanted qualities and weaves — in rich 
deep blacks and elegant finish. 




FOR .\ BL.\CK DRESS. 

Every weave that has a 
standing is shown in our col- 
lection — you are always sure of 
pleasing if you buy black for no 
woman ha* too many — deep rich 
black.s in the textures that giva 
bfSt satisfaction. 

7 yards !•< the average 
pnitera for a gown or 
suit — pay from 50c to $1 
a yd — s|H^cial values at 
$1. $1.25 and $1..50 a yd. 



SC.UIFIXG CREPES. 

"W'e show a most extensive 
line of these dainty materiaLs — 
designs that you have not seen 
before and will not find else- 
where — you'll l)e sure to admire 
them and eager to secure some 
for gifts. 

Use from 1 V^ to 2U yard.s 
for a scarf — they s^ll 
for 73c, $1.00. $1.2.5, 
$1.35 and $1.50 a yard. 



i 



GIFT LUGGAGE. 

Our third floor is rich in things 
for the traveler — Trunks, Su'.t 
Cases, Hand Bags, etc. Compare 
and see how much you savel 
GIFT SUIT CASES. SPECIAL $4.68 
Full stock Cowhide Suit Cai?es 
our grand leader — special holiday 
price $4.68. 

Extra Fittinp^ for Ba«9 
and Suit C^ses — Just in. 

WOMEN'S HAND BAGS, WITH 
FITTINGS, $13.50. 

Ladies' Hand Bag of fine grain 
leather, new shape — best bra.<-s 
mountings — full leather lined with 
ebony and nickel plated fittings. 
Complete $13.50. 

.Same as above in Gen- 
uine Alligator, $17.50. 



FOR 


ELDERLY 


LADIES. 


Pretty materials 


for huu.-^e 


gowns- 


— soft clinging wool 


cloths 


in pretty 


melange 


grays. 


modes and 


soft toned 


greens 






7 


yards for a 


gow^l 


42 


in. wddo— 75c yard. 



FOR THE GIRLS. 

A very desirable line of all 
wool goods at SOc and 59c the 
yard — also finer sorts up to 
silk and wool at $1.35 to 
$1.50 a yard. 

We can toll yon 
how much to buy. 




Give Oriental Rugs 

What could bring more lasting enjoyment to the whole house- 
hold and the friends? And Rug lovers will find here not the larg- 
est, but one of the very choicest of Rug stocks. 

Every Rug is a picked piece— every one of ttieni 
at a real reduction of $5 to $25 on re^^ular prices. 

$27.50 Bokhara $22.50 

A beautiful little Royal Bokhara 
of unusual texture and color — will 
grace any room and can be used as 
a table cover — chair cover or rug — 
was $27.50 — special price, $22.50. 

Large Royal Khiva $92^^ 

The soft dark reds are in evi- 
dence and combined as they are 
with soft greens and blues — make 
a very pleasing combination. How 
would this do for that dining room, 
the library or hall ? Regular price 
was $115. Can you duplicate it 
at $92.50? 

Superb American Rugs 

An immense rack displays the 
carpet sizes easily and quickly — 
you can see the best Rugs of the 
be.st makes to best advantage. 

Our fine Wiltons are exception- 
ally strong in designs and col- 
oring:s, the prices we guarantee. 



Special at $6.95 



Fifty finest quality Axminsters — the country's stand- 
ard — rich Oriental colors — 3 feet wide — wear guaran- 
teed — rich deep pile. We price these this week at. . . . 



$6.95 



»L\TERI.\LS FOR MEN'S 

House Coats 

With a Ladies' Home Journal pattern — and 2 "i^ yards of material — 
a frog and sewing silk — you can make a coat any man will be 
proud of. 

We liave plain, mi.xi-^d and fancy cloths — 
mannish looking stuffs that tailor best. 

The finest materials for the purpose are here at $1.50 and $2.00 
a yard. 



ACCEPTABLE NOVELTIES FOR 
THE HOME. 

Magazine Racks, etc., for den, 
living room or library, in natural 
and Mission oak, just arrived. 

MAGAZINE RACKS, $3.29. 

Choice of two finishes — two dif- 
ferent style Magazine Racks — 3 
feet high — 20 inches wide — three 
shelves and book trough. Special 
$3.29. 

UTILITY BOXES. 

Acceptable Boxes and Chests. 

The newest things in this line In 

g-^nuine red cedar and soft maple 

for shoes, waists, skirts and furs. 

Finely built Chest — of cedar 

— an ornament for any 

room — a big \alue — here $6. 



Special Sale of '*Pyro Expert" Sets 

Tomorrow we offer our finest pyrographic outfits at special 
prices! These are the best outfits made — imported by us through 
the Flemish Art Co. — even the novice can do more and better work 
with a good set you know It takes fine tools to do fine work. 



$1.98 



for $2.50 and 
$2.75 Expert Sets. 



$3.98 "Profession- 
al" Outfit, special. 



$2.98 



Toilet Articles and Sets 

Pretty little pieces for the dressing table — in German silver 
that positively will not tarnish, at 25c each — and in guaranteed 
sterling silver at 50c, 59c to $6.75. 

In toilet sets of Silverine. Ebony and Sterling Silver, we've 
many kinds, ranging from $3.75 up to $25. 



Christmas Stockings. 

Every pair in a dainty gift 
box — the prettiest stockings we 
ever saw — the best the best 
makers in France and Germany 
could send. 

Tlie gift hosiery In lace 
and cnibr«»ld«'r»»<l effects, 
and in >i1k range in 
price from $1.19. $1.25 
and up to $4.00 the itair! 

And we've some choice novel- 
ties at 75c. S9c and $100 the 
pair — and more staple styles at 
25c to 50c a pair 

Silk Underwear. 

Elegrant garments for the wo- 
man who wants the best of 
everything — prices range up to 
$3 a suit. 

Fancy li.sle vest.s — silk-lin- 
Islied or fancy crocheted 
Kannonts here at 50c to 
91..'>0 each. 

Picture Frames. 

Handsome little affairs of that 
gold-like French gilt — it doesn't 
tarnish. 

Pretty pictures in some of 
them or you can .".lip a 
photo in — prices range 
2."><' to $12."). 



I 



Give Handkerchiefs Bought Here ! 

We bought hundreds and hundreds of dozens — bought them nine and ten months ago — bought them so 

that we could offer values impossible elsewhere! 



35c Handkerchiefs 25c. 

Tomorrow we place on sale 63 
dozen of our regular 'SSc handker- 
chiefs at 25c each. 

Choose from plain white hand- 
kerchiefs, white with colored bor- 
ders or colored embroidery — 
choose from hemstitched, lace or 
embroidery edges, with plain cen- 
ters, all-over embroidery centers or 
embroidered corners. 

We'll put these Sik? Hdkfs. 
In with the 2.5c line tomor- 
row. Gel your pick of them 
early. 

Men's Handkerchiefs. 

Pure linen initialed kerchiefs at 
15c here. You can pay more for no 
better el-sewhere! 

Lots of others tliat men «in 
like at 10 cents to 50 cents 
each. We'll box them in 
li;ilf dozen-* for yon. 



.See tlie 20c Handkerchiefs 
marked to sell at 15 cents. 




A surprise I THvo thousand 
purc! linen 12 '.jC kerchiefs 
marked to sell at 10 cents. 

?.^Wl^^» ^^ ^^ l^W .^W ^l^*t»<^M l~l (~ fc < ~ « 



65c Box Children's 
Handkerchiefs, 50c. 

Some three — some six in a box 
— all white — some of them with 
embroidered corners — regular 65c 
box — special 50c. 

Box of Three 50c 
Handkerchiefs, $ 1 .25. 

Five hundred dainty kerchiefs — 
taken from our regular SOc lines — 
three in a dainty box — instead of 
$1.50, special at $1.25 the box. 

Queenly Handkerchiefs. 

The ta.stie.st as.sortment of fine 
kerchiefs in Duluth — that's saying 
a good deal, but it's true. 

And the best part of it is 
— our prices are less than 
common. See for yourself. 



11 d 5} 



Milady's Bracelets. 

A tapering wrist may well 
wear one of these pretty brace- 
lets we've Just received. 

Many styles — prices $1.00 
to $4.25 each. 

Milady's Combs. 

Refined styles that mark the 
good taste of their wearers 
chased, plain, wide top combs 
also Inlaid, wrought gold a 
jeweled effects. 

I*rloe8 SOc to $3.98 each. 

Milady's Belt. 

Simple to elaborate effects — 
steel and bead trimmed ela.stic — 
also velvet trimmed, with coral, 
turquol.se, steel and jet. 

Prices 65c to $2.75. 

Milady's Pins. 

For insjtance — veil pins, col- 
lar pins, hair barrettes. as well 
as belt pins and buckles. 
Tliey're all hei-e — and all 
good — iiicltuling many 
novelties at 25c to $1.25. 

La Vallieres. 

Chains of sterling silver, of 
gold or gun metal, studded with 
doublets of turquoise, emeralds, 
amethyst or jet. 

Prices $1.25 to $3,98. 










I 



PLAYING IN H.\RD LUCK. 



Formep .Attorney Ha.^ to .\sk Police 
for Lotlpnis:. 

James F. Brooke, formerly a promi- 
nent practicing attorney in Philadel- 
phii. now a physical wreck, without 
money and without position, applied 
last night at the Central police sta- 
tion for lodging and was put up for 
the night. 

Brooke's story is one of a brave, but 
^•ain battle, against adverse clrcimi- 
stances. which overwhelmed him. The 
neatness of his clothes and the evident 
fineness of texture, though they were 
well worn, told of the broken-down gen- 
tleman. Brooke safd that while prac- 
ticing in Philadelphia, his health broke 
down and he was told to seek a differ- 
ent climate. He io«jk his family to i 
Brookings. S. D., where he secured a ( 
position as a clerk, but the work was; 
confining and he gradually failed. 

A few days ago. he came to Duluth 
looking for a position, where he might ' 
be out in the open air. He tried to] 
get a job as time-keeper In a lum-| 



ber camp, but was unsuccessful. His 
money dwindled, until, without home, 
money or friends, he had to throw him- 
self on the bounty of the police, who 
may do something for him. 



BIG PRICE FOR COINS. 



New f20 iiold Pieres Bring |2S in 
Wall Street. 

Xew York, Dec. 16.— The faot that the 
new $20 gold pieces are very scarce 
and that collectors are already paying 
a large premium for tham, has started 
a rumor among the young men of Wall 
street, who some day hope to be brok- 
ers that a mistake waa made at the 
mint, and that there is more than $20 
worth of gold in the coins. For that 
reason there is a scrambl* along the 
curb in the street to obtain the new 
coins. Only a small number were sent 
to the sub-treasury in New York, and 
they were quickly bought up by col- 
lectors. Now the demand has grown so 
strong that as high as $28 is being 
offered for the coins. It has been an- 



nounced that when the next Issue is ] 
made there will be several changes in 
the coins, and this, of course, is what ' 
has made the demand from collectors 
and dealers. However, the Wall street 
young m-en are not convinced, and in 
spite of the positive denial of the mint 
authorities they still believe there is 
more gold in the new coins than there 
should bo. 



GIRL S0CL4LIST TALKS. 



ers of the World. 

.She urged her hearers to overthrow 
the domineering capitalists and estab- 
lish competition once more. 



Dainty Miss Preaches Doctrines and 
Roasts the Capitalists. 

As fervently enthusiastic and as red- 
rldlng-ho-^ded as when she was in Du- 
luth before, Elizabeth Greeley Flyitn, 
the girl Socialist and promote: for the 
Industrial Workers of the World, spoke 
to a large audience last evening at 

Odd Fallows' hall, on Lake avenue. 

She conderruied many thin^gs and up- 
held the doctrines of Socialism. The ' 
only way to get to true happiness and ! 
to the life beautiful, that Miss Flynn ; 
knows, ts to see that your tickets readj 
via SoolaJiam and the Industrial Work-i 



LIFE SAVERS QUIT. 

Members of Crew Retired Without 
Pay Until Spring. 

With the close of navigation tho 
needs of the Duluth life savmg crew 
have ceased, and the station has been I 
closed for the winter, and the members' 
of the crew retired without pay until: 
the opening of navigation next spring. 

BACHELOR DESPONDENT 

And Laboring Under Hallncination, 
Takes His Onn Life. 

Fargo, X. D., Dec. 16.— Despondent 
from living alone and fearing that his 
brother William had been murdered or 
kidnaped. Henry Ahrand, a well known 

and highly respected farmer living 
three miles north of Mapleton. N. D.. 
took his life. His body was found by 



a posse of citizens and officials from 
Mapleton who visited his farm after 
the neig^hbors had sounded an alarm, 
having been unable to get into hla 
house and finding no .one about. Th© 
victim had succeeded in his purpose 
well, his remains being found undressed 
In bed. a revolver being held under the 
covers which were not disturbed In the 
least. A bullet through the heart had 
ended his life instantly. 

Aihrand was a well to do bachelor 
worth between $5,000 and $10,000. ag«d 
50 years, who has resided near Maple- 
ton for the past three years. He came 
to North Dakota from Fairmont, IlL, 
where his parents live at the present 
time. 



Don't take "just as good" soap. In- 
sist on WHITE LILY. 



IMPORTED 
XMAS GOODS 

Chinese and Japajiese dishe.s. genuine 
fancy Japanese silks and other beautiful 
Oriental goods. 

Charles Smg Lee, 215 East Superior 
street. 



.._-> 



;=?= 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALp- MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1807c 







We are overstocked and must dispose of a good 
man}^ before Christmas. We have the largest stock 
of high grade v^atches at the head of the lakes and 
in order to make it an object to you we will give a 
20 per cent discount off our already low prices and 



a written guarantee with every watch 



Mention this 
Advertisement 




v«^» 



428 W. Superior St. 



'■''■iiii , 




STERLY 



Spalding Hotel Jeweler 



I 



m TME lioi um 



EVELETH BOYS 
SEND PETITION 

To Governor Johnson to 

Have Militia Company 

Formed. 

Evelfth, Mitiii.. I'tc. IG— (Pp. clal to 
The Ht'iaUl. I- The pt '..'!i of the lucal 
young riK ri fov ;i tuiliu.i lornpany in 
Blvfltth h;is beui forwarded to Gov. 
John A. Johnson. 

Thf naiiies of tht- P' 'ition Include R. 
M. eornwcll. H. K. L. y. . E. H. Hatch, 
L. L. Sutton, \V. i; I'ryin-. P. J. Mahan, 
R. II. \V' 11.. <;'<rg.- A. S<ott, Harry 
BJlvtr, A. L« v.uit. t'rcil Boorman, John 
Bartn*s.«, \V K. Scoit. O. \V. Hill. O. 
A. Ptrham. J. .■^. Wilson, E. M, Gans, 
8- A .Mci.!., (i. C. Miller. J. D. Mc- 
Cart r, 1.. C. I iaujirh»-rty, T. F. Brown. 
J. W. House Inian. 1> A. Murray, Nes- 
tor Hauma, Sid .Sicoit. . <'. B. Hoel, i^.Lm 
Trenpov.-. K. II. Alien, T P. Ferry, Ed 
Bkeei. H. Cr. \V;.Ikfr, J. W . « )Nc'ill, W. 
D. Harris, O. E. .Sundlie. I'. E. Rose. 
Fred W, Uhler. .«. R. «.;r. vn. E. H. OTon- 
nor, P. V. .Stauff, R. Hligrht, Jr., Jeven 
White. O. D. Munson, A. r. Anderson, 
Hiram G(ir<lon, E. R. Scott, A. M, 
Weiss. Gi (URe Xe.«l>er(f. W. F. Phillips. 
F. R. Ellsworth. Otto .Sahotta. X. B 
Arnotd. M. Surela. M. Kronlund. J. 
OFanic. J. Saari, J. Glazer. E. A. Juhn- 
Bon, S. Hl> ks. Leo Shapiro. E. Myer*!, J. 
L. Tuirifl" J. F'. Sararuf. E. M. l»ornier, 
R. J Taylor. F. K. Lister. Alilu ('....per, 
Charles Leoant, N. Thomas, S, 
Bonino. P. Junl<e, Ft. S. Howe, J. 
Bprietzt r and M. Wcienberg. 



In Duluth, wa.s held yesterday at 3 p. n> 
from thf Swedish Lutheran 
Rev. -M M.iitinson officiated. 

Deccii-scd was 41 'ears old. and a 
bachelor. Interment was at VirRlnla. 

Luigi Falazz.irl, who was killed in 
tlie Ncp. 2 i<haft u iderground at tne 
Fayal. wa.s buried yesterday morning 
from the Holy Faniily church. Father 
Billiin offiiiated. T he funeral wa-s in 
<harKe of the Italim society. Scott s 
Fayal band furnish d tlie music. 



lander named Larukin. in Johnson's lum- 
I ber camp, near Keewatin. Kelly was in 
I charge of the camp in the absence of 
I Contractor Johnson and the shooting !s 
1 said to have been the outcome of a 
drunken brawl in which several Fin- 
landers and Kelly drank freely from a 
jug of alcohol. Kelly got troublesome 
and took a shot at the Finns, winging 
Larultln. The wounded man wa.f taken 
churcn ^^ ^ hospital and Sheriff Hoolilian noti- 
fied. 



T. 
F. 



OVER TWO THOrSAXD 



Dollars Received 
Church 



foi' Building 



Presbyterian 
Fund. 

!<'..-( Spedal tj 



il stattincnt of ' 



EveLrh. Minn., I'^-r 
The Herald I -Th. fli...n 
the building fund of the 
church shows receipts as follows: 
of church irt-ctlon. tl.''''.fi. Ladles" Aid 
•oclttv, JIW; Fleming' .sate. Jir.O; Fowl°r 
estate, Ji.'r- Murphy < stat> , JlOO; C. E. 
BOCitly, t2i i4. Sunday school, $2S.S5: tifty- 
eeven Ir.cliviiliiul suixcrlptions, S-'-SS .".^i, 
total, $::. 1.^.' to. The total receipts euallej 
the expt liii.toures. 



CHRISTMAS EXERCISES 

Will be Held at T\vo Harbors Thurs- 
day Exening. 

Two ITarhors. Mini.. Dec. 16— (Special 
to The Htrald.i— Th following program 
will be rendff^,! a; nnual Christmas 

exercises to be giv n in the assembly 
room of the high sc lool Thursday even- 
ing at S o'clock: 

"Christmas Time Is Come Again" 

High Scho d Chorus. 
Reading— "'The Ruggles" Christmas".. 
Harriet Owens. 

Piano duet— Selected 

Inez Graliaiii an. I Emily Ktxnan. 
Paper— "Christmas n Norway and 

Sweden' 

Eva ] iUsch. 

•First Christmas Gifts'" 

Boys" Ser J--chorus. 

Rt ading— "The Heavenly Guest' 

Esther Anderson. 

Piano solo— Selected 

Inez G aham. 
Readine— How Santa Claus Came to 

Simpson's Bar" 

Lerow Pegelow. 

•■.\I< rry Christmas B lis"" 

Girls" Glee Club. 

Original story 

Ruth Woodward. 
Vo<al duet— "A Christmas Lullaby".. 
Madeline James ami Gretchen Rothfue. 

Reading— "When We Were Boys" 

Emma '*aulson. 
"Merry, Merr>- Bells of Christmas".... 
High School Chorus. 



MORRIS mim:r injured. 



nibbing, Minn.. Dec. Ifi. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Dan Drobats, an Austrian 
miner, working at tl e Morris mine strip- 
ping was caught u ider the frozen ore 
discharged from a dump car Saturday 
Presbyterian i night and sustained a broken back. Dla- 
Rn'iri i P'*^ *'^*' seriousness « f his injury the phy- 
^^ " I sicians in charge o' the case say that 
while he will be lali up several months 
he may recover. 



TWO EVELETH FUNERALS. 

Bodies of John Carlson and Luigi 
Palazzari Are Interred. 

Eveleth, Minn., I>ec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herahl .— The funer.il of John Carl- 
son, who di'd in St. .Mary's hospital 



SHOOTS FINLANDER. 

"Comer Post" Kelly Said to Have 
Injured Lumberjack. 

Grand Rapids. Mii n., Dec. 16.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — William, or "Comer 
Post' Kelly, as h. is known on the 
range, has been brmght to the county 
Jail by Sheriff Hooli lan on the charge of 
shooting and serlouily wounding a Fin- 



A WONDERFUL SALE OF 

PIANOS 

We have never been able to offer such 
astonishinjor piano values as we have been 
offering at this sale. We bought the entire 
stock of the Porter Music Co. — they han- 
dle high grade pianos — we are selling these 
to you at prices /czuer than other dealers 
are asking for old, used pianos. C 
and see. 



ome here 





TAKES LARGE SUM. 

Drunken Croatin Said to Have 
Cleaned Out Boarding House. 

Eveleth, Minn., Dec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Mike Senotovich, a 
Croatin, living at the Adriatic mine lo- 
cation, is said'to have ixibbed the land- I 
lady of his boarding house, Mrs. Katie I 
Y^novich, and several of the boarders 
of a large sum of money, while left In '■ 
charge of the place and her baby, by i 
the landlady, who had stepped out. I 
It is reported several hundred dollars I 
were taken, and tlie police are looking! 
for the accused. j 

Senotovich is only 20 years old. hav- I 
ing been on a long spree i»rior to the I 
robbery. Mrs. Yenovich was recently i 
dtesrted by her husband. ! 



of the throbbing fltet. There followed 
a brief reception on board, the presi- 
dent having a farewell mes.sage for the 
four rear admirals and the sixteen 
commanding oflicers, who are taking 
the ships through Magellan to .Saji 
Francisco. At the conclusion of tlie 
jneoling on the Mayflower's quarter- 
dtck, President Roosevelt sliook each 
officer cordially by the hand, and as 
they went over the side he bade them 
official adieu. * 

Load.s the Fleet. 
Then for a journey of nearly ten 
miles the president, as commandor-ln- 
chief of the American army and navy, 



also came down from Washington with 
a party of congressmen on board to 
witness the review. 

Weather Is Delightful. 

The day of departure broke fair and 
cool with an eight mile breeze blowing 
from just a little to the south of west 
and ruffling the waters of the roads 
into sparkling waves. At the time of 
the ipresident's arrival the brilliant 
sun had set the bright work and polish- 
ed decks dancing in its rays. The 
immaculate white hulls of the big 
fighting machines gleamed resplendent- 
ly. Not a cloud flecked the sky. 

The early morning scenes about the 



led the long line of battleships out into [fleet anchorage was most picturesque. 
Chesapeake bay. They followed his I Long before daylight the tidy little 
flag to Thimble shoal light, just live; steam launches were making their last 



ESCAPES HORRIBLE END. 

Section Hand Said to Have Been 
Tied to Missabe Track. 

Eveleth, Minn., Dec. 16.— (Sreclal to 
The Herald.)— As Charles Olson, a section 
hand on the Duluth, Missabe & Northern 
railway, was returning to the section- , 
house early Saturday morning, he was i 
attacked from behind, robbed, gagged and 
tied to the track between the No. 1 and I 
No. 4 Spruce mine stockpiles. i 

OLson was robbed of $30 and a gold 
watch. A dirty handkerchief was stuffed | 
into his mouth and he was tied to the | 
track. Half an hour after lie was freed a i 
switch engine passed. When John 
Schwab, a local watchman, foui;d 01.«on 
he was practically exhausted from yelling , 
for help. 

Officer Bessen was called by Bchwal^ ' 
and both ttK.k Olson up town, where hj ' 
was revived. i 



RABBIT HUNTER SHOT. 



Ben Woolen Receives Charge From 
Shotgun in .Abdomen. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Dec. 16.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Ben Woolen, the 17- 



Warning to Parents! 



Do you realize the clanger that menaces your children when they 
play in the streets on which there are car tracks? 

Do you realize the danger they court by sliding down the steep 
avenues and across the car tracks along which cars are running at 
frequent intervals? 

Do you know there is a city ordinance which expressly forbids 
that practice because of its danger? 

Do you caution your children often enough about the danger? 

Are 3'ou sure YOUR CHILDREN are not daily exposing them- 
selves to the danger of a collision with a street car — in fact jeopardiz- 
ing their lives? 

Remember that children become so engrossed with their play 
that they do not, sometimes, note approaching cars and run heedlessly 
in front of them. 



ASSIST US IN THE PREVENTION OF ACCIDENTS 



Duluth Street Railway Co. 



WANTS $50,000 
FROM RAILROAD 

Engineer Sues Northern 

Pacific for Loss of 

Leg. 

Maurice Dwyer wants $50,fK)0 from the 
Northern Pacific railroad for his leg. 
Dwyer, who was an engineer, em- 
', ployed on a switch engine in the North- 
ern Pacific yards here, was injured in I 
1 a collision with a freight engine, about j 

j a year ago. He claims to have lost 
\ the use of one leg. and to have sus- ! 
! tained other serious injuries,, as the] 
I result of the accident, and he has: 
1 brought suit against the railroad for | 
the a.mount named. i 

The e.a9e was begun this morning in ] 
the district court, and Dwyer is repre- 
sented by S. S. Anderson and Alexan- 
der Marshall. 



FOUR NEW CARDINALS 



(Continued from page 1.) 



miles inside the capes, where the May-] trips from the shore, some of them 
flower turned aside and dropped lier blowing impatient whistles for delayed 
anchors for the formal review. As a mail orderlies, who were the last per- 
naval pageant, the review and de- 1 sons to be taken aboard, 
parture of the fleet today was the most Man o'wars men arose early. Five 
vfar-old son of Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Wool- i notable in American history. There o'clock found every deck of the six- 
en. accidentally shot himself in the ab- have been several presidential reviews teen ships well filled with them, 
domen while hunting rabbits with two 'of the Atlantic fieet during the past | They were busy with the last chores 
near Mile Post 2S. Sunday, 1 eighteen months, but in those in-iof scrubbing and polishing. Changing 

red and white signal lights glowed at 
imes from mastheads, ship command- 
^ ers having gome last instruction.e to re- 
serted t~he ramroad into the bore that , passed up and down their lines. io-|ceive from the divisional flagships, 
had not b^en fired. The force of the Im- , day the fleet was under way. had cast] . j„„u„v,t «o^^ ti,^ ov,i« u„v.« ^i„ 
pact upon the live charge caused it to ! off from the shore and was outward ^^ daylight came the ship lights dis- 
explode. young Woolen receiving the full | ^ound on a cruise, which, as the ppjsi- i aPP«?ared one by one until all w-ere 
charge in his abdomen, the viscera being I ^""" ,V ' «. if f-unresKed if • no floet ! *^0"^ ^^ the sun rose a great red ball 
penetrated. He was hurried to the hos- i ^^"^ himself ^^P'^^^^J^^ 'J;^ "° ^^^^ in the East. It seemed to hang for a 
pital. where the surgeons are doing of such size nas e\ er oerore unoer 
evervthing possible to save his life. 'taken." The guns which had voiced a 

welcome to the president, upon his ar- 
i rical in Hampton Roads, uttered a good 
bye tribute as they passed the May- 
flower, outward bound. The salute 
' of welcome had been paid in unison. 



which is being carried on by Modern- 
ists, who disdain the pontifical author- 
ity and desire themselves authoritative- 
ly to sanction a new faith and a new 
conscience. If the Modernists would 
enlist themselves frankly among the 
enemies of the church this evil would 
be less; as it is, they proclaim them- 
selves Catholics, partake of the sacra- 
ment and celebrate mass. Fulfilling his 
apostolic duty, the pope said, he had 
adopted against the Modernists such 
measures as were necessary, striving 
particularly to save young clergymen 
from perversion. 

Appoiiitnient of Kennedy. 
In conclusion, the allocution reads: 
"The episcopacy has accepted the papai 
directions with eagerness and has ap- 
plied them with zeal, but the Modern- 
ists preserve in their rebellion and give 
manifest p'roof of their attitude even 

I in the press. May God enlighten these 

j misled ones." 

I The pope made official announcement 
during the consistory of the appoint- 
ment of Monslgnor Kennedy, rector of 
the American college here, to be titular 
bishop of Adrlanopolis and the ap- 
pointment of Monslgnor Dennis O'Con- 
nell. rector of the Catholic university 
at Washington, to be titular bishop of 
Sebaste. 



companions, near Mile Post JS. tsunday, j eighteen months, but in those in- i o 
and is in a critical condition at the Two g^^jj^^^g jj^^ great ships were lying do- ' r 
Harbors hospital. He was cleaning one , jj j^ ^ ^f spreading anchor t 

barrel of his shot gun with a ramrod, '"i'*^. **•■ "I;.,, ,v,^ Y.^[.i^^.■^^^^ „a«f,ti 
after firing a shot and accidentally )n- ! chains, while the re\iewlng ya^ht I g 




ships. 



Pa.«s Out in Single Culunin. 



Hit'bing— M. E. Osherman, proprietor of The farewell tribute was an individual 
the Columbia Clothing company, has sold ; offering from each one of the sixteen 
a part Interest In the business to Mr. 
Bloom of Superior, who has removed to 

Hibbing and will take an active part in | , , . , , 

business. ' The fleet passed out in single column, 

Virginia— .T. Kleffman and associates of j the big government-built Connecticut, 
Hibbing have secured an option on lands , the flagship of Admiral Evans, lead- 
in section 17 58-18. in the Mountain Iron i , _ tj^g ^^.^y The vessels were -100 
district, and ' -i"—' - -i — i i ms 



time in the gateway of the Virginia 
Capes, through which the fleet was 
soon to pass, then mounted higher into 
the skies with the promised fulfillment 
of a perfect day. 

At eight bells, or eight o'clock in the 
morning watch, the dressing lines were 
broken out on every battleship and 
the pretty little triangular signal flags 
gave a gala touch to the scene. 



diamond drill at work. ,' yards apart and from the Connecticut 

Tw„ Harbons-Elmer Hlllman. a driver i to the Kentucky, which brought up to I 



Your Wardrobe 



for Beckman Bros., sustained a broken 
right leg Saturday while unloading salt 
pork. A barrel fell from the wagon and 
struck his leg. 

Sparta— Several cases of scarlet fever 
have broken out here but the health 
authorities have the situation well in 
hand. One death has resulted from the 
epidemic. 

Biwabik-Capt. C. M. McKenzie of the 
WllllatTis mine, owned by a Milwaukee 
man. has left Biwabik for a trip througn 
Michigan. The Williams has closed down 
indefinitely and may not be reopened 
for some time. 



TRIMDAD FIRST STOP 



(Continued from page !•) 



the rear, the line reached a distance 
of more than four miles. In space 
of time there was the stretch of a 
decade between the 16,000 tons of the 
Connecticut, to the little more than 
11,000 tons of the Kentucky. Five 
stages of American battleship con- 
struction were represented In the line, 
and as an object lesson in the growth 



a party of guests, came down from 
W.ashington on the naval yacht May- 
flower. His arrival in the roadstead 
was signalized by a roar of salutes. 
When the resulting veil of powder had 
lifted from the ship.s, the Mayfloweiland Mrs. Simms 
proceeded to anchor In th« very center '^^'^ naval rUs 



Can be place<l in the care of an ex- 
perienced man, who will Dry Clean, 
(not brush) and press, call for, and de- 
liver to your home every week at the 
rate of $2 per month. 

My many friends and former patrons 
are cordially invited to call on me at 
my new location at 213 West First 
of the American navy the spectacle | street, and inspect the most up-to-date 
found one of its most striking features. 
A large number of yachts and ex- 
cursion boats accompanied the fleet 
down the bay and gathered at the re- 
viewing ground. 

President Roosevelt's party on the 
Mayflower included Mrs. Roosevelt, 
Miss Ethel Roosevelt. Secretary of the 
Navy and Mr?. Metcalf, the assistant 
secretary of the navy and Mrs. New- 
berry, Rear Admiral W. H. Brownson, 
chief of the bureau of navigation, and 
Mrs. Brownson, Rear Admiral and Mrs. 
Cowles and Lieutenant Commander 



establishment of its kind in the 
Northwest. 

Htre you w-ill find all the facilities 
installed which make it possible to do 
the best work. Special attenton given 
to 

Ladles* Dresses, Ball Gowns ete. 



The naval dispatch boat Dolphhin 



THE ZENITH VALET 

\V. J. .SITTOX. 

Office— Old 'phone, 1834. 

New 'phone, 1588-X. 
Residence— Old 'phone, 1076-L<. 



leave the city. He was given until 8 
o'clock this afternoon to get out. 
* * * 
Robert Thompson pleaded guilty tp 
Indecent exposure and was given $S 
or three days, while .seven plain drunk$ 
who were gathered in that they might 
escape the biting frost of last night, 
and sleep off the benumbing of their 
senses, drew the minimum fine. 

EXPENSIVE HINTING. 

Crookston, Minn., Dec. 16.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The first arrest and 
conviction recorded in this section 1ft 
many years for shooting prah-ie chick- 
ens out of season occurred on Saturday 
when Deputy Game W'arden William 
Munch arrested Antoine Boucher of the 
town of Lambert, Red Lake county and 
had him arraigned before Judge A. 
Lanlel of Crookston. The game warden 
Induced him to plead guilty to avoid 
further costs and he did so, the hunt 
costing his $11.45. 

Because of the mild weather thert 
are great flocks of prairie chickens In 
Lambert county, where considerable 
brush is found, and It is not a difficult 
feat to slaughter them as tliey rise in 
bunches at the edge of the groves. 
This is the first fracture of the chick- 
en law reported since the close of thd 
season this year, but spies of the game 
warden had the man nailed the day 
after the shooting took place. 



mm 



If"! W^fyi-/ 

cji iiK-.df .'ii::.'?!:-;. , 






%dU>^ 



m 



y 



iiiStt; 



m 



iiiiy 



;'?* 






;i;r< 



'^i 



PLAIN DRUNKS 
FORM THE GRIST 

The Prolonged Saturday 
Night Jags Bring Vic- 
tims to Grief. 

The case of W. H. Reynolds charged 
with petty larceny in municipal court. 
Indicted for grand larceny by the grand 
jury, and just released from the de- 
tention hospital after recovery from an 
attack of smallpox, will not be threshed ' 
out In municipal court for another 
week. Reynolds' attorney appeared in 
court this morning and requested an- 
other continuation of the case, as his 
client Is weak after his illness and 
needs a rest. The case was continued 
for one week. 

• • * 

Joseph Leo was arraigned In muni- 
cipal court this morning on a charge 
of assault. He pleaded not guilty and 
j the case was set for Thursday after- 
I noon at 2 o'clock. Ed Abelson claims 
I that he and Leo had a dispute last 
Thursday at the corner of Sixth ave- 
nue west and First street, and that Leo 
slugged him. 

• • * 

Arrests yesterday were mostly the re- 
sult of prolonged effects of Saturday 
night jags. W^esley Bishop was fined 
$5 and costs, with the option of five 
j days in jail. He pleaded with Judge 
Windom to release him and he would 



CtOlHIMC 

M0NEY 
DOWN 



Our terms arc the easiest 
in the city and our prices 
the lowest. Buy presents 
for Christmas-- -Pay after. 

SOME SUGGESTIONS 

MEN'S OVERCOATS 
MEN'S SUITS. RAINCOATS 
BOYS' SUITS 
BOYS' OVERCOATS 
CHILDREN'S SUITS 
MEN'S SHOES 



FURS FOR WOMEN 
WOMEN'S SUITS 
WOMEN'S COATS 
TRIMMED HATS 
WALKING SKIRTS 
RAINCOATS 
LADIES' SHOES 
LITTLE GIRLS' COATS 



UPSTAIRS. 
STORE OPEN EVENlNwS. 



r 



■— r 



..+ 




;l 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALDs MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



18 



Energy for breakfast to start 
the day. ^ . 

Sustenance for lunch to carry 
you through. 

Rest and renewed strength 
at close of day. 

The food ideal for every meal. 

Uneeda Biscuit 

More nutritious than any 
other wheat fcod. 

^ In moisture and 

* dust proof packages, 

NAT10N>^X BISCUIT COMPANY 



SOUL MARRIAGE 



Desired by Hiin«;arian, Who At- 
t<»mpt*M! to Kill (iirl He Loves. 

! i r^ • ■ l(i.— T>> practice his 



tJ; 

in 



.g 'It •! ''.y on the un- 

Riris a Bulgarian 

kill J-\=;.-(;8 

t > ■:' .-is«. and t.ien 

' : liri'iff'ij body w i -: 

■ ■: :r;i Inight. The gl:- 

i •.) his lova makins. 
' - t ■> f-i ir D^'nied a 

.-;::. IP. thought 

■^ ;ior"t boi- !:■ i '.vith 

- !■ Mi-ilay ui<ht he 

•Ts 'if tht' fitriily ex- 

■■ ■'\ :' ■ u - 

•k.s viiiu. a iatd 
1 han.ik^Tchi.-f 

Th.! 



ur Kelting, shot 
ling, little girl 
On Saturday 
Scott brothers 
was robbed of , 
duce. Securing 
ofticers. the Sco 
river and appro 
shanty boat. Tl 
^ ling return the i 
c'j.ied him of ha 
the charge and 
boats to be si 
irgea that ai 
. r-r the boat 1 
followed. 



In the arm; Agnea Kel- I 
hot In hand, 
aight the home of the j 
at Huston's Landln.g 

.small imoant of pro- 

the a3sl.stance of two 
rt brothers crossed the 
ached Arthur KelUng's 
.ey demanded that Kel- 
• roperty which they ac- 
ving stolen. He denied 

refused to allow his 
•arched. Mrs. KelUng 

attempt was made to 
ly force and the battle 



Thfis is th" .s<M 
m\M vitality; »i 
r«tain. If you' 
your syste-m w 
M-mtitiim Tea, 
cents. Tea ..•;• T 
gist. 



the following morning a large amount 
of discarded merchandise was found 
lying In the yards where it had been 
thrown as u.sele.ss by the thieves. Since 
that time the robbery has been steadily 
progressing. On Monday night eight 
cars of merchandi.se were entered and 
valuable property removed. 



NO WONDER HE DIED. 



.■«>n of Je>t?ay and wexk- 
iK>d hi'Ulth is hard to | 
d retaiJi yours, fortify 1 
ith Hollidter's Rocky j 
th« surest way. 35 
iblets. Ask your drug- 1 



ROW i\\ SHANTY BOAT. 

One Man Kilbid and S.»veral Were 
Wounded at Bi'thlehem, fnd. 

■ ■ ■ •"' Ky.. D.'.:. !■• ■ •.; ,r- 

; q O'* h"'"*r f'lt'tM' 



vtctin: 
•.LIXr;. 



ROBBINP, BOX ( ARS. 



<ir»'at Xorth^T; 
Car 

Minot, N. D.. 
Th> II ■:,il..l.v-I 

: • >bt!tl by ear I 

' - •■ •;■! h 1 V',. „< 

; 1 . ) ■;>■■.■'. i\ 



I Losing 



Ooods From 
. at Minot. 

D''c. 1«. — (Special to 
? the Great Northern 

,• being systematically 

lieves or are the lossn.s 

urred during the last 

.le efforts of unat- 

.-. I k^ut'sfion which the 

■s ire endc^avormg t.) 



! J •! - 



I -^'^ •' ' . -M.-s A:' 



-; ::; r the Great 

X.trtiu'rn -^h the io.ss of marchau- 

lisf from - i:s has been noticeable 

\ ^reainr e> tent than ever before. 

' . th tf r.itrht -ii veral cars were touched 

i by "h.- .^jme consumed. The 

'" '' ' . /, vigilant in their en- 

I previ nt any looting but on 



Seven -Year-Old Boy Drank a Pint 
of Prohibition Whisky. 

Williston, N. D.. Deo. 16 —(.Special to 
The Herald.)— Derwln Smith, the 7- 
year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charlea 
Smith U dead from the effects of a 

pint of liquor which he drank. The 
Ii(]uor was on the kitchen table when 
the little fellow .secured the bottle and 
drank almost all of the contents. Tho 
first his parent.s knew of it was when 
he fell on the floor. They then#thoughL 
he was playing with a neighbor boy 
who was there and did not take any 
particular notice for awhile. When they 
did try to make hun get up they found 
he was unconscious. Even then they 
were not alarmed and thought he would 
sleep It off, but later in the day he went 
into convulsions. The boy was brought 
to town, but nothing could be done. 



NORTH DAKOTA BANKS 

OOT PANAMA BONDS. 



HORSES ARE 
PLENTIFUL 

Good Loggifg Teams 
Cheaper Than in Prev- 
ious Years. 

Small Loggers Have Good 

Chance to Make 

Money. 



The fact that logging operations will 
be greatly curtailed in the Duluth dis- 
trict this winter, in compari.s<3n with 
previous seasons, mainly as a result of 
the financial situation, is making it 
very hard for the horse dealers who 
make it their custom to supply th^.- 
Northern Minnesota camps with horses 
for the winters work. The supply ot 
horses greatly exceeds ihe demand, ani 
the dealers can se^ no profit in th.- 
business for them. Some of them fac 
an actual loss. 

Duluth id quite a center for the dls 
tributlon of the animal* every fall and 
winter, and numerous purchases on a 
large scale usually are made here. Som.- 
horses are being sold locally, but very 
few, as compared with last year. Ther- 
are so many ownette and dealers who 
are anxious to rent teams, now that. 
they cannot get a fair price if they 
sell them, has brought about a situa- 
tion where ihere is practically no mar- 
ket for the animals. A flrst-claas 
team may be rented for $20 a month, 
where last year tkMKenial was $35 i 
month. The logge^K|y uses his horses 
a few months, genSKlIy selling them 
again at the endkoKthe season at a 
substantial reduct fcifc over the original 
buying price, andliplrefore he wouM 
rather pay the l|wfc-rental asked in 
many cases than h\i^ his horses out- 



in^Ku: 



right 

it is considerea|*Bber unfortunate^ 
that a conditloii^fculd exist tha 
makes a curtailment of production nt-i^- 
es.sary. in view of the fact that this is 
one of the most favorable seasons in 
years for carrying on operations in th • 
woods. Conditions are ideal for log- 
ging, and those who are in the busi- 
ness vvill be able to get out a recoirl 
number of logs, if they wish to do so. 

Tho small logger this winter stands 
to make good money, thanks to the 
labor situation. Because of the low 
wages paid the men he can carry out 
his contracts with a good margin of 
profit. The last two or three years tlic 
wages paid labor in the woods has been 
so high that the small contractor hasn"' 
had much of a show to come out ahead 
of the game at the fJiil of the season. 



A l.eai Wnmlcrland. 

.South D.ikota, with its ri-h silver 
mines, bonanza farms, wide ranges an i 
straiige natural forniatjons, is a vetit- 
al)l<^ wonderland. At Mound City. In th>^ 
home of Mr.s. K. D. Clapp, a wonderful 
case of heiiilng has'Ltfety occurred. Her 
son seemed near deat.h with lung and 
thro.at trouble. 'tJxnau. sling coughing 
spells occurred every tive minutes," 
writes Mrs. Olapp, ' wlien I began giv- 
ing Dr. King's >Jew Discovery. tho 
great medi( jne^tnat satf^-d his life .ind 
coTiipletely ouT-ed him." Guaranteed for 
coughs and-'-olds, throat ami lung trou- 
ble, by all druggists, 50c and $I.JO. Trial 
bottle free. 



Fargo. N. D.. Dec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Among the Norlhwe.sterii 
bidders for Panama bonds the follow- 
ing were successful in securing a few: 
First National. Harvey, $ir..oO0; First 
Naticnal. Litchville. $4, DM, and First 
National. Dickinson, $37.r)(H). all at 
102 1-5; Hope Natiimal, Hope, $37,500, at 
104. 





OTICE 



To Users of 

Calcium Carbide and 
Acetyiene Gas 

The Union Carbide Companv, the owner of United States Letters 
Patent No. 541,138 of June 18, 1895, for the product crystalline Calcium 
Carbide, cautions the public agaiist the use or sale of Calcium Carbide 
(cr carbolite) manufactured by ar y other person, firm or corporation. All 
commercial calcium carbide is crystalline. 

Especial attention is called to the law which makes the person who 
merely uses or sells an infringing product just as liable to damages as the 
manufacturer of it. 

This cautionary notice is givt^n to save innocent parties from litiga- 
tion and damages to which they v/iil be liable if they use or sell any such 
calcium carbide (by whatever name it may be called) manufactured by 
any other person, firm or corporation. 

The public is especially advis«:d that im.portant suits have been 
brought by Union Carbide Comtpany, and are now pending in the United 
States Circuit Courts in New York and Ohio, against parties using and 
selling the product manufactured by the American Carbolite Company, 
and that these suits will be followed by such others as may be deemed 
necessary to protect this compan/ in its patented product. Calcium Car- 
bide. The pending suits are beir g vigorously pushed by the undersigned 
with all available energy, and such progress has already been made that 
a finding and judgment sustaining the rights of the Union Carbide Com- 
pany may reasonably be expected in the not distant future. 

UNION CARBIDE COMPANY. 

^ December, 1907. 



EXTRAVAGANCES 
OF THE NATION 

Attention of Governors to 
be Drawn to Fire 

Waste. 

Washington, Dec. 16. — The governors 
of tha several states have been In- 
vited by President Roosevelt to meet 
in this city in May to discuss tha na- 
tion's wastes and extravagances, her 
criminal prodigality -with what havj 
seemed to be inexhaustible natural re- 
sources that are fast tU.sappearing. and 
to devi.se means of tef4ening this appal- 
ing destruction. A^tiis is a splendid 
and most timely move on the part of 
the president. 

While these genttenien are assembled 
here it is planned Jjx. Architect Fitz- 
patrick, the executive of the Interna- 
tional Society ')f Building <,' ^mmission- 
ers, to submit for their consideration 
some facts and figures anent the lire 
waste that it is believed will impel 
them to take the initiative in pro- 
posing legislation in their several 
states looking to tha betterment of 
building construction and the reduction 
of the fire tax. That authority points 
out that of all our wastefulness fire is 
one of the very costliest and the only 
one in which human lives are also sac- 
ritlced. Over 6,000 lives have been 
destroyed by fire in a years' time. Tha 
tax in actual C')nstruction of buildings, 
in the maintenance of fire departments, 
and In premiums to Insurance com- 
panies in the hope of recouping some 
of the damage, amounts to over $5i)0,- 

000,000 a year a sum that is just 

barely equalled bjj» the cost of new 
buildings erected in our most prosper- 
ous year. No other nation on earth per- 
mits of any such waste. Fire nas 
eaten up in twenty-five years' time 
over $3.(»O»3,00O,0((<) worth of property— a 
sum that exceeds the highest point ever 
reached by the United States debtl 

In Europe fires seldom extend be- 
yond the buildings in which they ori- 
ginate In this country whole city bhxika 
if buildings and even entire sections of 
cities are wiped out in one conflgrration. 
Boston will average $1.5».»0.0<)0 In fire a 
year, while the average of five Euro- 
pean cities of etiual size is but a 
trirte over $150,000. Uur fire tax here, 
the cost of combustion only, exclusive 
of the cost of fire <iepartments, etc., is 
over $2 per capita. In tJurope it is less 
than .33. In for(ty-tiiiree cities of 
Europe, there are but -So fires per 
thousand people. Iij the United States 
there are 4.05 per .thousand. Here in 
Washington, a city of 300,000 people, 
there were 846 flri^jj last year with a 
loss of $233,744. and the cost of mairi- 
taining its most excellent fire de- 
partment was $433,Jii^>. And Washington 
stands well toward the head of the 
list of American cities Yjr low fiie 
los.ses and economi^yad management, in 
Berlin, during the same period, a city 
of 2,100.000 people, tiiene were 2.090 fires, 
Involving a loss of qniy $167,205 and its 
fire department coJgt $312,000. Rome, a 
city of 500.000 people, had a loss of 
but $,'J6.000, and Its fire department 
cost $50,000. Figures and c<imparison3 
that may well make ti^ governors atop 



TKis Catalog 



Will assist you to make satisfactory 
selections for your 

HOLIDAY GIFTS 

Tlte Catalog is yours for the a.sking. CJall or write for It today. 



'^ymt^,.:im^)p-s^^4m,ikmsiimism^ :^ 




tr* 






! ■ - ^■' 


> 






1 



It Is brim full of dainty and artistic good*, useful asi well as 
ornamental, and will save you much worry and doubt in your 

purchase of Holiday Goods. Contains the newest and brightest articles. Every one suitable for a 
gift and every article is backed up by our guarantee to be exactly sm represented. Prices will be 
«r groate.st interest to careful buyers. 



Buying Direct From the Manufacturer We Save the Middleman's Profit. 



.\7iT// 



o5'«> 



:^JfW' 



$12.75 No. 2111 
14E Solid Gold 

Qeauine Full Cut 
Diamoud 



$20.00 No. 2102 

14K Solid Gold 

Genuine Full Cut 

Diapiond* 
Aosiraliaa Opalf 



$12.00 No. 2352 

SoUd Gold 
Bote and Green Finisli 



$10.00 No. 2174 

Solid Gold 

Romnn, Green and 

EQgUsh FiaKb 



$35. OO No. 2278 

HKSoUdGold 

Geaulne Full Cut Diamond 

Real Pearls 

Pendant Attachment 



^m r^f*. v<, oiflo $18.00 No 2358 

$5.00 No. 2188 Solid Gold, 

Solid Gold Green and Rose Finleh 

; Soman and Rose Genuine Full Cm Diamond 
Fmi£li Buby £79 



A CORDIAI^ INVITATION TO VISIT OVR STORB. 

It is becoming more and more a general practice for experient-ed and tasteful buyers to start their 

CtirijStmas lists at 

M. HBNRICKSEN JE^WELRY CO. 



PROVIDENCE BLDC. 



Fourth Ave. W. and Superior St. 



Here the diversity of beautiful and worthy things is so great, the reliability of every Item Is 
so well understood, the environment is .so pleasant, the clerical service so courteous, diligent and at- 
tentive, and the Prieos so Agrt^ahly lx>w for the aualllies offered, that many discreet shoppers de- 
pend upon our varied a.ssortment to complete their lists before leaving our store. 



Chri.stmas Gifts l><>ught now will be laid away ; Our Catalog contain.s hundreds of beautiful 
luitil you want them. | gifts. 



tr YOV Mr AWT A 

Reliable Catalog Mailed Free 

MrWtfTKi rOR XT TODAY. 

It will enable you to select just what 
you want to get for Christmas. 



COUPON 



MAIL ORDKRS PROMPTLY FILLED. 

Anything pictured here forwarded im- 
mediately, postage prepaid, on receipt of 
the price, and delivery guaranteed. 



NAME 

STREET 

CITY STATE.. 

Fill in Coupon and mail to us. 



CUT THIS OUT. 



STORS OPCN EVBNINOS VNTIL CHRISTMAS. 



and think upon the wastefulness of 
their people. I 

Mr. Fitzpatrick will also point out toi 
them the cure that is proposed. He' 
maintains that if adequate legislation! 
is enacted, compelling that all new I 
buildings be at least moderately well 1 
built, and that the old ones have such | 
improvements made in them, involving! 
little cost but rendering them less vul- 
nerable to fire, this terrific tax will be I 
reduced more th:in one-half inside of 
five years, and that we will be able to 
compare favorably with European cities 
within fifteen years. The one and only 
thing to do now. since we have m- 
slsted for so long in building shoddily, 
is to add no more firetraps and to re- 
place them, as fast as they are de- 
stroyed, with modern, well-built struc- 
tures. 



relief in the form of a more liberal 
Sunday ordinance that they expect the 
board of aldermen to pass next Tues- 
day. 



There Is nothing better offered the pub- 
lic today for stoma.h troubles dyspfpsia, 
indigestion, etc, than KODOL This is 
a scientifie preparation of natural digeest- 
ants. KODOL Is guaranteed to give re- 
lief. Sold by all druggists. 

LID MOVEMENT 
IS EXTENDING 

But Few People in Oma- 
ha, However, Obeyed 
the Law. 

Omaha, Dec. 16. — Merchants who 
come under the ban of the Sunday clos- 
ing order issued some time ago to taive 
effect Dec. 15. observed the occasion in 
a half-hearted manner yesterday and 
last night. Perhaps 1,000 persons lai!l 
themselves liable to the law by de- 
cling to close their places on the tir.st 

day of the week. These places included 
the theaters, newspaper offices, barber 
shops, cigar stands, billiard halls, bowl- 
ig alleys and minor places, which to<jk 
their chances of being forced to con- 
tribute to the exchequer of the ^-itj' 
with tines, the maximum of which is 
estimated at $15,000. 

All the Omaha theaters were open as 
usual. The names of managers, 
ticket sellers, doorkeepers and stage 
foremen of all the theaters were taken 
and warrants for their arrest will be 
issued. 

Chicago Heigiit.s Dry. 

Chicago, Dec. 16.— Chicago Heights, a 
manufacturing town of 15,)00 inhabit- 
ants, thirty miles south of Chicago, 
was closed down by common consent 
of its ninety saloonkeepers yesterday 
Not only were the saloons closed, but 
also were the drug stores, confection- 
eries and news stands. The .salooo- 
men insisted that these places oe 
clo.sed because of the activity of the 
Municipal league, which is waging an 
antl-saioon war. 

Very Blue in New York. 

New York. Dec. 16. — An enforcement 
of the Sunday closng law and the ele- 
ments combined yesterday to provide 
a Sunday as "'blue" as the strongest 
Sabbatharian might wish. The amuse- 
ment promoters generally kept their 
places closed, while an overcast sky, a 
damp chill in the air and bad walking 
shut In thousands, who. in lieu of 
other errtertainment. gladly would have 
found recreation in the parks. The 
restaurants were as before benefited by 
the change in conditions. 

The theatrical men made no at- 
tempt to test the law and will await 



DANGERS FROM 
CHRISTMAS TREES 

They Should be made 

as Fireproof as 

Possible. 

A year ago a Christmas tree caught 
fire in one of the larger churches in St. 
Paul during the program of a Sunday! 
school festival, and a panic was barely 
averted. 

Such awful consequences may follow 
incidents of thi.s nature that it stag- j 
gers imagination. ; 

W.irning.s against the dangers lurk-i 
ing in ttiis t'jr'jh-like toy, this instru- 
ment of wholesouled joy, or. per- 
chance, nameless horrors cannot be re- 
peated too often. 

A Christmas tree snouid be made ns 
fireproof as possible. It Is dangerous 
at best. No candles should be put upon 
it. If candles must be used, then— 

Dont put cotton on it. 

Don't put paper articles on It. 

Don"t put candy wrapped in paper 
on it. 

Don't put celluloid articles on it. 

Don't put lace or popcorn strings on 
It. 

Don't put candles on weak branch's, 
because they may shift position in los- 
ing weight from burning and set iha 
tree on fire. 

Don't put any Inflammable articles 



under the tree when the candles are 
lit. A spark from a twig may set them 
on fire. 

Don't set the tree in a cotton made 
snowbank. It may put your hou.se in 
ashes and turn your joy into mourn- 
ing. "- 

Don't leave children alone with tho 
tree, nor the tree alone with itself when 
the candles are lit. 

Don't place the tree near window 
curtains. A slight draught n%ay 
swing them against a candle. 

Decorations can hardly improve upon 
nature's architecture, as displayed In 
a we!l-prop.»rtioned ■ evergreen, but If 
the tree musi be decorated, non-in- 
liammatale articles should be put on. 
And the Christmas shops glitter with a 
countless variety of pretty and cheap 
ornaments that may be safely used. A 
little care in its selection may save 
money, joy. homes, churches, festival 
halls and lives. 

EDWARD PETERSt3N, 
State Fire MajshaU 



TO CUBE A COLD IN ONE DAY 

Talce LAXATIVE BKO.MO IJUININE Tablets 
Dru^Tis'ists r;-funil nuiiey il it IjiIs to cure. E W 
GRUXE's siifnature is on each box. 25c. 



EAST (JRAND FORKS 

MODERN WOODMEN ELECT. 



East Grand Forks, Minn.. Dec. 18. — 

(Special to The Herald )— The Modern 

Woodmen camip of this city has elected 
the following officers: 

■Venerable consul, Jerry Enright; ad- 
vi.sor, John Halleen; cl»rk, G. Purcell; 
banker, Thomas Powers; escort, Fred 
Fiers; warden, M. J. Enright; sentry, J. 
C. Dangerfieid; managers. M. A. Foote, 
(three years.) J. H. McNichol. (two 
years), M. J. Sullivan, (holding over); 
physicians. Drs. G. P. Kirk and 'Wil- 
liam Wilson. 

The installation of the new officers 
will take place at the January meet- 
ing. 




Ayr' HEADof THE 11115 

^ -I IS BREWED piTGER'S BEER 

H The proper water tor brewing is one_^ot me greatest 
elements in &e making oi good beer.^ Scientihc testa 
bave proven fiiat &e water of Ae Great Lakes, and par- 
y ticularly of Lake Superior, is flie best in flie world for flie 
purpose. For fliis reason A. Fitger & Co. built iteir brewery at 
Dulufli twenty-five years ago. Tbeir expert brewers were , 
given 4e best equipment and best materials obtainable. 
Tbus flie bigb standard of Fitger's Beer was estab- 
lished and today it is known as me best in me 
land. Your home deserves a case. 





'•illlllll 



*'\ 



D. E. 11.. Dec. 16, 19OT. 

Home, Sweet Home I 

i 




Don't shop for Smok- 
ing Jackets. This is the 
one store a hie to hiiy and 
sell (jiunuities of these 
garments at (juantily 
prices. 

The Colnnihia is a 
Smoking Jacket customer 
mannt'acturers consider 
worth going after. That's 
why we show more jack- 
ets and '>ell them for less 
than an\- other store in 
this section. 

During the week hefore 
last we made a late pur- 
chase at a sa\iiig of at 
hM^-t 'i'j and in >onie case> 
of .10 |)ercenlum. 

Smoking Jackets 



At fS w sIhiw a \;iiii ty of ;it 
It'tiit .-'•■\ siyl'K, ina?U' frffii iluu- 
l)l« IK-iit (Jirinari (r«>lf <lt'th. 
OthtT storts liivi- tn i-h;uv:»' frftm 
nix dollars t<. sevt u-tilty lur 
th.' likf of thf-m. 

At $«. .S7.50. $10 aiul $12 you 
win find a ^'i<;.t .■^(lections hfrt- 
and at a < orrt sininilliiX sitviriK in 
tilt! pile*'. 

.\l $10. $12 mihI $15 V- offf r a 
lint "f tho Mat* la.s^,- and \'«lvet 
.SnmkinK .latktts. purihaned at 
tJu- ."^aint,- tlriif. Th»sf« are quall- 
tlf.s every\vhtr«> r'lail<d at from 
fiftfcn to twrnty-fivf dollari?. 



Lounging Robes 



Wuidon f>n. s at JTi. fC. tT.50 
and $1(1 that ai«- iM.^itively innn 
orii. dollar to ivvo-iifty below any 

■ • I \i' tilor'H. 

H.XTii H*nii:s. 

n< r. 1> iil^o a full lint- of T.rry 

rioth I'litli l;ol"s ■•iiid i.ri<> s raoK- 
inK fr-.m fli.r.H to ♦ Hi. 

A\^<< liath Slippirs. Hath Tow- 
els and fv. rythintf rise pcrtain- 

InK to a iiii'iTH i' al honu: roin- 
turl. 




M</»> ^ 



Pulufh. 



TWO s'r<>Ki":s 

!'!■' i"ril \N! ' SlTI'IRTaR. 
1;:\^!\ t \..,;iwi i.i ..;.)vli- is allSOlut'*- 

Iv ^uar uitff.l. ir not .«atlwlii' tory. 
ii \ K. hroiiKl'f l>ai k ;it :tny Itam 

;, I . . i.l nK<-<l f < 1' U .'.<■ W "■lie. 



CHALLENGE 
FOR DEBATE 

Formal Invitation Sent 
to Open Shop Commit- 
tee by Unions. 

Labor Men Want to Meet 

Walter Drew on 

Platform. 



Walter H. Dr* 
the National Man 
tlon, has been cha 
bale on the up^-n 
Federated Trader 
lange ha^ Ijten i 
Dwighl K. Woodbi 
open shop C(»mn 
l>rt w accept, seim 
sembly, probably "> 
be selected to me« 
unions say It is 
setting public opin 
ject that the deba 
of Mr. I)(^'s ch:i 
ions ;ire branded 
Following i.s the 
■I'wlKhi E. V 
UfK ri .Shop' comn 
chang< , Dulufh. M 
trade utdoris hnvi- 
•iiid mlsrtprc.s* nteii 
malntiilninK th« u 
been c'liarK<'(l with 
ol til" pronrtbs ot I 
orKJiiiizations of In. 
hidu(''(i to ojiposf 
liwul,' \)\ Diir oppon 

iIlLT il-; ;ui I ppcjrl 

.■■ ■ i\ IS, 

< >:.■ , M: 1 >rew, 
Natleiiai .\ssoci;iti<. 
In u .Hpeech b»fon- 
i.*-- allt-xed to havf 
iiCeii.xatioiis ;tKHins 
prai-'.iifs of Iiulult 
that we ;iri- In a i 
lii.s statnienti:^ are 
end wc h<'ri-t»y el 
cbhatf with u repi 
.•«iribly on any siuli 
tually UKrcC'd upn 
contentions at I.^^SU' 

"The pro[Hi.se<l dt 
a pulilic hull, and 
kHoWMIk where Ule 
lilt iMtlu.strial euri 

■"TruHtinie lh:it | 
from you. I 

'•yeer«'tary !•"' il' i :i : 
George H. Haw 
Minnisota State 
arrived In the ( 
Haw ley is here to 
at ion, but say.s 1 
whatever In the 
ganized labor's Hi<; 
the open .sla>p. H 
ion that the man 
palgn is in hands 
pable. The state 
a report of the 
Gompers. pre.sidei 
Fedt ration of I..: 
hanfly likely tha 
come to Duluth. ^ 
slon, Mr. Gomper 
kiokinjf after legi.*- 
iOK lal'or, be.side.-^ 
work. Mr.IIawley ' 
derst<Kid that his p 
signify his lakinj 
>;de of the froub 
will be left in tlii 
wliosf efforts thu 
tirt ;y satl.sfactory 
The eontractois 
are on the watch 
here an<! the Twii 
being to Influence 
t(t keep auay fron 
empiiatiially '!• n 
truth to this It p. 



V, repn-sentative of 
ufacturers' a.s.socia- 
llenged to public de- 
ihop <iue»tlon by the 
assembly. The chal- 
JKued in writing, to 
Idge, secretary of the 
litffe. .'Should Mr. 
'-. man from the as- 
'< . i; McEwen, would 
I hnn in debate. The 
for the purpo.se of 
Ion right on the sub- 
te Ks desired. Many 

rges against the un- 
i.s false, 
challenge: 

oodbridge. secretary 

Itlte. Hullders' ex- 

nn. r>iar Sir: The 

detn ^rtKSSly maligned 

In thf-ir effort al 

uon Bhop. We have 

Htanding in the way 

)ulijth. Hepresentative 

siness men h.ive been 

us upon a.'cusations 

•nts. and without giv- 

mity to defend our- 

.said to repre.«ent the 
n of MMnufaeiurer.s. 
the Commercial club, 
inadn some 'startling' 
the method.« and 
1 unions. W'f believe 
KisUion to pmve that 
lot true, and to tliat 
allmge Mr. I)r»w to 
fc.st-ntative of itii.s a.s- 
jeet that may be nm- 
1. hearing upon the 

ixitf shall be held In 
Is for the purpo.«e of 
right llt.M in the pres- 
'liet in this city, 
may hear favorably 
■ irs v«rv truly. 

"Iv F. PKTliRS. 
'd Tratles assembly. " 
;ey, piesidenl of the 
i'Vderatlon of Labor, 
ity yesterday. Mr. 
Investigate the situ- 
e will take no part 
management of or- 
e of the fight against 
t* expres.ses the opin- 
igement of the cam- 
that are entirely ca- 
presldent will n.ake 
situation to Samuel 
It of the American 
bor, but says it is 
t Mr. Gompers will 
V'lth congress in .ses- 
' is kept pretty busy 
latlve matters affect- 
his regular routine 
vants it distinctly un- 
■esence here does not 
r hold of the union 
e. The management 
hands of local men, 
s far have been en- 
lo organized labor, 
claim that pickets 
at stations between 
• 'Ities, thiir mission 
Incoming mechanic:-' 
I ruiluth. The unions 
th.it tin r»- is any 
'•t. 




MmKK (Ji'Lli f.t TCH'i'. 
Lei n don, I'ec. IC— The .'^uni of about 
|r.(i(i.«'<iit In gold availabie in the t'p«-n 
ni..rkt t today, v\ :i.'< s. cured by the I'lil- 
ted States al an atlvanee of three 
faithings ovei till last (jiiotaliori. 



OhrMmms Is UnpleasMii 

Unless your personal appearancTe is equal 
to that of your associates. Correct and 
Neat Dress is a personal duty. This 
In aU cases does not mean an expensive 
attfre, just a becoming style and per- 
fect fit, which we guarantee. Wo in- 
vite you to investigate our stock and 
regular terms of Small 'Weekly Pay- 
ments. 



THIS IS 



GATELVS 



A Christmas Gift! 



Prom now until Xmas we thall present with every suit 
or overcoat, a nice, handsome watch, guaranteed to keep per- 
fect time. It is free for the asking, and if you don't need it 
yourfcelf, it will make a very suitable Xmas gift for a friend. 

Oair Suit and Overcoat qualities are unquestioned and our 
prices have not been tampered with to create so-called "Sale 
Sensations," but run at honest prices, as follows: 

$10.00, $12.50, $15.00, (18.00, 
$20.00, $25.00 and $30.00 




*^' 





We Present This 
Watch With Any 

SuitorO'coat 



##. A, NELSON, 
iVigrm 



B Eomt SukbbHo^ Streeim 





HEARING IS 
PO^rPONED 

The interstate Commerce 

Commission Will Come 

to Duluth. 



TRAINS ARE 
INSTALLED 

Regular Service Now Es- 
tablished Over Rainy 
Lake Road. 



50 



Cards, e)VC 



rriiittti iti tilt- latt^t .■-t} It.s 
cf type. 

Card Engraving 

and Steel Die 

Embossing 

For the Holiday Trade. 
I'lacf your orders at 
oncf if veil want yciir 
w oik eoin|)Ktcd for 
( I'iriNtiuas. 

Bargains in 
Stationery 

( lood ([iiality Lint-n 
Lawn Taper and I'nvcl- 
oi>is. at 10c per quire. 



CONSOLIDATED 

STAMP AND 

PRINTING CO. 

14 Fourth Avenue W. 



BAD GANG 
BROKEN UP 

four Alleged Members 

of Christiania Gang 

Are in Custody. 

Two Are Arrested for 

Hold-Up Affair in 

Superior. 



1 Wiih the .irres' In Superior of Gust 

' .\i l^ol. and < ii irv Selmer, alias George I 

Olson, lolli.uing so (luickly after the! 

capture of Tojii .\nder.son in I»u!uth. i 

t!,. |.. ;ii e li.nM that the e'hrlstiania I 

K.iKK ii! wliose loor numerous burg- . 

iMi.s, lioid-upfi aid Was .Herious crimes 

h;tv< l'« .' :.. i I ,..^ been broken up. 

I The polire beiie- e that Nel««)n. Selmer I 

an<l AndM-^on were the rlng-le.iders of j 

li.e K.iri).- ; he real operators, while the 

other memt»ers. numbering s«>me five i 

or .«lx. steered u« suspecting woodsmen j 

into Howery dlvtK or dark holes, that 

' they might he r«' ieved of their rolls. 

After a hearing in municipal court 
t Saturday afteriMMUi, Anderson was 
' committed to the grand jury and it Is 
l>ellcv«d that hit trial in court will 
! mark the last «d the I'hristiania gang 
in Duluth. And* rson has been identi- 
li< d as one of tl.e men, who held up 
I jiiui nddied Jostpii t'harnage. a wtK>ds- 
( man. In a restamant on West Superior 
j stre. t last Thurs lay night. 
' The two men arrested in .''uperlor 
1 are .«aid to ha\e bt.en surprised in the 
, lu t of knoekintr i man d»>wn and rob- 
bing him and th\v tire due for a trial 
■in the ctnirts of the Wisconsin city. 
With those three men <Kit of the way. 
the other membe s of the gang, said to 
fjbe weak of counige. and short of men- 
[tal capacity, will umloubtedly not con- 
tin 



ue operation."! and the Howery will 




kntiw thi tMirlsti mia gang no more. 
I t'hrist Johnson arraigned in munlci- 
I pal court this inoridng on a drunk 
''■barge, Js b»;2b_;vod ^o be a member of 
I tm- gang. The pOilCe liav^en { tiViy i&ngi. 
j ble evidence yet, on which to prosecute 

him for some of the ilepredations they 
' believe he was i nplicated In, but they 
j are working on the case an«l hope to 

get the remalnd r of the gang, .hdin- 

scm was given $0 and costs or tlfteen 

days and while 'ic is behind the bars. 

the police expec to learn mor of him 

and his connecth-ns. 



Matter of Railroad Dis- 
crimination Will be 
Taken Up Here. 



The hearing granted l^u^ Duluth Com- 
merclal club Vy the Interstate comnierce 
. < inmission, relative to th< Injustice be- 
ing done ty the Omaha, Northern I'ac!- : 
fie and Great Northern roadt^, in granting 
free storage fccilities at the Hei;d ot the ^ 
l.rf.kcs to Twin City business houses, j 
which was t<. have h»en held at 8t. Paul [ 
next Wednesday, will be postponed, and 
will be held in L>uluth at a l«ter date. 

ItriKiaally it was announced that the 
hearing would be h« Id in Dulutii. Wed- 
nesday, but later the place wa« changed 
to St. Paul. This did not meet v/ith the 
wishes of the Duluth Interests, and the 
C'onur.ere.al club s«nl a telegraphic re- 
<iutst that the hearing be held here, as 
first planned. An answer was received 
this niorn.i.g, to the efftn that It would 
be inipossibl* for the Interstate commerce 
eomniisslon to he here Dec. 1}<. but that, 
if agre«at>le to this city, the eominls- 
sion would arrange to be here at u later 

This arrangement Is perfectly satisfac- 
tory to Duluth, and the commission has 
been so notified. The date for the post- 
iM.ne<l hearing ha-s not yet t»een set. but 
It wdl be announced vei'y soon. It Is ex- 
pected. It Is considered very desirable 
that the heating sh<.uld be In L>uluth. for 
local Interests will then have a much bet- 
ter opportunity to give their side of the 
case, and Introduee the testimony of var- 
ious wUn»-ssts that might he unable to 
uppe.'ir l>«ror» thf commission m St. Paul. 

l^uhith tuisintss intertst.- an thorough- 
ly aroused to the great importance of 
this jnatft r. .•«? affecting the fut\ire <om- 
merelal w« Itarr of the city, and there will 
l(t a strong pr« ."» niatlon ol tht lase made 
iN'fore llu' eoiniiiission. With the vv\' 
dence at hand. U looks very much as f 
a favorablt decision would he rendered. 

('(HTKRFRKSIDENT. 

DiiTftors of Re-Orpanized Per« 
Marquette Ruad Huld a Meeting. 

iKtroit, Mich., Dec. 16.— Ii was an- 
nounctd al the gen< ral office here t>f the 
Pere Mar(:uette railroad today that at the 
first directors" meeting of the reorganized 
Pere Marguette Itailroad comr<any, held 
yestt>r.lHy m New York, Will-am Cotter 
was ♦lecttd presidmt of the road. Mr. 
Cotter ha.s l>»in g« neral manager of tho 
Pere Marouette since Oct. 1. IftH. George 
W. Perkins of N< w York wap elected 
chairman of the liojird; Frederick H. 

I Stevens of IHtroit. gem ral solkitor; J. E. 

j Howard. Cinclnn.'iti, s^eretary and treas- 
urer, and J. L. Cramer, Cincinnati, comp- 

, troller. 

Th«' receivership Of Judson Harmon of 
Cincinnati will end at midnight tonight, 
wh«n he will turn over the Pere Mor- 
fiuette system to the officers of the le- 
orgamzed company. 

Ontiinisni Phicards. 

^.,«H.al railroad otiicials are r«celvlng 
■"opttmism" signs from New Yt rk, l>ear- 
Ing the words "We are advance agents 
of optimism. Good times talk .brines good 
tlm«s.' The placards contain no adver- 
tising, and there is nothing to Indicate 
who Is sending them out. They are ac- 
companitd by a requvst that they be hun^ 
In a conspicuous place, where the public 
may see th«'m. The supfi>sition is that 
believers In auto-suggestion have some- 
thing to do in getting them out. 



Possible to Travel Direct 

Prom Duluth to 

Ranler. 



Nortliern train, which arrived in Duluth 
at 3:40 this afternoon. 

On tlie return trip, the Rainy Lake train 
left Virginia at l-:40 p. m. The same 
schedule will be maintained right along. 
Tlie trip from Duluth to Ranier may be 
made by taking the Missabe morning 
train Out of Duluth at 7:40 o'clock. This 
makes good connection with the passen- 
ger train on the Rainy Lake line. To 
begin witii. there will be only one train 
a day each way over the new line. The 
pjussenger rate from I>uluth to Ranier la 
p..M Freight rates will be ready for tlie 
shippers by Wednesday, It is expected. 

C>fficers of the Rainv I.~ike road and a 
party of Virginia business men left 
Virginia yesterday afternoon for Ranier. 
in order to be on board the passenger 
train on its first trit) over the new road. 
Through train service to Winnipeg will 
\h- establislod early in the spring, upon 
the completitm of the bridge over the 
Rainy river. Ranier is a town located on 
the river about two and one-half miles 
from International Falls. 

C. Foss left l>uluth this morning for 
Ranier to becom< agent for the Rainy 
iLake road at the border town. 



evening, wh»n the traffic i.s hea\y. As y^j.yjjg ^^^ Magellan by such an ar- 
thmgs are al present, it is not a veiy ' , j^ .. miise 1«? <?nccp<?«<fuilv 

good advertisement for two up-to-date , "^^°^- ,, " .'^"*^ , , . .! successiuJiy 
cities like Duluth and Superior. If, as I ac*-'0>"Pl5shed, and if at its end, as ti e 
we often hear, the street radway com- j program contemplates, the vesscds aro 
pany officials are unable to cope with 'able to engage in target practice, thU3 
the situation. I would say that It is up to demonstrating their readiness to meet 
the street railway company to Put on i a hostile fleet, the whole naval world 

{"^2 *^a.-.i^''"w^L^r,"'!hl°Jir''''ii onH ^.^ilJ ^^^^ ^ff Its hat in admiratioH. 

long waitmer between the car.a around b „,, . „..,, ,, „ , ^ „„._„,;„., „*• ,», ^ 

oclock every evening has as a natural I ^^I's. ^^^" ^.e a demonstration of the 
result, th( overloading of the cars, and efficiency of the crews and the ships 
half of the passeng.-rs have to be con- of the American navy which will make 
tent with hardly space enough for stand- even tlie English navy look to ita 
Ing room. But this Is solid comfort In ! laurels." 

comparison to what It is when tills ■ 

crowd gets alxiard the ferry, wliich is i /-iii'nci n t \i t i-ft^\ ivi-^ C'U ikiti\ 
loaded (as it would seem) with reckkssf lirjl^ IJAMAuh.l {.iF J^^,UvU. 



disregard of capacity or po.>-.slble conse- 
quences. There Is certainly chance for 
improvements, but It seems ihey are very 
slow In commg. 

A PASSENGER. 
Duluth. Dec. 14. 



De Witt's Kidney and Bladder Pills 
afford quick relief for all formg of kidney 
and bhulder trouble A week's treatment, 
2Ic. Sold by all druggists. 



Regular train service over the Canadian 
border extension of the Duluth. . Rainy 
Lake & Virginia road wa-s established 
t<Klay. The lirst regular passenger train 
to bo sent over the lint started from 
Ranier, Minn., at b o'clock this morn- 
ing arriving at Virginia. Minn., in time 
to connect with the Duluth. Missabe & 



A. B. Sieti/ert rSl Co. 

For His 
Christmas 

Why look fur- 
ther than our 
Habe rdashery 
Shop. Everything 
here that a man 
prizes and most 
desires. 

Fashion's latest 
dictates in Cra- 
vats, Neck Scarfs, 
etc. Fancy Vests, 
Evening Dress ne- 
c e s s i t i e s, Dun- 
lap Siik and 
Opera Hats, Hos- 
iery par excel- 
lence. A Glove 
certificate — good 
idea, let him select 
them himself. 
Bath and Loung- 
ing Robes, Smok- 
ing Jackets, etc. 

Our own spe- 
cial import Steam- 
er or Auto Rugs 
from London. 

Every atten- 
tion, courtesy and 
service accorded 
tq ladies, 

' You arc cor- 
dially invited to 
pass judgment on 
our Holiday stock. 

A. B. Sietifert i^ Co, 



RINKS FOR BIG 
CURLING MATCH 

Games for Manley-Mc- 

Lennan Trophy to be 

Played This Week. 

The fOilowlng rinks have been chosen 
by the board of directors of the Du- 
luth Curling club to play against Supe- 
rior In the first game of the Manley- 
MiLennan contest, to be played this 
wet k Jibout Dec. 18 or 19: 
M. A. MacLennan, W. C. Rochler, 



Miss MeKeiizie Was Courted Seven- 
teen Years and Then Jilted. 

Des Moines, Dec. 16.— Miss Winifred 
McKenzle. a schoolma'am at Hampton, 
Iowa, has been awarded damag<-s of 
IS.fiOti from J. B. Gray, who courted 

her seventeen years under a promise 
I of marriage .ind then eloped with a 
Des Mtdiies woman last June. The jury 
brought in its verdict atn-r thirty-four 
hours' delllieratitin. Miss M< Kenzl© 
sued for %'l^.i*.<0. Every member of the 
.iury favored giving n<r |2(s(iOe <'xeept 
Foreman .S. N. Main, wiio stuck for 
fS.CtO until forced to conipremise. 

The jury awarded C. A. Myers |5,<iC0 
from the Norwood Coal company. He 
was driving a mule which sat down on 
hir.i. causing tuberculosis. 



FRENCHMEN 

INTERESTED 

In Long Cruise of Amer- 
ican Battleships to 
the Pacific. 

Paris, Dec. 16. — French naval officc^rs 
are intensely interested in the cruise of {^^ ^IBERJACK'S FAT.4L 8PKEE. 

the American battlesliip sciuadron to the \ 

Pacific. As a professional feat they re-' Bemidj!. Minn.. Dec. 16.— (.Special to 
gard it to be surrounded by almo.9t The Herald.)— John Mooney of Brain- 
insurmountable difficultie.'*. Capt. trd. better known as '"Whitey," died 
„ . . „, , . «. I , ,1 very suddenly, while sitting in a chair 
Faber of the general staff said Id-1j,^ ^ ^^1^,^^ ^^ Minnesota avenue from 



A "WHITE LILY " shampoo! Simply- 
delightful !! 



day: 

"The financial resources of America 
make the problem of coaling the fleet 



W. C. Harris 
F. A. Currier. 
R. J. McLeod. 

Skip. 
M. W. Allworth. 
Thomas Gibson, 
Jc)seph Callln, 
Ron Smith. 

Skip 



S. H. Jones, 

C. T. l-\ilrbalrn. 

H. Ilurdon. 

Skip. 
G H. Spencer, 

C. C. Staaeke, 

D. W. Stocking, 
C. A. Duncan. 

Skip. 



It is the annu.al match for the trophy, 
and the winner will meet the Western 
Curling club. 

The present cold snap has put the ice 
in condition and thr rink will open 
for curling and skating tonight. 



Duluth Lod^e No. 10, 

A. O. U. W. will give a stag card party 
tomorrow evening, Dec. 17, at Its hall, 
18 Lake avenue north. Paster Master 
Workman William J. Stephens will also 
give an address on "Fraternal Insur- 
ance and New Rate Plans." ( »ne of the 
largest meetings of the year is ex- 
pected as Mr. .Stephens is well posted 
on fraternal and old line rate plans, 
and his talk is sure to be well worth 
hearing. 

SLPEKKIR MAN TRYING 

T(l COLLEq' JUDGMENT. 

Chippewa Falls, Wis.. Dec. 16.— War- 
ren E. McCord of Superior, one of the 
Northwe8t"s well-known lumbermen, Js 
trying to collect about $15.(KH) frjm 
William McKinnon and H. S. Ackley of 
this city, and under the "discovery" 
statute is trying to locate some of their 
property. The $lo,0(>0 Is a judgment re- 
ceived In the state supreme court last j 
summer by Mr. McCord in a litigation | 
which has lasted over fifteen years. and| 
had been tried three times in the su- 
supreme court, three times in the 
state and once in the United States 
supreme court. 



natural causes. 

Mooney. a lumberjack, had been 
around Brainerd and Bemidji for sev- 
eral years past, and he had acquired 
comparatively easy, but there are three j^jj ^y^^ habits of the fraternitv. includ- 
great difficulties— first, to keep so many , j^g ^y.^ periodical Indulgence in strong 
units together; second, to prt)vision and. drink, which usually lasts until all 
repair the ships in the event of an ac- finances are gone and health in bad 
cident, and third, the navigation of the I ^.(^^^{(i,,^ 



D. E. H., Dec. 16, 1907. 




Street Cars to Superior. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

How long, O Lord, how long? This is 
the prevailing cry amon^ the longsuffer- 
ing public who are regular patrons of the 
street railway between puluth an.d Su- 
perior. 1 liave been a long time waiting 
to se^i some article In the paptrs In regard 
to this, but it seems that everybody Is 
determined to suffer in silence. T would, 
however, suggest that we might better 
do all in our power to call the attention 
of the public at large and the city official.? 
of Duluth and Superior to existing condi- 
tions, as I understand wc are supposed to 
have a lO-mlnute s(r\'ice. but this Is most 
of the time stretched to fifteen and often- 
times twenty minutes. We ought at least 
to have a b-minute service morning; an^ 



Fine Umbrellas 



Duluth never savi' such a line of Umbrellas for both 
men and women as The Columbia now shows. 

From the $1 kind to the Extra Fine and from the 
Ordinary Congo handle up to the solid gold. The inost 
artistic designs, such as Buckhorns, Ivory, Polished Horn, 
Mother of Pearl, Sterling Silver. Gun Metal and ell the 
natural woods. These handles are all on the very latest 
Paragon frames and the quality of silks to match aa 
near as possible the quality of the handle. 

Umbrellas for the little fellows at $1. A pleasing 
Xmas gift. 



Columbia aothing Co. 



_^^»»« 



MiM 




i^ 



j-f^: 




■ ■ — !■ 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



15 



s. F. STAPLES ! TESSMAN WARNS HIS 

FRIENDS OF ROORBACKS 



im/ 



ALDERMAN OF SECOND WARD. 

I have served mie term and am 
seeking re-election on the follow- 
ing groun<ls: 

1 have done what I thought was 
yi^ht in all matters of Municipal 
Legislation and have advanced tiie 
interests of the Second Ward to 
the best of my ability. 

1 have urged the sale of the 
Bonds for the Hillsdale Water 
System and done all in my power 
to hurry the completion of the 
same. 

I introduced and helped pass two 
ordinances that, when put in force, 
will compel the street railway com- 
pany to provide better service. 

I got an appropriation through 
the Conference Committee of $r,- 
200 for the purcha -ite for tire 

hall near Fifth a^tinc east and 
Seventh street. 

Ah chairman i»f the Purchasing 

ind Supplies Committee I saved 

!!i ■ City nearly my salary for one 

year on the matter of city printing 

alone. 

No citizen of my ward has ever 
asked me to bring before the 
Council any matter, however small 
It might be. that has not received 
uiy immediate personal attention. 

W'itli the aid of my colleague we 
have huUt more sidewalks, im- 
pr<ived more streets and placed 
mart- lights in the Second Ward 
during my term than any two 
years previous. 

S. r. STAPLES. 



Says He Will 

Hands Free 

Elected. 



Have 



His Workers Claim 
Ward in City But 
First 



if 



Every 



a THE PRIM AIIY CONTESTS. 

O — <* 

Miiyor-Enill 'lowjiinun and >I. B. Q 

O Calluni, Dcino-rutM. O 

•O Vlrtit ^\urt^ A. C;. .McKniKlit Oi 

O "ml ^V. H. KoukltT, Republlojins. Q 

Sei'und wnrd KdwHrd K. 1. Imlk, O 

O Jain«'M I., t'r.tuiwell «Hd S. 1'. O 

gStnitlfM, Repul llfuuM. 

Fifth wjird- l». .Malnella, I.yle S. 

Mender. Joliu E. Room*. Repub- O 

gllcnnn. .Ma.* Cleiiienx. John 

IIuKiiii and John .MoUouuell, O 

I>enio<*rata. ti 

Seventh wa-d-Krank SohalTer 

and Otto Johimon, Uenioorat.H. 

0000000000^i000<t0Ori><>CM>0<^ 

Toda.v is the hst day of the hottest 
primary fight Oul ith has ever witnessed, 
and tomoirow tie voters will r»>sl.>tcr 
their decision on the various candidates. 
The poUs will be open from 6 a. m. to » 
p. m. 

"I would like to warn my friends 
aKalnst campaign roorbacks sprunff at lii 



contest with three candldatsB for each 
nomination. The average voter who 
.shuts his eyes and draws a name from 
tho lUt. would stand a« much chance of 
pirklnK the winners, as the wisest of the 
politicians. 

* • * 

In the Seventh ward Otto Johnson 
and Frank Schaffer are flghtlngr it out. 
with the odds even, and the ward sure 
of a Kood representative whoever 
wlti.s. The West onders know Mr. 
Si-haffer's record as an alderman, and 
this fact will doubtless win him tho 
support of many of the voters of tho 
ward. 

• • * 

In spite of the endorsement given Mr. 
MiKnii^ht by a number of the Influen- 
tial titizena of the First ward, friends 
of Dr. KonkKr havo by no mk>Ans "laid 
down. ■ In fact, they claim hla elec- 
tion by a small majority. They assert 
tliat thoy have made a house to house 
caiiva.ss of the ward, and that thejr 
candidate stands a little better than an 
even chance of victory. 



lyPEIRQOi iEW 



THINK IT UNJUST. 






SoriKtlmea ever r of thi.s paper 

will read your aii. Ai other times, one 
In ten. It depends r>u the ad. 



Superior People Exercised Over 
Peddlers' License Law. 

Pe<3ple in Superior who are Interested 
in the development of the agricultural 
lands about the city are much ex«t- 
cisfd over the law relative to licenses 
for peddlers, hawkers, milkmen, etc. 
Although Deputy State Agent Burresa 
ha.s mjt yet taken any action toward 
pixjsocuttng any of the local milkmen, 
he is said to have halted Paul Bross, a 
last moment." said Mr. Tessman this i farmer, who was selling poultry direct 
morning. "I ha. re made no promise? to the trade. 

which will embai rass me after election, j A.ssistant City Attorney Dietrich 
and will enter th« mayors office, ii 1 dJ J claims that It Is an injustice to the 
enter, with my ; kirts free of all cam- . milkmen and the farmers to bring them 
palgn I'»^'^is;^'?- ^1.1 prepared to give ^U^^^ ^ , ^ ^^ asserts that the 

ptople ot Duluth the be^il adm nlstratlon ^ u » ..w u „♦„«•> ;„ n,^ 

that Is within my powt-r. Any storie.> ; law would not "hold water in ths 
that may be pul iisiied or circulated to ' courts. 

the contrary are alse." | A fisherman, who was compelled by 

Tessman headt uarters this morninj; , the state agent to take out a $30 licimse 
were probably tin- busiest place In pu- i to operate a push-cart in the city, has 
lull. Three leKa Hones were buzzing al- | retained an attorney, and will make 
c"owded"?;om V"o clock thl^moS wifil j an effort to have hi. nmney refunded, 
frif-nd-s of the < andidate, anil work< rs 



Violates Court's Order. 



from tht various wards bringing in their 

'^'fhe ''outlook wa i certainly rosy, and at PVank Valley, a former mombor of 
noon today Mi naa^er •Billy" Smitli . the police force, was arrested Saturday 
claimed tliat Mr Tes.snian's nominatloa j on the charge of violating the court's 
wa.s almost a certainty. i injunction that he should not interfere 

The To:jSinan lollowers are claiming 
ev 

j^orU.v'^ln'^Tire Ffrir waTdr'bur cU:7n tiiat ; claimed that Valley visited the houste. 
Mr. Te.<»sman will carry every other ward | kicked the door and threatened to do 



The Tessman lollowers are claiming | ^.■^^^^ Y\\a family, pending a divorce ac- 
very ward m tie city but the First.],, otarifvi hv M.-s V'allev It is 

•he concede May Jr Cullum a small ma- i """ ^[.S^\ ,-*,,'•. ,) ^J Z' u ,..„ 



Plans Being Made for 

Highway fir District 

on the Hili. 

Line Along Course of 

Brewery Creek Has 

Easy Grade. 



The surveys being Qiade by the city 
engineer's office to determine, if possl- j 
tole, a line for a road to Duluth Heights, 
with a less accentuated grade than that 
of the highway now used between Du- 
luth and the district on the hill, is bear- I 
ing fruit and it is believed a course 
has been found, which will give the re- 
sults desired. 

The proposed line, on which the en- 
gineers are now working, follows the 
course of Brewery creek, beginning at 
Seventh avenue east and Sixth street. 
A line is being run along the bank of 
the creek, the grade of which is ea.«?y 
and feasible for a roadway. At the 
boulevard, the creek passes under tho 
roadway and were the proposed new 
road to cross on a level with the boule- 
vard, a fill of about fifty feet would 
be liecessary. The plans being laid 
out, therefor, call f^f a tunnel under 
the boulevard at that point, quite an 
undertaking, but l«Ss expensive and 
more desirable than the lilling process. 

Proceeding from the boulevard, the 
line continues along the course of the 
creek to the Rice Lake road, joining 
that highway aboiJr three-quarters of 
a mile from Dulii^^ Heights, in the 
plat of the Highlaif||:Addition. 

The proposed new iittad is being laid 
out for the purpose of providing a 
thoroughfare, which will be useful both 
ways, so to speak. At the present time, 
the farmers at Hermantown and the 
other districts are able to bring loads 
down the hill, but tiie grade Is so steep 
that a return with Uk ordinary load is 
impo."5sible and sup^M are transported 
to the farms only wTth difficulty. 

The proposed new road, it is believed, 
will obviate many of the defects of the 
road now in use, and the people inter- 
ested are working strenuously to bring 
about its construction. 




CHICKERING 
PIANOS 









in the city. 

"The mayor wi i probably come out In 
the First ward \fhh a sm.all majority." 
said one of the piomiient Tessman worlt- 
»rs this morning "He may have fifty 



bodily harm to his wife. 



Held on Serious Charge. 

William VVinlock, who is being held 




will carry it. (ulluni may get a ma- ! morrow. VVinlock has bet^n held at 
jorltv In the Flnt precinct of the ward. | at the county jail pending Neumann'.^ 
but Tessman will more than wipe this ; injury, on the charge of attempting to 
out in the othe- three precli.cts. and j^jj, ^yj^^^^^ pj3^j.j.ig ^^j^,.,^ Neumann 
should come dov\n to the eastern <'di?« , died a few days ago from the effects 



of hi.«; wound, and the charge against 
Wintock haa been changed to a more 
serious one. 



Hi list mas Coinb Sale 

Tomorrow at Miss Horrignn's. 



notice: I 

THE CURLING RINK 

Is now open for both Curling and 
Skatin$(. ice in fine condition. 



Did you ever consider 
that we sell so many 
girives, shoes, behs, bags 
and suit cases as to be 
entitled to the name of 
the 

Leather Store 

This seas. '11 we have added 
a c MupletL' liiic ni pocket l)iioks 
— siirh cas.s a■^ men will really 
use — thin, compact and com- 
plete so as to fit into a hip 
pocket without a Inline. They 
are made oi Russia Calf, Alli- 
gat">r and I'i^skin Leather. 
Prices SI. 00 to $3.50. Fine for 
a ^itt^ Well, 1 should smile! 

Leather Novelties 

Th -n a very extensive line of 
Oentl.MU'n's Traveling neces- 

aan •». .^ueh ha Collar Bags, 
Handkerchief IIi)lder>!, Cuff and 
Ti.» Envelopes. Whi.st .Set.s, Play- 
ing '-'ardis in Leather Cases and 
all •>■" '<ttl.' thing.s that go to 
mak 'liniT a comfort. You 

will •• -nri)ris. d at what we fur- 
nish in thi.s line ev.n at so low 
a prlre as ." Oi. 

Nam^-s put on without extra 
charge. 

Bags and Cases 

La'lfes' and G'nitlemen's Trav- 
eling Bag.s and Suit Ca.'^es are 
one «>f this store s foremosts pe- 
(laltle;4. 11.50 and up to $50. 

Sum,- of the higher priced 
rases are filled with every toilet 
artlite necessary for a journey 
Ml' any extent. 

i'ovs- .School Suit Ca-ses at $1. 



of the Third war. I on an even basis with 
the mayor. If te can do that, there 
.should be nothing to U. You know what 
the Third ward will do for TesKman. and 
the Fourth. The Third is Mr. Tessman's 
home ward, and he knows nearly everv 
man. woman ana child in it. and has 
liardly an enemy n the wai^J. The Fourth 
will also give hii i a liand.^H>me oluniUty. 
The Fifth will !>,■ clo>er, but we expect 
to carry It, all hough the aldermanic 
lishi tli.T»- may ilso complicate matters. 
The Sixth is the mayors strongest ward 
outside the F'irst. and he may give us I 
a hard fight th. re. His workers lia/e 
t>een tellin>r tho tt-mperance people of 
the ward— and t ley are strong there — 
that tlie mayor vas resp<insiblo for put- 
ting on the Ud. whereas in working 
among the salooi men. they claim th.it 
the attornrty general did It. In spite 
of this, however, we exptct to carry the !'- 
Siiixth. for many .»{ the voters are not as , 
easily fooled as that, and they know 
something about the lid affair them- 
selves. 

•The reports 'rom the Seventh and 
Eighth wards ar-t most encouraging. We 
will carry both oi them, the Eigiith prob- 
ably stronger than the Seventh. The 
mayor's dreams of playgrounds and cheap 
homes didn't ma<e much of an Impres- 
sion out In the I^lghth ward, among th'.- 
workingnien the e. They know what 
ttixes they are j^aylng. in spite of the 
fact that the mayor h;*s had two terms 
to wi>rk out his plans, and we count on 
carrying West D iluth." 
» • « 

Some of the w .rd contests are gettmg 
surprisingly war n. not.ab!y the Second 
and Fifth. In th.- S»'Cond ward Janle..^ L. 
Cromwell. S. F. Staples and PMwar-l 
I'halk are In a merry free for all. for 
the R. publican i ominallon, and it looks 
about like an e\ en break, with St.aples 
the favorite if ther*^ is any favorite. All ' reaching the Golden Gate city Nov. 
three men are well known In the ward 
and they are mating a red hot canvass. 



LOOKS BAD AT 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Felix Selegman Returns 

From Voyage on the 

Winnebago. 

Felix Seligman. Jr., who went to 
J^.m Francisco on the vessel Winne- 
bago, which left Duluth last August, 




T\\ 






liK.S 



DCLUTH A.Nl) SUPiiRlOR. 
Every ColiKnbla article is absolute- 
ly guaranteed. If not satisfactory, 
it may bo brought back at any time 
and exchanged for a new one. 



W. H. KONKLER, 

Candidate for the Republican nom- 
ination for alderman in the First 
Ward. Mr. Conkler, who is one 
of the pioneer residents of Lake- 
side, stands f r r the upbuilding of a 
Greater Duluth; for an economical 
yet progressi /e administration of 
the city's afJiirs: for a fair and 
equitable tax rate that will attract 
manufacturing enterprises; for the 
opening up and improvement of 
streets; for a radical improvement 
in the street car service to the sub- 
urbs: FOR BSTTER LIGHTNIG 
OF SUBURBAN STREETS: and 
for the openirg and beautifying of 
the parks of Woodland and Lake- 
side, the city's natural beauty spots. 
Residents of the First Ward will 
find it to their interests TO VOTE 
TOMORROV/ FOR W. H. 
KONKLER for alderman in the 
First Ward. 



j 30, after encountering rough weather 
j In the passage of the straits of Magel- 
Fhe fifth ward offers Just as warm a , ^^n. that came very near wrecking the 
— ■ I light boat, returned to this city yester- 

|day. 

i Young Seligman says that conditions 
in San Francisco are beginning to look 
, serious. He came home to get a square 
\ meal. For the last month they have 
i fed the sailors on hash, .served for 
; breakfast, dinner and supper, he says. 
I Vesaelmen were obliged to pay 10 per 
I cent tor getting their checks cashed, 
and the same condition holds true in 
regard to the great body of laborers, 
\ who are employed in the building oper- 
ations in the city. 

He says that many of the men em- 
ployed upon the nUlroad extension are 
i unable to cash their scrip, unle.ss they 
' are willing to permit men to cash the 
checks who will charge a heavy dis- 
count. The financial stringency .seems 
1 to be felt with particular emphasis at 
\ San Francisco because of the sharp 
reaction following close upon the ex- 
I cessive wage scale and general pros- 
; ptrity that the labor class were enjoy- 
; ing under the rule of unionism. The 
i throwing out of work of a large num- 
\ bor of men. the stopping of work on 
many of the buildings, which are in an 
inromplete state, coupled with the 
money llghteness, threatens to worlf 
.stvere sutTering before San Francises 
! can weather the storm that local con- 
i ditions have contributed a great deal 
1 to bring about. 

i A great amount of money has been 

\ borrowed to erect expensive buildings. 

Excessive rents were charged, to get 

back this money, but now the money 

shortage threatens to work a serious 

\ business tieup In all lines and trades. 

I The young man says that but little 

i trouble was encountered on the trip 

' to the coast until the straits were 

reached. Here they met a territlc gale. 

The Winnebago is a light craft and for 

a while it seemed as if the ve.'?sel would 

be lost. It was tossed about on the 

hea\T waves like a cork and every 

instant the members of the crew ex- 

f pected to be swept into a watery grave. 

j Finally the ve.ssel weathered the heavy 

' seas and struck a smooth sea. 

The Winnebago has been placed In 
service as a lumber boat in the Pacific 
coast lumber trade. 




SURVEYS BEING MADE. 

Preliminaries Undertaken to Con- 
struction of New Street Car Line. 

Surveys are beinff made for the im- 
provement of the road from the pres- 
ent termination of the street car lino 
at Woodland to the northern limits of 
the city, in :uccordance with the di- 
rections of the council, and soon a 
report will be ma^e, which will show 
the course to be pursued and the cost 
of improving it, so as to allow the con- 
struction of the proposed street car 
system to the Jean Duluth farm. 

The proposed line louvers the end of 
the system at Waodiand, near Hardy 
street, follows the Snively road to the 
East Duluth and Dester river road, con- 
tinuing along that to the city limits, 
near the Joan Duluth farm. The lino 
is designed to furnish the farmers on 
'the route a means of communication 
i with the buslnes.s part of tho city and, 
I if constructed, it is believed It w ill 
prove a large factor in the building up 
of that portion of the city. 

IS APPOINTED RECEIVER. 

Minot. N. D.. Dec. 16.-( Special to The 
Herald..)— Dudley L. Nash, the White 
Earth attorney, has been appointed le- 
celvor of the Huh store In Minot and th ) 
Oiobe store at Willlston, owned by Frank 
Bros., who were forced Into liankniptcy 
with liabilities of $28,000 and assets of not 
more than $1S,000. with the chances that 
they will be less than that amount. 

HIS DEXTAL DRAWING ROOM. 

New York Sun; 'There certainly Is 
a good deal In a name," said the en- 
terprising dentist. "X good name or 
title may help a lot; but. on the other 
hand, even a ver>' good name may do 
a lot of harm if not happily used. 

"I remember the time when dentists 
began to soften the terrors of tooth 
treatment by hanging up signs read- 
ing, 'Painle.ss dentistry"; and It was 
within my day too that dentists set 
out to make their places more at- 
tractive to people by calling them 
'dental parlors.' 

"I had a sign up myself. 'Dental 
parlors." and 1 thought It was a good 
thing, but when I came to think it 
over I thought I could improve on 
it. If 'dental parlor" was good, I 
thought, why shouldn't 'dental draw- 
ing room.' with Its larger suggestion 
of still greater comfort and lu.xury. 
be better? And that idea struck me 
quite hard, and I had made and 
hung up on the front of the build- 
ing over my office windows a fine 
gold sign reading: 'Deittal drawing 
room'; and then I waited calmly for 
the increased business that I thought 
that sign would surely bring. 

"But It didn't come. As a mat- 
ter of fact my business began to 
drop off from the day I put the new 
sign up; that Is, the transient busl- 
nes.s. My regular cn.stomers kept 
coming, but I didn't get nearly so 
many strangers, people who just 
dropped Into have a tooth pulled or 
a toothache stopped, and that sort of 
thing. 

"Finally, a wise man told me that 
It was all due to my new sign, which 
Instead of attracting peojde was ac- 
tually repelling them. 

'You see. In the narrow view that 




Can Be Purchased by Mail Advantageously. Our Inexpensive Mail Order 
Department Affords you the Convenience of Buying a Chickering Direct 
and Avoid the Annoyance of Dealing With Agents. 

THE CHICKERING 

is one of the very few artistic pianos made in this country and has unquestionably been 
awarded the highest honors of any piano in the world. Chickering & Son, Boston 

(makers of the only genuine Chicker- 
ing piano), have the distinction of be- 
ing the only pianoforte manufacturers 
in the United States awarded the Cross 
of the Legion of Honor by the French 
government. From an artistic and 
tonal standpoint the Chickering has 
maintained its supremacy during the 
entire 84 years the factory has been es- 
tablished. It is one of the most expen- 
sive pianos made, if price is the only 
thing considered, but when rightly 
judged — by durability and tonal charm 
— it is one of the cheapest pianos on the 
market. .It is made for those who de- 
sire and insist on having the best 
money will buy. 



Why Not Give Her a Chickering Christmas? 

If you will write our Duluth Store, catalog and full particulars will be mailed to 
you immediately, and you will be able to soyou immediately, and you will be able to sol 
ance whatever. 

HOWARD. FARWELL & CO., 

120 East Superior Street. 

W. J. ALLEN, Manager. 














I had taken of it, 'drawing room* 
meant to me, without the toothache, 
simply a gloritied parlor; while to a 
man with the toothache 'dental 
drawing room' instantly suggested 
painfully the Idea of a place for 
drawing teeth! 

"Why, it wouldn't do at all. Peo- 
ple just sheered off. instinctively, 
when thty saw that sign, and went 
around the corner to the soothing 
'dental parlor.' 

"So I j'anked down the 'dental 
drawing room,' right away, and put 
up again my old sign of 'dental 
parlor,' and got my share of the 
tian.sient business back again. That 
experi»*nce taught me one little les- 
son: That you want to think twice 
at least, and look at it from all 
sides before adopting a new busi- 
ne.ss title or trade mark, for the 
best of words may be worth less 
than nothing if not used fittingly." 



Perfumes — Toilet WateP8. 

Get them of Miss Horrlgan. 



Closing Out at 

HALF PRICE 

If you need any pf the aticles 
given below we c^rij.save you ex- 
actly one-half, as we are closing 
them out. i 

-J 

Pocket Knives* — Razors 

— Strops - Rifles —Cuff 

Buttons - Clialns — Pins 

— Asli Trays 

And other articK»"^Very desirabk 
Un Christmas remensbrances. The 
above are raoney-fsayers. 

125 E. Superior St. 



Opp. City Hall. 



fpen evenings. 



MOUNTAINS THAT DON'T EXIST. 

Outing: By far the neatest tale of 
Canadian mountaineering* concerns 
Mounts Brown and Hooker — myths now 
relegated to the limbo of Mount Iseram. 
In its palmy days alchemy fostered no 
such credulity as sways some .scientific 
map makers. Unexlsting Mount Till- 
man. Ala.ska, which had decorated 
maps for fifteen years, where the writer 
in 1900 first found a fiat plain, or the 
rubbery height of St. Eiias, wliieh has 
bobbed between 12,000 and 20,000 feet 
(even Ru.ssell cheated it by a sheer 
half mile) are not even good jokes be- 
side the 17,000 and 16.000 foot mountains 
which from 1827 on have been engraved 
on each side of the pass at the head of 
Athabasca river, with the "Commit- 
tee's Punch Bowl" between. Now, as a 
fact, the walls of this pass are only a 
few thousand feet high, and the punch 
bowl" is twenty yards wide! 

Neither the railway surveys, spend- 
ing $3,000,000. nor George Dawson him- 
self nailed the lie. That was done In 
a library by Collie after two seasons' 
expeditions and a year of worry. Ex- 
cept the maps and a hint in Palliser's 
journal linking Brown and Hooker with 
one Douglass, a botanist, of Dougless 
fir (Oregon pine) fame, no mention of 
them could be found In print until Col- 
lie struck Bancroft's '"History of Brit- 
ish Columbia." There the botanist's 
diary was cited. Collie dug It out. 
Douglas.s had crossed Athabasca Pass 
from Vancouver in 1827, camping In the 
eye of the pass on May 1. On the 
north lay a mountain, he wrote, "which 
does not appear to be less than 16,000 
or 17,000 feet high." But this three 
mile sheer park he climbed In a single 
afternoon— "which," as Collie naively 
observes, "was naturally absurd." The 
chance sayso of a botanist, but geogra- 
phers ate It alive! A Prof. Coleman 
had been in the pa.ss five years l>efore 
Collie, but finding no Brown and Hook- 
er, and seeing higher peaks to the west, 
imagined they had been mislocated. 
But these peaks then had names; the 
Brown and Hooker business Is no er- 
ror, but a hoax. During the Klondike 
rush, when the writer was just north 
of this region, trappers smiled and 
shook their heads when you asked 
about Brown and Hooker. They knew. 
Okographers are more guileless. 



difficult to see even a sharp and de- 
fined object thniugli a diamond. The 
single refraction of the diamond also 
allows one to determine an uncertain 
stone. 

"If the finger Is placed behind it and 
viewed through the stone with a 
watchmaker's glass, the grain of the 
skin will be plainly seen if the stone 
is not a diamond. But If it is a dia- 
mond the grain of the skin will not be 
di.-^tinguished at all. 

"A diamond in .solid settings may be 
identified in the same manner. If gen- 
uine, the setting at the back cannot 
be discerned, but if it is a phony stone 
the foil or setting will be seen. 

"There Is no acid which haa any per- 
ceptible effect upon a genuine diamond. 
Hydrofluoric acid, if dropped on a s.tone 
made of glass, will corrode It, but will 
not affect a diamond one way or the 
other. A trained eye can see the hard- 
ness in a diamond, whereas the imita- 
tions appear soft to the vision of the 
experts." 

CROQUET GOLF. 

Eben M. Byera. Pittsburg's famous 
golfer, was talking at a dinner about 
dawdling players. 

"Nothing is more vexatious." Mr. By- 
ers said, "Mian to follow one of these 
dawdlers over a course. They all should 
l3e served as a bow-legged chap was the 
other day. 

"He was playing at Englewood. His 
play was as slow as It was poor. Setting 
his warped k-gs wide apart, he would 
miss the easiest ball three or four tlme.-J 
handrunnlng. He was retarding half a 
dozen good, brisk players, but this he 
didn't seem to mind at all. 

"Finally one man. having drawn very 
near, lost patience, and with a neat shot 
sent his ball flying directly between the 
slow player's i)ow legs. 

"The slow player Jumped back In a 
great fright. Then he yelled angrily: 

" "Say. do you call that golf?' 

"'No.' said' the other;; 'but I call It 
pretty good croquet.' " 

THE GIRL GUIDE. 

Mrs. Chapman Sinnlckson, the Western 
lecturer, said in the course of a debate 
in St. Paul. 

••Why shouldn't woman vote? She is as 
clever as man. Clover*»r in some things. 
In affairs of the heart much cleverer. I 
used to know a pretty girl whom a 
young banker was courting timidly. One 
afternoon in the garden the banker 



scraped up courage enough to ask In a 
tremulous whisper for a kiss. The pretty 
girl looked at him gravely. 

" A kiss.' she said. Tou ask me for a 
kiss. Now, applied to the hand, a VXas 
signifies respect. On the forehead it de- 
notes friendship. Upon the lips it Indl- 
cate.s all things— or nothing.' 

"She paused pensively, then she went 
on: 

" yes, Hert)ert, you may, since you 
wish it. kiss me. You may express your- 
self In one kiss. Proceed.' 

■■'rh.» timid Herbert, red and confused, 
pondered. 

•■ "Jl luusn't lose her,' he muttered to 
hlm.self. Where then, shall I kiss herT 
The forehead, the hand? Through re- 
.spect and friendship love may eventual- 
ly be gained; but If I am at the start too 
bold-' 

'Suddenly his meditations were Inter- 
rupted by a trill of divinest melody. It 
was as if a niglitingale were singing. 
The young man look up. 

•"The girl was whistling, her red mouth 
puckered into the siiape of a rosebud. 
Her hat was pulled down over her eyes, 
hiding her forehead completely, and her 
hands were thrust up to the wrist In the 
pockets of her jacket." 



. HIGHEST CHIMNEY STACK. 

The highest chimney stack In Amer- 
ica 13 the new one at Kodak park. It 
Is 366 feet high and rests on an octagon 
foundation, which Is twenty-thre>e feet 
deep to bedrock; It is 40 feet across the 
flat sides of octagon at base and 30 feet 
at top. 

The base contains approximately 23,- 
000 cubic feet of concrete and weighs 
1,600 tons. The chimney proper, says 
Camera Craft. Is a round shaft, btillt 
of hollow radial brick. 

The outside diameter a/t the bottom 
ia 28 feet, and at the top is 11 feet. The 
Inside diameter at the bottom is 19 feet 
and at the top 9 feet. It is lined on the 
inside with acid-proof brick and ce- 
ment, 4 inches thick, leaving a 2-inch 
air space. 

The smoke opening Is 6x12 feet, pro- 
viding for 2,400 horse-power boilers, 
and the acid fumes from the chemical 
manufacturing departments. 

The stack Is provided with a light- 
ning rod. having four carbon points, 
and is equipped wi-th an iron ladder on 
the inside and one on the outside. Th'.> 
total weight of the stack is about 3.200 
tons. 



'1 



/ 



SIMPLE DIAMOND TESTS. 
New York Sun: '"There are few per- 
sons," remarked a je-vvcller, "who are 
I able to purchase a diamond on the 
• strength of tlieir own knowledge and 
j observation and without placing im- 
! plicit confidence in the man who sells 
the stone. It is a fact that even pawn- 
brokers hare often been taken in by 
jewelry and precious stone fakers. 

"Although it takes many years of ac- 
tual observation and experience before 
one can become a diamond expert, 
there are a few simple tests which will 
considerably aid a buyer of diamonds. 
One test Is to prick a needle hole 
through a card and look at the hole 
through the doubtful stone. 

"If the latter is spurious two holes 
will be seen, but if it is a dinmond 
only one hole will be visible. Every Im- 
itation stone which resembles a dia- 
1 mond gives a double refiectlon, while 
the diamond's refraction is single. 
"Thia is a delicate test, becauae It Is 



D. E. H., Dec. 10, 1907. 





»rFRCHANDISE 


CERTIFICAIK. 


$.. 




nils Entitles 




Tn 


/Vnioimtlng to 
Duluth Minn 










Dollars 
CO., 






CLOTHING 


Account of 


COLUMBIA 
Per 





If you want to leave the selection to him, 
hand him a 

Columbia 
Merchandise CerHiieate 

Designate either the price or the article or both. 



^ 



S, 



-"^'^ 



. ,.,.Nii 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY. DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



-L»l 



WHEAT HAS 
GOODBDLGE 

Demand is Firm During 

the Session in 

America. 



Flax is Fairly Firm 

During Session in 

Duluth. 



Duluth Board of Trade, Dec. 16 —The 
American wheat markets were strong to- 
<lay and closed more than a point hlgner 
than Saturday. The demand was good 
and cables were up. 

At the opening, prices showed an im- 
provement and the offerings were liberal- 
ly taken during the day. Some wheat, 
both spring and durum, was worked for 
export by i^uluth exporters. 

The strengtli abroad helped prices on 
this side of the Atlantic. Livt rpool 
closed ]\d higher, Berlin S^fec higher and 
Budapest ^c higher. 

The L>»cember option closed l%c high- 
er in Duluth; ^c higher in Chicago; l%c 
up hi Minneapolis; 2%<.- higher in New 
York and 2\c higher in Winnipeg. The 
May option closed l^r higher in Duluth 
and Winnipeg, l"/8-^,«c up in Chicago; IV4- 
%c higher in Minneapolis and Vj^c high- 
er in New York. 

May corn closed \-%c higher in Chi- 
cago and -jtl higher in Liverpool. .Ma; 
Ottts closed •'•sc higher in Chicago. 

Brooiuhall cabled from Liverpool; 
"There was a firm opening; in wheat, with 
V.alues Vi to Id higher, stimulated by the 
flrnuiess in America on Saturday. Of- 
ferings were light and support rather 
gential. Following the opening, a fur- 
ther sharp advance occurred, prices gain- 
ing an additional %d to "sd on the "con- 
tinued rainy wtather reported m Argen- 
tina and the fact that La i'lata offerings 
were scarcer and six p» nee higher. Spot 
markets were steady and tJie fact of ligiii 
shipments from Russia further encour- 
aged good speculative buying. A .«Jlight 
reaction took place at midday: "^d of the 
advance was lost. Prices at this time 
were I»-4d higher than Saturday. 

"Corn was grni and >4d higher early, 
and further gained 14U during the morn- 
ing du» tc the firmntss in America and 
In sympathy with wheat Wheat cargoes 
Arm and from 3d to tkl dearer. Corn very 
ateady, but inactive." 

Car rtceiius at Duluth were 105 
against M last year, and at Minn, apol-ld 
642 against (C2 last vcar. making a toial 
for the Nonliw.st of 747 against 673 last 
year. Chit ago received 24 against 109 
last yar Winnipeg received 2'C againsc 
68 last ytar. 

Primary receipts of wheat were 1.204,000 
busiiel!^; la.vt year, 1 1'44 tdK) bushels. Ship- 
ments. 17^.0<l« bushels, last year. 381,000 
bushels. Clearances of wheat and flour 
aggregiited 544,00(i bushels. 

The visible supply of wheat increased 
2,04fv,CK:;0 bushels, and is now 45,4t)y,tHX> 
busliels against 43:245. Of>0 bushels a year 
ago. 

Primrifv rtcelpis, of corn were 790,000 
bushel- ' -• ytar, 79'J,WO bushels. Ship- 
ments ■ bushels; last ye^ar. 215.000 
bushelt .^ .■ ufancvs ol corn were 228,b8<) 
bushels. 

The v;s:^ll■le supply of corn decreased 
64.000 bu.shels and is now 2.763.000 bushels 
against 4,421(100 bushels, a year ago. 

Workl s shipments of wheal and corn 
last w*ek, the week prtvious and the 
corresponding week a year ago are 
■hown as follows. 

WHEAT 



Durum wheat, 5 i^ars. No. 1 SB 

Durum, S'TO bus. Wo. 1 So"* 

Durum, 84t> bus :lo. 1 to arrive 85 

Durum, 1 car N<». 1 W'i 

Durum, 1 car No. 1 M-** 

Durum, 2 cars No. 1 8C>V4 

Durum, 12 cars '.^0. 1 SB 

l^urum, 2 cars No. 2 83*^ 

I)urum, 11 cars No. 2 R3 

l>urun>. 1 car N.c 2 S34 

I'uruin. 1 car No. 2 t<2-,4 

Durum, 875 bu.s 4) lbs No. 2 82H 

I>urum, 5 cars No. 2 83^* 

Durum, 8 cars N ». 2 83 

Durum, 2 cars. Mo. 3 82«.4 

Durimi, 2 cars, Ko. 3 S2 

L'ui um. 2 cars, No. 3 82 

iHirum, 1 car. N© 4 81 

lUiium, 1 car. No. 4 SI 

No grade durum. 1 car 81 

Oats. 5 cars. No 3, white 4iili 

Oats, 1 car, No. i, white iO\a 

Oats, 1 car. No. 1, white 48 

Oats, 119 bus, 22 bs. No. 4 47>3 

Oats. 151 bus. 8 llw, no grade 45>4 

Barley, 1 car 77 

Barlev, 1 car 76 

Barley, 1 car W 

Fl:;x. 5 cars 1.12^ 

Flax. 2 cars ... 1.13 

Fhix. 1 car 1.12% 

Flax. 700 bus to irrive 1.12^ 

Flax, 3 cars 1.12V4 

Flax, 2 cars 1.12 

Flax. 10 bus 9 lbs 1.123i 

Flax, part car Vo. 3 l.lO^i 

Flax, part car .. 1.13 

Flax. 2 cars 1.13»/4 

Flax, 3,5oO bus 1.12^4 

Flax, 500 bus 1.12% 

Flax. 11 cars 1.12% 

Flax, 2 cars 112% 

Flax. 8 cars 1.12>i 

Flax. 2 cars 1.12 

THE (HK A(J(rM.4RKET. 

Advance in Liverpool Brings (hit an 
Active Demand fur Wheat. 

Chicago, Dec. 1«'.— An advance of more 
than Id in the price of wheat at Liver- 
pool brought out an active demand to- 
day for that gral 1 on tlie li'caj exchange 
end resulted in a strong market. There 
was a general scramble to buy, shorts 
and commission houses being lively bid- 
ders. Offerings, lowever, were compar- 
atively light. May opened '2ti%c to lUW 
l\4o higher at %1M% to $1.02*4, «nd for a 
time held strong within that range. 
.Minneap*>lis. Duluth and Chicago re- 
ported receipts (f <71 cars, against 840 
cars last week and 781 cars a year ago. 

The markt t cc ntinued hrm ali d:ty. 
The high point f « r May was llOaVs- The 
ilose was strong with May up V/^iiWic 
at $1.02-14. 

Tne sharp adv.mce in wheat induced 
active buying of corn which caused an 
advance In ail deliveries. The fact that 
local receipts w< re considerably more 
than A'hat had 1 een estimated had ap- 
parently no effect May opened V44<'h>e to 
■?i!ii%c higher at i-l%c to 5Sc, and dJring 
the first half ht ur, held within that 
range. Local reci ipts weit 224 cars with 
11 of contract gnde. 

Prices ruled fi m from the opening 
until the dose. The final eiuotallon 
on May was lafy^ic higher at oTSgc. 

Oats were strong because of the firm- 
ness of otiier grtiin. A leading commis- 
sion house was an active bidder. May 
opened ',^c to >/4C higher at 54c and sold 
up to 64V2li'%c. .(.locai receipts were 15J 
cars. 

Provisions were weak on selling by local 
packers, which Wj s based on exceptional- 
ly liberal receipts of live hogs. May pork 
was off 10c to 15i at $13 to $13.06. Lard 
was down 7'4c U 10c at $7.85 to $7.87*^. 
Ribs were 5r«^7Hi to l\(tiUc lower at 
16.97% to $7. 

Close: Wheat- I>erember. 96c; May, 
$1.02=»4; July, 97e. Corn— December. 50>i,r; 
May, 57%c; July, Bi)%t»56"t,c. Oats— May, 
old, 54%ryi4V4c; M: y. 52«ic; July, old, 48c; 
July. 45i^c. Pork-January, $12.75; !May, 
$13.20. Lard— Jam. ary, $7.86; May. $7.1*2%. 
Ribs— January, $t>80; May, $7 07%. Rye- 
Cash, 78c. Barky— Cash, 844.j9*)c. Tim- 
othy—Cash, $4.A>. Clover— Cash. $11©15. 
Cash wheat— No. 2 red, 977^(&98>-4t., No. 3 
red, 9«v4r»i97\4c; N.-. 2 hard, 9l!cro$].04; No. 
3 hard, 96T«c(|y$l; No. 2 northern, $1.06(0' 
1.09. No. 3 spriiifc', $1(^1.08. Corn-No. 3, 
new, oSVyMc. 



Saturday. Continental markets were 
stn>ng, led by Berlin. Good London au- 
thority showed conditions of wheat for 
the year at a shortage of 4oo,000,000 bu>«. 
All foreign advices agree that unusually 
large oflferlngs of Argentine wheat have 
befn discounted. Northwest markets 
acted strong. Seaboarti export hojses re- 
ported better bids than for d;iys pa t. 
Tlie market closed at an adv::nce of i'/4C 
for May. We think the situation is 
changed permanently Jsum tb ^ depresskn 
of the i>reviou« wtek. 

Corn— -May closed firm at B7%c, %c 
gain for the day. Weather condition* 
over the corn statts are unfavomble 
for the handling of the new crop. 
There is little < hance for heavy re- 
ceipts until after the first of the year. 
Some export buKiness reptirted at the 
seabo.'irtl. World's aliipments fell very 
much below last yeai. The situation 
Is Ptrcmg on natural features backed 
by bullish feeling on the part of the 
corn ralst rs. 

Oats— \ery many people In the trade 
regard oats too near the same level as 
corn. Bull leaders are doing nothing 
at present and this makes the market a 
slow taller for the other grains. 

Provisifins- After the t'Penlng It was 
found at the yards that the receipts 
were far beiow the figures first given 
out on hogs and prices recovered. The 
same Interests bought the provision 
prices all day, btt the market closed 
near the top. The situation is healthy. 



New York Cirain. 

New York, Dec. IC— Close: 
May, $1.09^4 ; July, $1.04»<i. Corn 
ber, 70c; May, 66%c. 



Wheat— 
-Decern- 



THE PRODltE MARKETS. 



were fur- 
the Duluth 




@> 20 



15 
16 
IS 
17 



24 
4 50 
1 35 



bushel. 



14 

16 
50 
JB 
fO 

8 i 

12 





La.^^t 


Previous 


Last 




Week. 


Week. 


Year. 


America 


. .6,3i<h.iiO() 


C.41ti.UO0 


4.824,(X>0 


Russia 


. 480,0(iO 


i,:{o4,ii<if. 


],52o.(XlO 


Danubt 


. 48.S,0<)0 


37(;,(NH) 


1,752.1100 


Argentina 


. 4tKi.(iOO 


44J<,0(K} 


712,(X;0 ' 


India 




;<2.s,(ioo 


160.000 1 


Australia 


. :2,oot> 


440.0»K) 


264,000 


Aust-Huiigary 


8.1IOO 


40,000 


56,000 


Various 


. 2M,0«Hi 


264 (K)0 


200,000 


Totals 


. .g,o.s(»,on(t 


9,488,000 




CORN 






America .. .. 


. 764.' If K' 


1. 12 ,000 


1,276,000 


Russia 


9S.(t(ll) 


65 000 


2It3,tKX) 


Danube 


. WM.IKPI.' 


1,495,(1(10 


7S0l«0 


Argentina .. 


.1.049,000 


683 000 


1,91!9,<X0 



MinneM|K>lis Wlieat. 

Minneapolis, 1>» c. 16. — Close: Wheat, 
May. $1 OSairy^; .luly, $1.0l»V«5(»; No. i 
hard, $1.07'^,; No. 1 northern, $105^; No. 
2 northern, $1.03% B'1.03^; No. 3 northern, 
9SVt??1.0t*i. 



Minnci 

Minneapolis, De 
IS unchanged. Tl 
wheal market h; 
Hour quotations 
change. Should ^ 
however, an adv 
Hour. Buying ws 
today, bat busine^ 
erate. Shipment> 
patents, $ri.40<ii€>.5o 
5.40; first clears, 5 
$3.30»i3.oO. 



|K)lis Flour. 

. 16— The hour market 
e stronger ti)nc in the 
d a firming effect on 

without making any 
«^heat prices go bigher, 
ince will be made in 
s quickened somewhat 
<, as a whole, was mod- 
, 44.871 barrels. First 

second patents, $& 30$? 
4.306;i>4.40; second clears, 



Total 2,71.'.,00() 2.885,000 4,348,OiiO 

The an. (Mint of wheat on passage de- 
creased aloiit $1.20tt,000 bus. 

Wheat was active at the oDcning today. 
The demand was better, and while trad- 
ing was not so lively during the latter 
part of the session, offerings were w»-ll 
tak<n care of. December whfat wag In- 
active and closed l^hc higher than Satur- 
day at $1.('2 nominal. May wheat opened 
Ic higher at $l.')9-*v. advanced to $1.09ai. 
declined to $1,090%. rallied to $109%. went 
off to $l.f>9% and closed at that price, a 
gain of 1'i.c over Saturday. 

Durum wheat closed %f nigher and 
ca^h sprinir wlieal wiis selling on a basis 
of 4%c under .Mav for No. 1 northern. 

Flax was active at the optning anc 
closed firm for the active option. I>e« 
cember ilax opened Ic higher at $1.13»4. 
went off to $1.11%, nillie.i to $1.12 and 
closed at Sl.n\, a los^; of %c from &it- 
urday. Mav Hax opened =^c higher at 
Hie advanced to $1.19%, went off to $1.18. 
rallied to $119, declined to $1.1S% an 1 
closed at Jl.l!'^ a train of Vic over Satur- 
day. 

Coarse grains v.n .11 hanged. 

Following were the closing prices: 

Wheat— No. 1 hard, on track. $1.(K)^4. tr. 
arrive, No. 1 northern, $1,048.4 No. 2 north- 
ern. JH»2'i; oil ti.-ick, No. 1 n<.>rtliern, 
g.04% No 2 northern. $1.02'-4; LH-cembcr. 
.02: May. $1.09%; Nor 1 northern In 
store, $1 02: No 2 north* rn In store, S9%c; 
durum on track, Nc*. 1. S5o; No. 2, S3c; 
December durum, 83c; May durum, t9%c. 
Flax— To arrive. $1.12%; on track. Sl.U'Vi; 
December, $l.li:^ May, $MS%. nats— To 



Grail in Store. 

At Duluth Saturd ly, Dec, 14, 1507: 
Wheat Bushels. 

No. 1 hard W,317 

No. 1 northern 620, S2J 

No. 2 northern ... <6r,182 

No. 3 spring 10.637 

No. 4 spring 7,303 

Rejected 2,420 

Special bin 1.070,1.5) 

Western 2,4Ca 

Durum 940,0:2 



Total of wheat 
Increase during v 
Slocks a year agi 

Coarse grains- 
Flax 

Increase 

Oats 

Decrease 

Rye 

Decrease 

Barley 

Decrease 



eek 



3,176,(53 

1,000,.<81 

1,167,921 



Cheese Is easier in the market today. 
Full cream twins are off a cent from 
Saturday and Wisconsin flats 'ire 2c low- 
er. Butter eggs are holding firm, 
though. 

The fancy imported Malagas grapes arc 
a little m.ire plentiful and prices for t*ie 
fruit are quoted 10 cents lower than last 
week. 

Fish and poultry are unchanged. Tn the 
meat market, mutton is up somewhat. 
All the packing houses will receive some 
fancy cattle for the Christmas trade, the 
last of the week. 

The followmg quotations 
nished by the secretary of 
produce exchange. 

BUTTER. 
Creamery prmts 

Renovatea 

Ladles 

Packing 

EGGS. 

Storage eggs 19 

Fresh eggs 28 

CHEESE. 

Full cream, twins 14 

Wiscons.n flats 11 

Block and wheel Swiss 18 

Brick cheese 16 

Limbergcr, lull cream 16 

Primost 10 

HONEY. 
New fancy white clover.. 

Per case 

Maple syrup, 10-lb cans... 
NUTb. 

Filberts, per lb 

Soft-shell walnuts, per Id.. 

Cocoanuts, dozen 

Brazils, per lb 

Hickory nuts, per 
Mixed nuts, per id. 

Peanuts, per lb, raw b ~Q 8% 

Chestnuts, I'er lb 

MAPLE SUGAR. 

Vermont, per lb 16 

FRUITS. 

New York apple* 4 00 ® 4 60 

Canadian, impoitea 4 26 «[j' 5 00 

Idaho apples, per box 2 00 

Apples, per bbl 3 75 (g^ 4 2S 

Transctndant crabs, per bus 2 50 

Bananas, per lb 4% 

Dales, hard, 12-lb box l 10 

Dat^^s, sugar walnut, 10-lb 

t>ox 1 10 

Figs, Smyrna, 10-lb box 1 26 

Figs, California 86 

Malagas, per keg 4 00 

Catawbas 25 

Grape fruit, per case £00 

California navel cuanges .. S 00 

Lemcns, California 5 00 

Limes, per box 150 

Fancy winter Nellls pears.. 2 75 
GREEN VEGETABLES. 

Cranberries, per bbl 9 00 

Wax beans, per basket 2 00 

Cucumbers, hothouse, doz...2 00 

"Cabbage, per crate 175 

Cauliflower, per basket .... 2 25 
Fancy Golden Hunt celery. 65 
New carrots, per dozen.... 76 

Endives, per bus 100 

Lettuce, hothouse, box 1 00 

Parsley, per dozen 4G 

Oyster plant, per dozen 66 

itadishes, round, per dozen. 20 
Long radishes, per dozen... 15 

Spinach 75 

t. ut tomatoes 2 50 

VEGETABLES. 

Horseradish, per bbl 6 60 

Onions Spanisli, per crate. 1 50 
Red Globe onions, new. ptr 

100 lbs 1 66 

Sweet potatoes, t»er bbl 

Potatoes 

Navy beans 

Brown beans 

Beets, per bus 

Carrots, per bus 

Bagas, p«r bus 

POP CORN. 

Choice, per lb 4 

Rice corn, shelled 6 

NEW CIDER. 
New apple ciderr, per keg.. 8 50 

Clarifleu. 16-gallon keg 2 75 

Orange, cherry or pear 3 60 

Black raspberry juice 6 60 

DRESSED POULTRY. 



STOCKS ARE 
IRliEGULAR 

-—4 

Market closed Steady 

and Dull After a Late 

Recovery. 

Heavy Selling of Amal- 
gamated Copper and 
American Smelting. 



New York. Dec. 16.— Union Pacific was 
advanced 1% in the opening dealings to- 
day, St. Paul 1%. Brooklyn Transit 1% 
Pacific, Northern Pacific 
Smelting 1, and Reading. 
New York Central, Am- 
erican Sugar and United States Rubber, 
large fractions. The dealings were on a 
moderate scale, but the tone wa* very 
firm. 

There was a further substantial ad- 
vance after the opening in which the 
standard railroad stocks were tnc most 
prominent. Heavy selling of Amalga- 
mated Copper after it had crossed 46 
and its itsultiint decline soon weak- 
ened the general market. Other active 
specialties were also stdd freely, and by 
11 o clock the market had relapsed all 
around to about Saturdays closing 



B.\JVKKHS AND BR0KL:RS. 



Members New York and 
Boston Stock Exchanges 



DULUTH OFFICE- 
Room A, Torrey Building, 

814 Wcat Saperlor Street. 



and Southern 
and American 
Pennsylvania, 




•O Coasreaa St., Boatoa. 

Members of 
Boston Stock Exchange. 

Direct and BxcIukIt* 

Private WIrea to 

BOSTON, NEW YORK. CHICAGO, 

CALCMBT and HOUGHTON. MICH. 

Dvlntb Office I 838 \V. Superior St. 

Old 'Phone, 18B7. 
R. O. UUBBELL, Manaser. 



@) 1 26 

^ 4 60 



® 32S 



level. 

The steady selling of Amalgamated 
Copjier and Ameritan Smelting was re- 
sponsible for the general heaviness. 
Outside of those stocks the depression 
was not acute. Amalgamated Copper 
fell 2H; Amerkan Smeptling, 2%; Na- 
tional Lead, 1. Chicago, St. Paul, Min- 
neapolis & Omaha pi cf erred sold at 
i'^7%, a decline of 2_'% compared with 
the preceding sale in August. Noon 
prices showed some recovery. Bonds 
were steady. 

Speculation agal^n became hfavy, but 
offerings were slight and prices did not 
vary much from the noon level. 

Proces gravitated slowly to a lower 
level without any effective points of re- 
sistance. The decline in American Smelt- 
ing reached 3, Anaconda and National 
L«'ad IV Canadian Pacific 1% and I'nion 
Pacific. Louisville & Nashville and Minne- 
apolis, St. I'aul & Sault Ste. Marl. 1. 
Large blocks of United States Steel 
changed hands at 25. 

The market closed steady and dull. 
The final hour of the trading saw a 
dull recovery, running to 2% in American 
Smelling and 1 in Union Pacific and R ad- 
ing. New York Air Brakf fell 3 and Rock 
Island preferred 1. Business contracted 
materially on the rally. 



Old Dominion was well bought and 
closed higher than the opening. The 
banks are advising great caution yet and 
are doing their utmost to restore confi- 
dence, but check speculation. 

THE COPPER STOCKS. 

The following are the closing quota- 
tions of copper stocks at Boston today, 
reported by Paine, Webber & Co., Room 
A, Torrey building: 



DULUTH COPPER CURB MARKET 

WALTER W.CARR, 



202-204 MANHATTAN BL ILDING. 



Private WlrcB. 
City 'Phones, 1805. 



References : 
CITY NATIONAL BAI4K. 
Duluth .Mien. 

DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



Prlvnte l-oag nintance. 
'Phonc<i, 1CS7-1805. 



nid.l A.wk. 



.^niorlcaii-i^nginaw. . 
Ariz-ConinuTcial. . . 
Blat-k Mountain. . . . 
Butte Coalition. .. . 
Butte & liondon . . . 
Butte & Superltir. . 
Calumet & Arizona. 
Cal. & Montana. . . . 

Cal. & Sonora 

Carman Cons 

Cliff 

Comanche 

Cctpper Queen 

Calumet & Globe. . 

Daly-West 

l>nvi.s-I>aly 

Denn-Arizona 



2.62 
ll.r>0 

4.25 

13.25 

.80 

1.19 
9S.50 



4.62 

1..50 

.70 

.04 

.65 



8.50 
4.00 
3.37 



2.87 

11.75 

4.37 

13.50 

.90 

1.25 

94.00 

.25 

4.75 

1.75 

.75 

.04 '/2 

.70 

.fiO 

9.00 

4.12 

3.50 



BSd.l Ask. 



East Butte 

Globe Cons 

Gretiie-Cananea. . . . 

Hancock Cons 

Keweenaw 

.\i|i<s»«ini; 

National 

North Butte 

North Butte Ex. . . . 

Old Dominion 

Sup. & Pittsburg. . . 
Superior & Boston. 

Sliiinuon 

Sliattuck-Arizona. . 
Tonapah Common. . 

Warren 

Wolverine-Arizona . . 



4 
0. 
5. 
4. 
5. 
6. 

37! 

1. 

27 

8 
o 

9 

13 

6 

4 



25 

00 

93 

75 

25 

12 

48 

25 

00 

.751 

«2 

.25 

.00 

.75 

,12 



4..'>0 
6.12 
6.00 
5.00 
5.50 
6.25 
.50 

37.75 
1.06 

28.00 
8.75 
2.37 
9. 50 

14.00 
6.25 

2.37 



ZENITH 1464. 



DULUTH 1871 



MARTIN ROSENDAHL, 

COPPER STOCK BROKER. 

414 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 102 MANHATTAN BUTLDINQ. 

Reference: City National Bank, Duhitb. Minn. 



disturbance was very 
barely disting'uishable 



small and only 
on the records. 



Stocks- 



I Bid. ! Asked. 



Quotations furnished by Gay & FtuT- 
gis, grokers, 22f West Superior street: 



Stocks— 



!High|Low|CIose 



@ 76 



€> 1 25 



(@ 1 00 
«l> 2 To 



00 




AOtchison 

Amalgamated Copper 

Smelting 

Baltimore & Ohio 

Brooklyn Rt^pid Transit, 

Colorado I-^iel & Iron 

Canadian Pacific 

Chesapeake & Ohio 

Ixjulsville & Noshvllle .. 

An.iconda 

Missouri Pacific 

Penn. Railway 

Reading , 

Rock Island 

St. Paul 

Southern Pacific 

Sugar 

United States Steel ... 

do preferred 

Union Pacific 

M. K. & T 

American Locomotive . 

Northern Pacific 

Great Northern 



70% 


69% 


46 


43% 


71 


m\ 


79'i 


79%l 


SJt 


37-il 


IK^ 


18 


148% 


Uf>\i. 


29% 


29% 


90 


89% 


2» 


26% 


BO 


49 


112% 


liOH 


91% 


S9 


14'4. 


14U 
100% 


102^1 


72% 


70% 


1»5% 


93\ 


•■d>% 


24\ 


K7 


86% 


116\ 


113% 


24%, 


24% 


84% 


34% 


116% 


113% 


116% 


114 



6?% 
43% 
(»% 

:»% 

87% 

1S% 

148% 
29% 
89% 
26% 
49% 

111% 
89% 
14% 

101 
71% 
95 
25% 
86% 

114 
24% 
34% 

114 

114% 




@ 3 00 



:.410,07G 

581,7; 

2>'0,KJ7 

33,. 64 

24.073 

12,574 

18,v,232 

59.7'J4 



Duluth I ar Inspection. 

Wheat— No. 1 n< rthern, 17; No. 2 north- 
ern, 22; No. 3 spring, 13: No. 4 spring, 
3; rejected. 3; ■western red, tj; No. 1 
durum. 14; No. L' ( urum, 2('; No. 3 durum, 
r.; No. 4 durum, 1; total of durum, 4i»; 
mixed, 1; total oi wheat, 105; last year, 

!61. 

! Flax-No. 1, 34; No. 2, 1; total of flax, 
j 35; last vear, 36. 
I Corn, 3: oats, 2. 

Total of all cars, 145. Cars on track 
today. 302. 



70-74c 



arrive, ^SV^c; in tr.iik. 4^'-..t . l;\ 
barley, tt-ltrc. 

Cars inspected— Wh* at, 105. l;ist ye.ir. Tl: 
corn, 3; oats Z: flax, 3^\ la.><t v' ar. oi;. 

Receipts— Wh'-iit. 1P6.'"; "oats. 17,ltS9; 
bari. V, 2.'i33: tiax. 79.11] 

Ship: ■ ■ ^\"::• : : 2.2i::: o.r > -• bar- 
ley, 15--- -.1-1 flax. ti,li:i 



IjiverjKK»l Grain. 

Liverpool, Dec. 16.— Close: ^Vheat, spot 

No. 2 red western winter, steady. 7s 7%d; 

i tului>^s, firm: Dcct-mher, nominal; Match, 



Springs, per lb. 

Hens, per lb 

Spring ducks, per lb 

Turkeys, per lb 

Geest, per lb 

FISH. 

Pike, per lb 

Perch, per lb 

Fresh salmon, per lb 

Trout, per lb 

pickerel, per lb 

White, ptr lb 

Fresh lakfe trout 

HAY. 

ton 

per ton.., 
FEED. 

Shorts, per ton 

Bran, per ton 

Uats, per bus 

MEATS. 

Beef 

Mutton 

Lard 

Pork loins 

Veal 



11 
12 

17 
10 






O 
@ 



11 
IC 

11 
11 
7 @ 

i2%(a) 



IX 

12% 

18 

12 

12 

15 

9 

IS 



Stock GoKsip. 

New York— Logan & Bryan to Paine, 
Webber & Co: Tne market opened high- 
er, but after the first sales. I he mar- 
ket lapsed into dullness and sagged un- 
der the leadership of Amalgamated and 
Smelters, the selling of which Is due lo 
the unsatisfactory condition of the cop- 
per metal market and talk of further 
curtailment. There was not much news 
of Importance, but b-ail rates continue 
firm. We do not loak for much aetivity 
until after the turn of the year, but 
think that the metal stocks should not 
be sold on bulges. 

New York Money. 

New York. Dec. 16.— Close: Money on 
call firm, 6(ftl5 per cent. Ruling rate, 10; 
closing bid, 5; offered at C. Time loans 
nominal; 6i» deys. VZ per cent: 90 days, 10 
ptr cent; 6 months, 8 per cent. Prime 
mercantile paper, S per cent. Sterling 
exchange firm with actual business In 
banktrs' bills at $4 S5.,V.<ii^.85.9() for de- 
mand and at $4.S0$r4.!S»>.«5 for 60-day bills. 
Commercial bills, $4.79.50. Bar silver, 
54%c. Mexican dollars, 43%c. Govern- 
ment bonds, steady. Railroad bonds, ir- 
regular. 



Amerloan-Saglnaw 

Atlantic 

Arcadian 

Adventure 

Allouez 

Arnold 

Ahmeek 

Arizona Commercial ., 

Balaklala 

Bingham 

Black Mountain 

Butte & Superior 

Butte & London 

Boston Cons 

Butte Coalition 

Copper Range 

Calumet A: Arizona 

Calumet *i Hecla 

Cumberland Ely 

Comanche 

Copper (Jueen 

Centennial 

Davis-Daly 

Denn-Arizona 

Daly West 

East Butte 

Franklin 

Granby 

Greene-Cananea 

Globe Cons 

Hancock 

Helvetia 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw ;.. 

Michigan 

Mass 

Mercur 

Mohawk 

Nipissing 

North B^itte 

Nevada Cons 

Nevada Utah 

National 

Old Dominion 

Osceo-la 

Old Colony 

Phoenix 

Parrot 

Pneu. Ser 

Pneumatic Service pfd 

Quincy 

Raven 

Rhode Island 

Santa Fe 

Shaltutk 

Superior Copper 

Shannon 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

United Copper 

Union Land 

Utah Consolidated ... 
I'nited States Mining 
United States Mining 

Victoria 

Warren :... 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Wolverine & Arizona 

Wyandot 

Amalgamated , 

Anaconda 



'i% 


8 


«% 




*■' 


8% 


4 


2 


2% 


24 


25 


45c 


55c 


45 


50 


11% 


11% 


2% 


2% 


4% 


4% 


4% 


4% 


1 1-16 


1 3-lC 


75c 


85c 


9% 


10% 


13% 


13% 


52^4 


6:i% 


93% 


94 


590 


«» 


fi% 


5% 


5c 




GOc 


75c 


23% 


25 


4 


4% 


3% 


3% 


«% 


9 


4 


4% 


6% 


7% 


75 


80 


6% 




6 


6% 


4% 


5% 


1% 


IH 


IC 


16% 


6% 


5% 


8 


8% 


2% 


2% 


25c 


2Sc 


42% 


43 


6 


6% 


37% 


37% 


7% 


7% 


2% 




50c 


55c 


27% 


28 


80 


81 


45c 


60c 


60c 


75c 


9 


9% 


4% 


4% 


10% 


11 


75% 


76 


85c 


87c 


2% 


3 


1% 


2 


13% 






16 


9 


9% 



Pfd 



62 

13% 
7% 
1% 

26% 

32% 

3r.% 

4% 

4% 

4 
110 

2% 
60c 
43% 
26% 



65 

13% 
7% 
2 

27 

33% 

4% 




Timothy, per 
Upland, No. 1 



IS (tO 
U 00 

2f 00 

24 00 
tt 

6 

9 
10 
10 

t 




& 



dt 



10 
10 

K.% 
10 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Ko. 
No. 
No. 
No 



Ca>h Sail's .Monday. 

northern wh«iit. 1 i;ir' $1.04% 

nurt hftn, I car l.o5 

northern 2 cars . l.<i4% 

northern. 1 car .Nt-. 1 imxii! , 1 

1,^50 bus 

1 tar 

1 4(«i liu.'. tl arrive 
8 cars 



northern, 
noi thei n, 
nort h<-;-n. 
nortlurn, 
northern. 
northern, 
nortlurn. 
nortlurn. 
northern, 
northern, 
northern, 
northern, 
iioithern. 



cars .. 
ears .. 
ear ... 
car ■ . ■ 
tar ... 
car No. 



2 riiixed. 



4 c.irs . 

part car 

t> cars . 




3 spring wh^at 1 ear 

3 spring, 1 « ai 

3 sprini;. '1 1 ai - 

3 sprinj.'. 1 'it 

3 spring. \ c :•: 

3 spring, par! > .ir . . .. 

No. 3 spring. 1 c;tr 

No, 3 spring, 2 cars 

No. 3 spring. 'Z cars 

No 3 spring, 1 i ai 

No, 3 spring, part > ai 

No i:! spring. 1 tar 

No, 4 spring. 1 car 

No 4 .'■■prine. '. < . : 

No, 4 spi ing. i .a: 

No. 4 spring. 1 car 

Re.lected spring wheat. 1 ra 
Durum wheat, 3 cars, No. 1 



1 04% 
1 .04% 
1 06 
1 04% 
1 05 
1.02% 
1.02% 
1.02% 
1.03 
1 .02% 
1 .02% 
1(12% 
1 02% 
.9'.l% 
1.00 

. .m* 
1.01 
1 oo'-i 

1.(10 
. 1.00* 
.9t»% 
l.Of. 
1.00% 
1.110 
i.00% 

,97:^ 

.07% 
.97 
.92*1 
.S9% 

.85% 



7s 10'%d; May, 7s 


UKl. Cc 


rn, sfK.>t prime 


mi.xed Amtrican, 


i=«s 5%d; 


futures, firm; 


December, noram. 
American 


.1. January, 5s 3%d. 


Wheat 


^larket. 


Du- 


Minne- 


Chi- New 


luth. 


apolis, 


cago. York. 


Deceember— 






Open 


$1.03%B 


96 


High 


l.(M% 


96%N 


Low 


1.03% 


95% 


CUise $1.02N 


1.04*(» 


96 $1.04%N 


Close, 14th. 1.01% 


1.02% 


»•:.% 1 .02% 


May— 






Or>en 1.09%1 


; 1.08% 


1 02%-% 1 09% 


High 1.09-54 


1.09 


1,03% 1.10% 


Low 1.09% 


1.0N% 


1.02% l.<i9% 


Close 1 .09% 


1.0S%-% 


1.02%B l.C9% 


Close. 14th. 1.0J>% 


1.07% 


1.91%-% 1.07% 


July- 






Open 


1 09B 


96%-97 1.047gA 


High 


!(«%-% 


97% l.M% 


Low 


1.09 


96% 1 .03% 


Close 


1.09%-% 


97A 1 .04%A 


Close, 14th 


1.07%-8 


96% 1.02% 


In Winnipeg, D« cember 


wheat closed at 


$1.02 and May wli 
Chicago Cat 


eat at $110%. 


s. Com 


and Perk. 




Oats. 


('..rn. Pork. 




May. 


May. May. 
57% $13.05 


Open 


..'•.4 


[High 


.^.4% 


.V< 13.10 


1 Low 


.54 


57%-% 12.87 


1 Close 


.54%-% A 57% IS. 20 



Grain Gossip. 

Logan & Brj an, Chicago: Wheat- 
There was a ver V stronp opening in re- 
sponse to the chunged conditions abroad 
on which we ba led our bullish advices 



Cliie«KO. 

Chicago, Doc. 16— Butter steady; 
cream*. lies. 20Cf28%c; dairies, 17(g'25c. 
Eggs firm, at mark, cases included, 
24(iij25c; fresh stock, others as low as 
18c. Cheese steady; daisies, ll%<gl2c; 
twins. ll(&ll%c; young Americas, ll%iij^ 
12c. Poultry, live, steady; turkeys, 11 
lrl2c; chickens 9..; springs, 8c. Pota- 
toes, steady, 48'fi55(.. Veal steady, 50 to 
60 pound weigiits, 5c; 6(i to 85 pound 
weights, G^7%c. 85 to 110 pound weights, 
7%'yi'%c. 

New York. 

New York, Dec. 16.— Butter steady; 
receipts, 3,804; cre.imtry specials, 24® 
24%c; extras, 28%lt21ic; third to first, 21® 
28c; held seconds to special, 22(|i28c: state 
dairy common to finest, a0(&28c; process, 
common to specials. l5iQ23c; western 
factory, common to first, 15(&'2tc; imita- 
tion creamery first, 21^22c. Cheese 
firm; receipts, 1329; state full cream, 
small, colored and white fine, I5%c; 
large colored fine, 15%c; large colored 
white, 15%e; larfie colored good to 
prime, 14%(?iloc; large colored late made 
best. Il%(lil2c; large colored common to 
fair, 9%<itll%c; skims, 10® lie. Eggs 
steady; receipts, e,<C5; state Pennsyl- 
vania and nearby fancy selected white, 
50c; good to choice, 43*1 48c; brown and 
mixed fancy, 40c; average best, 36'&38c; 
first to extra firsts, 32f<35c; western 
firsts, 32® 33c; seconds, 28® Sic. 



Chlea^ Livestock. 

Chicago. Dec. 10. — Cattle — Receipts, 
about 25,tK.i(>; market steady; beeves, $3.16 
^(;.10: cows and heifers, Jl.lt"®4.5ti; 
Texans, $3^? M; calves, $4.75!g7; west- 
erners, $3.10i&4.70; Blockers and feed- 
ers, $2.20®4.15. Hogs— Receipts, about 
63,000; market weak; light, J4.10®4.60; 
mixed. $4l5®4.Gt»; heavy, j4.Kt®4 55; 
rough, $4.10®4.20; pigs, $3.50®4.35; bulk of 
sales, $4.35®4.5(i. Sneep— Receipts, about 
38,000; market. 10c to 15c lower; native. 
$2'fj4.70; western. $2'(r4,70; yearlings, $4.60 
((j5.3(i; lambs, $3.75® U20; wt stern, $3.75 
®6.20. 



Ft. Paul Livestoik. 

St. Paul, lyf^c 16.— Cattle: Receipts, 2.- 
200: steers, $3.25®5.76; cows and heifers. 
Ji.i'.JJ^.^E; caiv«s, $1.50''f«'.75: stockers. 
$2ro3: feeders, $2.25®)3.75. Hogs: Receipts. 
4,50(t; steadv: range, $4.10f?T4.:i(t; bulk. $4.20 
®4.26. Sheep: Receipts. 3,5Ci0. Sheep- 10c 
lower; lambs. 10®'15c higher; yearlings. 
$4.26®'4.60: ewes, $0.25®a85; wethers. $2® 
4.10; lambs. $5.50®<^.10. 



LAST VESSEL FROM I PPER 
L.4KES P.4SSES DETROIT. 



Ship Your Grain to 



0. 0. WYHii 

liULUTH. GRAIN COVl\iiSSii>.>J. 




Detroit, Mich., Deo. 16, — The steel 

I steamer Yale, loaded with grain and 

bound for Buffalo, the last vessel dc>wn 

from the upper lakes for the season 

of 1907, pas.5ed Detroit safely this 
forenoon. The arrival of the Yale at 
Buffalo will close the navigation sea- 
son. 



MINNEAPOLIS 



MADGEBURG NOMINATED. 
Washington, Dec. 16.— The president 
sent to the senate today the nomina- 
tion of Frederick H. Madgeburgr to t4 
pensicn a^ent at Milwaukee. 



Tile Cotton Market. 

New York, Dec. 16.— The cotton mar- 
ket opened steady at an advance of 16 
points to a decline of 6 points, earlier 
months being relatively firm on the 
cables while later m.cnths were easy 
under llcjuldation. The opening was 
considered ratiier disappointing In view 
of the firmness of the English mar- 
ket, but there was active selling by 
local tears during the early session. 
Prices soon sold off to a net loss of 13® 
15 points on the active nionths. and the 
market during the middle of the morn- 
ing was nervous and unsettled with 
fluctuations irregular. 

Si:>ot closed steady. 20 points lower. 
Middling uplands. 11.90; midling gulf, 12.16. 
Sales, 5,200 bales. Futures close steady. 
Closing bids: lu cember. 11.34; January, 
10 Of. Februarv. 10.7,"; March, 10.84- April. 
IO.S'7: Mav. 10.90; June, lO.SO; July, 10.86; 
August, iO.GO. 

Copper Gos.«*ip. 

Boston to Gay & Sturgis: The gen- 
eral market opened today with no 
stocks offering. A rally of 1 point oc- 
i curred on minute transactions. Inside 
; of ten minutes the market was flooded 
iwith selling orders and prices rapiiliy 
' crumbled. This looks anything but 
I natural. Powerful traders and lools 
are doing It «11 ..and transactions are 
not significant. It is generally bellcv. d 
I that AmalganTOt<»d will pass its divl- 
I dend and the few remaining holders 
i are getting out. The gossip is very 
blue and invitation to get out is as In- 
I sistant well conceived and convincing 
as the one to get, in 15 per cent higher 
ten months ago. 

• • • 

Boston to Paine, Webber & Co.: Am- 
algamated weak all day and had a bad 
effect on all the others. Mohawk Is com- 
ing out .slowly from people who expect 
the dividend will be passed or cut. North 
Butte declined on selling by the traders, 
but was In gopd demand at 37. Copper 
Range is the stronsest stock on the Hat. 



TILLMAN TALKS 
ON FINANCES 

Speaks on His Resolution 

Looking to Senate 

Investigation. 

Washington, Dec. 16. — A character- 
istic speech was delivered today in the 
senate by Senator Tillman. He spoke 
on his resolution? directing an investi- 
gation of the recent bond issues and 
clearing house certificates, but he took 
occasion to comment on a good many 
matters concerning financial affairs of 
the country. 

"I must confess I have not studied 
finance very much from the book.s," 
began Mr. Tillman apologetically. "My 
own labors in that direction having 
been confined to my own expenses. 

"If we are not in the midst of a 
panic we are In the midst of a 
chill produced by the danger of a 
panic," declared Mr. Tillman. 

The treasury, he said, has "dumped" 
its money in Wall street, and the 
country has praised the patriotism of 
J. Plerpont Morgan in aiding the 
country to get a grip on itself and not 
crazy and precipitate 
horrors on the coun- 



CHILDREN UNCHANGED. 

The Greek nd Roman nursery toys in 
the British museum collection belong 
only to the nursei-y, and that is to an 
age which can never be later than yes- 
terday, says a writer in the London 
Spectator. There is, for instance, only 
one date to which can be assigned the 
leaden chariot with its two prancing 
horses, possibly an inch and a naif 
high, and the leaden horsemen cut )ut 
of a thin sheet of metal like a bi.scuit 
stamped from pastry. Both of tiKjn 
belong to the same period as the little 
tin soldier who went sailing down the 
gutter in the paper boat of the Ger- 
man fairy tale, an dlhe grenadier whom 
Stevenson's child buried and exhuni-^d, 
lamenting, nevertheless, that "After 
all that's gone and come, I shall lind 
my soldier dumb. " Nor are they worse 
made; nor is the ti:iy chair more cluni-' 
«y which, belonging also to the lead 
age, would have brought sudden hap- 1 
piness to the owner of a Roman doll's! 
house. The date, indeed, now and thtn 
only an antiquarian, and an anii-[ 
quarian who knew something about sol-| 
diers and furniture, could easily deter- ] 
mine. Here, for Instance, is a sofa 
made of brown glazed ware, is strong, ■ 
solid, measures some three or fouri 
inches in length, has a back and arrnsj 
cf an imitation rolled pattern, would 
seat two or three dolls, and is of ex- 
tremely satisfactory nature. It miijht! 
have been made last week at th^l 
Doulton ware factory, if you can get j 
sofas of Doulton ware. 1 

Here again is a model of a woman, 
kneading a cake or a roll. She has no 
legs, for legs would destroy the bai- ' 
ance of the model and prevent it being 
easily set upon the floor or the table. 
But she Is cleverly pinned by the topi 
of her skirls to hei pastry board, her 
arms are jointed, and she would move 
her rolling pin (unfortunately lost) up I 
and down the board as ingeniously and I 
industriously as any sawing Dear, 
carved at Brienz in the darkness of last 
winter. The Swiss and the Roman 
wood carver knew their business, and 
combine simplicity, regularity of move- 
ment and imitation of the doings of 
■grown ups" all the essentials of a 
proper mechanical toy. 

In this market, whatever the supply 
may be, the demand does not vary. 
The first necessity, or nearly the first, 
is a toy capable of providing a satis- 
factory noise. Such a desire is met in 
the collection exhibited by two or three 
different specimens of rattles, one of a 
rather elegant description, a mixture 
between an owl and an amphora, which 
would probably do nicely for a girl; 
another, heavier and more masculine, 
modeled into a hollow pig. At a litll-ii 
later period comes a demand for mugs 
to hold milk and water, and these, of 
course, are painted with figures -f 
children, generally crawling for an 
apple or an orange on the floor, and in 
one ase, perhaps designed for twins, 
with a picture of a boy and a gin 
teaching a neat looking dog to jump 
through a hoop. 



illlT©iH!ELL 

COPPER STOCKS. 

AU nA!«SACnO!«S CONFiOSNTUL 

•04 FIRST NATIO.'V.AI. n.\NK 

yUII.DI.XG. DL'bLTII. 

Zenitb. 19M8 PHONES Dulntb, JOSS. 



$500, or any part, even 
money, on Cullom's 
nomination. 

N, S. MITCHELL 



SATISFACTION. 

Chicago Tribune: The nian with th« 
long hair and the cowboy hat stuck his 
head inside the door or the little cigar 
store. 

"Do you own this weighin' machine out 
in front oi your shebang?" he inquired. 

"No. sir." said the proprietor. "What'a 
the matter with It? " 

"lis a holdup game. 1 stepped on it, 
dropped ni.v coin in thr slot, and didn't 
get any action. I want to find the 
chap lliat owns It." 

■'You'll have a hard time finding him. 
It's owned by a trust." 

The m;in with the cowboy hat went 
hack to th" niacliiiie. took out his re- 
volver and fired six shots through the 
dial. 

"I reckon that mako, us about even," 
he said, replacing his shooting iron and 
walking on. "I don't keer a duru for the 
coin, but nothin' that stands on end kin 
play a bunco game on mc and get more'n 
an even break out'n it. ' 






Ti©L^ 




One Cent a Woril Llacli Insertion — No 
Advertisement liess Thau 15 Cents. 

Dr. Lucy A. Daily, pioneer Osteopath, has 
moved to 5<i3 Burrows bidg. Zen. 384-X. 



The uuiuu. 
from 21st avc 



H, LlU:is 
W. to the 



C). 
new 



na.s moved 
Seekins blk. 



Fashionable hair dressing, inanicurinjc 
scalp and face treatments. Miss Kelly 
opposite Glass Block, upstairs. 

SITUATION WANTED-POSITION BY 
married man as collector. E. 34, Herald, 
or Zenitli 'phone, 1857-y. 

FOR RENT — SMALL BUSINE:3S 
place. 121 West First street. 



'OR RENT — 
room and use 
street, to one 
I 31, Herald. 



FURNISHED FRONT 
of piano, on E.ast First 
or two ladies. Address 



let everybody go 
further 1c>se and 
try. 

In the oour.«;e 
Tillman said he 
dent Roosevelt 
that while he 



of his remarks, Mr. 
believed that Presi- 
was a patriot and 
has been guilty of 
many Indiscretions and said many 
things, which in cooler moments, he 
would have been willing to take out 
of print, he did not believe that the 
president felt any satii-faction what- 
ever in having been instrum- ntal in 
the present financial paraly.-<is, as 
had been charged. 



SERIOUS OPERATION 

Perfornied on Justice Cassoday of 
Wisconsin for Gall Stones. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 16. — An 
Evening Wisconsin special from Madi- 
.son. Wis., says: Chief Justice Casso- 
[ day of the sup>reme court underwent 
I a serious operation Sunday afternoon 
at his home for gall stones. His con- 
dition today wa.e much improved, and 
in spite of his advance.^ age. 77 years, 
his physicians hope the recovery will 
be speedy, barring complications. This 
morning he was especially bright and 
cheerful. 



SMALL EARTHQUAKE. 
Washington. Dec. 16. — A very small 
i earthquake was recorded at the 
weather bureau yesterday afternoon, 
Dec. 15, beginning at 12 hours 57 
minutes 26 seconds p. m. The am- 
plitude of motion throughout the 



PICK'WICK ANNIVERSARY. 
Under the auspices of the Dickens 
Fellowship a Pickwick exhibition to 
celebrate the seventieth anniversary of 
the completion of the "Pickwick Pa- 
pers" has been opened in London. 

The collection, as described in tho 
Queen, includes specimens of every: 
known edition of "Pickwick"— English, j 
American and foreign, and translations 
— among which should 'oe noted one of 
the first 400 copies of Part 1 of the 
"Pickwick Papers," stated in the , 
catalogue tc be "one of the most pre- : 
cious items in the exhibition;" a pres- ■ 
entation copy to Sergeant Talfourd (to ; 
whom "Pickwick was dedicated), con- , 
taining the following autograph In- ; 
scription by the autor: "Mr. Serjeant' 
Talfourd, from his sincere friend apd 
admirer. Charles Dickens," and also a 
very interesting letter from Dickens to 
Talfourd written shortly before the 
completion of the book; a copy of thei 
first American edition, dated 1837; a' 
curious German edition; and a copy 
said to be a great curio, of an edition 
purchased in Van Diemen's Land in 
1838-9, "with illustrations 'after, 
Phiz.- " 

Among notable plagiarisms, parodies,; 
etc., are an exceedingly fine copy of; 
the 'Tenny Pickwick," "The Post- \ 
Humorous Notes of the Pickv.ickian 
Club," edited by "Bos," described as 
"a very rare Dickens item;" "Pickwick' 
in America," edited by "Bos;" "Pick- 
wick Abroad, or the Tour in France," | 
by George W. M. Reynolds, illus-i 
trated by Alfred Crowquill; and "Pick-; 
wick in India," stated to be "one of the! 
rarest of the numerous plagiarisms pub- 
lished in 1840." 

Of plays, playbills, jest books, song 
I books, political cartoons, caricatures, 
■etc., bearing the names of Pickwick, 
I Sam Weller, etc., and Pickwickians of 
I every description, a numerous and most 
amusing collection is exhibited, under 
the heading of the latter being a copy 
of "The Readings of Mr. Charles Dick- 
ens, as Condensed by Himself," in- 
cluding "Mr. Bob Sawyer^s Party" 
(from "Pickwick.") 

An exhibit attracting peculiar atten- 
tion is a threefold screen, formerly bc- 
I longing to Moses Pickwick of Bath, and' 
I which stood in the coaching office of, 
{the White Hnrt hotel of that city, 0.1 1 
I which are painted the rules and regula-i 
jtions relating to passengers, fares, lug-! 
;gage, etc.. laid down by the pro-; 
iprietor, who, without doubt, supplied 
I Dickens with the name of his im- ; 
I mortal work. ' 

Of portraits of the great novelist the 
most interesting and valuable in th^ 
exhibition is the life size portrait in! 
water color and crayon, 
Laurence (1S38), showing 
he appeared at the time 
made him famous. 



FOR RENT-TWO FUR.NISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping, with bath and 
electric light. 823 East Third street. 

LADIES- TURKISH BATH AND HAIR 
dressing p.irlors. 24 West Superior 
street, uj»stair3. Knauf Sisters. 

THE SPALDING TOILET P.IRLORS. 
Miinicuring. massage. shampooing. 
Room and 'phone 19. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

John Darcy Wilson and Robina Bay- 
son. 

Harry J. George and Nellie Cllppert 
Clark. 

Arthur Osborn and JuHa Tretsven. 

Dommico Defazlo and Antoni.a Leour. 

Albert Bochka and Sigrid Marie Milch. 

A. E. I'lum of San F^rancisco. Cal,, 
and Ruth E. Ingersoll of Superior. 

Louis Julin and Lotta Hallberg. 

Tom Olson and Wallberg Johnson. 

Christ CarUs* n and Ann Johnson, both 
of Superior, Wit*. 

Christoplier Johnson and Karen Seath- 
er. 



BIRTHS. 

LEVETT— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

Levett, 111^ Wet't Eighth street, Dec. 11, 

a girl. 
CH ERNEY— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

Chcrney, 1102 West First Sireet, Dec. 10, 

a boy. 
SCHORBITZKI-Born, to Mr. and Mjy. 

Frank Schorbitzki, 715 Fifth avenue 

east, Dec. 14, a boy. 



DEATHS. 

CHESTOCK— Maria Chestcck, ag*d 

yecirs, died Dec. 15 at 2G17 West Third 

street, of diphtheria. 
GROULX— Harry Groulx, aged 15 years, 

died Dec. 10 by drowning in St. Louis 
; bay. 

|LTMPI— Alna Lampi, aged 34 years, died 
j Dec. 13 at St. Louis hospiial, of septi- 
I cemla. 
I WARD— Joseph H. Ward, aged 35 years, 

died Dec. 12 at 323 West First .strf et. 
' ERICKSON-W alfred Hjalmer Erickson. 
> aged 32 years, died Dec. 13 at Idle West 
I Fourth street, ol pulmonary tubercu- 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR. 
M. J. Filiatrault. Both phones. W. 



DuL 



FLORISTS AND DECORATORS. 

EISCUEJr"BRObT^^W^ST''^R"sT? 



Some tenants are as bad as fire. Herald 
want advertise for the sort who have con- 
sciences. 



NOTICE TO STOCKHQLDERS- 

The regular annual meeting of stock- 
holders of the City National Bank of 
Duluth, Minnesota, will be held at the 
bank's office, Tuesday, January 14th, 
190}>. during the h.jurs oetween 10 o'clock 
a. m. and 4 o'clock p. m. 

The object of the meeting Is the elec- 
tion of a board of eleven directors who 
shall have charge of the affairs of the 
.association during the ensuing year, and 
"Pickwick" j for the consideration ot such other busi- 
ness as may properly be presented. 

W. 1. PRINCE. 
Cashier. 
Duluth Evenln« Herald. Dec. 13-14-16-17- 
18-19-20. 



by Sam uel 
Dickens as 



! 



>^ 



.ii% 



1 












1 



-i" 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, DECEMBER 16. 1907. 



17 



$1.200 — A good five-room houa-?. 
In .?ood repair. West end. 

$3.000 — A fine seven-room house, 
with hardwood floors downstairs 
— well and sink In kitchen — 
stone foundation. hot water 
heating plant. On West Third 
street. Central. 



G.P.GRAIG&CO. 

220 West SuiMTior Street. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

FROM PAGE 18. 




SITUATIONS WANTED— 
FEMALE. 

I SITUATION W V.VTED - BY YOUNQ 
woman of luliure and refinement, of 
good appear.li ce. position as house- 
keeper or companion for a person of 
means; highes credentials. E. L. E., 
Herald. 



RAILROAD TIME TABLES. 

buluth& iron Range RR 

Efft-ctive Nov. 24, 1907. 



D aily Except Sunday i l>;ii iy Kace pt >unday 

Northbound 

.-3tam 4 i6i>iu 

8:t5;Hii 4 .25 nil 

lixcaoj 6:301,' 111 

i;jv,iin 7-.4cpm 
n;«>dii. 7.jjpni 
1 1 4>i 111 S 20 pin 



L».. Duiutb ..Ar 

.\r Kuitt-Kiver Lv 
Ar.Two Hbrs. Lv 
.•\r...'\l;fnJct..L\ 
.\i.. tveleth . Lv 
Ar.. Virginia. .Lv 
.\r... Tower ..Lv 
Ar....Ely ....Lv 



boutti bound 
i2:ooa> 645pm 
ii:ioam 5:5>pm 

V:o5am 340pm 
740am 3;i;p.'n 
745am 220pm 
8j37am i45pm 
7;i5am a.oopm 



_ » I» E; C aAL— »V »I pa. If O WM^Y. 

7:45 am Lv Duluth Ar 12:50 pm 

II' 'inl.v... Two Harbors ...Lvll:50am 
l*J vT ..Allen Junction.. .. Lv li):t 5 am 

U vr Ev-lrth Lv 8:45am 

11:2.1 am Lv Tower Lv l»:15 am 

12:05 pm A r Ely Lv tt:30 am 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



SITUATION WaNTEI'>— POSITION AS 
stenographer 01 boakkeep«'r. Have had 
sewral years' exp>'rience in lumber 
business. Herald. 1-25. 



SITU.\T10N W/NTED — AS STENOO- 
rapher by experl^^noed young la<ly with 
some reliable Irm. First-dasa refer- 
ences furnished I. 28, Herald. 



SITirATION WANTED - WO.MAN 
Wants work by tlie Jay. 110 East First 
street. Zenith "plione, 1774-X. 



SITU.\TION W/NTED— YOUNG LADY 
disirt's posltit n a.** assistant book- 
keeper or HI In J o'.erk; two years' of- 
flce experient't' F. 32. Herald. 




Leave 1 

* 4:00 VJB Ashland and East 

* tiOCa.m .^shiand and East 

* 7:30 9Jn M:nn. and Dakota Expreta 

* l;i5a.tft . .. North Coast Limited... 
Leave 1 

I «:00a.m 
*l:S>p m 
*II:lo».a 



Duluth Short Liaa.' 

ST. PAni 

MinirEAPOLIS 



Arrive 
*II]I5a.m 

• at^o p.m 

• 7t55a.m 

• *tis»ja 

Arrive 

• i:30a.m 
t 3:05 y.a 

• 7:00 » 



•Dai; y. tDaiiv Except Sunday. fbones 214 

I n ri. 1>-;-- .n 1 - ■« We*'. ^'JV***rlor *'tr«ei 






Iorth-Western Iine 

! — 'icmf. m 1M M. f^ my^A*'^ I 

I X; jfh 15 f > pn. I L » ru:u:h 1* 4 j am i j 1 5 pm 

""■■•■' >f J i> jwr i l.v Superior ^c^am 5 ^ pm 

: 1. .i\r? > pit j Ar St. f aul t3P pot d ij pm 

' ; am I Ar MpU 5 o] pm 9 i > pm 

vn I Pullman sl^ntpcrs anJ chair 

am j cars to thicago. Par: jc and 

•- ,...;i|fi - J,, am ; cafecanco Twin <. itie*. OSca 

itiy, Otutcapt Siumday. ' —jfa W. Superior !>(.. I>u;utb 



S 1,1 no Caak or eanlil^r'a cherka, and 

$_',fKX> Iti one an'l two y<^ars. buys 
75 by 150 f >■•<•>. on East Flr.-*t street 
— stre.-t. (No J Hill), between Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth avenues 
east. Own* r paid much more a 
year ago. tour gain.— 175-10. 

20I3 Pledmonf .4vpBue. Weat end, 

must be so d to closa an estate. 
.^iubmlt offe >*.— 5t>-i{. 



SITUATIONS WANTED — MALE. 

SITU.VTION WANTElv- POSITION AS 
office manager or head bookkeeper. 
Thoroughly acquainted with corpora- 
tion Ixjoks; competent to open, close, 
and houdle any set of bixiks in an up- 
to-dat« manner. Can show a good, 
clean past record; ZH years of age. L. 
'iS. Herald. 



HERALD S WEST DLLUTH DEPI. 




BR.^.'vrH office:— J. J. moran 

400 North Central Avenue. 
Kenlth 'Plione 81B8-A. 




■k 



f\mm 

KEPT^BUSY 

Hot Coals From Stove 

Start Blaze In Candy 

Store. 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE* ATLANTIC 



A 
a 
a 
F 

a 






A 

!> 



(No. 7.|No. 5. 

iaTm.TpTm. 

'"|-''-:*h , Ar ' 111 -M'a C:5s 
- a 6:4;: 

[■ ^'iit'jn .Lv:;ii - 

'..'al Jiaet |b '.'.J 1 

jP. M. -\. M. 

I=ihp^m!nir b!2:15ia 7:55 

: »d .... bll:30a 6:45 
- - \' irle.... b S:*)' 

lb : ■ 

I A. m.:p."m. 

. Ar.b 7:30'alO:l.S 

IP. M.lA. M. 
N ■•A- V .rk T.vl b 7:0 i>ja 8:4a 

Dining 
18. 



DULUTH, MISSABE & NORTHERN RT 



FOR RENT 



Small stores in new building 
at corner ot First street and 
Second aven le west. 



f. M. 

3:50 
4:vi 
4:20 



fllO 



<:56 



7:40 Lv 
7:55 Lv. 
»:15 Lv 

12:Ol Ar. 

iy.40 Ar. 

10LJ7 Ar. 

IU:29 Ar. 

10:56 .-Vr. 

ll:20.-\r. 

10:56 Ar. 



STAllO.S* 
..Duluth 
57ttu\v.VV. 
.. Pruciar. 

Culeraine 

M't'n.Iron. 

Virginia . 

.Eveleth . 

. Sparta.. 

.Biwabilt. 

.Hihbing. 



A.M. 
Ar 10:30 
Lv 10:15 
Lv 10:00 
Lvi 6:10 

Lvi 

Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 



7:00 
7:42 



r.u. 
3:30 
3: IS 
3;00 

ii:~i6 
12:40 
12:47 
12:24 
12:02 
12:ir 



Daily exc>?pt Sunday. 

Morning iraiQ flop Dultith makes diract coa- 
mtctjon at Rainy Junction with O. V. Jfc R. L. Ry 
for Ashawa and points north ot Virytala. 



ST. PAUL AHD 



THE GRE AT NOBTHE HW. 

1 *:00a.tn j 

•li:XO pirn ) — MIHllAPOUS ... 

• e:4Sa.in l Cro«.>kston,(.r^rKl horlci 

* 8:55 p.m i Monr : .Jjast, 
1 2:4- p.m..*'!'*-''^' > ^'"j'n'a.-+I2:I5p.iii 

1 «:COa.iii J SiotLX Qty ( tlOtlSp.m 



.Arrive 
I +10:15 p.m 
• 1:55 p.m 
6:30 a. m 
m 
m 



r 6:51 p.i 
>' 7:I5a.i 



T. 



Tiuly. rD,iiiy Except >un4-iy 

-. «;r» riaJy at gv.rn Otiii.e 'Spalding Hot* 



HOTELr LrENOX 

•vr-...r • borough ly equipped In tha 
•"■ -St Sanitation perfect. 

; ^an. Jl.Ou and up. American, 

|j.'-iu and up. 



E'' 
IB:' 



• N Al'i'Ll<ATI»».\ 
I' i-N' MK LA.M». 



FOR 



t: 



: .=;■., L«>ui3. 
.'i;vtal L»i3- 



tt»r 

\v . 

1. 
i 
t 



i. 



■i. t • 



Mendenh.all & Hoopes, 

209 First l>Iat. Bank Bldg. 



WHKHE.AS DcCF.-VULT H.AS BEEN 
made in the cndition-s of a certain 
uiortgag'j duly tiade, executed and de- 
livtred by Alexander McDonald and 
Eliza McLKiraJd. his wife, mortgagors, to 
I.'. B. Benson, n ortgagee, dated August 
— . I».t6, and reooided in the office of the 
Register of Dee< s of St. Louis County, 
Mmnesota. on -Augu.st 22. VMX>. at 11:49 
o'clock A. M., in Book VK of Mortgages, 
on page 12^; whi -h mortgage contains a 
provision that if default be made in any 
of the conditi«in i or covenants therein 
contained on the part of the mortgagors 
to be kept and performed, then the whole 
Slim secured by laid mortgage shall im- 
mediately becom ' due and payable at 
the election of th© mortgagee without 
notice; and 

WHEREAS saia default consists In th.> 
rion-paymeni of f5«)o of princip;il and of 
i.i»e aenil-annual installment of lnter«3i 
.1;- August 22. li^Kl, and in the non-pay- 
: lu of taxes ois part of the mortgaged 
:-i.ini.^e3, by rea ton wnersof said mort- 
gagee has elect! 1 t<> declare and dues 
h r. !.v b-vlaro ih .' wliole sum secured by 
ii'jrtgage t» t>e du^ and payable; 
i:.l 

vVHERE.\S there Is claimed to be due 
and i.s due at th < date hereof upon .said 
:uortgage debt tie sum of $3.3:>t».35. and 
:io actii>n at law or otherwise baa b^-en 
instituted to rec« ver said mortgage debt 
..>r any part thereof; 

NOW, THERE 'ORE, notice is hereby 
given, that by Irtue of the power of 
.«ah> in said mortgage contained, said 
;!iorrg;ige will h. foreclo.sed by the sale 
• >{ th-' mortgage! premises therein de- 
scribed, to-wit: Vil that tract or parcel 
of land lying ami being in the County of 
St Ijouis and State of Minnesota, de- 
scribed as folio vs, to-wit: Fractional 
Lot numbered sixteen (1(5), Block num- 
bered one tl). Gay's Divi.sion, and Lot 
numbered four h iiidred foity-seven (447). 
' Block numbered one hundred sixteen 
I (II-^*. D'jluth Pt-Mper. Second Division of 
l>uluth. ae«"ordin ; to the recorded plat 
thereof on tllo in the offict> of the Regis- 
ter of Deeds. St Louis County, Minne- 
sota; whicli .sale will be made at public 
auction to pay said mortgage debt and 
toiterest. taxes on said premises (if any). 
1 $75.00 attorney's fee. In said mortgage 
! stirtulated in ca.s< of foreclosure, and iho 
disi>urseinents al owed by law, by tht 
.Sheriff oi St. Lot. is County, .at the front 
di>.ir of the cour . house, in the City of 
Duluth, in said I'ounty. on January 9th 
i:os. at 10 o'clock .\. M. on that day. 

Datevi November 25th, U«i7. 

C. B. BENSON. 

Mortgagee. 
STE.VKX?; A Ht .VTER, 

.\::>i li.ys fo Mortgagee, 

5'J7 L/i nsdale Building. 
^ Duluth, Minn. 

Duluth Evening Herald— Nov. 25, Dec 

2-l*l«-i3-30. 1907. 



I..i 



• . .IS 
: Uieii.St vjuar- 
, .- . .':ty-f'')ii:- r,U. 
.p I>'itiy-nii: 
iJighteen «1>J» 

PI litUiffs*. 



V-i 



". M.Kitiley, 
; !i Bradley 

I ail other 

i unknown, 

:.'. title, es- 

rest in the 

'I !■; Mv ip- 



Q 

ai' 
a; : 
a 

B:> 
tl'. 
fii: 

d 

I., 

tl; 

ti- 
ll: 



li 

v.. 



L> 



: Minnesot-i to the above 
• n<laiii3: 
■ kereliy sumnv)ned and re- 
answer the application of the 
idiintiiTs m th- above entitled 
t: f )r I' t;- i.s t rat ion and to file 
r yo'ir an.>jwer to the said ap- 
m the office of the clerk of 
rt. In .said county, within 
iiys after the service of this 
> up«m " '•• "xclualve of the 
-uch 3> : atd if you fail 

' fhe >.,. ; ..'iilbation within 
■id. the applicant plain- 
non will ripply to the 
; ■Hef ih-iu :u..l-.'d in the 

11. <lerk i»f said 
:eof. :it Duluth. 
ouiiiy. tliid .ioth day of No- 
.V. D. liW7. 

J. P. JOHN.^O.V, 

I'lerk. 
By J S. MOODY, 
Deputy. 
^frlct (?ourt. -St. Louis Coutity. 

■'-tns Herald. Dec. 2, 9 and 



Woman 



4 



iJ lntrr»s«ted and should tnoir 

al-iut ihe woii'lrrfnl 

MARVEL >^hirling Spray 

[The new Va^laal SrrtaM. lnJeC' 

tx.n aT,d .Vucfi. n. I»eat— saf. 

fsi-Mnst Convenient. 

ItClMSMS laaUaUj . 



ftk year dr««f bt for K. 
f he canrnasundy tb« 
MAHVKI.. accept no 
cUnT. I'i t 4«nd siKtiip for 
lihisiraii-l txHilc— walrd It glvna 
fall particulars and •tu-»'.-tM-rii til- 
^»lij.-.blei..la<1lea. .<nAK%'KI. ro., 
*• K. 93d ^T.. %KV¥ 1«»HK. 

FOR SALE BY MA.X WIRTH 
DRUGGIST. 



NOTICE IS H 
default has iK-en 
of thiit certain 
power of sale, ex 
John Derzaj and 
gors, to James \V 
uig dale the 24th 
filed for record o 
laOl, at oixt: oclo 
of the Regi.ster ( 
County of St. Lo 
sota, and recordi 
Register of Deed 
gages, on Page 
is now owned ani 
gagey therein m. 
consists in tlie fu 
said mortgagors 
princit»al and inti 
by said inortgag 
due and payable 
tober. 1901; that 
payable upon sau 
thereby secured, 
dred and ten an^ 
and that no actio: 
that no action > 
been commenced 
secured by said 
thereof. 

Tliat. therefore, 
of .sale containe<J 
pursuant to tlie 
made and provii 
win be foreclosed 
ises descritx'd in 
mortgage, to-wit: 
Till rly -one (31). 
of tl»e First Ad. 
Eveleth, in the C 
State of .\linne^ 
plat thereof on ii 
office of the Rej. 
for said I'ounty. 
unto tile said mo 
said lands, togeth 
and privileges of 
ing and reniovlt 
said sale will be 
said St. Louis t\i 
of the Court Hoi 
luth, in the Coui 
of Minnesota, on 
of iV'cember, 1907 
at public vendue, 
for cash, to pay 
and the sum of tv 
attt)rney's fees, 
mortgasc. and t 
lowed by law, si 
any time within . 
of sale, as allowi 
Dated Novembe. 



HARVEY S. CLA 

Attorney for f 
Duluth Evening I 
2-9-16— 19(>7. 



^JREBY GIVEN: That 
made in the conditions 
mortgage containing a 
ecuted and delivered by 
Mary Derzaj, mortga- 
Falk, mortgagee, bear- 
day of .■Vpril, 19yl. and 
n the 27th day of April, 
ck P. M., in the office 
f l>eeds, in and for the 
lis, and Slate of Minne- 
d in said office of said 
i. in Book 1K2 of Mort- 
X which said mortgage 
I held by tlie said tnort- 
med; that said default 
ilure and refusal of the 
to pay any part of the 
rest on the debt secured 
. which said debt was 
on the 24th day of Oc- 
there is now due and 
mortgage and the debt 
the sum of Five Hun- 
l SJ-li.x) ($5l0.aj) Dollars. 
I or proceeding has ever 
•r proceeding has ever 
to recover said debt 
mortgage or any part 

by virtue of the power 
in said mortgage and 
statute In such case 
ed, the said mortgage 
by a sale of the prem- 
and conveyed by said 
Lot Four (4>. of Block 
>f the Re-arrangement 
Ition to the village of 
juntj of St. Louis, and 
Ota, according to tlie 
le a«d of record in the 
risler of Deeds, in and 
excepting and reserving 
tgagors all mineral.*? in 
•r with the usual rights 
exploring for and min- 
g said minerals; that 
made by the Sheriff of 
unty, at the front door 
ise. in the City of Du- 
ity of St. Louisi. State 
Monday, the 30th day 
at ten o'clock A. M.. 
to tlie highest bidder 
said debt and interest, 
enty-five dollars ($25.00) 
as stipulated in said 
)e di.sbursements al- 
bject to redemption at 
•ne year from the date 
d bv law. 
9th. 1907. 
JAMES W. FALK, 
Mortgagee. 
PP, 

lortgagee. 
lerald. Nov-U-18-25-Dec- 



SITUATION \V'.\NTEr>— POSITION BY 
young man as Ixwkkeeper or assistant; 
best of references. Address. X. K., 
Herald, 

SITU.\TION WANTED— AT .\NY KIND 
of work around house; will take small 
wages for winter. E. 33, Herald. 

SlTl'ATION WANTED-ANY KIND OF 
work, by middle-aged man; has some 
experience as painter. L 20, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— POSITION A3 
janitor for winter. .\ddrres« "H. H," 
flat A. No. S East Fifth street. 

SITU.\TION WA.VT ED— POSITION AS 
contractor or operating millwright. 
Al rotary saw filer. Address J. M. 
Walker, Cass Lake, Minn. 

l-SITU-ATIO.N W.V.NTBI>-SM.\LL JOBS 
I of cutting wood and other chores. Ad- 
dress C. 100. Herald. 

WANTED - THOROUGHLY COMPET- 
ent stenographer and office man, at 
present employed, desires to make a 
change. Has ten years* experience 
and can give excellent references. H. 
59, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — PLASTERING 
contractor, non-union, with years of 
experience and plenty of good help; ] 
will handle contracts large or small. 
In or out of city H. C3. Herald. 



MORTG.\GB FORECLOSURE SALE.— 
Default having been made In the pay- 
ment of the sum of Four Hundred and 
Sixty -six and 45-lOQ Dollars ($4(>6.45) for 
principal and Interest which Is clSLimed 
to be due and Is due, and which default 
has continued to tlie date of this notice 
upon a certain mortgage duly execut»d 
and delivered by V. M. Lord and Ella B. 
L<jrd, his wife. Mortgagors, to Samuel 
Buck, Mortgagee, bearing date the first 
day of November, 1S93, with a power of 
sale therein contained, and duly recorded 
in the office of the Register of Deeds In 
St. Louis C^ounty, Minnesota, on the 14th 
day of November, 1*»3, at 4 o'clock P. M. 
in Book 104 of Mortgages, on Page 121; 
and 

WHEREAS. Said Mortgagors made de- 
fault in paying taxes against the mort- 
gaged premises for the year 1906, amd 
which were paid by the undersigned on 
the 9th day of November, VMl, amount- 
ing to Sixto«n and ;f7-luu DoUara 
<$H;.;57) with penalties, costs and interest, 
and no part of which has been repaid to 
the undersigned; and 

WHEUE.VS, The said Mortgagee since 
the delivery of said mortgage has do- 
parted this life, and letters testamentary 
have been duly Issued to the undersigned, 
and he is now the executor of the will 
and estate of said Samuel Buck, Mort- 
gagee, deceased: 

NOW. THIiREFORE, NOTICE IS 
GIVEN that by virtue of the power of 
sale contained in said mortgage and pur- 
suant to the statutes in sucli case made 
and provided, the said mortgage will be 
foreclosed by sale of the premises de- 
scribed In and conveyed by said mort- 
gage, viz: Lot numbered thirteen (13), in 
Block numbered two hundred and eighty- 
nine (2S9), West Duluth, Fourth Division, 
St. Louis County, Minnesota, according 
to tlie recorded plat thereof, which sale 
will be made by the sheriff of said St. 
Louis County, Minnesota, at the front 
door of the County Court House in said 
County and State ot) the 2tjlh day of 
December. 1907, at 10 o'clock A. M. of 
that day, at public vendue to the highest 
bidder for cash, to pay said mortgage 
debt .and interest and said taxes and in- 
terest ami F'ifty Dollars ($50) attorneys' 
fees, as stipulated In said mortgage in 
case of foreclosure, and the disburse- 
ments allowed by law, subject to redemp- 
tion at any time within one year from 
the day of sale. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., November 11th, 
1S07. 

GEORGE W. BUCK, 
Executor of the will and estate of Sam- 
uel Buck, decea.'ed. 
S. T. & WILLIAM HARRISON, 
Attorney for George W. Buck, execu- 
tor. 
Rooms 608-511 Torrey Bldg., Duluth, 
Minn. 
Duluth Evening Iferald, Nov. ll-18-'25. 
Dec. 2-9-l>>. '07. 



Department Makes a Rec- 
ord-Breaking Run Satur- 
day Evening. 



The West Duluth fire department was 
called at 10 o'clock to a grocery and 
confectionery store, owned by Mike 
Sprilong, 5610 Raleigh street. It was 
only a small lire, started by a back 
draught from the chimney, which blew 
some hot coals out of the stove onto 
the floor. The alarm was sent in by a 
passerby, only a 16-year-old girl being 
In the store when the Are started. The 
fire department was on the spot before 
the lire got any start and they quickly 
extinguished it. Tljere was very little 
damage done. 

There were two alarms turned in 
Saturday evening. At 6 o'clock the de- 
partment made a recrord breaking run 
to Fifty-seventh avenue west and 
Grand avenue, where the reflection of 



bay, was h^ld this afternoon at 2 o'clock 
from the residence, 11 South Fifty-first 
a\enue west. The remains were sent to 
Bay City, Mich., the former home of the 
family. 

Maria Chestock, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Chostock. 2617 "West Fifth 
street, dl< d of diphtheria yesterday after- 
noon at her home. The funeral took place 
this noon from the residence, and the in- 
terment was at Park Hill cemetery. 

Charles J. Brown has taken the position 
of superintendent of works at the car- 
bolite plant. 

William Spencfr of Oklahoma Is In town 
on business. He is the owner of the 
Sponcer pharmacy, 402 Central avenue. 

W^b <:%avonaugh and Ed Doone returned 
ye.storday from SkllK), Minn. 

William Ayers returned from a business 
trip to Minneapolis Saturday evening. 

Big line of ladies' and gents' and baby 
rings, in .solid gold, at prices from 76c 
up. Hurst, West Duluth jeweler. 

COST GREATER 
THAN RECEIPTS 

Hill Tells Why Railroads 

Raised Freight Rate 

on Lumber. 

Washington. Dec. 16.— James J. Hill. 
chairman of the board of directors of 
the Great Northern railroad, was the 
principal witness today in the hearing 
before the Interstate commerce com- 
mission of the complaints of the Wash- 
ington and Oregon lumber associations 
against the railway lines of the North 
Pacitic states, with respect to an ad- 
vance in rates on lumber and forest 
products. 

Mr. Hill said that his attention was 
attracted to the situation last summer 
and on investigation, he found that the 
the charcoal burning in a salamander | cost to his road or handling the lum- 
in a new building, had fooled a neigh- 1 ber traffic from the Northwest was far 
bor into telephoning an alarm. The j greater than the revenue gained from 
men were out just five minutes. At | it. The difficulty was, in his judgment. 
10 o'clock Saturday night the depart- j that the oars had to be hauled by the 
ment worked over an hour with a Are I railroads from the eastern points to 
In Mrs. L.. Stone's boarding house 6 1 Oregon and Washington practically 
North Central avenue. The fire start- j eanpty. The haul of sjbstantially 4.0U0 
ed from an oil stove in the corner of I miles cost the lines about $280, while 
the dining room and spread very quick- j the revenue, per car from the North- 
ly. The windows of the house were west to the points of destination of the 

lumber products was about $200. This 
produced a loss of $80 per car. This 
situation was serious, from the view- 
point of the railway lines, that it was 
necessary to take some action that 
would remedy it. It was decided to 
increase the rates on lumber and lum- 

ber products, not witli any idea of pro- 

r, . * riu 1 f\ LI i.. ^ « „.. I hiblting the traffic in lumber from the 

Remains of Charles Dahlstrom Are ; Northwest, but merely with the idea 

I of protecting the interests of the rail- 
way lines. From his point of view, it 
manifestly was impossible for the car- 
riers to haul the lumber traffic from 
the Northwest to points of destination 
in the East at the former rates and to 
obtain a fair and equitable rate on 
hold tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock j lumber, was the only reason the rail- 
from the Swedish Lutheran church, i roads had for making an advnce in 
Fifty-fourth avenue west and Kinnear. their tariffs, 
street. Interment will be at the 
Uneota cemetery. 

Mr. Dahlstrom was taken ill with 
typhoid fever some time ago at his 
home in Balfour, N. D., and from 
there was taken to tlie hospital at 
Minot, N. D., where he died -ast 
Week. Mr. Hendrlckson and Mr. 
Nyhus accompanied the body from 
Minot to West Duluth last night. 

Mr. Dahlstrom was a member of the 
M. W. A. C. and I. O. O. F. at Bal- 
four. 



all closed and when the firemen enter- 
ed it was almost Impossible to face 
the smoke which had accumulated. 
About $2(J0 worth of furniture was de- 
stroyed by the fire. 

DIES AtTmINOL 



D. E. H., Dec. 16, 1907. 

The man who gets as much fun out of putting two dollars 
in the bank, as he does spending it, is a financier. 

To Draw 
The Xmas Crowds 

This is the chief task of the overworked Advertising Man 
during the busy days before the Holidays. We advocated a 
Band Concert and American Beauty Roses as an attraction to 
cause every woman In Duluth to take a walk thru our festive 
aisles, for an inspection of the Columbia stocks is all that is 
necessary to proclaim their superiority in quantity and quality. 
B-ut we were overruled by wiser heads who told us that the 
women themselves are too busy for concerts and that they 
would prefer the money It would cost in 

Special Xmas Bargains 

So the special Xmas bargains go, and the sarcifice of 
profits is to be charged to the advertising account. Here is 
Number One to be placed on sale. 



Brought to West Duluth. 

The funeral of Charles O. Dahlstrom. 
a former resident of West Duluth, and 
a brother of Mrs. A. Hendrickson, 625 
North Fifty-sixth avenue west, will be 



MAN WHO EXPOSED 



CHICHESTER'S PILLS 



■^_^->. THE llIAMON» HRA>D. 




I..adU«I A<k your nrncvlst f >r 
Ch|.<-laeM-lcr*a UlBinviid Draai 

I'llls In Krd and 4iold mrtallic 
t- •«.-», sealeJ with Blue RiM^jn 



-TEBV 



I ak« ■« other. Buy of vour > 

Hnw'^ A%i<f,>Tciri.cire*.TEu_ 

UIAHOND l»RAM» PILI.a.f r t» 

yfirs known v, Hf it. Safest. AUays R«Ii»l.l« 

SOLO BY [WlGOiSrS EVERYWHERE 



Receiving Attention. 

Mrs. Frederick Owens and her four 
children, wlio are under quarantine at 
their home, 20 North Fifty-sixth ave- 
nue west, are no<\' being well tak3n 
care of. A nurse was secured for 
them by the health department last 
Frday week and Mr. Owens himself is 
back in West Duluth and Is seeing that 
his family is supplied with all nece'*- 
slties. 



NEIGHBOR IS ACCUSED 

BY FATHER OF GIRL. 

Bagley, Minn.. Dec. 16.— On complaint 
of John C. Reeves of Moose, Minn., al- 
leging that one of his neighbors, Roy 
Luce, had abused a daughter of: 
Reeves, under the age of 16 years, a| 
warrant was Issued. Luce was arrested ' 
and brought here before Court Com- 
missioner Brown, and waived examin- 
ation, giving bonds in the sura of; 
$l,00u for his appearance at the next 
general term of district court in Clear- 
water county. 



Curling Club Opening. 

There will be a grand opening at the 
West Duluth Curling club rink tomor- 
row evening. A band will furnisli music 
for the skaters throughout the even- 
ing. 

All three rinks will be in u.se to- 
night for the first time this Si^ason. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

Mrs. Mary Dovelace of West Duluth 
left today for Pittsburg to spenu the 
Christmas holidays with her daughter, 
Mrs. F. W. Winters. 

George Levinson, 522 North Sixty-third 
avenue west, has returned from a visit 
In Siiginaw, Mich. 

Miss Gertrude Anderson, 624 Central 
avenue, will spend Christmas with rela- 
tives in Houghton, Mich. She leaves this 
evening. 

Coal, Coke and Match Blox— W. A. 
Pond Fuel Co., 411 Central avenue. Bell 
phone, 3062-L; Zenith, 3052. 

Axel Peterson of Virginia is visiting his 
brother, William Peterson, 435 Fifty- 
fourth avenue west. 

John Cook of Virginia sjpent Sunday in 
West Duluth visiting friends. 

D. S. Tuthill returned, yesterday, from 
Chicago, where he has spent the last 
month. 

Saturday eveniru? the ladles of the West 
Duluth Baptist church gave their annual 
fair and oyster supper. It was at the 
Victor Carlson hall. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Borne, 514 North 
Fifty-seventh avenue west are the par- 
ents of a baby daughter. 

Ally Scott, who has bepn attending th« 
university, will be home this week to 
spend the holidays with his parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. J. A. Scott. 

Fine engraving. Hurst. 301 Central. 

The funeral of Harrv Groulx. who was 
drowned last week, while skating on the 



Big Rebel Plot, is Now Inmate of 
a Poorhouse. 

Chicago,, Dec. 16.— <Jompletely forgot- 
ten by the outside world, Maurioe 
Langhorne, nearly 70 years old, crip- 
pled, almost blind and pennilesSs once 
hailed as the hero who had .^aved Chi- 
cago from destruction, is today an in- 
mate of the county poorhouse at Dun- 
ning. 

In a day that is forgotten by the 
younger generation, he achieved na- 
tional prominence by exposing the 
"Great Western Conspiracy" and 
thwarting a plot to burn and plunder 
the cltj', relea.se i^bel prisoners at Fort 
Douglas, capture the Michigan, the 
only gunboat on the Great Lakes, bom- 
bard lake ports and levy tribute for 
tile Southern cause. 

He has dix-uments to the service he 
once rendered the citj', letters signed 
by prominent men of Chicago during 
the war, some of whom are still living. 



GETS $500 DAMAGES 

For Being Falsely Accused of Pa.ss- 
ing Counterfeit Money. 

Xew York, Dec. 16,— A silver half dol- 
lar has proved to be worth $500 to Her- 
man Zwicker. One day last summer 
Zwlcker and his wife started for Coney 
Island and Zwicker gave the ticket 
seller on the elevated road a half dol- 
lar. He received his tickets and his 
change, but soon after entering the car 
he was arrested for passing a counter- 
feit coin. He was di.scharged In court 
next day. the coin proving to be a gen- 
uine half dollar, although it was not of 
the kind usually current in New York, 
being a Mexican coin. Zwicker sued 
the railroad company for false arrest 
and recovered a verdict for $oi>"». 



HIS OWN SKIN GRAFTED. 

Manitowoc, Wis., Dec. 16.— Skin 
grafting had to bo resorted to to save 
the eyeslgtit of Emil Waoh. the North- 
Western car repairer who was burned 
by acid a few weeks agxj. Wach wa.i 
operated on at Chicago, and skin was 
grafted from his leg to the face and 
for the forehead, and it is now said 
that he has a good chance of recovery 
and will be able to see^. without de- 
fect. 



COL. WING'S ESTATE. 

Wa.shburn. Wis., Dec. 16.— The ad- 
ministrators of the estate of the late 
Col. Isaac H. Wing of Bayfield, have 
filed a schedule of the property as ap- 
praised by them in the county court in 
this city. The total appraLsement 
amounts to almost $600,000 and this 
wa« largely in stocks and bonds, .al- 
though $78,()0<J was in actual cash in 
banks. The state will get as an in- 
heritance tax from the estate of the 
colonel about $28,000. j 




LOC.\TES IN OREGON. 

St. Cloud. Minn., Dec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herild.)— A. M. Lara, who up to a 
few weeks ago made his home In this 
city, has gone into business for him-' 
self at Bend, Ore. While located here, ' 
Mr. Lara was a commercial traveler for 
the F. A. Patrick company of Duluth. 
He resigned his position last fall and 
decided to go into buslneas for hlm- 
soU 



SKATES FOR PRESENTS 

We have everything In the skate line at prices that please — 
60c to $5.00. 

BOYS' SK.\TF.S. only 60o 

SLED 8K.^T^>». f«>r ffirls 50c 

HOCKKY ri,.\MP SK.VTKS $1.50 

HALF lIOtKEY CL.\MP SK.^TES $3.50 

829-331 CENTRAL AVENUE. 




Tomorrow 
50e Hose 




23c 



That is the biggest part of nearly 100 dozen 
Fancy Lisle and Mercerized Hosiery will be quick- 
ly recognized by you as the regular 50 cent 
qualities. 

We bought these at a very low wholesale price, 
but instead of making an extra profit we'll sell 
'em to you for wdiat they cost us. 

This is without doubt the best Hosiery value 
we've offered this season, our famous 10 cent sales 
notwithstanding. 

Being before Christmas, we'll put the limit as high as 
13 pairs for one customer. 

ff 

Look for Christmas Bargain No. 2, 

Columbia Clottiing Co. 

store Open Evenings Beginning Wednesday. 



RECIPROCAL 
DEMURRAGE 

Provision May be Added 
to the Interstate Com- 
merce Law. 



annual spring distribution by senators 
and members of the house among their 
constituents. At the time stories were 
written that thi.s loss of seeds would 
entail considerable Inconvenience to the 
farms and truck gardener who yearly 
has depended on the government for 
his annual supply of seeds. However, 
the loss will be replaced immediately and 
the aeeds go out as usual, or rather 
almost as promptly as though the flre 
had not occurred. The secretary of agri- 
culture has offiolallj' informed congress 
of the loss, and requests an emergency 
appropriation of $50.0)0. This request to 
repair damage by fire will undoubtt-dly be 
one of the first bills to go through con- 
gress after the holiday ri?cess, and, as 
stated, there will be scarcely a per- 
ceptible delay In the annual distribution 
of seeds by the government. 



Cattle Men and Grain 

Shippers Demand Cars 

When Needed. 



FROM THE HERALD 
WASIUXGTON BL'RE.\U 

Washington, Dec. 16.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— Immediately after the holiday 
recess the committees on commerce of 
the house and senate will take up various 
measures looking to amendments of the 
interstate commTSrce law. One of the most 
important problems which congress will 
be called upon to solve is, shall railroads 
be penalized for failure to supply cars 
when needed by the shipper? Another 
Is the question of reciprocal demurrage. 

Throughout the entire country there has 
come a cry for cars which during th3 
past two years, ha.=3 been louder and more 
insistent than 'the demand for currency. 
Yet, while this demand for shipping fa- 
cilities has been country-wide, it has 
gained the force of a cyclone In the cattle 
sections of the Southwest and In the 
grain shipping centers of the wholp sec- 
tion west of the Ohio river. The cattle 
growers of Texas, Kansas. Wyoming, 
Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico have 
been the principal sufferers from the car 
shortage, apparently, and that Is be- 
cause they are compelled to drive their 
herds long distances before shipping, and 
the failure to have cars ready subjects 
the owner of the steers to grfjat exi>ense 
for feed and to loss of weight, which 
sometimes reduces his returns by as 
much as 5 per cent. It is admitted there 
will be gr<=at difficulty in preparing a bill 
which will be just, alike to the railroads 
and the shippers. It Is proposed to re- 
quire common carriers to have shipping 
facilities at designated points within a 
reasonable time after notification of the 
requirement of the shipper, and failure 
to have the necessary cars after such 
notification shall subject the railroad to 
certain penalties prescribed either by the 
act itself or by the Interstate commerce 
commission. The Interpretation of the 
term "reasonable time" and the question 
of the proper penalties will tax tho 
committees and provoke a gr<»at deal of 
discussion in both senate and house. 

The legislature of the state of Wash- 
ington has adopted and sent to congress 
a memorial asking the "reciprocal demur- 
arge" be Incorporated into the federal 
commerce law. The plan has worked well 
In Washington state, and it Is b?lleved 
that it would be equally effective as a 
national policy. As matters stand today, 
a railroad corporation is in no way re- 
quired to accelerate the movement of 
freight over its lines. 

• . • 

On the morning of Nov. 6 flre destroyed 
practically all the seed stored In the 
warehouse of the agricultural depart- 
ment, these seeds being intended for the 



DRIVER DELIVERED 



Pint of Cream .\fter Hours, and 
Was Discharged. 

Chicago. I>ec. 16.— The delivery of a 
pint of ca-eam after union hours oost 
James Painter, a milk wagon driver, 
$25 and his job. Slate's -Attorney Healy 
is investigating the case to determdne 
whether it may cost the oflloers of the 
Milk Wagon Drivers' union. 

Painter was employed by W. F. 
Stroup. a milk dealer at 1721 Briar 
place. Mr. Stroup says he was a dili- 
gent workman. The union requires 
every driver to t>e off the streets at 5 
o'clock In the winter months, and at 
1 o'clock during the summer months. 
Painter forgot the rules in his eager- 
ness to dispose of a pint of cream that 
was left in the wagon at 5 o'clock. He 
refused to pay the fine, and Mr. Stoup, 
who runs a union place, had to dis- 
charge him. Painter haa laid his caae 
before the state's attorney to find If th« 
officers of the union cannot be indicted 
for conspiracy. 

William Neer, president of the union, 

said he had not heard that Painter wa» 

seeking the indictment of the union 

j officers. Painter, he said, was an habit- 

I ual violator of the union rule, and had 

1 been su-spended for non-payment of 

dues. 



A MODERN DIOGENES. 

Eighty-Year-Old Man Still Search- 
ing for Honest Persons. 

Portland, Or., Dec. 16.— Although he 
has traveled all the way from the Rio 
Grande in Texas to Portland. "Diog- 
enes" John Hughes, an aged prospector 
: and miner, declares that he has failed 
to find an honest man, one whom be 
could trust to work for. Johnny is 
over 80 years old. if he Is honest him- 
self, and he says that for fifty years 
he has never paid rent or asked char- 
ity. He arrived here bound for Alaska, 
where he Intends to prospect. 



BURY DROWNED GIRL. 

Walker, Minn.. Dec. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— All that was mortal of 
Miss Lola Briglit, who was drowned In 
Leech Lake was laid to rest Friday 
afternoon, services being the saddest 
and most impressive ever held in this 
village. 

The services were held m the Meth- 
odist church at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. J. T. 
B. Smith of Akeley presiding. 

There was profuse and beautiful flow- 
ers. 

The body of Walter Johnson, who 
met death at the same time as Miss 
Bright, was shipped to the home of th« 
dead boy at Robbinsdale, Minn. 



f 



V. 



f f 





DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1907. 



^g«i" 





Pltone 

Your Want 
Ads to The 

Herald. 



j^Myim 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
AdvtTtisenient Li«» lliaii 15 Cents. 

SHOPPING 
BY TELEPHONE^ 

•piione. "Pnone. 
MEAT MARKETS— 

B. J. Toben ^ 2| 

Mork Bros COi-M 16» 

li^UTXDHlES— 

Yale Laundry <.9 ^ 

Lutt's' Luu.ulry f,jl ^i 

Home Luumlry H^W-M UJJ 

DKVtiGlSTS- 

Boyce ^^ 

FL*»iusrs— 

\V \V Set kins i'>-'« ■'** 

BAKKKIES— 

Tlu- l^on Tell li-i>L n-3 

PLl MHlXti AND IIE\TIX<.— 

McOi.nin & Co ,^15 »d 

Archu MiLVugail ^'-3 »'» 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 

Ailvtrtiiienient licss Ilmii 15 CeuUJ. 

liEl^^WA >JTED— M ALE. 

Men to learn baj ber trade; only short 
time required. JUus. Cat. free. Mjjar 
Barber Col., 27 13. Nicollet Ave., Mplis. 



FOR SALE-UNR jDEEMED PLEDGES. 
i;50 unredtenied overcoats, fur coats, 
and cravene;tts. G6 revolvers, m la- 
dles" and gems' watches, 3uO solid gold 
rtnjjs; also a full and complete line or 
Jewelry and ^lu^ical instrumente, suit- 
able for holiday presents. Keystone 
Loan company, 33 West Superior street. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertit»enient Leas Tliaii 15 Cents. 

RELIABLE HELP ALWAYS TO "bE 
had at Mrs. Callahan's Employment 
oftlce. 15 Lake avenue north. 

jW'ANTED-EVERY WOMAN TO TRY 

I Dr. Le (Jrans Female Regulator, 

tfuarantctd. Kugkr, Your Dryggist. 
I 11* West Superior street. 



MRS. SOMER3' 

ftce, 17 Second 
tibones. 



EMPLOYMENT 
avenue east. 



OF- 
Bnth! 



\\ANTEI>-FOR "HE U. S. MARLME 
corps men betwi en ages 21 and 35. An 
opportunity t-j s e the world. For uiU 
information uppU in person or by let- 
ter to Mr-.rlno Re<?ru.ling station, 5 
South Fifiii avei ue v/est, Duluth. Minn, 



WANTED - AT ONCE, COMPETENT 
and all-rc.ind printfi; wajres. $38 per 
w^ek; wire at our expense. 
Times, Biwablk, Minn. 



Uiw.ibik 



WANTED-SEE CHRISTMAS OFFER 

on pliotos. 25 Weet Superior street. 



One Cent a Word F^ch In-sertion — No 
Advertlseitient Less Tlian 1ft Cents. 



liOITDOML 



' One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less Tlian 13 Cents. 

FOR RENT— ROOMS. 

FOR RENT " FURNISHEL ROOM, 
suitable lor one or two gentlemen; all 
convenienceti. 220 East Second street. 

FOR RENT — TWO MODERN FUR- 
lli^<hed room.'i for light housekeeping. 
431 East Superior street. 

FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOM, 
electric light, heat, bath, $7 per month. 
ibC Mesaba avenue. 

FOR RENT - LARGE FURNISHED 
front room, all conveniences. Call 11 
P'ourth avenue east. 



WANTED — EVERY WOMAN. MAN 
and child that has rough skin or chaps 
to use Kuk1» r g Karnalion Kold Kreaia, 
the great skm food, 25c. Kugler, Your 
Druggist, U* West Superior street. 



WANTED-EXI 
Hotel McKay. 



ERIENCED WAITRESS 



REAL ESTATE. FIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 

j^^hn^X'^SUThrnson, Wolvin ^u'^j^f- 
E D Field Co. 203 Exchange buili ling. 
L" A. Liirsen Co.. 215 Providence buildrn^. 

Charles P- Cra.g & "^^-i, ^ ? -.>!''*'« ide 
Pulfoid How & Co., 3tia Exchmigf Pldfe,^ 



WANTED-MEN TO COME TO US IF 

you are suJtering from any disease 
peculiar to your sex. We cure Vari- 
cocele. Syphilis, Stricture, Gonorrhoea. 
Bladder and Kidney diseases. Lost 
Vitality and al pelvic troubles. Es- 
tabllsneJ in Duluth. We cure to stay 
cured and you can take our opinion 
as tinal. If your case Is curable, we 
will cure you. Progressive Medical 
association. Nc. 1 West Superior 
street, upstairs. 



WANTEL>— GIRL, 
light housework. 



ABOUT 

!>22 Ea*it 



17, 
Fifth 



FOR 

street. 



WANTED--A GOOD GIilL FOF GEN- 
eral housework. 19u5 East Superior 
street. 

WANTED-GOOD, STRONG GIRL AT- 
tending normal sciuiol to assist with 
liousework; wagt*s $1.50 per week. In- 
quire 1112 East Th-rd fclreet. 



ELECTRIC STANDJLAMPS.^ 

ALAK<;i: ASSORTMENT AT 
FUFLLAK PRICES- 

112 West 
First Sf 



WANTED - FOR U. S. ARMY, ABLE- 

bodied unmarrieil men, between ages of 
21 and 25; citize is of United States, of 
good character and temperate habits, 
who can speak, read and write English. 
For informatio! . apply to Recruiting 
oftlce. Torrev I ; aiding, Duiutli, Minn. 




WANTED - ONi SKIDDING TEAM 
and two heavy teams. Western Labor 
& Supply compmy, 4W/ft West Michi- 
gan strtet. 

PC>RTER AT BOYLES 



WANTITD - GIRL FC»R GENERAL 
horsework at 322 Twenty-eighth avenue 
west. Mrs. T. Maiion. 

W.,^rED - EXPERIENCED SALES- 
ladi»s at Frelniulh e. 

WANTED-A GIRL TO ASSISf COi 'K i 
in private family, uno East First sirtet 



PERSONAL. 

LIQUOR HABIT CURED. 
Free yours. -If from slavery. Take my 
cure and .n two wtiks I will guarantee 
to turn your taste against intoxicating 
liquors or I will refund your money. 
No danger to health. Price reasonable. 
Call, investigate for yourself and be 
convinced. Nt charge for aclvsce. Prof. 
John H. Fiste, 380 Lake avenue south. 
Empire house, Duluth .Minn. 



PERSONAL-BACHELORS- JUST THE 
thing for you; iron bed with pneu- 
matic air mattress; less than whole- 
salt at $26. 4415 Regent street. Du- 
luth 'phone 5o52-K. 

Private home fcr ladles before and dur- 
ing confinement; expert care; every- 
thing contidential; infants cared for. 
Ida Pearson, M. D., 284 Harrison ave- 
nue, St. I'aul. 



WANTED - GIRL 
three in fauiily. 
flats. 



FOR HOUSEWORK; 
Fiat D., Ashtabula 



MONEY TO LOAN 



DC .NEED Mt'NEY? 

Money lo..;. .. .:. iiuluth and Superior to 
salaiied peoplv without security. Also on 
piarK.s, lurnltuie, horses, wagons, etc. 
Business abroiutely confidential tad and 
get our rates and terms, v Moiitldy or 
we« klv iwvu.ents as desired. We guar- 
antee 'to save you monty. No good ap- 
plicant it fused ^, ^ ^ 
WESl'ERN LOAN CO.. 
:.2i .Mr.uhattan Building. 



WANTED - 
restaurant. 



WANTED - 
housework. 



GIRL FOR GPJNER.'VL 

7t>fc^ East Fourth street. 



WANTED- PORTER AT 
perior street. 



3ti6 WEST SU- ) 



WANTED - 

East Third 



COMPETENT 
street. 



GIRL. 2116 



WANTED - EXPERIENCED CROCK- 
ery salesman. Si anduiavian; one who is 
ac<:iiair.ted m Vv'est end; inarrUd man 
preferred. Itxif West Superior street. 



Nev.- yh 



X-l . 



Old phone, 71.9- R. 



CHEAI CURKSTMAS MOaL\. 

. We will loan you on your 
SALARY OR CHATTELS, 
At tilt liiiowing cheap raies. 

l.Ltii Interest and I'rincipal. 
We, kly. 
Weekly. 
Weekly. 
Weekly, 
Weekly 
ning 
CO.. 



Thest pay 
$1U— Return 
|20— Retuia 
$30— Return 
f40- IVlurn 
t5(>— Retun» 

Open every tv 
DUL. FINANCE 



.-1." 

»l.l50 

12. 2i. 



ii.to 

$3.60 
Jo -io 
J7.20 
Jii.liO 



Monthly. 
Monthly. 
Monthly. 
Mo.Uhly. 
Mont!.ly. 



WANTED - CO.MPETENT CARPEN- 

ters. plumbers, > le-ctrieians. siieet metal 
worktrs, roofert and plasterers; steady 
work; gfmd wa>.ts; open shop. Apply 
Employment 1 'ept. Duluth Builders' 
Exchange, :>Cl Lyctum building. 

MAN AND WOM- 
Tablets. the ifreat 
$1 per box, Kugler, 
W< St Sui erior St. 



WANTED-EVEl.Y 
an to try Nei vo 
nerve regenerat n; 
Your Druiiglst 



!(.* 



MUSIC. 



until 9 oclook. 
Ml Palladio Bldi 



MEKCHAND16L UF 
Eui- 



MONEY TO LOAN ON STO'^KS, 
bonds and good securities. A. H. Baw- 
den Co , 4i*-»07 Torrey building. Zenith 



dc 

'phone, 



2ilT-.'\. 



tlO TO ll,(m LOANED ON FURNI- 
TURE. PIANOS, HORSES. ET''. the 
day you atk lor It, by the old reliable 

MINNESOTA LOAN COMPANY. 

2U5 i"ailadia BKlg. 




WANTED - GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework; small family; good wages. 
Call 127 West Fourth street. 

WANTED — GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; small family. 429 
Tenth avenue east. 

WANTED-AN EXPERIENCED GIRL 
for general housework. Mrs. H. L. 
Dresser, IC South Nineteenth avenue 
east. 

WANTED— GOOD, RELIABLE GIRL 
for nurse maid in Etist end family; 
must furnish references. Address Z. 2Q, 
Herald. 



PERSONAL - WANTED - AT OUR 
studio, you and your friends to sit 
for novel photos; 2 doz^n; 4 positions, 
26 cents. 5 West Supeiior street, 
room 7. 



FOR RENT- FURNISH ED ROOMS P^OR 



housekeeping. 210 
Zenith plione 87b. 



East Second street. 



FOR RENT - HEATED WELL FUR- 
nished single room. 439 Mesaba avenuc- 



FOR RENT - TWO WARM ROOMS 
tor housekeeping; light and ball). 331 
West Fifth street. 

FOR RENT-FURNLSHED ROOMS FOR 
light housekeeping. 323 East Third 
street. 



FOR RENT - ROOM, LARGE AND 

very pleasant; steam heat; telephone, 
etc. 1420 East Superior street. Old 
'phone, 252-L. 



One C«nt a Word Eacli Insertion — No 
Advertisement Liess Timn 15 Cents. 

FOR SALE — MISCELLANEOUS. 

Wcw>aiKH;i(tt-C3a-t^'ai>o^aoK>oo<>o<KH;( 

g 

a 
o 
a 

8 



O "SNAPS 

I? FOR LATE BUYERS. 

P A real opportunity to gel a good 

if stove at a big saving. Come and 

Q lake a look ai ihern and be con- 

O vlnced. Your credit is aa good 

Q as anybody's for anything in stoves, 

Q lurmiure, carpets, bedding, etc. 

H? M. SHAPIRO, 

<t 12 First A. W. Just off Superior St. 



FO SALE-HORSE GOODS, REPAIR- 
ing done cheaply. L. Kernes, 29 E. 1st, 



MASONIC. 
PALESTINE LODGE. NO. 79, A. F. Sk 
A. M.— Regular meeting flr»t 
and third Monday evening* 
of each month at 7;30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Dec. 16th, 1807. 
Work— Lodge of Instruction 
by custodians of the work. 
James A. Crawford. W. U-l 
H. Nc»bitt, secretary. 

IONIC LODGE, NO. 186. A. F. & A. M.— 
Regular meetings second and 
fourth Monday evenings of 
^ath month at 7 30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Dec. 16. 1907. 
Work— Lodge of instruction 
by custodians of the work, 
James L. Cromwell, W. M» 
«. 5>. N« wcij 





FOR SALE-IRON AND WOODWORK- 
Ing machinery and supplies, pulleys, 
shafting, hangers, boxes, etc., new aii.l 
second-liand. Northern Machinery com- 
pany, Minneapolis. 



KEYSTONE 



secretary. 



FOR SALE-GENUINE BLISS NATIVE 
herbs. Besi curt for rheumatism. F. 
Gabrieison, l.o West Superior street. 



•'OR SALE— GAS RANGE AND COAL 
range. Inquire 1121 East Fourtn street. 



FOR RENT-ONE FURNISHED FKONT 
roemi, suitable lor two. 19 Seventh ave- 
nue WfcSt. 



GET Your sanitol before its 

too late; $2.70 worth for $1. Eddy Jer- 
onimus, t>03 E. Fourth St. Both 'phonea. 



PERSON A 1^ 

tiring done. 



■Clafses in china 
2*606 W. 3rd. Zen 



painting. 
1938-X. 



FOR RENT-ONE 
healed, tor 15. 
West Duluth. 



FUItNISHED 
5711 Wadena 



ROOM, 
street. 



FOR RENT-TWO FURNISHED ROOMS 
at 16 Masun Hats. 



PERSONAL - EXPERIENCED SEAM- 
Btress v.ants to go out sewing by the 
day. 1112 West Third stret. city. 

Private and class lessons in English. John 
Tanis, A. B., instructor, 28 Winthrop Bldg. 



Guaranteed Main spring, $1; watch clean- 
ed, $1. Garon Bre-s. 213 West First St. 

I'ERSONAL-ENGRAVING, JEWELRY 
and silverware. Duluth Engraving 
Bureau, y Winthrop block, Zemin 
'phone, 2106-D, 



VALENTINES DRESSMAKING 
SCHOOL. 
Two weeks' free instruction In dress- 
making; easy to learn; Valentine'* 
self-calculating system, cutting and de- 
i«lgning; inve;?tigate; visitors welcome. 
Miss Gray, third floor. Gray & Tallant 
cennpany; 



PERSONAL - OLD 
vereel. St. Gern.ain 
nut west. 



MIRRORS RESIL- 
Bros., 121 First ave- 



PERSONAL - 
lors, 24 West 



CENTRAL BATH 
Superior street. 



PAR- 



PERSONAL — SATISFACTORY TAIL- 
onng. Stcltz, 526 East Fourth street. 



PLANO TUNING. 

C. /.. GREGORY, ZENITH 'PHONE. 606. 



PHONOGRAPH REPAIRS. 

Repiiiring done .ntiiply on all lalkin.? 
machines. C. C. >ovehy Co.. 120 W. Mich. 



MONEY TO LOAN - ON I^L\.MONDS, 
wall his, luis, lirtot. etc.. and all goods 
of value $1 to Sl.WU. Keystone Loan & 
Mercantile Co., It West Superior street. 



i- I A N O S . PHONOGRAI'HS AND 

ev»ryth:ng in tl>e line of music. All ot 
the popular songs and two-steps. Send 
us your orders. Zenith Musk company. 
No. 6 East Sup' rior street. 



OPTICIANS. 

C. C STAACKE, 3ti3 NEW JERSEY 
building, 106 West Superior street. 



OPTICIANS - WINNERLUND & NEL- 
son, 1V'£> West Superior street. 



Duluth. 



MONEY 
pvoplfc a 
without 
flees in 
Palladu 



SUPPLIED TO SALARIED! 

lid olhe rs, upe'n their own ne'tos 

MHurity; easy payments. Of- 

sixti-tiiret cities. Tolnian's, 5ii3 

building. 



FurJiiturt aiitl salaried loans by Unii>n 
Lean company, 210 Palladio building. 

FOR SALE— HORSES. 



BOARU OFFERED. 

Bt.>.-\RD AND ROOM (.)FFERED — 
Gc>od. siretng. i mbitieius girl attending 
iugh school or some business college 
can secure bo.trd ana room fret m 
return for her assistance with house- 
spare time. Reference 
.1. R. F.. 6(S VVesi fhlrd 



work during he 
rrqiiiied. Call 
sll tet. 



F(tR 
bet" 

Sui" 



- HOUSE. 'A'EiGUT. l.ti«A) 

..!.(! ^ ytars e>ld. 725 West 
- ( t. Gregory Carlo. 



BOARD 
Steam 
ladles 
street. 



AND 
heated 
or gent 



RO«'M CiFFERED— i 



re)om 
emen. 



with board for 
313 West Third 



FC'R SALE - TEAM OF HORSES,! 
weight 2,900. aTid one set eif deuble Board and room offered- 919 E. First St. 
harioss e>ne lieavy elouble wiigon, one 
set <.A ii'.ivy tlcighs. Addi'^s Ken- 
wood I'.ii k Livery, city. 



FOR SALE-TEA.M; WELL MATCHED, 
dark bays, weight 3.00t> pnunels; 6 years; 
also e>ne i:(n grey inare: weight. 1,400 
pounds, b years old. S. M. Kaner, 1213 

Ea s^i Se V e r 1 1 h street. 

FOR SALE-GOOD WORKING TEAM: 

weight, 2.600 pounds; als«. one bay 
mare, weiphs 1 ¥M) iK)uruis, t years. 1227 
East Seventh street. 



L'OARI> AND Ri»OM, K- 50 PER WEEK; 
iiioeleru conveiii nces. The Dakotah. 117 
West Second sireet. New 'pnone, 1445. 



BOARD AND ROOM-122 S. FIRST ST. 



tirst-class table board. 10 W. Second St. 



AND STORAGE. 




LUMBERMEN TAKE NOTICE. 
We new have on hanel at our Duluth 
barn several carloads ( f sound, young, 
extra heavy logging horses, weighing 
from 1,W*(J tt I MX.' pounds, from which 
we can till ye. or oreler. Every liorsc 
sold guaranteed to bj as repr. sented. 
Fart time give n if de:|;red. Barn oppo- I 
site postoffut. Barrett >.'4 Zimmerman, 
Duluth, Minn. ] 

5 Dealer in p , 

glJ<ri-ks. Wagons, and Buggies, 5' 
L'uluth. Minn p I 



PE«>PLES MOVING & STORAGE 
pany, 2u7*^ We.n Superior street, 
■phones. t<01. 



FARM LANDS. 

FOR SALE-SELECTED FARM LANDS 
In the agricultural secticms of Nor! hern 
Minnesota, and liomesteads and timber 
claims in the timber districts. Easy 
terms of payment. Correspondence 
solicited. R. C. .Mitchell, Jr., 312 and U3 
Torrey building, Duluth. 

FOR SALE - 3,000 ACRES OF LAND 
on Crooked lake, near Emily, Crow i 
Wing county. Minnesota, in the drill- ! 
ing area of Hie New Cuyuna iron j 
range, and with mineral rights intact, ; 
is also in an excellent f.'irniing com- ' 
munity; land well bunehed; good soil 
with rolling surfaee; partly timbered; , 
well watered and in a beautiful lake ' 
region. The tract at JIO per acre. Ad- 
diess box 34. Iowa City. Iowa. 

FOR SALE-LOT IN PLATTED DEER- 
wood. has 100 feet frontage on Serpent 
lake. L 42. Herald. 

FOR SALE — LANDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actual settlers; small payments 
down and balance on fifteen years' time; 
t>n or before privilege. Call or address 
l.ind department, D. & I. R. Railway 
company, 512 Wolvin building, Duluth, 
Minn. 



FOR RENT— FLATS. 

FOR m^rir^-'RTKm flat, firj^t 

floor; mi>eUrn, excejit heat; furnished 
or unfurnished. 41fc North Fifty- 
seventli avenue west. 

FOR RENT-7-ROOM FLAT, STEAM 
heat, electric light and bath. Zenith 
'phone 929. Old, 36-L. 124 East Fourth 
street. 



FOR RENT-THREE ROOMS, UP- 
stairs, 4207 GHUat street, Lake'sidc; 
near street au- line. People without 
children preferred. 

I'XiR RENT-FOUrt R(.)OMS; SMALL 
family; $12 per month, including b.nh; 
322 West Filth street. Inquiry 607^ West 
Superioi stiect. 

FOR RENT - LAR.GE FURNISHED 
front room lor light Jiousektcping. 121 
East Second gtreet. 

FOR REN'i - FURNISHED ROOM. 
with bath. 221 East Fourth street. 

FOR RUNT - THREE FURNISHED 
rooms, on car line; heal, light and 
balh; facing lake. L. 37. Herald. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM; $8 
per-xnonth, also one for $6, for two; 
electric light, bath and heat, 333% Wc:*t 
Third street. 

FOR~RENT - THREE FURNISHED 
rooms, light and balh; lake view; on 
car line; for iigJit housekeeping. Ad- 
dress I. 23, Herald. 



FOR SALE-COUNTRY EGGS, SWEET 
elder and honey. We trust till pay elay. 
Thatcher's grocery, 312 W. Founn St. 

D CIUCKEKING, 

O FiaCHKR, 

O FRANKL'N. 

O PIANOS, 

a EASY I'AY'MENTS, 

O HOWARD, FAR WELL & CO.. 

Q 120 East Superior Street. 

a Phones: Zen., 14"<S-X; Old, 1752-K. 

O W. J. Allen, manager; Fred R. 

{j Mann, expert pihiio and pipe 

ijt organ tuning. 

DID IT EVER OCCUR TO i'OU THAT 
It would be prohtable to prowl around 
our book store or write lor what you 
want'.' We buy, sell, exchange all kinds 
of books. Lundberg .'* Stone. 231 West 
Superior street. 




CHAPTER NO 20, R. A. M. 

Mated convocations sec-ond 
and fourth Wodne-sday even- 
ings ot each month at 7 30 
clock. Next 
Jan. 8, 19(#. 
Qe'gi^e. Newton H Wilson. 

tl-. ^J Alfred LeRlchleux! 
recorder. ^ 



crmvoeatlon. 
Work— M. M. 



DULUTH CO.MMANDERY, NO IS K T 
—Stated conclave, first" Tues- 
day Cff each month. Next 
concJave, Tuesday Dec. 10. at 
7:30. Dinner at 6:30 p. m., 
followed by Order of Red 
Cross and Temj le. Wil- 
iam A. Abbett, eminent com- 
Allred Le Rkbeux, recorder. 

SCOTTISH RITE. 
Regular meetings every Thurs- 
day evening of each week at 
T:;>0 o'clock. Next meeting* 
Dec 19 m»7. Work— Thirllelb 
de-gree. J. E. Cooley, Becr*- 
Uiry. 




FOR SALE-LUTEFISK. 
418 East Seventh street 



D. CLAUSEN, 



ZENITH CHAPTER, NO. 26, 
Order Eastern Star— Regu- 
lar meetings second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 7. 30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Dec. 27. 
Work- Inetailaticn officers. 
Harriet Hoover W. M.: Ella 
F. Gearhart. secretary. 



EUC 



FOR SALE-OiNE COLUMBIA GAR- 
land lange; cheap for cash. J15. Inquire 
at Duluin Van & Storage house. 



FOR SALE - UPRIGHT PIANO. IN 
good condition. First J10<; buys it. Call 
after 6 p. m., 319 West l>'lllh btieel. 




LODGE. NO. 198, A. F. & A. 
M— Regular meeting first and 
third Wednesday evenings ot 
each month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Dec. li. Third 
degree. J. H. Opperman, 
W. M.; A. Dunleavy. 
secretary. 



FOR SALE - 
works worth 



- FULL SET 
?(ji>. Cheap. L. 



BALZAC'S 
40, Heiaid. 



FOR RE.NT - FIVE-ROOM STEAM 
heated, nicely furnished room; phone 
and bath. flfl Fifth avenue west. 



FOR SA LE— SK A TI r^G 
est grade, cc-^t :j>4; No. 
ed, cost $;;; $9 in all, 
No. 4 s.hoe^s, loo smaH 
and vejy little used, 
road. 



SHOES, HIGH- 
1 skates atiach- 
will sell for »o; 
for present use, 
No. 1123 London 



DULUTH riL-.rTER, NO. [.P. R. A. M.— 
Meets at West Duluth sec- 
ond and fourtn Tuesdays of 
each nieinth, at 7:30 P. n». 
Next meeting. Dec 24. "Work 
— P. M and M E. M, degrees. 
E. G Wallinder, H. P.; A. 
Dunleavy. seen tary. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED 
East First street, flat B. 



ROOM. 321 



FOR SALE - PHYSICIAN'S CHAIR, 
books and table. 513 Burrows building. 

FOR SALI-:— AN $80 CHEi.'IT CERTIFI- 
caie on Kimball piano, good until Jan. 
1st; $10 cash. 429Vb East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT-FOUR- 
East First street. 



ROOM FLAT. 212 



FOR RENT-FOUR-RO<:).M FLAT. FUR- 
njshed complete for housekeeping; 
very central; must rent Immediadeiy. 
Box IS, city. 

FOR RENT - 7-ROOM FLAT, FUR 
nished or unfrunishtd. Flat F, Ashta- 
bula. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROO.M FLAT; 
furnished comptete for light house- 
keeping. 3W Fourth avenue west. 

IXtR RENT-VERY DESIRABLE FLAT, 
entirely modern, new, fine view, six 
rooms, hot water heat. Inquire 42b 
Eleventh avenue east. 

FOR RE.NT - FIVE-ROOM FLAT; 
me-dern, except heat; first floor: imme- 
diate posse'ssion. Call 513 East Fifth 
street. 



FOR RENT .- NICELY FURNISHED 
warm room anel board; modern conven- 
iences. Ill yecond avenue east. 

FOR RENT-2 FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping. 3'23 East 
Fourth street. 



FOR RENT — NICDLY 
roeim, with board; all 
314 East Second street. 



FURNISHED 
convenlenoes. 



FOR RENT - PLEASANT FRONT 
room with large alcove, lake view, 
nieely furnished, all modern, suitable 
for two gentlemen. 715 East Second 
street. Old phone 1174-M. 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED 
Ea.st Third street. 



ROOM. 2^>^ 



SATIN SKIN SPECIALTIES. 



To tone deiwn, refine, 
use Safin skin powder. 



beautify the 
4 tints. Only 



are, 

Zbc. 



New and second-hand sleighs. Gilmour 
& Co., Central and Grand, W. Duluth. 



^OR SALE-SET OF TWO SLEIGHS, 
also oak bed and spring. 705 South 
Twenty-thira avenue east. 



FOR SALE - PRACTICALLY NEW, 
large golden oak sideboard. 26 West 
Third Street. 

FOR SALE-AT A SACRIFICE PRICE, 
almost new sideboard, tables, rockers, 
chairs, rugs, bookcase and one set of 
encyclopedia Bntanlca with Amer- 
ican edition. 628 "VA'est First street. 




LODGE, NO. 2S. I. O. O. F.— 
Meets every Friday evening 
lit Odd Fellows hall. 16 Lak« 
avenue north. Next meetlnf 
Dec 13. First degree. 

noble grand; R. S. For«y. 
secretary. 



'^. 



FOR 

$15. 



SALE- NEARLY 
221 East Fourth 



NEW 
street. 



CUTTER, 



FOR SALE-LIGHT DELIVERY SLED, 
two sets of 'lighi single harness. Old 
Third avenue east. 



hall; 



K. O. T. M. 
DITLUTH TENT, NO. 1 meet» 
every Wednesday evening at 8 
p m at Matvabee hall, 224 
West FiTvt street. Visiting sir 
knights welcome. C. J. Hec- 
teir, eommander; J. B. Gelln- 
eau. record keeper. Office in 
hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. dally. 



Ft)R RENT-A 
Nelson Bros.' 



FOUR-ROOM 

knitting mills. 



FLAT. 



PICTURE FRAMING. 

DECKERS, 16 SECOND AVENUE W. 
GUSTAVE HENCKE. 211 E. SUP. ST. 



DULUTH 
pany, 210 



V.\N & STOR.\GE COM- 

West Superieir street. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 

^Blft h ' FOR"'REis^r^^^^fi^i^^ FLAT7''7lot 

' and five-room cottage, $13. 614 East 
Seventh street. 



West Duluth 
Central Ave. 



a;.d Duluth 
i',enith, 32.5 



Transfer, 
old Hal. 



b26 



STOVE REPAIRING. 

REl'AIRS FOR OVER lO.WO DIFFER- 
ent stoves in ftock. Duluth Stove Re- 
pair works. '1 hones.' 217 East Superior 
street. 



FOR RENT-HOUSE; WATER AND 
sewer; $6 p* r month. Call on C. Manilla, 
223 Eleventh avenue west. 



FOR RENT-FIVE-ROOM FURNISHED 
winter cottage. Park Point. Old phone, 
626- L. 



FOR RENT-FIVE-ROOM HOUSE. 415 

East Si.<th street. Inquire at 11 West 

Filth street. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT, WITH 
bath, electric and gas light; gaa 
range; including water and beat. In- 
quire 1030 West First street. 

FOR RENT-5-RGOM FLAT, WITH 
bath, electric and gas light, gas 
range, including water and heat. In- 
quire 1030 West First street. 

FOR re:nt-nbw five-room FO^T; 
all modern; also four-room flat; water. 
sewer and toilet. Call 60ti West Third 
street. 

FOR RENT - seven-room FLAT, 
newly papered, water and sewer, 
cheap rent. f>32 Eaet Fourth street. 
Old phone. 10E*-M. Zenith, 1761-X. 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 

CLAlRVO^YANTS^^^IkLADAjil LUETTRIA 
celebrated Egyptian palmist, has 
established a real Gypsy e^amp in the 
big storeroi>m of the Le)well block, 
11 First av*huc east, iDuluth. Store- 
room crowded to sec her reading dally 
from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. If you have 
already made mistakes, thrown away 
money and lost confidence through 
dealing with much-advertised and self 
styled palmists and clairvoyants an.l 
their cheap claptrap methods, start 
from the beginning and consult this 
famous Egyptian lady. She will tell 
frankly your condition and what you 
may expect. If notlilng can be done 
for you she will not lake one cent of 
your money. 



FOR SALE— SIX-HOLE STEEL RANGE, 
one small cook stove. Zenith phone, 
686. 506 Palladio building. 



MODERN SAMARITANS. 

ALPHA COUNCIL, NO. 1. 
meets at Elks hall every 
Thursday evening at 8 
c'eloclt. Beneficent Degre« 
first and third Thursday. 
Samaritan Degree second and 

fourth Thursday. Frank Noble, 

Lucy Purdy. L. G. S; T. A. Gali. 

cial scribe, First National bank 

Wallace P. Welbanks, scribe. 

raarUiins invited. 




G. 3. 

fl nan- 
building; 
All Sa- 



FOR SALE— DESK, OFFICE CHAIRJ? 
and table, cheap, nearly good as new. 
Address J. 22, Herald. 



FOR SALE CHEAP - TWELVE SET 
heavy logging harness, complete with 
collars at 108 V/est First street. 

FOR SALE OR RENT- FURNITURE OF 
recent twenty-i-oom hotel. 1928 West 
Michigan street. 




A. O. U. W. 
FIDELITY LODGE, NO. 
neets at new Maccabee 
every Thursday evening 
o'clock. H. E. Simons, M. 
W W. Fensterinacher, reocrd- 
er; O. J. Murvold, financier, 
217' East Fifth 



lOK, 
hall 
at 8 

w.: 



street. 



FOR SALE - $475 UPRIGHT PIANO, 
used four months, $150 takes it; this is 
a snap; eran be seen at room 11, Phoe- 
nix block. 

FOR SALE- BEAUTIFUL XMAS JEW- 
elry; best goods and lowest prices. 
Garon Bros., 213 W'est First street. 

FOR SALE CHEAP - FRONT ROOM 
set and couch. 616V^ W. Superior street. 




DYE WORKS. 



W. R. 

tan. 



ARCHITECTS. 

Parsems & Sons Co., t;i4 .Maniiat- 
Ail classes of building golicUed. 



FRANK L. VOl'NG & CO . 201 Pal. Bldg. 



FOR RENT — MISCELLANEOUS. 

FOR RENT-1 ARGE. WARM. DRY 

basement, suitable feir workshop or 
storage; very low rent. 219 Fiftii 
avenue west. 



ZENITH CITY L»YE WORKS - LARG- 
est and most reliable. All work don? 
in l^uluth. Work called for and de- 
Uvered. Phones: Old, 1154-R; new, j pQR 



FOR RENT - FIVE-ROO.M FLAT; 
modern conveniences. Inquire Bridge- 
man & Russell company. 16 West First 
street. 



!!>*«. 220 East Superior street. 



TRUNKS AND VALISES. 



FOR RENT-A LARGE OFFICE. NEL- 
son Bros.' knitting mills. 



SAVE Mi;i»LKME.V 
lulh Tru-.K laeory. 
Street. 



S PROFITS-DU- 
220 West Superior 



FOR RENT-St 
storage revom. 



ill room and frost-proof 
Neff Bros,. 302 W. 4th. 



DULUTH DYE WORKS-FRENCH DRY 
cleaning; fancy dyeing. Old phone, 
1202- R.; new, 1191-A. 33o East Superior 
street. Suits pressed by the month. 



RENT 
re«e«m Hat; 
lUl-K. 



-NEW, MODERN, FIVE- 
very central. Old 'phone. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



RITTEN 
Cooley & 
Ing. 



IN BEIST COMPANIES - 
UiielerhlU, 20T Exchange build- 



TENTS AND AWNINGS. 

PuTHTElP&~Txrri(«~Ea^^t^^ 



FOR RSNT— STORES. 

FOR RBNT^nT/ RGE. LIGHT STORE, 
17x70. in the h> ai;t e>f the retail district, 
in fine condition, recently decorated In- 
side and front painted. Basement space. 
If desired. Mist act quickly. Address, 
A. VV., care Herald. 



WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTED TO RE.NT - FOUR-ROOMS 
with bath, gas or electric light. L. 39. 
Herald. 



BOARD AND ROOM WANTED. 

I BOARL^'A^^I^lROO^Pv^^^^ 

young lady a place where she could 
have room and work for her board. 
Z, 41. Herald. 



CLAIRVOYANT - R O 8 C O E. 
phone, 4518. Engagements. 



OLD 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 



MRS. HANSON; GRADUATE MID- 
wlfe; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
Ave. east, old phone, 1594; Zenith, 1226. 



MILLINERY. 

M. A. COX, 330 EAST FOURTH ST. 



MRS. BRANDT. 114 WEST FOURTH ST. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

MISS .MARIA 'iKINDERBENG. GRAD- 
uatcd masseuse from l>r. Arvedsons 
Institute, Stockholm. Room 3..0, Burrows. 
Zenith piione, 1736-X. 



FOR RENT — TWO STORES 

and S South F rst avenue east. 
Martin Smith. First avenue 
Michigan strc< t. 


NOS. 6 

Inquire 

east and 





FOR SALE HOUSES. 



TIMBER LANDS. 

FOR SALE- 300.000.000 FEET TIMBER 
and l,500,00e»li0ti feet pulpwoe>d. Sworn 
Cruiser Atlantic coast. $130,000. Bex 
462, Sibley, Iowa. 



UPHOLSTERING & REPAIRING. 

Both 'phones. 



WE BUY TIMBER IN LARGE OR 
small tracts; also cut-over lands. See 
us for quick deal. Hopkins & Ebert. 
300 Torrey building. 



MASQUERADE COSTUMES. 

Costumes for dances and theatricals. BOc 
to $3 60 Elegance and variety. Mme. 
Elolse Jordan. 122 Third avenue west. 



MEDICAL. 

LADIES — DR. LA FRANCO'S COM- 
pound, .""afe, speedy regulator: 25 cents. 
Druggist or mail. Booklet free. Dr. 
La Franco, Philadelphia, Pa. 



DENTISTS. 



A. E HANSON, 

Jersey building. 



MASSEUR. 400 NEW 

Old 'phone 1826- K. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFP-I.N S Nt). 18 LAKE AVENUE 
north. Beith 'phones. 



STENOGRAPHERS. 

lEssoNS IN "bookIceepinc; and 

stenography at any hour. 2815 West 
Third street. 

GRACE BABNETT, FIRST NAT. BLDG. 



FOR SALE-THREE-ROOM COTTAGE, 
with pantry end hall: double fleKirs, ^ 
storm doors, ^a8hes in place; ^i-O^K $350 * 
CfLsh. balance $1 per week. Call any 
time. 1413 East Tenth street. 



I BUY' STANDING TIMBER; ALSO 
cut-over lands. George Rupley. 404 Ly- 
ceum building. 



FOR SALE— Fi /c-TOom cottage; water, 
sewer, gas, e ectrlc lights, with heat- 
ing .stove. In jiiire 526 12th Ave. E. 



carpi;nter work. 



ALL KINDS C 
and repairing 
George, 1007 E 



F CARPENTER 

done promptly. 
Fifth St., phone. 



WORK 
C. A. 

1361-K. 



L. A. HUME, 710 TORREY BUILDING. 



IF YOir WILL BRING 



LAURA BAXTER. LENOX HOI EL. 



Suits to 10 Fcuith avenue 
it for 50.;. pa \tia. l&c. J. 



west, we press 
Oreckovsky. 



BUY TIMBER IN COOK OR LAKE 
counties. Also furnish abstracts of 
title. Alex McBean. 406 Burrows Bldg. 



DR. BURN'ETT, 
rows building. 



TOP FLOOR. BUR- 



SHELr>ON-MATHER 

First National bank. 



riMBER CO, 610 

Dul. 'phone. 1601 



PRINTING AND BOOKBINDING. 

Thwing-Stewart Co.. 116 W^ First sireet. 



QUICK AND GOOD PRINTING. CALL. 

old 'phone. 1604. Trade News Pub. Co. 



CLOTHES CLEANED & PRESSED | 

Suits Cleaned. Pressed, Rtpaired and de- 
livered for $l..'iO a month, work guaran- 
teed. Grassenger, over Gasser's grocery 

L. TOBAK. CUrrHES CLEANED AND 
repaired. Suits pressed, 40c; pants, i5c. 
We call end deliver. 31 East Superior 
street. Zenith 'phone, 1745-D. 

Clark, 113 'W. First St., Swanson. Mgr. 

JOHN MUELLER. 202 WEST FlRST ST. 



FOR SALE— COWS. 

FOR SALE^^^^r^EVINE'^'^UST^^F^ 
rived with a carle<ad of fresh milch 
cows. 821 Fourth avenue east. Zenith 
'phone 1708-D. 



LOST AND FOUND. 

LOST - LADY'S GOLD WAiCH BE- 
tween Bethel on Lake avenue anel Sec- 
ond avenue east and Superior street. 
Suitable reward. Notify Lake avenue 
Bethel. 



LOST-SMALL SILVER WATCH AT- 
lached to pin, between Nineteenth 
street, Park Point, and Congrega- 
tional church. Reward if returned to 
Albenberg 8. 



FOUND-BANKERS' CHECK. OWNER 

may have same by identifying It and 
paying for ad. 723 West Third street. 

LOST - RED MORROCCO POCKET- 
book. 4 by 8, on the G. N. train from 
Bemidji to Duluth, with name "Je- 
rome E. Underbill ' in gilt on outside; 
contained several papers of no value 
to anybody but owner. Reward for 
return Cooley & Underbill, Exchange 
building. 



FOR SALE - MEDD'S HOME-MADE 
horsehide mltis, the be«t on the market. 
Never rip. None genuine without 
stamp. $1 at leading clothing stores. 



1. O. F. 
COURT COMMERCE, NO. 
32}<3, Independent Order of 
Foresters, meets first and 
third Friday evenings at 8 
o'clock, at Rowley's hall, No, 
112 West First street. Next 
regular meeting. Dec. 20th. 
Tupper, C. R; W. W. Hoope% 




M. W. A. 
IMPERIAL CAMP, NO. 2206. 
meets at Maccabee baJl, 234 
West First street, second and 
fourth Tuesdays of ,,eacl» 
month. J. W. Wood, V. C; 
P. Earl, clerk, box 411. 



FOR SALE — A 
enta) rugs and 
clieap. 426 West 



NUMBER OF ORI- 
hand painted china; 
First street. 



FOR SALE— Cod Liver Oil. Swedberg, 3 
E. Superior St. and 2015 W^. Superior St. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR RENT — ALSO 
for .sale; $25 up. Edniont, 410 West Su- 
perlor street. 




NORTH STAR LODGE, NO. 

36, Knights of Pythias, meets 
every Tuesday night. Second 
rank work, Dec. 10; social 
club party, Dec. 17. William 

H. Lamson, C. C; H. Mc- 
Kenzie, K. R. S. 



OLD GOLD BOUGHT. 

OLD GOLD AND SILVER BOUGHT BY 
the M. Henricksen Jewelry company, 
324 West Sui)erlor street. Providence 
building. 



ing. 



STEWART, NO. 50. O. 8. C, 

meets first and third Wednes- 
dnys each month, 8 p. m., 
Folz hall, West Superior St, 
John R. Ross, chief: Alex G. 
M< Knight, sec; John Bur- 
nett, tin- sec, 413 First Nat- 
ional bank bldg. Next meet- 
Wednesday, Dec. IS. 




E. E. Esierlcy, manufacturing jeweler, 
Spalding hotel, 428 West Superior street. 
•Phone, 1806-X. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

■ o 





LOY'AL 




WANTED $6,000 LOAN ON NEW 
$20,000 BUILDING. 



Wish to negotiate 
private party. Write 



direct with 
at once to 



GUARD, SUBORDINATE Divi- 
sion, No. 132, meets first and 
third Wednesdays of eac^ 
month. H. B. McKinley, cax>- 
lain general; H. V. Holmes, 
paymaster, 415 Fifteenth ave- 
nue east: E. F. Heller, re- 
corder, 230 West Fifth. 



MODERN MACCABEES. 

ZENITH CITY TENT, NO. 
1044, meets every first and 
third Friday of the month 
at Kalamazoo hall B. Com- 
mander, Charles E. Ncrman, 
1610 Minnesota avenue; rec- 
ord keeper and finance 
keeper, C. H. Loomis, residence B04 East 




J.-M., Evening Herald. 5 



COURT 



BUSINESS CHANCES - FOR SALE- 
Small stock of groceries and notion<i 
also fixtures to be removed or store 
can be rented at reasonable price I « 
Herald. ^* 



DIAMONDS ON CREDir. Old 1234- 



FOR SALE — A LOAD OF FRESH 
milch cows will arrive Saturday, Dec. 
14 E. Carlson. Tv^enty -second avenue 
west and Twelftii street. Zenith 'phone, 
1664- D. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

]JJ7nNESOTA ENGlp^ERIN(rT7x^. 
A Reed, consulting engineer. Suiveys, 
plans, estimates, specifications. Super- 
intendence. Zenith, 633. 408-409 Provi- 
dence building. 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 
ZENITH CITY CAMP, NO 5 MEETS 
eye-ry second and fourth 
Monday at old Masonic Tem- 
ple, fifth floor. H. Saxton; C. 
V»V' . ? Larkln, banker, 201 
West Superior street; Rob- 
ert Forsyth, clerk, 817 East 
Second street. 





U. O. F. 
EASTERN STAR, 
meets every first 
Thursday of each 
Maccabee hall 
First street. 
Dec. 17. J. Wilde 
152 Mesaba ave. 



fvText 



NO. 

and third 
month, at 
224 West 
meetinif 
secretary, 
J. E. Gel- 



urer. 




A. O. U. W. 
DULUTH LODGE. NO 10 
meets at Odd Fellows' hall 
every Tuesday evening al 8 
o'clock. R. R. Deichsel, M. 
M. ; R. G. Foote, recorder; 
T. J. St. Grermain, financier, 
121 First avenu« west. 




ineau, C R.. 116 W. Fourth 
street; Harry Milnes, treas- 
Office at hall. 



MODERN MACCABEES. 

ST. LOUIS BAY TENT, NO. 

1045, meets every first an<S 

third Mondays, at Gilley'st 

Duluth. Matthew Et- 

commander, 308 Eigh- 

and One-half avenue 

New 'phone, 3099-X. 

Eklward Shanks. 28 



West 
linger, 
teenth 
west, 
keeper. 



Finance . _ 

North Fifty-eighth avenue west; record 

keeper, C. C. Low, 5712 Wadena street. 




ROYAL LEAGUE. 
ZENITH COUNCIL, NO. 1«L 
Royal League, meets in Elks' 
hall first and third Mond«> 
evenings, at 8 o'clock. James 
A. Wharton, arohon, court- 
house; Andrew Nelson, 411 
First National bank bids. 







* 



•r 
« 



-^ 



4- 




^■■ i 



imi DULUTH EVENING HERA 




18 PAKS 




TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 18, 1907. (ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.) TWO CENTS. 



FIRE BREAKS OUT IN THE 
YOLANDE MINE WHICH MAY 



ASK HELP 

DELAY WORK OF RESCUE PaHlamenT^p^ls .0 

the World for As- 



PERSIANS 



Thirty-Eight Bodies Al- 
ready Taken From 
the Pit. 



it 



is Believed Death 
List Will Reach 
Seventy. 



Twenty 



-Six Men 
From Mine 
Recover. 



Ala.. Dt't :" 
it] b( t n tak 
V .. . ie Coal & 

Rescuing part c.-i 



• Jll'Uli. 

; t .i I ha 



th' 




sistance. 

Desires That Constitu- 
tion's Rights Shall be 
Preserved. 



NEW COINS 
APPROVED 

Last Issue of Double 

Eagles Satisfies the 

Bankers. 



;i. F. OF L ENJOINED FROM 
CONTINUING THE BOYCOTT 



* TWO MEMBERS OF PRESIDENT'S CABINET SICK. I 



***-'*-#^*-,IWMf^*****#*^^'j^*'*****^^ 



riy 



lUort; 



bud it. 



That He Will Not Be a Candidate' '"M.'^''^'"- "^ only^hop- 



It. 



STEPHEN R. MALLORY, 
n><-p entry. The ^ k- , United States Senator From Florida, 
: ii windy' shot i Who Is Seriously III, Announces 

-ttunu t.Aiy.. There were 

Tv,f-r !ak> II oiit alive aiid] 

'. Women, men and ! 

iui.ii.ll abcrut the mouth ofi 

. nigrht. It is estimated that ! 

St u:ll reach seventy. 



Teheran. Dec. 17.— On behalf of the 
nation the Persian parliament has is- 
sued a manifesto to the world, explain- 
ing the present constitutional crisis and 
appealing for assistance. The mani- 
festo, which- was distributed to the 
foreign legations and consulates here 
this afternoon says: 

"When the affairs of the empire had 
fallen into a hopeless state, the nation 
saw its only salvation in constitutional 

Kovernment. Tlit late shah granted a 
constitution and the reigning shah con- 
firmed, but persons who under the des- 
l>otle regime were accustomed to op- 
I ress the people, misled our young sov- 
ereign into the belief that the constitu- 
tion was the cause of the present trou- 
bles. 

"The nation wants to do nothing that 
will disturb peace, but in view of the 
attack of the reactionary members of 
the government it wij^',defend the con- 

pe, to the utmost. 



for Re-election. 



CmWiJ IMIKiHKRTV 

BEFORE SCHdOL BOARD. 

I'l. ..I, 111.. L>ec. IT.— Xi '.vton C. 

! - --upt linleiident of schools 

' : V' tio ifi ncuv servirur 

ti - : .'■ : r t ii.l.'Ci:;:.. i:i. j,; ,•: 

^ .ireu before ihe board 

» . V ;)^ ;i iTcr.--ni.lant in 

' recover 

i , ,t of his 

• ■ ^7511, 0(H). 

■i ' ■■■ n>,i>> ;>' I ii V f.^iigate 
-ssued liy I'oiii^herty, 

■' • ' ''■ ^ tisfact- 



OWES $12,353; 
ASSETS $168 



By means of this manifesto the Per- 
sian nation makes known to all lega- 
tions and foreign diplomatic represent- 
atives the actual conditions of af- 
! fairs, and inform.^ them that the sov- 
ereign is violating his covenant wit.i 
Jhe people. It makes this announce- 
ment to all the nations of the world 
convinced that they will show brother- 
ly love to the ten million Persians and 
not allow their rights to be trodden 
under foot." 

The negotiations between the s.iah 
and parliament have up to the present 



Some Changes Are Made 

in the St. Gaudens 

Designs. 



Philadelphia, I>ec. 17.— The new twen- 
ty dollar go-Id jKece, so designed as to 
better conform with the tastes of bank- 
trsi. is now in circulation. The new 
design substantially e<jnveys St. Gau- 
den's ideas, but has been altered in 
details to such an extent that prais>e 
and admiration has sujiplanted the 
critlcisni w-hich br*ke out several weeks 
ago, wheii the original coin left the 
Philadelphia mint. 

The new double eagle can be sta<'ked 
quite as ea-sily as aiiy other coin. The 
high relief to which bankers found 
objection hai^ been greatly reduced, 
though both sides art artistically crm- 
oave, the eagle and the goddess stand- 
ing out boldly 




Which It Had Established 
Against Stove Com- 
pany. 

Court Grants the Tem- 
porary Injunction 
Asked for. 



Concern Objects to Being 

Put on the "Unfair" 

List 



Washington, Dec. 17.— In the case of 

I the Buck .Stove and Range company of 

■St. Louis, against^ the American Fed- 

teration of Labor, involving the right 

of labor to boycott business houses 

which labor organizations regarded as 

'unfair" to them, Justice Gould of the 

Wuxhington, Dec. 1 7.— -Secrotarj Cortel.vou is oonfim-tl to his l>od with District of Columbia equity court lo- 



SECRETARY METCALF. 



SECRETARY CORTELYOU. 




The new 
pr()mise 
looncd" 
the dt«i 
adornment of the eagle, yet those who [ fttta** «f tli*" frrip 



found objection to this ftviture have no 
further grievance, ajB the legs are ob- 
siured. 

The figures 1907 have displaced the 
Roman numerals. The sharp edge of 
the coin has been eliminated. Around 
it are stars and tht phrase of "E Pluri- 
bus Unum." 

There was a great demand for the 
new issue yesterday when the first con. 
signment of $400,000 was delivered to 
the cashier of the mint for circulation. 
About half of thi.s sum was distributed 
among local banks and trust compan 



\Mun tie returned fi-oni N«»rfoIk tmlav. where he of tne case. 



time been without result. Todav the | ies. The coiners are striking off the 
member.-- of the old cabinet are hdjding coins at a rapid dip and today a sec- 



(HI< A^.O MA.\ SHOOTS 

WOMAN. KILLS HIMSELF. 



years old. 



itUSband of Grace Vani^"'"""^*'. '"^^^i*"'''*'^*'- Thepostofficejon^ consignment w'iji be delivered 

Studdiford Says He is 
Bcinkrupt. 



fcei* Whi. 

at«:T. I 



i:.-M. L. Dillon, X. 

■Man. k'-r ninht shot 

.Mis X Ii. 

-t.c \\ ii.-- asleep, and 

:. The shooting was 

.rans room, 286 Ohio 

■1 had concealeif him- 

hran was at the the- 

- said, deserted !iis of the best k 

ording i( ttiij police. ■ , p. :it'' 



Wife Has Won One For- 
tune for Herself and 
Husband. 



and all shops in Teheran arc closed and 
no newspapers have been published to- 
day. 



-*parat€ 



St L. .i.s 1h, . 17.— Charles Van Stud- 
diford, .lusbarM of Grace Van Studdi- 
ford, the actres-s, and a member of one 
vv n families in the city 
i> :ii rday in the United 



State.^ distriv • 



■ ii been , 
ienitent Judged a banki ^j 
-- at ten- i that most of 



PROHIBITION 
IS EXTENDED 

Another Square Mile 

Added to "Dry" Area 

in Chicago. 

Chicago, Dec. 17.— Chica.go today has 

one more squa.re mile of "dry" territory 

than it had yesterday. Last night tho 

squiue mile, almost 1 per cent of the 

The petition states j entire city, was added to the prohibi- 



t asking to be ad- 



The error of the d^-signer of the old 
double eagle, if such it may be called, 
had H singular result. "There were 8,0'JO 
of the original design issued, and while 
this meant $160,000 jn circulation, the 
high premium of |10 on each coin 
brought $240,000. It is said tha^ none 
of the eagles are in circulatiop, as they 
all have bee^ bpughi up by collectors 



went witli tiie prei^Ulent and |»art.v. he was enHH)elled to take to hrs bed. i A bill in equity was filed by the 
The secretary WH^^ unable, according to the reiK>rts from Norfolk to leave <^C'inpany last August foi a permanei't 
tliv cabin of the Maytlower to review the fleet, Imvin" been indi!^i)o«;«'d J"J"»*«-"t't'n restraining the federatiaa 
left Wastihigton. " from boycotting the company and put- 

ting it on the "unfair" list in the 
federation's official organ, and later a 
supplemental bill was filed charging 
that notwithstanding the pending 
proceedings the federation was still ac- 
tively engaged in pressing the boycott 
and a temporary injunction, passed up- 
on today, was asked for. 

The case will now jtroceed to a final 
liearing. which is not expected beford 
early next sj)ring. The court in ren- 
dering its voluminous findings, ex- 
plained that there were several points 
which he had not taken up in the 
present decision, including the ques- 

tContinutd on pagf ir>, fourth column.) 



Ill 



he liabilities are judg 
against the petitioner 



EXFLOSIOX. . """ ""' ■■' 

,Ut. !>.>,. 17.- ^.x iKui- (if -A-hich 1 
- ■ ■ • :ne in the Du- 

anil onV-haif • 

■" a lit r ■■■■ . ■ • 
t.fllevei; 



.\ 



tioii area by the city wjuncil. 
No oratory marked the addition to 
Wolff Realty company, j the city's prohibition districts. With- 
- for a time an officer i "^'''^ comment otiier than that the dis- 
-Mr. Van Studdi- I f'l^-l,*^'"' been can va.ssed and that pm- 



iU t:.at 



' - .'lai; r 1 r 

•.■.■<'d In the 



! hibition was the desire of iu* residues 

ut ..< tion was taken to; the v<»te was ordered taken. The result 

P th. iudgrnents against himself I was that by 37 ayes to 25 nays, Chi- 

estate company. His Ha- ^J^^" '=' ^ P"" ^^''"^ <^"er than ever k>e- 



* 
^ 



! before he left 

TWO DIE IN THE 
ELECTRIC CHAIR 

Charles Gibson and 
Stephen Dorsey Elec- 
trocuted at Newark. 

Trenton, N. J., Dec. 17.— Charles Gib- 
son and Stephen Dorsey, colored, were 
eleotrocutid at the state prison today 
for the murder of Mrs. Edward Horner' 
.Hiid Victoria Natoli, the latter a serv- 
ant girl employed by Mrs. Homer. The * 
muiders were c-ommitted in connection 
with a robbery of the Horner home, 
near Camden, last August. 

Gibson was electrocuted first, and 

Dorsey a few minutes later. Both men 

tial on charges made by his bu- 2| ! '^^*^'^ instantly. The electrocutions were 

perior. Lieut. Col. Deems, has % witnessed by Edwanl Horner, hus'band 



I TWINGE Of lUNBAGO 
CAUSED DISRESPECT 



New York. Dec. 17. — Capt. A. 
W. Chase of the artillery' corps, 
who is under trial by court-mar 



i^l-'.:M. w.hile his assets are 



ATTITUDE 
OFJUJGHES 

Regarding Presidential 

Nomination Was Stated 

in Speech. 

Does Not Care to In- 
fluence Action of 



aru. 

biiiiits ..i 
only $161*. 

As a young n an Van Studdiford was 
considered one of the wealthiest real 
estate owntrs i 1 St. Louis 



fore. 



I Grace Quive, a comic opera singer, and 

they were mar: led. Mrs. Van Studdi- 

I ford left tit ^tiit't rind they were prom- 

• ' ■ ! .-^^•. i.' Ii- srociety for several 

y< <ii s 

'1'!'' •)-'■! ■:. M..)! with an unsuc- 

' . ssfu, i.-.i:t\ c .;iipany Van Studdiford 

.. St his fortunt and his wife rf»turnod 

:.. the stage, and in two years had won 

a second comj etence for herself and 

, liusband. She left the stage again and 

: tin y built u CO inlry home, which Mrs. 

^■:tn studdifonl named .\tlasta Place. 

Th. y were finally forced to sell this 

home and Mrs Van Studdiford went 

; back on the stajje, where she is now. 



LORD KELVIN SIXKIXG. 
^"'*°"- ^^^- 1"— L-ord lielvin, the 
He wooed ^^"^'^"'^ scientist, who has been da'nger- 



2 asked the court to summon as a 

* witness, Capt. Charles F. Morse, 
^ post surgeon at Fort Howard, 
^ where Capt. Chase is stationed. 

* Testimony has been introduced 
¥" at the trial to show that on one 
^ occasion when spoken to by Col. 
§ Deems, Capt. Chase tossed his 
% head as if in anger. He says 
^ that he can pfcve that the toss 
^ was due to a sudden twinge of % 
? lumbago, from which he was at ^ 
S the time suffering, and wants the ^ 
^ surgeon's testimony on that & 
^ point. Capt. Cnase is conduct- s 
^ ing his own defense. 



I of one of the murdered women. During 
the night Dttrsey wrote a letter to Prin- 
cii>a! Keeper C>sborne, in which he de^ 



MARRIAGE 
CEREMONY 

Nearly Postponed Owing 

to Swiftness of the 

Party. 

iaiiceman Stops Bridal 

Couple in Auto in 

St. Paul. 



CLAD ONLY IN 
NIGHT ROBES 

Thirty Women and Chil- 
dren Removed From 
Burning Building. 



St. Paul. Minn., Dec. 17.— (Special to Denver. Colo., Dec. 17.— Fire that 

The Herald.)— A St. Paul policeman i broke out in the Tamale block, at 

nearly caused tlie postponement jf a! Eleventh and Larimer streets, this 

clarwl himself innocent. He did not j '"^^^ '^**^ ceremony last night. It was city, early today, endangered the lives 

i deny, however, being present when th-:' | all because of a desire on th& fjart of of fifty persons living in the upper 

stories. Thirty women and children. 



k women were killed. 



I. 



' '"a swift cpiirtshin hv n ^-x..!ft >io„h r ^'^^ ^'"'i' '" night robes, and hysteric-il 
it tea, !.*''''" courtship by a swift daph froiHj^jt,, j^^r, were carried from the buihl- 



Gibson wrote a ' the groom-tc-be to put a swift end 10, 
number of letters, one of them to "vvni exiu 10 , 

I Horner. In his letter Gibson admit . 

j the crime, and said he fireil the barn | ^"^"^^P^'is in an automobile. ling by policemen and firemen. Al- 

and then went to the house, where hj ; The dash was interrupted when on" ' though no lives were lost in the flie, 
killed Mrs. Horner and then the serv- of the "finest' stepped into thp ro-i.i '*'^"^*' fatalities may yet result from 
I ant girl. Gibsc^n also s«id that Dor- 1 , „,^^,„,„, ,w„ v,, r„^ ' '^"exposure as snow was falling and the 

jsey was in the house with him when,^"" stoppeJ the machine. Those m it weather was extremely cold. Tha 
I the murders were committed. ; were accused of exceeding the speed damage is estimated at $5,000. 

' 'limit, and were taken to Prit 



ously ill for some time, is sinking. 



V 


viaiiiiiiiv! 


L. 






-.1 Ma 


- 


■, T i 

•e- 








.\« w York 

n * ntii'tif- 



PRESIDLNT BACK 
IN Wm HOUSE 

Returns Safely From His 
Review of Battleship 




Washington, t>ec, 17. — With an en- 
thusiastic wave of his high hat and a 
liearly good-by, as he was pii>ed over 
ihfc side of the c 'uiser yacht Mayflow*^-, 

•" i'-' "^ ■'^ ........f. "'lit tvtjiiij- Pre»»id(nt Rot>8t velt ended with everv 

"uunty com not tee 10 otter d rt-solu- , , ...... 

. the *-rrfct that it is the l.tlitf or *^ ^''*'* ' ■"" '^^ gre; t satisfaction, luii trip 
Mittt-e that iht- R»puoM<an voters ^ of : :«• fie Paciflc-U.und ba.ttle- 

througnoiit the Cdiuity of New I , .. „ 

sire your name prt-sfnteu for i '^'"l^ '^'■''^^ snort y after 8 o clock this 
at tht national convt-ntion. Inimrnins:. The Mayfiower came alonK- 
1 am only itttemptuiK to give ^. , ,v, ... . . ^ , , 

xprvssion to Hit- Sfntinunt ttmt *""''" ^"' ^\ a^nin,{ton navy yard dock at 
:* so that the Republican party h.ju .jclwk. The White Houae car- 
it thr .'Stat* may havt- utriciai . ^ '^ ^ ' 
n vt-r. a.s I do not wisi , '"'^K*' ^^'^^ »" waitingr. as *ere the con- 
-c wnich nr^ay be dis- veyancea of the secrelarv :.f 'he navv 
.......nally or embarrass- 1 and other ohiciA ». who Were tht- guest's 

one 

- ^ had 

taken his s»at In his upt- 11 carriage 

■.'\*J';*^*il'V\T^o\"^^., 1^^*^^ *^*''^- R'«"*velt. .Miss R<»o»evelt 

■MARTLN SAXE. j and Miss Kubin <on 
Dec. Iti. My Dear n,,j 

of the 15th has bt-en 



..... ,... >..,n^,,y u. t-..ii.«iia»s- and Other olllcjia. who werp the «ruest 

plans of thf.se who are m your ,.* ,w ,.-^.„i,i.'„ ./ *"^'^? uit guesi 

T Will apor.ciate some expies- ,,..*: ^'^^*,"^*-"' «>" the trip. No on 

.^:.. ij u.ll guide me in the i "V '"'•.*"^P " »til the president ha 



Th*' president dil 
wait for tte dfbarkation of the 



1 u... 

..iKe an 



1 

I r- 



Mok it proper for'"**^ ^^ ^^^ olflnal party, but started 
St ion as to what ^^ once for tht White House, wher«. 
" 'Uld door should ! he arrived at*«.l5 o'clock. Ju»t befon^ 

.ttitude in my leaving the dec t of the Mavfiower a 
^^ ; Jt.lican chib and I \vireles.s message was placed in the 

^^w;.^k"irVlfe i^*S 1 f/;"tor', r^- ''V'f"'- ^-— W a 

■ iisinit^rfsted. and I M***' word frtmi the tleet. 

nfluenee tlie selec- 1 '^^'^^ ^f'P from Hampton Roads, which 

- I assume that *a.H madt- duriny the night, was with- 

>« wrli take such , out incid.^nt. The landing could have 

huvv'^^he 'r^'^dutt ' *'*"^" "'^'*^ ^*'''*' ""■ ^"^ ^^^ ^P^^ "^ '^.^ 

^k my position i. If "^'r-'^l^*' ^^^ >'ayi1ower was so regu- 

j lated that the a rival might accommo- 

' -y truly yours. 1 date itstlf to th • president's usual ris- 

•tH.-\KLKS E. HUGHES." j ing hoUT. 




MRS. ALERGO RELEASEIk ■t.c.Vo^' ctati^ri '«.v. .V^ " " '"' avenue 

Minneapolis, D- c. ]7.-Mrs. Francisco , P*^''^*' station, where the groom very 
Alergo of tills city, who was arrested .soon I unromantically gave up |25 to insur«- 
* latter the murder of her husband Satur-lhis appearance today to explain how 
ii,>i.ai*i-x-'i^>t--.v.-.>i*^Mt(,5Li^^ "*»^'^- h:^s been iv leased, as the po- | it all happened. 

-^.v-'*>c^>r/f'.-^.-'^.--o^-rf^'SfT¥'!fflf^Mt^ 111.; were convinced of her innocence, l «-..... ..^«.{.» «■ ti 

, I V Will isjiip \\ us ?i8iort. 

Robert J. McKinney of New York 
and M1S.S Ida Olson of .Seattle, Wash., 
were the bridal pair in the automoijile, 
and with them were Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Weems of Minneapolis. It was 
through the good office of Mr. and 
Mrs. Weems that Mr. McKinnty and 1 
Miss Olson met one evening at a cafe I 
after the theater. j 

That was three weeks ago and a ' 
day or so ago it was decided to bring 
the courtship to an end by marriage,! 
and Carlings uptown cafe, St. Paul, 
was chosen as the proper ^lace for 
the ceremony. 

So last night the pair started out in 
an automobile for St. Paul, exceeded 
the speed limit, were arrested, gave \ 
bail, were liberated, arrived late for 
j their appointment with a justice ofi 
the peace and the marriage supper. ' 
found the justice again by chance and 
were married. 



RUSSIAN 
ADMIRAL 

Greatly interested in 

Cruise of Battleship 

Squadron. 

Rojestvensky Knows the 
Troubles It Will En- 
counter. 



St. Petersburg, Dec. 17. — Admiral Ro- 
jestvensky. who during the Russo- Jap- 
anese war led the ill-starred Russian 
fleet around Africa to ultimate defeat 
at the hands of the Japanese in tho 
sea of Japan, is keenly interested in 
the cruise of the American battleship 
squadron. He talked today with the 
correspondents of the Associated Press, 
on the matter. From his own experi- 
ence Admiral Ropestvensky is familiar 
with the problems which confront Rear 
Admiral Evans and after outlining 
some of the difficulties the American 
vessels would have to overcome said 



KEEL LAID FOR 
BIG BATTLESHIP 

I t 

The North Dakota Started 

Just as Fleet Sailed 

Away. 

Quincy, Mass., Dec. 17.— At the mo- 
ment the guns of jtdmiral Evans' fleet 

were roaring out their farewell salute j he considered the voyage to the PacTlio 
at Fort Monroe the first keel pl^te of 'o be entirely practicable. "It can be 
the great battleship North Dakota the ! 5"^^^.^ safely either in time of peace or 
i„ „ ♦ K ♦*. v.- ■ ... ,^ . ,' I In t'"^« ^f war, said Rojestvensky. 

largest battleship in the world with the j Harlwrs Available. 

exception of her sister ship, the E>ela- j "Sheltered harbors are available for 
ware, was laid in the yards of the Fore 1 coaling and there is no fear of Inter- 

Rlver Shipbuilding company here \ ^/'^"f °" ^^^ P"'"^ "^ '^"y of tlie South 
- . , *^ 1. ,_ "cie. -^ American governments. The passage of 

fourtn larger than the largest ship now the straits of Magellan, especially in 
in the American navy, the actual con- 1 summer time, presents no difficulty to 
structlon of the Norlh Dakota mav ' ^ skilled commander. This expedition 

,now be .aid ,o have be^un. The a.s\ I rrh"'l,'S'e'"wre 'oXea't'TS'k^ "sS 
plate laid was No. IC. There are twen- ! We were not permitted to linger for 
ly of these piates each twenty-four ^-^^et i even one day in the unfrequented bay 
I'lng and each weighing 3.000 pounds. 1 of Annam without brusque orders from 
.AS soon as the first plate was laid | the French governor and the English 
frames were attached to it. I admiral to move on." 

The contractor ha.s three years in : According to Admiral Rojestvensky 
which to complete the building of th? the chief criterion of the success of the 
ship, but the ofticers of the company ' voyage will be Rear Admiral Evan.V 
f:<y that ihey will be able to complete ability to bring every vessel of th© 
:iie North Dakota, proviaed the mater- { sfluadron to the various stopping places 

I iril is not delayed, so that her launch- ; on scheduled time. The straggling due 

j !ng may take place ten months from j to mechanical defects, he said, will t)e 

I today. j hard to overcome. 



^ 



I 

.4- 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 



J 



r^^ 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: JTUESDAY, DECEMBER 17. 1907. 



:f^i^Tii^iv^yar^^^ 



V FATHER— Partly cloudy tonight and Wednesday: t older tonight 

AU Sorts of 
Christmas Toggery! 



GLOVES 

NECKWEAR 

HANDKERCHIEFS 
SUSPENDERS 
MUFFLERS 
HOSIERY 
FANCY VESTS 



BATH ROB]£S 
HOUSE COATS 
NIGHT ROEES 
PAJAMAS 
SUIT CASES 
TRAVELING BAGS 
UMBRELLAS. 



Ours is a men's store, which is made very at- 

traciive especially at this season of the year for 

women shoppers, who are looking tor presents for 
men and bo\'S. 



Home of the 
Knox Hal 





nfys lor the American Encinp company 
and the CoUimbia Incandescent Liamo 
company, which concerns recently ob- 
tained verdicts against Crowley for ma- 
terial ftlrnlshed the Crowley Electric 
c»)iiipany. One of the Judgments is for 
Jl.fitid.irj and the other for $J02.43. It is 
understood that uLh^^dgment creditors 
have tied up infth^ banks about $3,00) 
belonging to Crod-ley^, with a view of en- 
forcing colKctlonlon The Judgments. 



Off to Rest Cur«i. 

Oeputy Siierlff Mugio left this morning 
for St. Cloud, w thl^incenzo Belardlno. 
who was convict hI In the district court 
of grand larcenj in* the second degree. 
He was sent to tha state reformatory. 
Hflanlino .stole i quantity of watches 
from a Bowery Jui^^lry store and was 
arrested while aTteniptlng to sell them 
in Superior. 



Home of the 
Knox hat 






Abbett's Drug Stores 



' and closed at $5.75 bid and $6 asked. ! 
I Butte Coalition op' nod at $13.50, ad- 
I vanced to $13.75, declined to $13.50 and i 
y,.u -.'5 per cent on the '; *^>ofe*J ^^ $13.25 bid and $13.75 asked. ' 
„, , / „, t , . „. Calumet & Arizona opened at $93. ad- 

famous W L>. O Pip.s, Lead.ng brand ; ^^^^^^.^.^ ^^ ,^ ^^^ ^,,^^^^ ^^ ,jj3 ^^^ ^^^ 

Of Ci>r;iis, lUK- per box and upwards. -*1 . jy^ asked. 
West Superior street, 101 West Fourth 



W 



m 



street. "^Sl East Second street. 



ABBEH'S DRUG STORE 



Suporifii- & Pittal urg sold at $8.62V= 
and clo.std at $8.50 b d and $8.62'>2 asked; 
Denn-Arizona at $1.50 and clos*^ at 
$3.75l2 bid and ?3.6^V3 askt-d; Warren 
at $4.37''S and close. I at $4.12^ bid and 
$4.50 u.-ik.d; Globe it $6 and closed at 
I $5.75 hid and $6.12H' a.sktHl; Calumet & 
and .select iine of Manicure Sets. I j^^^^p.^ ^y_ j(.j 75 ^n i clor^ed at $4.62M» 

Razor Sets. Traveling Cases, j bid and $4.87^*; askt 1, and Butte & Su- 
nn. 1 <'ombs. Perfumes j perior at $1.25 and *losed at $1.12Va bid 



Lars 
Safety 
Mirrors. Hrushf 

Secorui at re ft. 



8KATING 

Grand opening at Western Cur- 
ling Club Rink, thin eTcnlnic. The 

public Is invited. Music by Lan- 
nt-r's Band. 



Anmtoiir Play.- 

The drama. ".More tinned Against Than 
Sinning," will be presented next Monday 
(Vt-nin- by tlu^ Cr*us:iders' club In tlie 
Cathedral auditorium. Fourth avenue 
west and Second jjrget. 

Advance, Man Here. 

William Rood TJanroy, the business 
manager of "Tlie Yank<>e Regent," is In 
town to make arrangements for the ap- 
pearance of his theatrical company In 
this city on Christmas day. 

Transcribes Old |*laf %>ok. 

S. George Stevens of this city has ju.st 
conjpleietl transcribing one of the coun- 
ty's oldest plat book.s In the register 
of deed's office The contract for tlie 
work was awarded to Mr. Stevens about 
a year ago. for $525. The p>at book was 
one of the most valuable records of the 
county and was, through long usage, 
in a very dilapidated condition. In or- 
i der to prevent a lo^s of the records It 
j was necessary to transcribe the whole 
book. It is stateil by the county offi- 
cials tliat tin- transcribing work Is 
highly satisf.ictorj in every Way. 

Murrh'd By th«« Court. 

James L. Blaine' of St. Clair. Mich., 
and Myrtle Safford of this county, were 
united in marriage by Judge Middle- 
coff. in the probate court office, yester- 
day afternoon. , 



Feminine 



Which 



Defies the Frosty Air Makes 
Most Suitable Gifts for the 






Women 



i^ 



.% 



Finds Mrs. Gustafson Insane. 

Mrs. Hannah Gustafson. wife of John 
Gustafson, a homesteader residing near 
Chlsliolm. was foumd insane at an ex- 
amination conduntaft before the probate 
court yesterdayf'ftija|ernoon. and was 
committed to tha ilpte hospital at Fer- 
gus Kails. Mrs.. Gtjitafson is helpless, 
following a spiill Irt sickness, and is 
quite irrational. {She Is considered in a 
very serious coivlition 



:iOi West Superior ] arwl $1.25 asked. 



.urih street 9^2 East 



COPPER STOCKS 
ARE UNCHANGED 



Xipi.s.-»ing dirt^ctor < declared the regu- 
lar dividend of 3 j-er ee.nt. Niplssing 
closed at $6 bid ami $6.25 asked. 

'Black Mountain -iold at $4.37V4 and 
$4.25 and clo.^d at S4.25 bid and $4.37^3 
asked. 

TO PREVENT THE GRIP 

LA.XATIVE BROMO QUININE removes the 
cau-ie. To v.c\ the genuine, call for lull name aud 
k>.3lc lor signature of I.. \V. C.KOV'E. 2;c. 



mi Mim FARM loR SALE 



Fine Stationary in Special Christ- 
inas 1'Oxes. 

Don't buy elsewhere until you have 



The .slump in Amalgamated put the 

entire' r.'pper stock market off during 
t!' part of th .lav. Some of Iho 

1S.U,.. r.cnered an.l closed about un- ] seen what -e^,ofTe; -^^^ ^ ^^^^^ 

chansed from yeateniay. Amalgamated 
was n')t one of these, however, as i'. 
close. i weak. Amnlganiated opened at 
^43.50. Wfiu off to $4.\.'.o aiul i-l.^s.-l at 

$42..ST»a '>iJ 



Smitli iV Smith. 

Travelers* roll ui s; manicuring sets. 



North Butte opened at $37, went off to n * 1 r^ ....1 *ik.. .... «»<! r'l..i; .4n...a 

f3«.75 rallied to $37 25 and closed at: Postal (aid Albii Hs and ihi'istnias 

$37.2."> bill and $.37..">u asked. Anaconda Pa^tal^ 

opened at $26.87^. went off to $26. ral- lusiais. 

lied to $2«.62i.2 and closed at $26.25 bid.! You will never l-e happy until you 
Gri n.-r.manea uprtied at $5.87-3, 1 have seen our stoc c of these goods 



advancfJ t.i $6, declined to $5.87^4 again 



LUNDIJERG & STONE. 



Music at the Spalding Cafes. 

Flaaten's orchestra will play Sat- 
urday. Sunday and "Wednesday even- 
ings during tiie dinner hour. 

Chrisunaji CiKarg. 

Billy Edens. ^I't Wtst Superior street. 

Notliing Doing for Ctipid. 

No marriage licenses had been Issued 
by the clerk of court up to 2 o'clock to- 
day, and It -seemed that politics and 
t'upid do not go hand in hand. If no ap- 
plications for wedding permits are made 
before this evening it will bo the first 
day for a long time that Cupid h;i3 failed 
to register at the courthouse. 

Take Interest In Eleetlon. 

Mucii interest was manifest at the 
courthouse, this morning, on the results 
of toflav's primary election. The county 
ofttcials are all Hepublican In political 
faith, but they have been much inter- 
ested in the contest between Mayor Cul- 
lum and Kmli Tessman for the Demo- 
cratic nomination for mayor and have 
bef-n making a few little bets among 
themselves. 



SO acren iidjolnilik'Wty limits, and only 
3*2 miles from ppstoTflce. Would make 
splendid farm. 1$37.&) per acre; $1,300 
cash, balance very <'asy terms. 

Gl.%R.*NTY ■F.jUlM LAND CO., 
4l«t L.>a-euin. 

' i . ft 

~ ^ -* -'■ - - — - -■ - ■ — 

Date Not Yet Set, 

H. V. Eva, sec retiiry of the Commer- 
cial club, today p<Mtived word from the 
interstate comiii(.-rc« comnjlssion that 
the date for thtf \h*aring of the club's 
complaint relative ao the railroad dis- 
crimination against Duluth and in fa- 
vor of the Twin Cities, would be set 
later on. and that the hearing would be 
held In Duluth. as announced In yes- 
terday's Herald. 



tludgnients Are Filed. 

Two judgments against th»> D. D 
t'rowley. in th,» district court, this morn- 1 
Ing. by Reynolds & McClearn. attor- 



Aerept the Plans. 

The members qf the county board met 
In a committee »L>sterday afternoon and 
considered the plans for an addition to 
the old courthouse, to aceowimodate 
the county board, and the "auditor's 
office, and provide additional vault 
room. The commissioners decided to go 
ahead an.l call for bid* on the construc- 
tion work, the same to be opened at 



the meeting of tthe TWar]! In January. 
It Is expected tIaJt tlie^work, if a eon- 
tract Is awardeOithen; "*n|l be piished 
forward as rapldry as.poaslble. as the 
additional vault riKim 'ahd office space 
is very mueh need^. 



"m: 



■#/*■ 



f>\ 



m 



;«r- 



ern Minnesota 

■ -^^ m 

Rich Fur Coats 

Of Natural or Blended Mink, Russian Pony, 
Caracul, Natural or Blended Squirrel, Near Seal 
and other desirable furs. In Blouse, Box, Semi- 
Fitting' and Loose models. 

$50 to $575 



Snug Fiir-Lined Coats 

Shells of fine domestic or imported broadcloths, and lininj^s of nat- 
ural grey and German squirrel or river mink, with collars of mink, lynx, 
beaver, Persian lamb and blended squirrel. Prices $35.00 to $175.00. 

Most Beautiful Cloth Coats 

In neat tight-fitting, semi or loose models. Tailored throtighout 
with the highest degree of .skill. Prices $12.50 to $75.00,, 

Children's Wearables, which correspond in points of excellence — 

Furs, Coats, Dresses, Sweaters and Leggins. 

3. M. Oltitdtng $c (En 



DULUTH. 



First Avenue Wes and Superior Street. 



CINCINNATI. 



mkL 




yp5:*;^^> *^^;r 



=% 



==/ 




S. Morterud's Closing 
Qothing Sale 
Attracts Hundreds 

Saturday and Monday evenings we liad to close the doors for t 
or three hours. The .store was jammtd, and we were unable 
wait on many customers who were anxious to avail themselves 
the un])aralleled opportunity to l)uy high-grade Clothing ? 
Furnishings for little in«»ncy. We have secured additional h 
and shall be able to give better attention to our patrons the rest 
ihc week. 

The Following Goods Go 
at and Below Cost: 



Men's Fine Suits, Overcoats, Fur-Lined and Plush 
Lined Coats, Young Men's fSuits and Overcoats 
Children's Clothing, Men's Underv^ear, Hosiery 
Neckvyear, Hats, Caps, Gl<»ves, Mittens, Mack 
inaws, Sheep-Lined Coats, Everything in Lum 
bermen's Clothing, Men'?t, Ladies' and Chil- 
dren's Shoes and Rubbers. Men's F ancy Sus- 
penders, Handkerchiets, Muttlers, Etc. 

The sale comes at a time whn overy one appreciates the o 
portunity to Imy u.seful Christmas gifts at a big saving. The ori 
inal price tags remain on every article. 




MORTERUD 



I'd 



The West End Clottiic r. 





Judge Ira R. Mills of Moorli<ad. chair- 
man of tht- stale railroad and warehousi 
commission, was at tlie Spalding to- 1 

'day. . .. T 

B Howard of Chi.shnlm is at the Lenox. 
J F Carey of Biwabik is at the Lonox. 
Paul Lubinsky of Sxibo is at the Mc- 

Mr's. Charles Christian of Skibo is at 
ihe McKay. ^, ., ., 

Mi.ss Emma Noren of Skibo is at thd 

McKay. ^ .^, ...... , * ., 

.Elmer Gustafson of Hibbing Is at the 

McKay. ,,. . . , . ,v. 

C. O. Anderson of Virginia Is at the 

McKay 
Ina Olson of HIbbIng Is at the McKay. 
J. M. Latta of Two Harbors is at the 

McKay. ,,. , . , ., 

Oust Carlson of Hibbing Is at the 

McKay. 

James Maney, assistant general pas- 
senger agent of the South Shore road, left 
yesterday for Cliicago. 

Arnold Peffer and I..awrence Fred- 
eri<k Peffer left f>iday. Dec. 13. for 
Soutli and coast points, where they will 
spend the winter. 

You know as well as any one when 
you need something to regulate your 
system. If your bowels are sluggish, 
your food distresses you. your kidneys 
jialn take Hollister's Rocky Mountain 
Tea. It always relieves. 35 cents. Tea 
or Tablets. Ask your druggist. 

PILES CURED IN 6 TO 14 DATS. . 

PA/0 Ol.NTMENT is guaranteed to^cure any 









Christmas Knick- 

Nacks 



cate of ItcliiQg. Blind, Bleedinj: or Protruding 
Pilc«in6 to udays or montr reiuoded. 



Soc 



Selected real estate mortgages for sale. 
W. M. Prindle & Co. 



Toilet Sets. 

Our stock of toilet sets, manicure sets 
and albums, Is the sweliest in Duluth. 
LUNDBERG & STONE. 





.Annual Meeting; of the Stockholders 

of Duluth. Missabe & Northern 

Railway Company. 

Notice is hereby given that an an- 
nual meeting of the stockholders of 
the Duluth. Missabe & Northern Rail- 
way company will be held at the office 
of the company on the fourth floor of 
the Wolvin building, in the city of Du- 
luth, Minn., on Tuesday, the fourth 
day of February, A. D. 1908. at 12 
o'clock noon, for the election of di- 
rectors and the transaction of such 
other buslne.ss as may properly come 
before .said meeting. The stock trans- j 
fer books will be closed on Jan. 24th, | 
1908, and remain closed until after 
said meeting. 

Dated, Duluth. Minn.. Dec. 17^1. 
1907. 

EDWARD B. RYAN, JR., 

Secretary. 



Books, Books, Books, Books. 

Books for the old and the young, 
hooks in sets, books in special gift 
bindings, books of history, poetry, fic- 
tion and of travel; they make excellent 
Christmas presents. For sale at Lund- 
berg & Stone's. 



MELBA NOT TO SING. 
New Tork. I>pc. 17.— Mme. Me-lba, th« 
prima donna, will not sing in America 
this winter. It was expected that she 
would return for a season at the Man- 
hattan opera house and a short concert 
sea-son. but she has notified her man- I 
ager that her father's health is sucn 
that she cannot think of leaving him, 
and will therefore remain In her home 
near Melbourne, Au.stralia, all winter. 

Only One "BROMO QUININE." that is 

L axative Bromo Qumine 

Cures a Cold in One Day, Grip in 2 Days 



1931 West Superior Street. | ^^^ 



on every 
«. 25c 




Beautiful Domestic 
and Imported 
Handkerchiefs. 



Fine and dainty Ker- 
j -^t^n chiefs in Dutchess lace, 
Mjl^lj drawn work, eyelet em- 
broidery. Armenian 
hand work, lace ^ trira- 
ined, barred and plain 
hemstitched styles. 
Either plain white or 
with tiny garnitures of 
colors to match the 
gowns — Prices 50c to 
$12.50. 



HOLIDAY UMBRELLAS. 

In plain black or colors. Ladies' or Gents' sizes 
or designs— a very pretty selection of handles, ac- 
companied by best quality coverings. Prices $3.00 
to $18.00. 

Fine Leather Goods, Jeweled 

Novelties and Accessories 
—Just Fill the Bill for 
Appropriate Gifts. 

Handsome Traveling Sets 
for ladies or gents. 

Grips, Carriage and Hand 
Bags, in all of the most 
nobby styles. 

Purses, Card Cases and 
Bill Books of fine leather in 
pretty sizes and shapes. 

Hair Ornaments and 
Combs — real tortoise, amber 
and jet. Either plain or gold 
trimmed. '*- 

Little Jeweled Ornaments, such as Ear Rings, 
Bracelets. Brooches, Pins, etc. 

Pretty Things for the Opera 

Including Dainty Head Scarfs. Opera Bags, Ruflfs, 
Marabout Sets and pretty Neckwear. 

q)ulutb. Cincinnati. 

"Correct Dress for Women." 












. i_ 










\ 




.1 




•^ " 1 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY. DECEMBER 17, 1907. 



iBit Ml • 



1. 1 




FURS 



For Christmas 



ASUAL REFLECTION 

upon the fur subject will give 
prominence to the point that 
one mast rely upon the reputation of 
the house for authoritative styles, supe- 
riority of make and first quality skins. 
To ascertain Duluth's store of 
confidence — one need but ask any of 
the cit}^'s well dressed women, and they 
will tell you that "Gidding's" carry the 
largest and most complete stock of 
rare and popular fur^ in the city. 

Separate Pieces, Sets or Garments 
well-accepted furs at from 

$5.00 to $500.00 



POPULAR PRICED 
SPECIALS! 

Blue and Black Wolf Sets are very cozy 
comforta .le and stylii;]i— at $25.00 and $29.50. 

Fur Neck Scarfs at $3.75, $5.00, 
$6.75 and $7.50. 

In natnr;.] or blended squirrel and river mink — 
collar or throw styles. 

Muffs from $6.75 up. 




Illgh-CIass Furs 





GET THEM ON 
BROADWAY 

Duluthians May Now Se- 
cure New York Ser- 
vants Cheap. 

Some of Gotham's First 
Families Laying Peo- 
ple Off. 



If you can't get servants in Du- 
luth, send to New York for them. 

They .say that the supply of servants 

in Gotham at the present time is mucn 

larger than the demand and Chicago, 

j Philadelphia, Washington and otiier 

•big cities are telegraphing to ihe 

(Great White Way for parlor ma;ds, 

'cooks, butlers and help of all kinds. 

I The servant problem is one that has 

!been perplexing American housewives 

[for a long time and that there should 

really be many out of work and anxious 

to accept "situations" of almost any 

domestic nature and location, setms 

too good to be true. 

The reason for the big supply of jer- 
vants on the market is said to be the 
general laying off of help by Nlav 
York's first familie.s, and some noi so 
prominent, but who have been flying 
pretty high. 

While here in this city, there seems 
to be jobs enough ^or all servants wiio 
wish them, it is said thiit the demand J 
for them is not nearly so keen as it was j 
a year ago. Indeed, it is whisp.:ied 
that Some of Duluth's families ha\e 
been curtaihng their household staffs. I 

But if thtre are Duluthians anxious j 
to secure the real, sure-enough :3er- ' 
vants, some of them imported direct 
from London and Paris to New Yurk, 
they can op?n negotiations at jnce 
with Fifth avenue employment bureaus 
and get all of the real articles they 
desire. The haughtiest of the unem- 
ployed butlers and other flunkies no 
longer snifr when that great vastness, 
"the West," is mentioned. 




Sterling Silver Novelties 



Niiil Files, Paper Knives, Cuticle Knives Buffers. 
Hat Brushes. Whisk Brooms, Hair Brushes, Infants' 
Brushes- and Combs. Shaving Sets, Pon Eon Dishes, 
Tea Strain -rs. Napkin Rings. Patent Bottle Openers] 
Stamp Cases, Book Marks. Table Bells, Baby 
Rattles, Match Safes. Cigaret Cases and a host 
of desirable novelties for gift giving at remark- 
ably low prices. 



Gift Umtrell 



as 



If perplext in what to give, think of Umbrellas. 
We are showing a complete line of dependable 
umbreJlas for men, women and children. 
Pt»r Men — All Silk Umbrellas with fancy and nat- 
ural woo.] handles — $2.50 to $10.00 
For Women — Black Silk Umbrellas with fancy 
handles, at from $4.50 to $12.00 
Colored Silk Umbrellas in red, blue, brown and 
green, natural wood handles — $2.50 to $«.r>0 
Plain Plack Silk Umbrellas, natural wood handles 

$2.o0 to $0.50 



Ribbons for Holiday U 



'ses 



Plenty of satin and taffeta ribbon in hollv. dainty 
floral designs and all the bright colors — for trim- 
ming cushions, baskets, opera ba^s, sashes and the 
like, and for tying to gifts. Prices range from the 
pretty Holly I aby Ribbon at Ic the yard to the 
beautiful »-inch Dresden and fjoral tffects at 

$4.50 yard 
Catchy gifts m.ade of ribbon — dainty and useful — 

50c to $4.50 
SiK'cial: — .Several pieces of our handsomest fancy 
effects. 6 to 9 inches wide of heavy taffeta adapttd 
for Opera Bags, Girdles, etc., selling regularly for 
Jl'.oO to $4.50 yd. 



$1.00 



Leather Novelti 



r 



\: 



UE^wm or 
Ik 



» HERE TO (iO TOMtiHT. 

LYCEUM — Mack-Lecne players 

"Fiiends." 
METROPOLJTAN— Burlesque. 



■^ 



..^ 



X 



in 



OTIS SKINNER 



First Avenue West and Superior Street 



WOULD RESTORE 
ARMY CANTEEN 

Association Formed in 

New York to Work 

to That End. 



tion, and Secretar.\ Taft, and is em- 
bodied ill all the 1 (-ports of the com- 
m:uiding generals >f the various de- 
pannienla of the I nited States army 
Thes*. include* Gen. Greely. command- 
ing the dt part men t of the Columbia; 
Gen. Grant, commanding the depart- 
ment of the Eitst; Freder:..-k Funsrton. 
'•f ihf Ivpartm-.nt of Cali- 
. thr juii^'t.. adviK-ate of th^ 



.1111- 



• Ml i=;tudtr s of military life 

< riting voice, that 

: I le caJiteen is aotu- 

!> ■•' mfriimie desertion and 

-■^-.r,' I. l.;.Stril«:Ti t." 



''.'■■ \ r- •: ,\- •"'■i r, - 

ut Aork- 
: the caii- 

..^sociation 

will uae its 

.,, r^^jx-al th 

; anu 

^'. ..y p. 

;;ng spirit in the 

,;« t,, <;iv about 

- crm- 
\l<erl- 
-t un- 
• ct by 



Whv Don't You 



URGES ABOLISHMENT OF 
PARTISAN 



GOVERNMENT 



les 

This section is the most complete in the city and 
contains about everything in Leather goods d« .sir- 
able for Xmas gifts, Traveling Clocks Playing 
Card Ca-'es. Bridge .Sets, Folding Drinking Cups, 
Collar Bags Folding Coat and Skirt Hangers. Medi- 
cine Cases, Collar Boxes, Calling Card Cases 
Telephone Registers, Military Brushes in Cases 
Leather Jewel Cases. Whisky Flasks. Traveling 
■Toilet Cases. Fancy Golf and Card Cases, Paper 
Knives and Scissors in leather cases, and a large 
a.^sortnient of other -u-seful novelties for Xmas gifts. 

mas Jewelry 

The most acceptable and desirable Xmas gifts. 
Our shewing comprizes a host of desirable and 
effective novelties at remarkablv low prices. 
New fancy coliar pins, new^ necklaces, fancy hat 
pms. .^ash jiins, fancy and plain barretter Doran- 
tique hand wrought buckl»-s. pure German silver 
card casts, new hand v.rought belt buckles, fancy 
combs, shell and amber, solid gold brooches cuff 
links, scarf pins and, in fact evervthing u.--ually 
carried in jewelry stores. 

Hints in Art Needle ^Vork 

Such a host of hints for making gifts — the mater- 
Such a host of hint.s for making giftst — lie mater- 
ials susceptible of endless combinations, offering 
unlimited scope to one's abilities in "doing' fancy 
work. 

White Wallachian Dining Table covers of pure 
linen — 27 and 36 inch, hand mrsde cluny lace for 
edges, and instructions for working stainpt white 
linen sets !n Floral designs consisting of one 18 
inch and six 7 inch doylies for the table or china 
closet. 

Battenberg Lace centers for Dining Rooms — all 
are pretty patterns and in all sizes. 
Tinted table covers for Dining Room, hall and li- 
brary in exceptional designs, both floral and con- 
ventional — sizes 8 to 36 inches. 

Cluny Luncheon Sets in sizes 6, 9, 12, 22 and 36 
Inches. And many other exclusive' and pretty 
novelties. 



(> 



k 



'. a new <.v, re. at for Chri.stm;is. 
I'ui can get a beauty at the "Fitwv.M'' 
Clothing Parlors' a uiiver.sary sale for 
$11.75. Store will be open even»iigs 

until Christm.is. e, , u-.-.i, ming Wednes- 



VV( ) H K J X< } Fn R M A( iOO.V 
Lincoln, .\eb., De :•. 17. — L'. O. Whe- 
don, law partner ff Charles E. .Ma- 
s'" 'ti provisional ffovernor of Cuba. 
tnlay wrote to all )f tht- members of 
the Republican sta e central commit- 
tee asking them ti Institute a direci 



Unity Club Speaker Ad- 
vocates Des Moines Form 
of Rule. 

Believes Charter Com- 
mission Could Make 
Necessary Cliangcs. 



mayor and the four cftnjmi.ssioners are 
eUcted at large. The tWO candidates for 
inaycr receiving the gtghist number of 
votes at tbe primaries, are the two candl- 
?^.*".^ ^ the p»-opk. The . i-.'ht candidates, ,.„„ „^r 
f^o^°'"ir'^?'""^'"^ ^^^ plact.l on the final duel ^nd 
^nllot, the tour receiv^ the highest votes foiiVeSut 
at the regular electloTf being elected. A ••t' hi »?,",:, 
man running for offic* must fuinish the I 
names of twenty-five c^tzens, who shalJ ' 
Certify to his moral 'Saracter. He Is 
foruidden to solicit vot^fcliavp other peo- 
ple work tor him, or ih any wav play 
n? nVA'^i • P?"^''-8 J^ave,- been eliminated 
in munlcir.al alTairs in Iowa, it is clalme 1 

^e Issues are strictly non-partisan, char- 

-■ter and ability counting. 



And Splendid Company in "The 
Honor of the Family." 

When Otis Skinner swaggered on to 
the Lyceum stage just before the close 
of the first act of "The Honor of the 
Family." last evening, the big audience 
present realized that jt was due for a 
genuine treat. Mr. Fkinner as Phillippe 
Bridau looked as ir ne nad stepjKd out 
of a picture of the days of the empire 
and his .«plendid interpretation of the role 
of the blustering, domineering French of- 
ficer of the army of Napoleon held the 
Interest ol tlie audience fixed during the 
rernainmg three acts. 

The play is typically French, with 
many strange situations and a somewhat 
unexpected ending. 

Thj sympathy tor the under dog at 
timA perverts the iew of the specta- 
tors, and almost makes them wish for the ' 
ultimate triumph of the wrong, repre- I 
^3enlcd by tlie two schemers who plot to ' 
gain the wealth of the old man. The' 
story opens with Flora Brazier, a former 
street waif, installed in the home of old 
Jean Jaeqies Roqiiget. She completely 
dominates the old man and is living 'h 
the hope of finally securing his fortune- 
and fletlng with hrr lover. Commandant 

Max Gilet- to Paris. The two have thi- thorough grasp of the part he is called 
old man completely in their power, when "Pon to portray. 

his nephew. Col. Bridau, arrives on the Mr. Fruhman seldom neglc-cts the minor 
t?c< ne at the end of the first act. to save ''C'^^'S in any company he sends out, and 
"The Honor of the Family." With his ! Mr. Skinner's company jg no exception 
superb physical and mental energy, his i to the rule. Every member of it is 
masterful will, and liis selfishnt-ss, he j fully equal to the role assigned to hiui. 
dominates the situation. The man had I The production, in fact, w.is one of the 



FANCY CHRISTMAS CALENDARS 

ALL STYLES AT ALL PRICES. 

You cannot fail in finding one here that wall please you. 

CHAMBERLAilV & TAYLOR, 

Book s anti Stallonery. 323 West SupsHor S^ree 



th 

ac 



primary to uscerlaiii the choice of the aCH><H3<j<K>0<K:><>CH5^CK>CkCK>Cw>0:>CKMj ' ^''*-^' .'" '^"'^ 
Republican voter^ for president. O s"^%'v^v.'v^v,«.«,«^ >,«.rw ness-l,ke city 



The great que.stion of the dav is city 
f *'^'' "fn/''it. said Mr. Harrison. One- 
third of all the p.»ople in the United 
States, live In its elties. and the correct 
government ol these cities is the great 
and crying problem of the future. He be- 
lieved that Lies Moines had gone a lonjf 
■" " ^*lnK at a solution of busl- 



pauperized his mother and brother witli 
his scrapes, when he swaggers on the 
scene. The girl is driven from the home 
of his uncle to the streets of Paris by 
him. Her lover is killed by Bridau in a 
the foolish old uncle Is left 
his few remaining years with 

The Honor of the Family' to comfort 
him, and with tiie nephew in complete 
control. 

Everyone with whom he comes in con- 
tact suffers by it, and if there is a les- 
slon in the play it is that the strong 
willed, tyrlannical men. while Uiey gain 
their purpose, generally leave a trail of 
suflering among their Iriends as well as 
their enemies. 

Throughout the last two acts the 
audience is kept in doubt as to whether 
he will marry the girl or not. and it is 
not until the curtJiin falls that the 
audience i? sure of the outcome. Mixed 



genuine treats of the year, and it is un- 
fortunate that Duluth was not given 
more than one evtning of it. 



A GOOD BILL. 

The Bijou Has Several Strong At- 
tractions This Week. 

The Bijou lia.s a strong bill liiis week. 
One of the best drawing cards is Frank ' 3^6 miles fro'nipostoftTceV'Woufd"^ 




CLDTHINC 



112 WEST SUPERIOJl STR£Er. 



Markley, a bau'o player who has playinj 

the interest down to a line art. He was 

given a royal reception last night. 

"The Expressman," a one-act play put 
on by Armstrong and Holly, takes very 
well with the audience. E. B. White, 
former sparring partner for J hn L. 



ACREAGE FOR SALE. 

80 acres adjoining city limits, and only 
6 miles from postofflce. Would make 
splendid farm $37.50 per acre; jl,300 
cash, balance very easy terms. 

GUARAIVTV FARM LAND CO., 
41C l>y-ceuiu. 



with regret at the disastrous end of the , Sullivan, assisted by MiSf^ Rol'.a White 



game fight the girl had put up, in spite 



Thin.l M 



't*' 



j", I Wheilun l.s actively 
Tins IS th ! ^"•" ^''*^ presidency. 
i. Bell, chief! 

( ret>rge B. i 

1. [it of »"'■•' 
i!ry a-'^- 



pushing Magoon 



$10.00 — Chicn^o to Vew York — $10.00. 

Ti: >i vtrj low rat-- is in ••1T<« t now vi i 
'hf Erie railroad. Full intormi ti.in from 
i:. R Porch. T. P A , St I'aul. Minn. 




PROGRESSIVE MEDIOAl. SPE^]- 
lAUST'S OFFIiiES CROWDED 



a "I lirlicvF that it in ^vithin the 

O power «.f the ehnrter eoniiiiiMNiou 

O >» iii:ik<- iiiiiendiiiontM to t!i«> I)u- 

O luth vhartrr. re<oiiiuieu<liuK "iih- 

O Mtiiuiiall> the K.-iiiie klad of i-ity 

O uo\oruni«>iit HM iu force in lien 

O >«<ilsie?» at the present time. i)u- 

O luth •.houI<l hJMe iiii lihsolutely 

O non-purtiMtiu eoverniiient. There 

O nre uo party UMue<« in eity ir«iv- 

O ernmenti tl:e eity Menne. the pride 

O olf eiliatuHi.ip Im «\but »\e \>ant 

O here." 
O 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



o 
a 
o 
o 



ce city government Cities shoul.i **^ ^^^ questionable purpose and methods 
.'rnf-d on bL-^iness line' the SD^•ak i '* ^ feehag of satisfaction that this mas- 
ared. Competence, business abil-^*"'"'"''.*^^"''"^^'"'"^ person was thwarlcO 



I'e gow 
< r decl 

;u''th^"^^**' ^'i"*^ ;S>--jncere desire to bene- 
iit the cay should b... the qualities that 



m at ie«.st one of his purposes. 
But unlovely as the role is, there Is 



ocunt. rather than political preferment or P'*' question regarding its faithful por 
bossism. gang rule. and graft. " ' "' "'' " 



I "own at Galveston th«y have gone a 

ul:f '"'tL'." T- r'"^ '^^ municipal prob- 
U-m. They still retain wards, and l.i 

*th. -'" '*'''*^'* ^r b^-'iind Des Moines In 
., L.^^.l '-'^ government. Yet since 
juk,ptmg he new form of eity govern- 
ment the taxes of tne city have been re- 
cueed overjt, per cent; »,000,000 of in- 



trayal. Mr. Skinner has probably no 
equal on the American stage as a read- 
er. He seems to live and breathe th- 
pan of the French colonel. He wenrs 
but one costume during the play but 
this Is perfection itself. 

Mr. Skinner has, as his leading woman 
this year, Miss Percy Haswell, a former 



has a good act. Black and Leslie delight 
the audience with the;:- acrobatic sinking 
and comic stunts. Thoy are very f^;nny. 
J«hn McDowell lias a clianning illustrat- 
ed song this wt-ek, "Bye-Bye, Dearie." 
Rose and Severance appear in a pliykt, 
"The Automobile Disaster,' whieh is 
clever. The moving picture.^ are good. 

The Burlesquers. 



the North are members of the associa- 
tion the annual convention never meets 
north of Mason and Dixon's line. 



Beaiitifnl New Silverware. 

Exclusive designs appropriate for 
holiday gifts. M. Henricksen Jewelry 
conipany. 



STABBED HIM.a.EDF 
Pittsburg, Dec. 17.-Crazed by dellrtum 



aiKH><HKH>OH5<H>CH>t><HCH><K5<H>CH>^ 

. , ~~ , ' In an address upon 'The municipal 

I heir Art of Healing Most Scientific ^"^*""'"*^"^ ^y commi-ssion,- delivered 

■• the Unitarian church last evening. 
Harrison strongly advocated the 



debtedness has been paid, and' the light 

rr^c^*" * ot*»«r necessaries reduced i:i ] handled by Miss Haswdl 



In many respects the entertainment of ^ '^'H' •'^"'^•-'"'"S frr>m typhoid pneumonia 

thP Vihhtinpale-- at the MetroDolita.n tM^ 5"" laboring und<-r tlie hall-jeination that 

the Isibhtingalc.-, at the Metropolitan i ,i., ^^ ^^^^^^ ^,^^^ l,imself bv cutting out 

week, is a strong one. Tlie chief attiac- , his appendix, William Echter, 47 years 

Twin Cifj- stock faovorite The role ]s ' ^'•^"s ^^e the pretty girl.s and the pretty old. of McKecsport. this county, stabbed 

a difficult one and it Is snlenrtidK- ' songs, and the weakness lies in th - bln-.self in the left iun? with a butcher 

one, ana n i^j^JP^^^j'^^jJi i oomedy. If some batcr lines and situa- knife. :He£::ed at the McKeesport hospi- 



portrays is a girl of humble origin who 



and Fame of Cures Bring Sick Men 
From riany Towns and States. 



to see the revelatirns of of 8elf.p«-»is.oning. yoi r blood Is dtsr^ased 



at 

S. T. 



adoption of the Des Moines and Galves- | nson said that under the Des Moines 



knife. 

.^ „ .„ ^ ^.,, ^^ .,u...w.c ujiK„. wnot^'*^'^^ could be furnished the comedians. Jal. He had told some days ago that 

San Francisco wa.-* mentioned a» a citv ha« by the use of her charms and ht-r • tbe show would run much more smoothly, he had symrtoms of appendicitis and In 

"■• ■-"' ' ' ^ antVve wit wortned herself Into the eraces ' The specialties are geK>d. McDevitt & his delirium repeatedly said he would 

of the dodderine old man In snite of ' ^^^^V a-r^ as clever dancers as the Met- cut out hi.s own oppcndix. 

- ' ropolitans stage ever sees, anr] Howud • 

and Lewis do a good singing and ta.lking 



that had emerged from the rule of bosses 
gratters and \'ice to elect a mayor on 
non-partisan lines. '"-j-oi on 

Touching on local conditions. Mr. Har 



-vl. 

W,, 



.1 the j-ervtee of suff< ring 

the Duluth sp* - 

- ^ of Duhnh and 

• !;iy found m t'i«- 

irom Bti-jjli'iid, 

.iiuiuet, Mich.; Ballard. 

Hem'dji and A<ir li:i, 

I- lias reached far te- 

■ f our state, and crowds 

-^^t daily. 

. who bear the mark of 



t! 



chasing of votes, either dlrectlv or In 
directly, the political boss and gang 
rule*. 

Tne Des Moines form of rity govern- 
ment provides for the election at large 
of a mayor and four city commission- 
ers. The mayor and the four eommls- 



:iieii .suffer, tliey 
**i u.siipation and stomach 

tru U'-poisoninK. To relieve 

this t are forniin-^ dru.f hab:t.j 

and h> > of them, altliough they 

know V. -y Well relief is onlv t- mpt.rarv, 
and their eimdition is worse than before 
If you feet tin.! in th.- morning and yo i 
d»t.. t your >t;i:i to b sallow, y ur 
toriKUf coated an-l ym have a feeling of 
fullness in your alii|om"n. you may know 
that your mtestin. s are d »• ased and they 
cannot perform th^- work of digestion. 

You are gettinK fwile a.nii losing fl.^sh, 
an,i your feeling tells you that you are a 
•ick man. You have started the process 



and your bloiid ves lels harden, which 
.>liiwly but surely prepares your grave, i 
.mil your sufferinjf is it long one i 

Kt ctal Piles cause of cancer and many I 
olht-r di.seases. 

The bad and stagnnnt blood Is forming 
piles, and tliese in turn result in a train 
of oth» r diseases, as ancer, constipation, 
rheumaiism. sciatica, pnin in the bic^, 
kidney trouble, heart and- liver diseases 

and nervousness. TI « se spc-lalists cure _ 

'T) disease Of lon:j: all these diseases, an I also Brlglifs dis- sloners form the <ity counell The 
' ease, catarrh and inn trouble, bronchitis, ' mayor reeeives $3.5<"0 aod each of the 
bl'K>d poison, rupture pelvic and bladder I commissioners IS,!)"*. Each eomini«slon- 
trouble. gonorrhoea, t;leet. syphilis, vari- er is at the h.-ad of a eity department 
tocele. hydrocele, st icture. eezema and 1 He must give the department his un-^ 
all skin d.seases. If y mi have any aliment I divided attention. •nKaging in no other 
and you want to know all abr>ut it. you • business during his t.rm of office 
are invitf'd to const It the Progress I vo i In the Iowa capital they have the 
Doctors. Consultatit n is fr. e. These initiative referendum and the recall By 
doctors can cure yoi.r disease, t,r th y : the flrst the voters can initiate any 
have studied In the best of unlversite.* ' eltv laws by petition; by the second 
here and in the old country. Ttiey are : they have the power of final acce 
well :irofessioned in ih? science of heal- or r*.- 
Inir chronic diseases t f men. Offices are ' the pow 
<-orner Superior street and Lake avenue, I the powe 
Duluth. I office 

Hours 




her purpose, that of swindling the old 
man and fleeing with her lover, she 
has the sympathy of the audience almost 

is not lack- 
has evl- 
faithful 

of Jean 
He is a 

d has a 



uiiUer the present mmvM. 
declared political prefSr: 
party rewards were ike 



absurd. He 
ment. pull an-J 
«ii .4 »». . ,.='*'*''■*' it^ elements that 
M.';**.l^* ^'5*' <»ffi':fs- Money was wasted, 
and the city vvas poclMy governed. Let 
the people of I»uluth vote on the adop- 
tion of the Des Moines plan, said the 
speaker, and they would fprry it. 

city sen.se, the 



What we want is 
pride of our city at 
greater Duluth. a b 
luth; a city governm 
pollt:cs are ellminat 
honesty adopted." 




rt. We want a 

r governed Du- 

where partisan 

and ability and 



THREB MEN FA 

Marshalltown. Iowa 
men were fatally injured and one oth 



Y HURT, 
ec. 17.— Three 




8 a. m. to < p. m.; Sunday, 10 ! or InefTielent. ' ' " j Iowa. The men \vere-4jai4«ht under the 

a. m. to 1 p. m. I Thov havo nn n'arHo in rVo_ V(^l«„_ fr.i. . I oncrln^ an.* ««_1j, ji tST /^" 



They have no wards in Des Moines. The I engine and scalded 3^ s 



Blood Humors 

Commonly cause pimples, boils, hives, eczema 
or salt rheum, or some other form of erup- 
tion; but sometimes they exist in the system, 
indicated by feelings of weaknes.,3, lane:uor, 
loss of appetite, or eeneral debility, without 
causing- any breaking out. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla expels them, renovates, 
strengthens and tones the whole system. 
This is the testimony of thousands annually. 

Accept no substitate, but insist on having 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

In usual liquid form or in chocolated tableU 
known a« 9ar»«tabS. K» doses «L 



act. Kennedy. Evan.s and Kennedy have 
a very bad act; they are wasting their 
time using it. The Vedinars d''' a gym- 
nastic turn with comedy trimmings that 
is all right. 

Pretty Anna Yale leads the chetruss in 
regular Delia Fox style. The chcru:, ap- 
pears In some handsome costumes. 

Green Room Gossip. 

The Mack-Leon Players will holi the 
boards at the Lyctum during the remain- 
der of the week, presenting "'Friends" lo- 
night and tomorrow, with a matinee to- 
morrow. During the last half of the week 
"Madam Satan will b.- the bill, and the 
p< rformances will be in the nature of a 
benefit for the Temple Aid society. 
* « « 

"The Yankee Regent" will he the Christ- 
mas day attraction and "The Royal Ch- f ' 
will be in the city for New Year's day. 

SURGEONS MEET. 
New Orleans, La., Dec. IT.— With 
about 100 surgeons in attendance the 
twentieth annual convention of the 
Southern Surgical and Gynecological as- 
sociation began a three days' session 
here today. A peculiar feature about 
the organization is that while a num- 
ber of the most prominent surgeons of 



Let the diet consist of foods 
that are nutritious. 

DfPRicrs 

WHEAT FLAKE CELERY 

FOOD 

is made by a physician and chem- 
ist and leader of the world in 
pure food products. Its daily 
use helps to regulate the bowels. 



/ 



For sale by all Grocers 



u 



/ 



-^•4- 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




"Iiir' 



P 






THE DULUTH EVENING HESMJ): TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1907. 



Two Columbia 

Christmas Specials 

For Tomorroi/v. 

To attract the crowds and to make a visit 
to our store worth while to the lacy buyers of 
Duluth and the neighboring towns, \vc offer new 
special inducements every day. 

This morning we placed on sale Xmas Special 
No. 1 — Hosierv at 23 cents. 

Tomorrow Nos. 2 and 3 will follow. 

Ladies* Gloves. 



When placing our orders for Spring, we decid*>d to close out 
©very kind of Ladles' Glove except our famous $1 Cape Glove. 
so as to start the coming spring with an ent rely new stock. 
We. therefore, will sell tomorrow the choice of 
our FIsk Glove-s. the regular price of which is 
12.00— at 



$1.29 



Boys* Sweaters. 



Two lots of them. One lot of extra heavy Athletic 
Sweaters which always sold at $2.50, to he sold at. 

There are only about four dozen in Lot. 1. 



$1.25 



The other lot of about ten dozen Boys' Swe iters that were 
exceptional valu«s at $1.00 and $1.25 — to be fiO#* 

sold at — (all colors in this lot) Ov^ 







CONCE 




Mary Pratt 
will have as 
Walker Jan 





Mr. Jamar 



tooinsmian his brother, 

id the ushers will be 

in aJid Warren Jamar 

'pelnran was hostess 



The woman was not feeling bo very 
well. 

Her feet were tired and her arms, 
in thy part where you feel for muscle, j Joseph T. H 
were so tired she could hardly lift j of Chicago, 
them. Her complexion felt soiled and l Mrs. F. 

she couldn't get the feeling out of it. j at bridge this afternoon in compliment 
Her head ached in the part where she j to Miss Patrick, ajid w>on Thursday, } 
thought she could feel the process of ; Mrs. A. M. MaJb»hall will entertain at , 
thinking. In other words she had (luncheon In her hoDor. Mrs. W.* J.; 
been out Christmas shopping. She \ Olcott will reoe<v« Informally Thursday 
had tried to counteract all these feel- ' afternoon in ho«*r of the bride. To- I 
ings by putting on her best silk stock- | (morrow e\-^nlng Mr. and Mrs. E. T. 
Ings and her nicest pair of pumps, but ; Buxton will be 'hossts in honor of Miss 



it didn't help much. She was dead 
tired. 

She sighed. 

Then the door opened and he came 
in. He hadn't done much to tire him. 
He had Ju-st done a day's rational 
work. He had plugged away since 8 
o'clock in the morning, but it was not 
shopping and thinking up present.s to 
give to her relatives. He had just 
worked. 

"Well," he .said breezily, "I guess 
winter is here." 

"What?" she inquired languidly, in 



PaitrLck and Mr. Jamar. 



HOME WEDDING. 

Miss Alice Webster Be- 
comes Bride of William 
B. Arper. 

A pretty home wedding took place 
last evening at the apartments of Mrs. 
i B. Webster at Ipo Wt«i Superior street, 
j when her daughter, Mi-ss AMoe Webster, 
a tone that f-iirly dripped with '■ became the bride of William B. Arpei 
honeyed sweetne.s3. If he had not been I ^^ Minneapolis. The rooms were pret- 
just a relation by marriage he would , ^"y decoruied In ground pine and white 

tlowers for the function, and seventy- 
tive guests were present for the cere- 
mony and informal reoeption. The 
wedding servkre was r^ad at 8 o'clock 
by Rev. Alexander Milne of Pilgrim 
Congregatii>nal church. The maid of j 
honor was Miss Pansy Loise Wirth, and 
the bridesmaid was Miss Elsie Prudden. 



SHE WOULD 
LIKE 



Gloves ! 



have knownbetter than to pursue the 

subject. Her voice was too sweet to 

last. 

"I guess winter Is here," he .said 

again in that happy, robust way which 

men a.ssume when they make the 

most irritatingly obvious remarks. 
She passed that bv in silence. It 

was easier to be silent than to talk, i The gi-oomsman was E. H. Webs-ter of 

Chioagv). and the usher C. F. Gilby of 
Hastings Minn. The wedding music 
w^as played by Miss Leona GreLser, and 
before the ceremony "O, Promise Me," 
was sung by Louis Dworohak. 

Th« bride won? a dainty frock of 
while voile and carried a bouquet of 
white hyaciatlis. Her attendants were 
gowned in grey voile and carried pink 
rosea. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arper left for Minne- 
apolis, where they will be at home. The 
out-of-4own guests at the wedding were 
Mr.«. Elizabeth Bumside of Hastings, 
Mrs. Charles Gl^by of Hastings, Mr. 
4^nd Mrs. F. Hj Ford of St. Paul and 
George T. Dam^ of St. Paul. 



But let them be "Perrin's" whioh are repre- 
sentative of tirst quality kid, perfect tit, durability 
and most attractive shades. 

Obtainable only at 

First Avenue West and Superior Street 



IMPORTANT CHANGE BY 
THE NEW YORK CENTRAL 



i J. Bigclow Made Resi- 
dent Agent for AH 
Its Lines. 



MATINEE MUSICALS. 



Interesting Program of 
Christmas Music is Pre- 
sented. 

The regular meeting of the Matinee 
Musicale. the last until after the holi- 
days, was held yesterday afternoon 
at Sleinway hall. The program of 
usic was arranged by Mrs, 



Multiplicity of Titles 

Would Dazzle Old- 

World Potentate. 



Eftec-th-p Jan. 1. th^ ! .,.i. /i: ' of the 
Michi.H>Ui r.'i;:r;i-l iM Iruad, at present In 
charge of S J. Big-iow. *ill be made a 
New York Ciural lirus office, represent- 
In;.; ill 111- fast freight lines operating 
over ihe Miehlg-an O.niral and L.ake 
Shore & Michigan Southern iractes. Mr. 
Bigeiow will coiilitvue in charge. He will 
have iilxnit three times us much work to 
do ;l3 fuimerly, aii.l ii n.u urallv follows 
1h:ii uUimiilely both his .salary and the 



offic 



force will he increas€'d. 



This move on tli. ij;irt of the New York 
Central is in recuan.zati.jii .»f the very 

great importance of Duluth as :i raihuad 
and onuiHreial cent'-r. an.l is in line 
with ih.- polity of other important rail- 1 
road sy.steins in providing th»mselves i 
witn better repr.'sentation here. This, 
will be the first time the Merchants' Dls- ' 
SKUeh. the l^ke Shore & Michigan 
HuuMif-i-n ;inr! s..m.' of the le.sser line3 , 
li - nled liere by aj 

t' ' . ■ . ' I 

'Uu- M.-rehaiits' DLspalch is the leading | 
West bound fast freight line, and up to | 
the present lime its lutsiness in the Du- 
luth ttrritory has bten handled by D. i 
S. Ca ' vith headiiuarlers in St. Paul. 
The .stioii' & Michigan Southern, i 

heret..i''i ■ . ha.-s bft-n represented tn 
NorthiTn \Vi.sci>nsin and Minnesota by 
J. C;. Hamilton. Northwestern agent .at 
Minneapolis, and in Northern Michiean 
by H. J. Nleoud. commercial agent for 



H. M . Gerson, 

LADIES' TAILOR 

1^22 Jefferson St. Duluth. Minn. 

Zenilh thune MM V- olU Ph.jne ITJI.—L 




But for the effort It would have been, 
she could have poured forth fine scorn. 
But she was too tired to try. 

"It's a good deal colder than It 
was," he continued, in fine conversa- 
tional style. 

She stared at the remotest corner 
of the room. 

"1 guess winter Is here for good," 
he said again with the air of rounding 
out the thought nicely. 

She sighed heavily. 

He was a trifle uncomfortable. 
Heaven only knows that a talking 
woman is bad enough, but a silent one 
around a house is uncanny. 

He unfolded The Herald and triea 
to sit back comfortably. The relaxed 
and silent figure near him. however, 
from which he could obtain no con- 
versation was disconcerting. 

She sighed again. 

He fumbled with the paper, and then 
-^ lid, "Christmas Is almost here." 

"1 know it," came in tones so crisp 
ihait he jumped with the surprise of 
the thing. If he had but known, the 
very sweetness of her tirst remark only 
pr*»saged the tartness of the next. "Do 

you suppose that I have gone from (jhristmas m _ _ _ 

store to store in this town, been walked p ^ iJradburv and Miss"Bradshaw, 
u|>on and frowned upon and stood upon ^g^^j ^'j^ meeting wils greatly enjoyed by 
and sat upon and everything else on j ^^10 large number of meml>ers present, 
earth but waited upon, without know- j ^he program opened with a gnjup of 
iug that Christmas is here? Do you j (j^jristmas carols, consisting of two old 
suppose for one second that 1 am so prench melodies, two from Briton and 
tind in brain and limb that I can't j^^ Irish Christmas carol. They were 
breathe, and not know that Christmas ^ jj^ng by MiM HylaiKl,' Miss Markell, 
is here'.* 1>) you suppose— but what's ^uyy Thiers and Miss Bradshaw and 
the use. a man who will observe,, upon I ^^^.i-^. heai;d with much pleasure. The 
the 17th day of December that t'hrist- cantata ior violin and piano C minor, 
mas IS almost here Is a man who will '■ by Grieg, iijityed l>y Mr. and Mrs. 



buy gokl nioimted pink silk garters for 
his feminine relatives the night before 
Chr>stmas and think his duty is don*;.** 



Bradbury. «a> ah Mijoyable number 

The laUer.fiUli ot the program 

sisted of a Chrfftlthas cant 



itata. 



on- 
"The 



The man h>>aved a sigh of relief. He!r,>ming of th<^ King." by Foster, and 



settled back to see how the primarioa 
were going, and who had a chance at 
being the next mayor of the city. He 
wiggled uito the chair to get the most 
comfortable pose, and put the paper up 
as a shield. He wouldn't have hor stop 
for the world. It was the accompani- 
ment to his reading that he desired, in 
fact the accompaniment without which 
he could not rt»ad. The noise of her 
complaint was not half so loud as her 
sil-ence which had pre<;«led. 

"When I think of the nervous energy 
I waste, absolutely waste, trying to get 
your Cousin Sarah and my Uncle John 
and your Aunt Jajie and my be,st 
friends, and yi>ur friends, to whom you 
are indebted, presents tliat they don'*, 
want, and that I don't want to give, 
I think that I shall go crazy. .\nd 
then to come home and hear nothing, 
absolutely n*)thing in the way of com- 
fort but that Christmas Is almost 
here " Her volcje broke In a gulp- 
ing sob of pity. 

The man who was enjoying hlmselt 
thoroughly sang a little song. And 'l 
began, "Joy to the world." 

And she .*»ighed heavily. 



sung under tUa «^u«tion of Miss Brad- 
shaw. 

The chofOSB^coBlttated of: Sopranos. 
Mrs. Homat CoUips, Jtliss Clark, .Miss 
Hyland. Miss Woodbridge. Second 
piano»/jMr.i. G. H. Jones, .^liss Thiers, 
Miss Bradshaw. Altos, Mrs. Stowers, 
Mrs. tJ. S. Richards. Miss Markell. 

The cantata was well sung. It .con- 
sisted of five, choruses with solos by 
Mrs. Collina, Miss Markell, Miss 
Woodbridge, Miss Thiers, Mrs. Stow- 
er and Miss Hyland. The accompanist 
was Mrs. C. H. Munger. 

The next meeting of the club will bo 
held Jan. 13 ahfl the program will bo 
arranged by Mrs. George C. Stone and 
Mrs. C. H. Munger. 



"THE MESSIAH. 



tt 



S. J. BIOKLUW. 



the road at Mil 
tory will now bt 
tlon. and Mr. Bi; 
of it. with head 
offices will be 1 
Mr. Carriel. Mr. 
coud will all b*^ 
but they will h; 
do with the L)ul 

Beside* the M 
Bigelow will rep 
freight lines: R 
Shore Dispatch, 
sey Central & M 
Jersey Central . 
Rutland-Michiga 
also appointed > 
LkiK*^ Shore & 
road. With this 
Bigelow should I 
old world potent 

Mr. Bigelow h. 
Kan Central in 
yt-ars. The Ne 
making otht-r cl 
of somewhat si: 
dating offices •'> 
der one head. 
<'entral lines Mi 
for in Duluth, a.' 
lines mentioned, 
tral it.self, the V 
Albany, the Mir 
Slior.' Hi Mich 
Pittsburg & La) 



waukee. .\ll this terrl- 

in the Duluth jurisdlc- 
telow will be at the head 
luarters In Duluth. His 
n the .\lworth building. 

Hamilton and .Mr. Nl- 
^ontinued in the service, 
ve nothini? whatever to 
ith territory, 
trchants' Dispatch. Mr. 
esent the following f-ast 
'd line. Blue line. North 

Canada Southerh, Jer- 
chlgan tVntral Dispatch. 
k Lake Shore Dispatch, 
1 (-Vntral line. He la 
ommercial agent of the 
VliehiKan Southern rail- 
multiplicity of titles Mr. 
e able to dazzle even the 
ites. 

s repr<'s*»nted the Michl- 
Duluth for the past ten 
V York Ct-ntral is also 
angles throuBh the West 
nilar character, consoli- 

dlfferent territories un- 
Among the New York 
. Bigelow will be agent 
ide from the fast freight 
are the New York Cen- 
'est Shore, the Boston & 
higan Central, the L^ike 
gan Southern and the 
:e Erie. 



Splendid Production of the 
Great Oratorio Assured. 

The seat sale for the singing of "The 
Messiah" by the Duluth Oratorio so- 
ciety assisted by the Minneapolis Sym- 
phony orchestra and imported soloists 
is most encouraging. Yesterday the 
largest daily sale of seats since the 
optming wa.s counted up. and the de- 
mand for seals is large. The society 
under the direction of Horace "W. Rey- 



Misses— 

Margaret Panth pf 
Superior, 

Elizabeth Siddall. 

Alice Memt, 
M' s.«rs. — . ■*■ »' 

John Burns. ;; > 

E.lmund St. Cmgc. 

Edward Bi^ms.'i 

Arthur Blanile.--* 



Agnea DeVers, 
Laura Chandler, 
Lena La Bree. 



Fred Hollinback, 
Sterling Sargent, 
Joseph Burns. 



Waugh - Morrison. 

The wedding of Miss Anna Waugh, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Waugh. 
to Walter Morrison of Spokane, Wasi>., 
will take pl*ce Saturday evening of 
this week at the home of the bride's 
parents, 1227 E^ast Third street. The 
wedding service will be read at 8 
o'clock by Rev, Campbell C. Coyle of 
the First Presbyterian church, and Mr. 



ner. has been working faithfully since .j,^__i^,,_ „„d his bride will leave for 
the autumn and a finished and splendid Morrison and his bride %mI1 lea\e for 

presentation of this work is assured, 
will be given in the audi 



W 



''MESSIAH 

FRIDAY NIGHT 

At 8:15 .Sharp. 

Th«»rr nre Mome ehole* n^ntn yet to 
h* obtained, hut if you wjiit until 
Frl«l«y, y»»Tir oliaiice of «>n^ in Minail. 
Sf ur«* y«iur nenlN toiiiorrnvv ut 
Cbniuberlaln <& Tnylur*a. Old 'pliun« 
.%1M. 



\ 



The oratorio 

torium of the First Methodist church 
and will be the first of the brilliant so- 
cial and musical affairs of the Christ- 
mas season. 

So many residents of Proctor will at- 
tend the concert that arrangements 
have been made for a special train up- 
on that evening. 



FOR MISS PATRICK. 



Affairs Planned in Honor of 
Bride and Her Attend- 
ants. 

A number of affairs have been plan- 
ned for the holiday weeks in compli- 

'!!?!Ti!:l^!%l^"el!!T^^^i"^7^;:f^: Church ;^o;^:" i^' sp^::^ ^r the 



the West, where they will be at hom«. 

Club Meetings. 

The Daughters of Liberty chapter 
of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution will meet tomorrow after- 
noon with Mrs. Victor Stearns of Lon- 
don road. Forefathers' day will be 
observed, and the afternoon will be 
filled with recounting deeds of ances- 
tors. The leader for the afternoon 

will be Mrs. Jay Cooke Howard. 

• • • 

The "Women's Alliance of the Uni- 
tarian church will meet tomorrow af- 
ternoon with Mrs. R. Spiegel of 1621 

East Fourth street at 2:30 o'clock. 

• • « 

An enjoyable meeting of the Young 
Ladies' club of the First Methodist 
church was held last evening at the 



wedding to Mitchell F. Jamar, Jr., wlli 
take pla<« the evening of New Year's 
day. at the home of the bride's father. 
F. A. Patrick, of 2306 East Superior 
street. The service will l>e read at 8 
o'clock by Rev. Dwight Hillls of Brook- 
lyn, an uncle of the bride. Miss Patrick 
will have as her maid of honor her 
sjster. Miss Isabel Patrick, and the 
brtdcsmaitls will be her youngest sis- 
ter. Miss Barabara Patrick, and MIsb 



evening was Dr. Stella Wilkinson and 
the soloist was Miss Nell Brown. An 
informal social followed the program. 

Personal Mention. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Whltmore of 
1007 East Third street are at Wa- 
basha. Minn., to attend the golden 
wedding anniversar>' of Mrs. Whit- 
more's parents^ Mr. and Mrs, Peter 



WINGS A BURGLAR. 



I Enderlin. N. 
The Herald.)— S- 
dnw in the rear 
ing a scratchin 
think a burgla 
In. J. C. Hari 
I "I'm .shot." Bi 
j the window an 

miles until the 
I the name of P 
I from Canada, w 
! is in the head ; 



3., Dec. 17.— (Special to 
hooting through a wln- 
of his store after hear- 
? souna that made him 
1- was Jtrying to break 
>er heard a man yell, 
ood was found outside 
d this was trailed five, 
vounded man. who gave 
-^rry and said he came 
as arrested. His wound 
md Is not serious. 



I $15 Black Suits Now $11.75 

lAt the "Fitwell" Clothing Parlors' 
{great anniversary sale. 



Wkat Retail Markets 



i bffer. 



.1 



J 



Holly. 15 cents a bunch. 

Mistletoe. 40 cents a pound. 

Florida pine needles, 25 cent.s a bunch. 

Magnolia wreaths, 15 cents each. 

Cranberries. 12 cents a quart. 

Bitter-root apples, 70 cents a peck. 

Turkeys, 18 to 22 cents a pound. 

Greeae, 16 cents a pound, and- they 
haven't any. 

Whatever el.se. you may or may not 
get for Christmas get mistletoe. There 
is plenty In the market Just now and 
you would better hurry to the telephone 



and order yoiir s^are at once. Christ- 
mas and New Year's day without mis- 
tletoe would be .very sad. The holly 
now in the xuarket is beautiful. The 
leaves are glossy .and unbroken and the 
little clusterj of saarlet berries are cona- 
plete. It would 1 better be ordered at 
once. '. _, 

A Christmas gtfese is a good thing to 
have around^ t^fi hou.se about dinner 
time on Chwtmls day. Just at presr 
ent "they dm iilxieen cents a pound 
and we have none." So the market 
man says. 



Teddv Bear 
Blankets " 

For the Babies. Here at 
last.* In pink, blue, and tan. 
The prettiest present out 
for the babies. 




Where Style, Quality and Values Harmonize. 
Superior Si.—LtxKji A.t)e.— Michigan S't, 



Store open Wed- 
nesday evening-T 
and from then un- 
til Xmas Eve. 



An Unusual and Timely Sale of 



Chiffon and 
Brussels Net 



Neck Ruffs 



dE^B^ 




At Less Than HALF PRICE ! 

On Sale Tomorrow Morning. 

An opportune and very fortunate purchase enables us to offer at 
this seasonable time, about 300 Chiffon Silk Net Neck Ruffs, at a 
ridiculous price. They come in black, black, and white, brown, blue, 
and white. We have divided the entire purchase into three lots as 
follows : 

Black Ruffs only — Ruffs that sell regular 
at $i.oo and Si. 25 — but out they go at 
this sale for each, only 



Lotl 



50c 



Consists of plain blacks, black and 
white, brown and white, white and 

black, and plain white and 

blue — sold regularly at $1.75 to 

$2.00 — yours at each, only 



78c 



Lots 



Consists of high-grade silk chif- 
fon Ruffs, in black and white — 
worth and considered excep- 
tional value at 52.25 to $2 50 
each — while they last, only__ 



98c 



This is a splendid opportunity to buy a beautiful Christmas Gift — a gift that every 
woman appreciates — for very little money. Come early — the first to come gets first choice. 
It's an unusual and very worthy bargain opportunity. 



Extra Specials for Wednesday 



From 8 to 11 a.m. only— TOY DEPARTMENT. 

No Telephone Orders Received on These Specials. 



Toy Furniture Amel-ican Toy Furniture sets — 
""''~""'~-~~~~~~~~" regular price 50c — 00#^ 
from 8 to II a. m. only- each OOV^ 

Doll Trunks Pretty DoU Trunks- ^ m 

- regular price 25c— from I •■iT 

8 to II a. m. only— each 

Q2III0IS Symatroscope — an entertaining 
^—■— "game— regular low price 48c — 
from 8 to i I a. m. only— each : 



MetallOCllOrdS Triple Xyolophones 
— — ^-^— — — "— — —regular price $1.25 
— from 8 to 11 a. m. only — each 



lOc 
69c 



Dolls K'^i body jointed dolls — regular 

price $1.48 — from 8 to ii a. m. 

'^— each 



only- 



Doll Cradles Little Red DoII Cradles 
"~""~'^'^"""-^" — a special at 25c — from 
8 to II a. m. only — each 



J§|0^S Girls High Sleds — regular $1.25 
■■^^■^^ kind — special from 8 to 11 a.m. 
only— each 

Doll Washing Machines ^^ •j'^>^ 

ball ^ 
bearings— just like Urge ones — regular 
price $3 — from 8 to 11 a. m. only — each... 



98c 
15c 

88c 

periectly, 

$1.48 



Extra Specials from the China Dept. 



Tiffin Comforts Beautiful gold dec- 



JI75- 



urations— reg. price if ClC 
-from 8 to II a. m. only— each *^ 

Sala d Bowls Fine decorated China /»Q^ 

— ^^— — — Salad Bowls — regular ■)»¥ IT 
price $1.00— from 8 to 1 1 a. m., only— each xr«^^^ 



With beaded frintje 
shade— regular price 
m. only — each 



Candle Sticks 

$1.25 — from 8 to II a. 

Vases Fancy China and Glass Vases — 
"— — ■— regular price 65c — special from 8 
to II a. m., only — each 



69c 
39c 



Informal Evening. i 

Miss Alice BufA.s wa.s pleasantly sur- 
pri.jit'd last evenifM; at her home on Ea.st 
Fifth street. An enjoyable evening of 
cards and music was passed by the 
following guest?; 



r WATCH TOMORROW! \ 

I For announcement and particulars of Freimuth's sensational sale of Lace and Net Waists, a 
f Sale will start Thursday. Values never before offered on such desirable and dressy creations, f 



Munro, who have often visited here 
and are known to many Duluth people. 

• • * 

Miss Grace Holdon will leave tomor- 
row for St. Paul to take a position in 
the newly organized Young Women's 

Christian association there. 

• • • 

Mrs. C. M. Forest of 706 West Third 
street is ill at her home with la grippe. 

• • « 

Mrs. F. S. Sleeper of Fifteenth ave- 
nue east has returned from a two 
weeks' visit In Chicago. 

• • * 

Mrs. J. E. Campbell of Fo»ston. 
Minn., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. W. 
A. Cragin of 414 Second avenue west. 

Scalp treatment at Knauf Sisters, 
over Gidding's annex. 

RECIPE BOOK 

Compiled by Duluth Women, Having 
Large Sale. 

One of the Christmas books tha^.- is re- 
ceiving much attention is the recipe book 
which has been compiled by the members 
of the Ladies' Aid society of Temple 
Emanuel. Tne t>ook is a collection of 
special family rules, handed down from 
the wonderful cooks of a generation or 
two ago, and wiU be especially welcome 
to those woman who have tried in vain to 
find In the new c<Jok books the rules for 
cookery like that of tradition. The men:- 
bers of the s<iciety contributed the most 
noted and more valued rules known to 
them personally, and the books, winch 
have bi^en on sale for the holiday trade, 
have evidently met a popular demand. 
The contributors are Mrs. H. Silberstem. 
Mrs. Henry Abraham. Mrs. L. S. Loeb, 
Mrs S I Lf-vin, Mrs. Max Albenberg. 
Mrs J. D. Zien. Miss Elsie Silberstein. 
Mrs. J. -M. Gidding. Mrs. P. H. I>evy, 
Miss Claire Abraham, Mrs. A. Bondy. 
Mrs. Hirsohfleld, Mrs. H. Heiman. Mrs. 
E Kunody. Mrs. S. Goldberg. Mrs. Sig. 
Levy Mrs. M. L«vy. Mrs. M. Cook. Mrs. 
Gust I.evin. Mrs. M. Cornfield. Mrs. Vic- 
tor Kohn. Mrs. Welzler, Mrs. Louis Ban- 
dy Mrs J. B. Saltier. Mrs. H. Hirsch. 
Mrs. M. l-refkovitz. Mre. I. Freimuth, 
MVs. L. Hammel. Mrs. Louis Newman 
and others. *• 

The Temple Emanuel cook l>ook is now 
on sale at the followinB stores: Silber- 
stein & Bondy company, I. Freimuth and 
J M Gidding & Co.. or can be had di- 
rect from the publisher. Miss Elsie bil- 
berstein. 



was finally brought under control, but 

not until fully $25,000 in damage \va3 

done. 

Besides the damage to the building, 
which was mostly by water, the 
I Young-Qujnlan company was tlje 
; heaviest loser, its stock being badly 
I soaked. The damage to the building 
'is estimated at $10,000. Doctors, den- 
■ tlsts and others on the upper floors of 
j the building suffered heavily. Their 
lloss is estimated at $5,000. The hre 
! broke out in the rear of the building 
Ion the fourth lloor. 

The Syndicate block is insured for 

$90,000. It is owned by persons living 

in Boston. 



I be due in part to the big holiday busi- 
ness which is in progress, and which 
' keep.s*money actively in circulation, th»* 
I liberal policy which the local banks 
have pursued throughout the trying 
period is also given full credit by 
bankers. Few complaints are heard 
that checks cannot be cashed, the use 
of cashier's checks and clearing houso 
, certificates is graduallj' disappearing, 
\ except in case of large transactions, 
and more freedom is being shown ia 
, the offerings of money on call. 



$20 suits now $13.75. "Fitwell." 



CURRENCY IS MOVING 

WITH MORE FREEDOM. 



Philadelphia, Dec. 17. — Currency is 
moving with more freedom in this city 
now than at any time since the mone- 
tary stringency set in. While this may 



Leather Goods. 

Pocketbooks, purses, shopping bags, 
writing portfolios, we sell them at be- 
fore unheard of low prices. 

LUNDBERG & STONEL 



Trousers at Reduced Prices. 

$4 trousers now $2.75. 
$5 trousers naw $3..50. 
$5 trouseis now $4. 
At the "Fitwell" Clothing Parlors* 
anniversary sale. 



Christmas Cigars. 

We sell them to both ladies and gen- 
tlemen, all standard brands. 

LUNDBERG & STONE. 



FIRE IX MINNEAPOLIS 

DOES $25,000 DAMAGE. 

Minneapolis. Minn., Dec. 17.— (Siie- 
cglal to The Herald.)— Fire broke out 
i in the Syndicate block, 513 and 017 
! Nicollet avenue, Minneapolis, at a late 
hour last night and became so threat- 
ening that a general alarm was ?ent 
In by Chief Canterbury. The blaze 



^. SS, Si'ewert dt Ca 



LONSDALE BUILDING. 



Exceedingly Attractive 



BATH ROBES, 
DRESSING GOWNS, 
HOUSE JACKETS, 
STEAMER RUGS, 
NIGHT ROBES, 
PAJAMAS, 
SHIRTS, 
CRAVATS, 



MUFFLERS, 
KNITTED SCARFS, 
FINE HATS, REEFERS, 
CAPS, GLOVES, 
TRAVELING BAGS, 
SUIT CASES, 
SILK UMBRELLAS. 



WALKING STICKS. 

UNDERWEAR AND HOSIERY, 

AUTO AND OPERA SCARFS. 
SILK HOSIERY, SILK SUSPENDERS, 
SILK HANDKERCHIEFS, 

PURE LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS. 

Evening Dress, Day and Dinner Waistcoats. 

Solid Gold and Gold Front Jewelry. 

Opera and Silk Hats. 



304- West Superior Street. 




I 



1 





Columbia 
Graphophone 
This Christmas 

If it cost ten times the 
price. you couldn't plan a bet- 
ter present than a Columbia 
Graphophone. 

Ask to see this special 
"BX" outfit — $28.60 com- 
plete, with records. Other 
outfits from $1000 up. On 
tnsy terms, if you like. 



THE RECORD 
ISJEATEN 

Northern Pacific Moves 

More Material Than 

Panama Engineers. 

Twice the Amount of 

Same Class of Work | 

Done. 




Columbia 
Phonograph Co., 

18 Third Avenue West. 

OPEN EVEIWWS Till CBAISTMAS. 



The American press has had a good 
deal to say recently about the rapid 
progres.s bei ig made In digging the 
Panama can.il, and has pointed with 
a good deal of pride to the fact that j 
1.868,729 cutlc yards of material was 
moved during the month of October. 
Writers on ihe subject evidently re- 
garded this as a stupendous task. 

Probably they would be surprised to 
learn that during exactly the same, 
period the ?<'orthern Pacific railway 
moved 3,432. SJ28 cubic yards of ma- 
terial, almosi double that moved by 
the Panama canal engineers, in new 
work now ui der way on that system 
I between Duluth and the Pacific coast, 
according to figures in the hands ot 
local officials of the road. 

While this work was going on, the , 
usual heavy freight and passenger I 
traffic was ni tved without any serious i 
Inconvenience frum this cause. The I 
figures offer a very Interesting com- ' 
parison, and show at • a glance the! 
tremendous 'olume of work being 
done by the Xorthern Pacific In Im- | 
proving its fiiciiitles to meet the new 
conditions. 

This work Is not confined to any 
one state, b it Includes the entire 
Northern Pac flc country- in the states 
of Wisconsin. Minnesota, North Da- 
kota, Montan I. Idaho, Washington 
and Oregon, reconstruction of single 
track to conform to easier grades and 
curvatures, reolacing old bridges with 
new and more substantial structures 
of steel and concrete, enlarging yards, 
providing new terminal facilities, etc. 
Another Item of interest is the fact 
that the NortHern Pacific is carrying 
over portions of its single-track main 
line as hr-avy a freight tonnage as Is 
handled by m my of the railways east 
of Chicago 1 ver their double-track 
Hues. 



WOULD CREATE 
A NEW BUREAU, 

I IMPOKrANT RlLINCi. 

Bill to Distribute Work ^o Extra ChaugTfoi^Spedal Eqmp- 

of Interstate Commerce 
Bureau. 





11- 



Btate toniiii 
1 



1 '■ ' . 17. < ■i';.yr>-=sm;in 

• ■ ■•ii:>-. «i .1 bill yt'Ster- 

g Interstate co;n- 

iuv purport of the bill, 

s tliirty-six sections, la 

■ the Inter- 

.nd ti place 

"Us.bilities upon 

lUTurce and lab-^r, 



nicntlnlessTrovided for in Tariff. 

Washington, Dec. 17.— It was decided, 
yesterday, by ihe Interstate comnils.sion 
that where three coneoting roads pub- 
lish a joint tar ft under which they hold 
themselves to :he purpose as prepare! 
to transport ccnmodlties In cark)ad lots 
of a certain rianinium magnitude at a 
fcpecified rate, Buch carriers cannot be 
permitted to charge morf than the rate 
specified in the r tariff, no matter what 
equipment the.v may provide for the 
transportation )f the goods, except as 
the tariff in sp Hiflc terms provides cer- 
iriment of transnorr'l ^^^" inlnlmum w^li?hts for carloads in 
/in "^'Viranhpoit- cars of crtaln length or capacity This 
^ provided in section 8 ruling was mad? In the case of th« Pacl- 
'■' -Mt: j flc I'urchasing 'ompany of Los Angeles 

... be in the department ^^^'"st the C)acago_& Northwestern 
ot commerce and labui a bureau to ij^ '■«"'■"'"' ""'' -.,,<>..„ 
ea' It'll ;< I 



railroad and ot lers. The record showed 
*' "•:insi,.,rtaiinn and ' H"^^^ ^^/ shipnient was of brass bed 
MM .,• -iMYm vh^ '^^^'^^ u^'""'" K.nosha, Wis., to Los An- 
. Si .itatlon, Aho geies. the initial road being unable to fur- 
■ >.--^'i ' -aul bur.au. f. be j nlsh a single c ir which would hold the 
I'v the !■:> .-^i.!.r.t. and who ' mi":iiivim Wt-itri t of the shipment pro- 
•■ a salary ol" $i).W.K» per an- )'W«'tl for in th. tariff. The road, there- 
re shall also be in said ;*""*'• l>'"'*^'<l«^d swo small cars, resulting 
deputy commissioner, who ,'J. ;!" .J^T.'n'ff ^''^""S-? ot 55 cents a hun- 
r*>c* ive a sal-irv r-r «i .nn . ^l^^'^'-'' JH.iun(ls. Reparation wa« granted 
rent a saiarj of J4.000 pt^r, to complainant in the sum of the ex- 

I m the ; Cess. 



till j *. » I i LH' I 

fflppointt'l 

F' ...-•■ , 
I. 

burtau a 
Bhall 

aiid who shall al- 

f the onimissli 

a Hon. and who shall 
'•fhtr dufi' - '^ ' 
■ ■ I.. in ■ 



"T.'. 



'.ts. clerk.s 

•nay be 
1 comn 



trans- 
rform 

'■••'-> '■'-■ .XH- 

■ tary of l-vio- 

' 'le said co;n- 

(Iso be in the 

Clerk and sucii 

and other em- 

rized by law. 

shall have 



TO Sm EED MARSOX. 



authority under tho. diroc- 
'■tiol of the secretarj- of 
labor to perform all 



\en General ^lanagrer of Red Lake 
Kailro.id .\nnoiineed. 

Bemidji, Mini ., E»ec. 17.-(Speclal to 
The Htrald.)— A change in the manage- 
ment of the M nneapolis. Red Lake & 
Maii.toba railway will be inaugurated 
with the new y» ar, when W. Q. Marson 

upon the -secretary l^i .^^■rIf'^:^,Jr'^'t ^cS^ ^ 

nd labor under the provi-' L. Moland^r. who comes to Bemidjl from 

.s act. and such other duties f^^'^"^' Rock. S. D. 

aay be confer!..! upon him byiw*^'"- Marson. tie retiring manager, has 

- .' •> I b€en connected Jiith the Red Lake road 

mo.,t impoM..,,. ..f the biU and it it I rke'l vf.rtr.'rn'"^ ')*'"""'°*''- '^^'"^'y 
jp^nerally conoed.d that' ti'e 'vvork .!f lo'^^^^^''l^%J^ n^!^ ^'l^^^ 
the interstate commerce commission i ^^^s installed as general manager which 
mast be distributed and divided. . nositi.m h*. h-.^ ,^t«^,...A ..„.>. .».. __ 

Th- Mis.si.:in is overwhelmed witli 

"•^f'' rk and cannot g^-t a .cutft- 



' I'Cf to 

1 'Ut tha ! - 

ber rate hearing t-ani' 

lini' i'lf t'...'oi rib.n'--. t!, 



\vnrk. It Is 
. I. v. ^.-iu iiini- 
.tt on oni 
it hern PU' 



r . emjloyed in mak- 

Mr. Stevens' bill is an amplificat: .n 
of or:c ' - , nte.l at the iast session. It 
^^ *!'• y t.. have the »-ndorsenient 

tf tti. iiiti rstate commerce eommls- 
BH-n and Judg Prouty of the commt-j- 
slon has !y advocated some such 

measure. 



I position he has :eta:ned until the 'present 

Mr. Molander. who succeeds Mr Mar- 
son as gf-neral nanager of the railroad 
was for several years connected with the 
St Paul rallwa>, and has had consider- 
al>le experience n railroad work 

It IS statfd thi t Mr. Marson will spend 
the remainder of the winter in Cali- 
fornia. 

Nen Mileage Book. 

'■ ago. Dec 17.— For the purpose of 
doiinf away wit:i the difficulties which 
have attended the use of railway mileaae 
books consequent in the recent passage 
of rate laws b • various slates in the 
^Sesf, the Chicago & Northwestern rail- 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; TUESDAY, DECEMBER C, TSm. 




wts^mm^ 



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YOU CAN 

MAKE HOME 

BEAUTIFUL 



^M^SS^Wwi' 



Ai i'i 



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rm 









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THIS STOTtE 
Will Be Open 
Till 10 O'clock 
Every Evening 

Vnlil Xmas. 



Xmas Furniture! 



SIX MORE 
SHOPPING DAYS 

before Christinas 
day— don't delay, 
but SHOP NOW! 



The Great Clearance Sale Still Continues, Finest Xmas Gifts at Bargain Prices! 



HE FURNITURE DEPARTMENT. (4th floor), is still a place of busy bargain-hunting crowds, attracted by the clearance »ale orices on our en- 
t.re hne of lurnuure. Ihe warehouse contents and new arrivals from manufacturers (purchased before LpIaS"o^h' salerhavea^ 

YTZr^.s:i ftt,'^;^ hunrd-itLTn""" ^- «'>" '"^= ^"^ '"^ ^'- - "">■ ^^^^y^^^'ot^'^<:^^^:i'<^'^^ 



Fine Brass Beds 



Formerly, 
f 28.50 .. 
159.75 .. 
$45.00 .. 



Now. 
.$22.00 
.$14.50 
.937.00 



Formerly. 
$30.00 . 
$32.00 . 
$36.00 . 



Mission Clocics 



Formerly. 
$35.50 .. 
$47.75 .. 



Now. 
.$22.50 
.$27.50 



Formerly. 
$49.00 .. 
$19.50 .. 



Now. 
.$22.50 
.$24.00 
. $25.50 



Now. 
.$81.00 
.$10.50 



Hall Racks 



Formerly. 

Fine Wea. Oak Rocker. .$43.00 

Fine gold, oak rocker. . 32.00 

Fine gold, oak rocker.. 30.00 

Fine gt'ld. oak rocker. . 22.00 

Fine gold, oak rocker.. 19.00 

Fine gold, oak rocker. . 8.76 

Sideboards 

Formerly. 

Golden oak $80. OO' 

Golden oak 31.50 

Golden oak 26.50 



Now. 
$27.50 
24.00 
22.00 
16.65 
14.00 
5.75 



Now. 

$48.00 

24.25 

17.98 



Dining Room Buffets 

Formerly. Now. 

Weathered oak $22.00 

Weathered oak 30.00 

Weathered oak 47.00 

Golden oak 65.00 

Gold* n oak 36.00 

Golden oak 22.75 

Goldf-n oak 19.00 

GenTilne mahogany .... 36.75 
Genuine mahogany .... 46.00* 
Genuine mahogany .... 36.75 

China Cabinets 

Formerly. 

Leaded gla.ss front $49.50 

Mahog. cellarette 105.00 

Weathered oak 25.75 

Golden oak 13.50 

Golden oak 37.50 

Wea. oak (Mission) 19.00 

Weathered oak 26.00 

Weathered oak 57.50 

ChUd's Iron Cribs 

Was. Now. Wa.s 

$5.50 $4.75 $,S.00 $6.00 

$11-00 $7.75 $12.00 $8.10 



$16.35 
22.08 
32.65 
42.50 
26.00 
17.00 
14.00 
23.00 
34.00 
27.50 



Now. 
$35.00 
65.00 
16. .50 
11.00 
27.50 
13.00 
17.95 
42.00 



Now. 



Now. 
$3.75 
6.75 
12.50 
15.00 



Couches 



Enameled Beds 

Formerly. 
Enameled Iron Beds.... $5.75 
Enameled Iron Beds.... 9.75 
Enameled Iron Beds.... 19.75 
Enameled Iron Beds.... 21.00 

(100 other bargains in beds.) 

Dining Chairs 

(Golden Oak and Maliogany.) 

Formerly.' Now. 
Golden oak, box leather 

seat and back $8.50 

Gold. oak. box leather seat. 5.75 
Gold, oak leather seat diner 5.00 
Gold, oak leather seat diner 3.50 
Golden oak, polished seat 

and back 2.90 

Golden oak, box cane seat 3.25 
Golden oak. cane seat diner 2.5 
Golden oak, cane seat diner 1.25 
Golden oak seat and back.. 1.98 
Golden oak seat and back 
Golden oak seat and back 
Golden oak seat and back 
Golden oak seat and back 
Mahogany, leather seat.. 
Mahogany, leather seat.. 



Book Cases 



$5.75 
4.25 
3.50 
2.50 



1.75 
1.50 
2.25 
2.00 
8.00 
6.00 



1.98 
2.25 
1.08 
.98 
1.39 
1.25 
1.10 
1.75 
1.50 
6.25 
4.75 



Formerly. Now. 
G. oak frame 
velour top. .$11.25 
4 G. oak frame 
velour top. . 16.50 
G. oak frame 
leather top. 47.50 
G. oak frame 
leather top. 42.50 
Chas.'d leather 
Couches .... 27.00 
Chased leather 
Couches .... 21.50 



$6.75 
10.50 
31.00 
29.00 
20.50 




Formerlj'. 

Mahogany $74.50 

Golden oak 79.00 

Golden oak 26.75 

Early English 39.76 

Golden oak 36.50 

Mahogany 37.50 

Morris Chairs 

Formerly. 
Mahogany frame, maroon 

velour $41.25 

Golden oak frame, green 

Vflour 15.75 

Mahog. frame, red velour 27.50 
Gol. oak frame, red velour 14.25 
Weathered oak frame, 

green velour 19.75 

Weathered oak frame, Red 

Seat cushions 24.75 

G. ok frame, red tape.^try 15.00 
Golden oak chased leather 

rocker 15.00 

Mahogany frame, red ve- 
lour 18.75 

(And dozens of others.) 



Now. 
$52.50 

59.00 
19.50 
27.50 
27.00 
29.00 



Now. 

$29.00 

11.00 
19.00 
10.75 

15.25 

17.50 

10.00 

10.00 
15.00 




16.00 

Ladies* Writing Desl(s 

Formerly. Now. 
Inlaid mahog. 

desks $55.00 $39.00 

Inlaid mahog. 

desk 32.75 24.00 

Birdseye maple 

desk 8.00 5.50 

Birdseye maple 

desk 7.75 6.00 

(These are but a few out 
of dozens.) 

Ladies Dressing Tables 

(All of thenj with FYonch 
plate njlri*<)rs, either oval, 
oblong or fancy <<hapetl.) 
Formerly. Now. 
Gold, oak dress- 
ing table . .$25.00 $19.50 
Gold, oak dre.ss- 
ing table . . 22.50 17.00 
Curly birch dress- 
ing table .. 19.50 14.00 
Bird.«eye maple 
dressing table 22.50 17.50 
Birdseye maple 
dressing table 23.75 15.75 




Here 

Are 

The 



Fore- 
noon 
Snaps 



Tlicy Pay You to Sliop in tlic Morning I 




Thilll C rhaiPC ^ small lot of genuine Imported 
\/lUlU a l/lldU^ Austrian cane seat and back 
rocktrs and chairs, with bent 
frames, in golden oak and ma- 
hogany finish — regular prices 
are $3.25 and $3.75, but we'll 
give you one of each Wednes- 
day forenoon (4th floor), — each 



ane seat and back 

$1.9S 



'DIABOLO" 

The game of the hour 
I — develops strength 
' agility and alertness — 

we have It 

From 98e to $2.25 



Mail your letter and 
Xmas packages at our 
postofRce. 



Fancy 
Towels 

50 dozen fine fancy towels 
— assorted kinds and pat- 
terns — damask, buck and 

hemstitched — regular 25c 
and 35c values — Wednes- 
day forenoon at the linen 
counter (rear 
aisle, main 
floor) — all 
you want at 
Our special 
price, each. . 



Finished Pillows ^^ ^^^ -^^^ Needlework counter 
■ iiii^iicu 1 1I1VWW5 __o„iy abotut a dozen of these 
nov.liy linished pillows, in ' 
mostly Japanese designs of 
cretonne and art denims — reg- 
ular prices were $1.98 and 
$2.48 — they'll last but a little 
while Wednesday morning at 



ibcMut a dozen of these 

$1.75 



at the linen 

19c 



Christmas 
Wreaths 



They're made of green 
paper strung on a wire 
hook, with a red Xmas 
bell; a beautiful decora- 
tive Xmas novelty — dis- 
played and .sold 
at the stationery 
counter at 15c 
each — Wednesday 
forenoon — (limit 
6) — only 



Rail 
Plates 

Coat-of-Arms rail plates — 
fine English ware, large 
size plates — emblems of 
the leading nations of the 



Shaving 
Mirrors 



^iiy — ais- 

9c 



world included 
a fancy holly 
gift box, 
complete, and 
worth 89c — 
in the base- 
ment, each. . , 



— each in 



59c 



A swell gift for a man. 
Adjustable shaving mir- 
rors — 7-inch round, bevel 
plate glass, with bracket 
ready to put on wall — 
will swing to any position 
Our regular 
price $2.50, 
At the drug 
counter — 
Wednesd a y 
forenoon . . 



' *i"y po 

$1 



.75 

Each 



Parlor Suits 

(Velour covered.) 

Formerly. Now. 
6-pc. carved 

mahogany $69.60 $39.50 
3-pc. carved 

mahogany 39.75 27.50 
2-pc. carved 

mahogany 42.50 27.50 
2-pc. carved 
mahogany 44.50 27.50 

Davenports 

Formerly. Now. 
Mahog. tap- 
estry covered $59.60 $35.00 
Mahog. ve- 
lour covered 60.00 40.00 
Mahogany, 
green velour 

covered 95.00 65.00 

Mahog. ve- 
lour covered 34.75 21.00 
Mahog. ve- 
lour covered 49.50 33.00 

Music and Parlor Cabinets 

Formerly. Now. 
Mahog. music 

cabinet $26.50 $18.00 

Mahog. parlor and 
music cabinet 39.50 29.00 
Mahog. music 

cabinet 12.76 9.75 

2 Vernis Martin 
music cabinet 29.60 19.00 
Rookwood par- 
lor cabinet. 45.00 32.00 
^ ernis Martin 
music cabinet 60.00 38.00 
Mahog. miusic 

cabinet 19.95 15.40 

Fine gold leaf 

music cabinet $226 $140 



tf 



THE BEARS" 

The live ones — are here 
dally — two hours fore- 
noon and afternoon — 
and 

All Day Saturday. 

You can't "miss it" — 
by giving a fine um- 
brella — $2.00 to $12.00. 



We Hold That 
An Opportunity 

t<» save money should h. a,-; wflcome - s 
an opportniuiv to mak.. n,,.ney Our 
money-sn lubbing offers are 

Justly fai:. Here are vonif ; 

GREAT FICTION 
OFFERS 

I.IBR4RV OF AMRRICAX FIC- 
TION. 1(» Volunie-s. 60 storits by Am- 
erica'-s Kreate.<«t authors, hound in 
silk cloth and wflghing over six 
pound.<i. .Tn.J Suooess Macnzlne one 
year fur «2.U5. 

I.IIIRAHV Ol- KNGLI.CiH FIC- 
TION' a ci.ii.jMi.ion set to the above, 
same price; the stories being by 
|-nBH.«h authors: or both sets uud 
SucceMn Maicazln« for 94MO. 




i»o iroii *kiii>w iittiiiuiu? 



OI U "*^>:K OF TK> noi.I..\RS WORTH OF M A«; A> IXF.S FREE. WITH 
THE .NATIRE MBRAKV. STII.I, HOLD*. GOOD. «»»" 



ZENITH SUBSCRIPTION AGENCY, 



401 Bl RROW$i Bl ILD1.\G 




road has placed on sale a new form of 
1.000 and 2.000-mile ticket. Bach ticket is 
good 'for bearer." Moreover, they are 
available for as many persons as care 
to ride on the ticket at one time and 
will t>e accepted at the current rate per 
mile in the slate wh»-rc they are soli 

FILES ^ITIOX. 

Xebrasilia Wants 2-(>nt Fare Case 
Remanded to Supreme Court. 

Washington, Dec. 17.— Attoi-ney G»mral 
Thompson of Nebraska yesterday filed 'n 
the supreme court of the United Statts a 
petition for a writ of mandamus com- 
1 pelling United Slates Circuit Judges Wlll- 
( lam H. Munger and Thoniat C. Munger 
to remand to the Nebraska .supreme court 
the case of the State of Nt-braska vs. thi- 
Chicago, Burlington & Quiniv Rallro;;d I 
coinr>any. which wa.^^ originally brought ( 
in the state sujireme court, "to enjoin the ! 
railroad company from injuring th« public 1 
by charging for its extra services as a ! 
common carrier in the state an unlawful ! 
an,i <xtortionate rate." 

The case was originally instituted In 
the supnme court of th.? ."statf on June 1.") 
last, and In the following July was re- 
moved to the United Statfg circuit cnuit 
on the petition of the railroad com- 
pany. 

The state Immediately made an effort 
j to have the federal court remand the 
case, in order to have the Issue d-cid d 
upon at once. The rtate then d-cid<d to 
pre.«ient the matter to the federal supreme 
court, as it did yesterday. In the shape 
of a petition for an order compelling tho 
United States circuit court to send the 
case back to the state courts. 

The law involved in the case is the 
statute enacted by the last legislature of 
Nebraska, and making a rate of 2 cent« 



per mile, prohibiting the is.euance of 
passes and reducing certain freight rates 
to the extent of 15 per cent of the old 
rate on Intra-state business. 

(o\ne(ti6xs"allowed. 

Decision in Case of MoRae Com- 
pany Against Seaboard Line. 

Washington, Dec. 17.-An important de- 
cision was rendered yesterday for the 
interstate commerce commission by Com- 
missioner Prouty in the case of the 
McRae Terminal Railway company 
against the .Southern Railway company 
and the Seaboard railway. This is a 
supplemental report Involving the inatal- 
latlon of physical connections and is the 
first decision of its kind ever rendered 



bv the commission. Upon the facts dis- 
I closed, the commission decided that the I 
j complainants application for physical i 
connections should be allowed so far as i 
it relates to the Seaboard Air Line, but ! 
should be denied as to the Southern rail- 
way. The commission ordered the Sea- 
board Air Line railway to construct t>e- 
fore Jan. 25, 1908, and maintain and oper- | 
ate thereafter for two years, a switch 
connected between the line of the com- 
plainant and the Seaboard Air Line 



Luther Beggott, a paroled convict, and 
died yesterday. Sofford was milking 
when attacked. A posse Is searching a 
swamp for Baggott. Domestic affairs 
caused the crime. 



» ■! ■ 




^ 



LOVES WIFE LIKE SISTER. 



PISO'S CURE 



Throat Trouble 

and all affections of the 
chest yield promptly to 
Piso's Cure. It is an ideal 
remedy for chi^ren, be- 
cause of its agreeable flavor 
and absolute freedom from 
opiates ard dangerous or 
objectionable drugs. 

All druKgUt5, 25 cents. 



COUGHS.hXOLDS 



REDUCE GRAIN RATES. 

Northern Pacific Cuts Rates From 
Montana 5 Cents a Hundred. 

Helena, Mont.. Dec. 17.— The Montana 
railroad commission late yesterday an- 
nounced that the Northern Pacific rail- 
road would reduce the rate on grain 
shipments from Montana jKdnts to St 
Paul, Minneapolis and points on the upper 
lakes from 55 cents to 45 cents a hundred, 
effc-ctive Jan. 7. 



Suits Dismissed. 



Birmingham, Ala.. Dec. 17.— At a con- 
ference here yesterday between Governor 
B. B. Comer and Railroad Commissioner 
W. D. Nesbit and Gen. A. D. Lightner 
and Counsel E. K. Campbell of the Fris- 
co system, the railroad agreed to di.'smiss 
its suits against the state and put in ef- 
fect the 2^-cent pajssenger rates. 



KILLED BY CONVICT. 
Poplar Bluff, Mo.. Dec. 17.— Owing to 
the fact thiit he was deaf, thus bei-ig 
unable to hear the approach of his 
slayer or his wife's cries of warning. 
Kinney Sofford, a farmer, was chopped . 
In the top of the head with an ax b7| 



Traveling Salesman Leaves Spouse 
to Live With Affinity. 

Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 17.— Mrs. Thoma<= 8. 
Handley, wife of a salesman who travels 
for a Chicago hou.se, applied for a divorce. 
Her evidence was in the shape of letlera 
from her husband, who has gone to livo 
with ills affinity, and who has asked his 
wife to come and live under the same roof 
with them. 

One letter that Mrs. Handley had 
reads: , 

"I wish you would forget me as a • 
husl>and. I shall alwavs love you next I 
best in the world because vou have al- ' 
ways been a good woman. It worries me ' 
to see you suffer. Why not give me a 
divorce? Then you can com© and live 
near us. 

In another letter he writes: 

"I think that we could all livp In Chi- 
cago and we will love you as a cister I 



will always love you as a sister 

"You ask me If I can come back ^o you. 
I can not. Eva, I am in love with some 
one else. W e are living together now 

lou have been a good wife to me and 
you deserve to have a better man I 
pray God that you may find some one 
who will treat you right and love you al- 
ways. * - »* 

Mrs. Handley told the court that she 
was In receipt of $S0 a month from Hand- 
ley, and he told her he would send her 
more If that was not enough as lone aa 
he was able to work. " s •*» 

A decree was given to Mrs. Handley. 

YOIXG MmDLIMIT 

Power to Enjoin State Officers to 
Federal Supreme Court. 

St. Paul, Winn., Dc-c. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Attorney General E. T. 
Young, In an address at the Hamllne 
Methodist church last night, recommended 
that the federal laws be so changed as to 
deprf\'e Inferior federal courts of tho 
power to enjoin state officials from en- 
forcmg state laws. He would confine 
such Jurisdiction to the United States su- 
preme court. 



i iili 



f 



OneD 



vse 



AtkyouT doctor to tell you, honestly and 
frankly, just what he things of Ayers 
Cherry Pectoral. Then do as he says. 



Often a single dose of Ayer's Cherry Pectoral 
at bedtime will completely control the night 
coughs of children. It is a strong medi- 
cine, a doctor's medicine, entirely free from 
alcohol. Made only for diseases of the 
throat, bronchial tubes, and lungs. Full 



formula on each label. 



J. O. Ajn Co 



f«rCo.. 
Km*. 



': 11. 



• JttJBttStllfaSiiafiH9l 

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-"-1 - 




I9i! 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 



1907. 



MAKE SOME 
PROGRESS 

District Court Has Steady 

Grind in Civil 

Cases. 




Reynolds Case is Sched- 
uled for a Trial 
Wednesday. 



The district court tl-.l d )wn 

to a sieaJy grrind on t.u.- civil eas_'d ; 
to be tiispased of bef.nv the end cfi 
the prosent term. Tw-. . i-^- a r • on 
trial t.Mlay, oiu- o£ which bad been m 
progre.ss r >• Tniuf tw) we«ks and is 

not ye: 
The tnai >t tlie p^^ifioual Injury casa 
J)wver asrainsl the Xu.tli- 
i:ai'lvvav company may be 
,.. mother day. Witnesses 
,1 -fcnse were an the stand this 



'\ 



I 



I 



of Maui ['. 
em Fa'i. 

fltlishid HI 

for U^ 
mort ;: =; 

D\v . , > t~ .^ngjm'er on a 

awi ^:ue tor Uie defendant com- 

patu mjust'ii about a year as >, 

•when an engine pushing a string of box 
cars ran into his engine n.ar Twen- 
tieth avenue weat station. He vvas 
thrown from his engine and liad his 
leg iniured. Dwycr claimed that Uis 
engine •• -- "> ''i" '"oss over bet\v»jon 
ti^e in' i 'it bound traoivs. 

awaitiiia ■^"•- -■'•'i;"-' ^'> ^'i'->s'' '■'^'* '^"'^" 
bound track. He claimed that there 
waa no liglit on the lirsl car in the 
Btrins pusli-d by the other engine and 
that he did not =iee or hear tlie tram ■ 
comin«. H.- elaiined that he w a:* given 
the proi>er sii^iials to go ahead and 
was pna-^-ding slowly when the box' 
cars suddenly loomed • up -nit of the 
darkness and struck ills engine. Dwycr 
•topped to throw on the air and re- 
verse hif» engine, but did not have tinre 
to jump before th- cars struck hid 
engine. , , 

The defendant ompany mtroduced 
some of its rules in evidence this morn- 
ing and took the ground that Dvvyer 
was at fault in not living up to the 
rules relating to the precautions to be 
taken in making a crossing. Quite a 
number of railroad men have been 
summoned a.s wltne-ss's in the case. 

The action was !)rough: to recover 
JSO.iW) damaged. 

In Judge Dtlwll's ro »m a jury is still 
listening t> Te.stimony for the defendant 
IB the two suits brought by X. W. 
Hblm^s agaln.-^t the Red Cliff Lumber 
company. This case holds the record 
for long trials during the pre.sent terra 

of court. ^ , - 

judi^e 'am is -x,..- -1 baok from 
Two Harbors, this evmuig. where he 
ha.s be,.n holding court this week. 

XTniler ttie pr^'sent arrangements the 
case of he state against W. H. Rey- 
nolds, charged with obtaining money 



I>ont mutfle your feelings. 




Muffler 



50c to $5 

Inexpensive, yet hii^h- 
class and always accept 
able. The nuitrler has of 
late years become an ab- 
solute necessity to good 
dressers on account of the 
crocking^ hal)it so ct:>minon 
with velvet overc(jat col- 
lars. 



Silk Mufflers in square or reefer 
shape. 

Full di-.\«ia proteetors. 

Phoenix knitted mufflers. 

Way's knitted mufflers. 

Knitted .H*'arfs. either wool or 
ni'-rc'rized materials. 

livery kind of a niuifler is here 
and ill my color of the rainbow. 




Hoys' Mufflers at 
and up to fl.fiO. 



_ •>i'. 



50c, 75c 



Finsst H'Mi- 
nut Sacbct 
Powder, only 
yoc per o^. 'f 




Paper Booth 

Tissue Paper, Holl 

Seals, Christmas Cardi^ 

Ribbon Tape, and every; 

thing for doing up th 

Christmas packages at th 
bix)th on the landing. 



Always Send Your Mail Orders to 




J 
. 15 



117-119 West Superior Stre«t« Doluth. Minn.. 
For Quick, Satisfactory Service. 



Save on Toys 



Take elevator to the 
third floor — we do not 
claim to have the largest 
stock — but we can prove 
to your profit and satis- 
faction that we are mak- 
ing lower prices than any 
other house hereabouts. 



NOT OPEN TONIGHT 



ore will open evenings beginning Wcdnes- 
V ill then so far as possible work alternate 



Our 
(lay — we » ... v..^.. .. - .-- — . — . , , . , . 

shuts, so tliat our people may be freshly active tor the 

trade of the day. 



The Spirit of Christmas 

Pervades This Busy Store 

with holiday decorations, all contributing to the spirit of the season! 

We are proud of the service we are giving— mistakes are few— mighty few, we are thankful to say— for we 
have tried as far as possible to secure trained people in every department— and people are daily teUmg us that they 
GET BEST SERVICE AT GRAY-TALLANT COMPANY'S. 

And Its a pretty well established fact that if you want something good at a fair price— you can get it at Gray-Tallaut's, 

Tomorrow Will Be Your Best Time to Shop Here ! 




CLOISONNE WARE 

A >oltc assortment, exquisite pieces in this beautiful ware. We 
plnco it ,.n ale at our art department at decided reductions from regu- 
.)w pric.->. which in themselves are fully jk fourth under the regular 

$2.50 Rose ajrs $185 

98c 



lar 



prices' 

g8c Vases 69c 

$1.25 Jewelry Cases 



5Dc CREPE PAPER NOVELTIES 39c 

A V. 1 V attractive hne of the faniou;. Denni.son .\rt Novelties. 
Letter Hi Iders. Calendars, Hatpin Holders. Shaving Papers, Phone 
Memos. Iwiue Holders. Tic Racks and Utility Holders. 

Choic: of our entire stock of 50c crepe paper novelties at 39c 



$1.25 Figured Crepe De Chine $1 

You remember them— a beautiful scroll design in gray— that 
brown blocked border effect— that beautiful design in bouquets of 
flowers, eto.,/iind then those liberty satin and net effects that come 
in scarf lengths. Our dollar line is so low that we decided to put 
these in aX that price instead of ordering others from the manu- 
facturer. • ^ »^ 



Women's $2.25 Carriage Bags $1.89 

_ ,1. ^ A^ • _^ I-> . ._- . -.. J>.0^ Tl -4 



Tomorrow we'll sell our $2.25 Carriage Bag.s at $1.89. Thursday 
they'll be $2.25 again. These are the finest $2.25 bags m the city, 
elegantly finished, all mountings in excellent taste, leather lined, seal 
or walrus, all fitted with coin purses; some fitted with card cases ni 
addition! 

On sale tomorrow, for one day only. Choice at $1.89. 



$2 50 and $2.75 Jap Drawn Work $2.00 

\ hiK' lot of handsome drcs-,ci covers and lunch cloths; regular 
Sj.So and $ ;.75 values. Tomorrow only, choice at $2 each! 



There'll be a rush for them, and as the pieces are not very large 

— it's best that you 
come early — as long as 
they last, your choice of 
the lot at $1.00 a yard. 



There 11 De a rusn 

$1.00 



THE SALES 

OF 

V/OMEN'S 

Coals and SuttS 

CONTINUE 

Come omorrow. Come early as 
you can." The earlier you come, 
the better you'll fare! 

You cannot afford to miss 

the bargains. 

Styles are the season's very best. 
Original prices were strikingly 
less thai common on garments of 
equal wi rth. 

Now come and see how 
we've .:ut them! 



HATS AT 
HALF PRICE 

All Pattern Hats and All Colored 
Trimmtd Hats at Half. 

We mean just what we say— and you know the 
wonderful reputation we've made this season of 
having the prettiest of hats at the fairest of regu- 
lar prices. 

Come and get the one you want tomorrow. 

Pay just half the regular price. Save the 

other half! 

Our trimmed black hats are not included r*_^ut 
in addition to the sale of half price hats we ^Bff^* 

D««ply Cut Prices on 



All untrimmed shapes, all flowers, all 
plumes, all feathers and all tams and toques. 






50c GOLD PICTURE FRAMES 39c 

Our French gold picture frames will not tarnish. They're a 
refined little trinket any one would be glad to get, slip in a photo 
if you wish. They're especially fine for baby pictures. 
' Choice of all our 50c frames on sale tomorrow at 39c each. 



Women's $ 1 .98 Silk Neck Scarfs $ 1 .50 

E.xquisitcly dainty affairs, a fine assortment of them in choice 
styles; every one a fascinating bargain at regular price oi $1.98. Spe- 
cial tomorrow $1.50. 









Children'sCoats 
Half Price! 

All Coats Sizes 6 to 12 Years. 
All Coats i^SS) Sizes 2 to 6. 

With the single exception of our white coats 
for little folks we offer all kinds of children's 
coats at exactly half the lowest regular prices 
in Duluth! 

Even our colored Teddy Bear Coats are 
on sale at exactly half the original prices! 

We have Teddy Bear Caps and Bonnets to 
match our Teddy Bear Coats, also knit 
sacques, bootees and leggins for little folks. 

Children's Furs Ys Off 

Children's Furs, in sets or separate pieces, 
made by one of New York's best makers. On 
sale this week at one-third off regular prices! 



GIFT FURS 

FOR WOMEN 

On Special Sale at 

CUT PRICES 



Our entire stock, sets or sepa- 
rate pieces, every piece guaran- 
teed a.s represented. 

We sell furs under their real 
names. 

You can depend absolutely on 
getting what you pay for, in fact, 
more than you pay for, as we are 
making 

Cut prices on the entire stock. 




uii.i.^r false preten.-^. s will be called for 
trill. Reynold.s wa « relea.sed from jail 
:, .1 bond a few d lys ago. 



Deafiu'ss (an loi lie Cured 

Hv loL-al applur. 110 i.< as tney cannot 
:■ .ich the di.si-a'=« ■.' portion of the ear. 
Ihor.' is only oil'- way to cure deafness, 
and that is by coi atltution.-\l remedies. 
i>eafn«'ss is caused by an Inflamed con- 
dition of the inucoi s lining of the Fu- 
ttaohian Tub-'. Wion thi.s ia inflamed 

. voii have a rumblin t sound <ir imperfect 
h'-aring. and when It la entirely closed, 
rvafnes^ is the re lull, and unless tho 
intlamniation can hi taken out and this 

, tub" restored to lis normal condition. 

I hearing will be de>lroyed forever; nine 

I cu'se.s out of t>^n ar • caused by Catarrn. 

1 which Is nothing bi t an InHamed condi- 
tion of the inucou i surfaces. 

W'f' will give On*. Hundrt'd Dollars for 
any ta.se •>r Deafne^.s (caused by catarrh) 
that cannot be eur d by Hall's Catarrh 
Curt'. Send for circulars free. 

F. J. CHENEY i t'O., Toledo. Ohio. 
Sold bv UrusRist '. 75c. 
Take Kali's Fami y Pills for constipa- 

I tlon. 



HIS MIND WAS A BLANK 
FOR FORTY-FIVE MINUTES 






TWO STORES 
DUI.l i H .A^ND SUPERIOR. 

Every Columbia article is absolute- 
ly guaranteed. If not satisfactory, it 
rnay ».►• brouRht back, at any time 
and .^xelianged for a new one. 



THE POLICE 
COURT GRIST 

Vags and drunk formed the election 
day grist this m uning. Three, who 
were charged with being useless mem- 
ber.s of society of the former type, 
didn't believe tha . they were entirely 
good for nothing. James Whitney; 
claimed to be working steadily around ! 
the Metropolitan cpera iiouse. although 
the officers denied that he had any 
steady employment there. Whitney in- i 
dlgnantnly denied that he didn't want! 
to work, so he wiis dismissed. I 

Oscar Jacobson and .Ajidrew Papparl 
were reported to be good-for-nothing j 
hangers-on about saloons, without em- j 
ui sXbp .'Cixis JO sjsoo puB cii JO auy ' 
pleaded not guilt;' to the charge and | 
will bf tfiven an examination this after- 
noon. I 

♦ • • I 
Kiiute Johnson didn't like to leave! 

the NieoUet salooi last night at closing 
time. He wanted to hang around for a 
while and absorb some more German ' 
disturbance, of which he nad already! 
imbibed a grand suPficiency. officer 
Gleason was cal ed and Knute wa.s 
taken out Into tie cold. wintr>- night 
and the place was closed. Knute ob- 
jected to the attentions of the officer. 
He was given $5 or seven days. Eight 
very ordinary drunks were let off with 
the minimum fine. 

• • • 
Andrew Conley a Weat end youth, 

whose face is noi entirely unknown in 

municipal court, wa.s up as a chicken 

thief. It wa.s Ci nley's first excursion 

into the fields of Illegal possession and 

he was sorry he tried to deplete the 

• poultry stock of W. T. Gardner, who 

, made eomplaint again.st him. Conley 

j was caught red handed, with seven 

I chickens Im his p issession. and he wa^ 

j Industriou.ily wringing their necks. 

when the officer took him In. Conley 

I pleaded guilty ai;d was sentenced to a 

1 qioa -spunj jnJtlU-tt puB luaiuXoid 

the tx>unty Jail. 

I $ir> overcoats now $9.75. "Fitwell." 



Carpenter Receives Mys- 
terious Wound on Su- 
perior Street Corner. 

Knows Nothing of Blow 

Which Nearly Proved 

Fatal. 



How a man. in his right senses and 
apparently normal in every way. can 
disappear from a street corner at one 
of the busiest centers In the city, at 
the noon hour, where there are hun- 
dreds of people on the street, and can 
appear at that corner within an hour, 
dazed with his head cut and bruised. 
Is the baffling mystery, which the po- 
lice are now trying to unravel, with 
but scant success. 

Albert Johnson, a carpenter, 55 years 
of age. residing at '201 East Eighth 
street, now lying in St. Luke's hospital 
fast Hearing complete recovery after a 
near approach to death's door, is the 
victim of the peculiar occurrence. How 
j he received his injuries, which almost 
caused his death, and where he spent 
, about forty-five minutes of the noon 
I hour o«e week ago today, are the facts 
i the police have been trying to learn 
during the past two or three days. 
They have learned absolutely nothing, 
except that last Tuesday, Johnson van- 
I ished from the corner of Lake avenue 
and Superior street shortly after 12 
I o'clock and reappeared there, bloody 
! and dazed about 1 o'clock. 
} His Str»u«e Stwy. 

! The story of the peculiar happening 
as told by Chief Troyer this morning, 
is one to completely mystify the inves- 
tigators. The police have looked at it 
from every angle. They have inter- 
viewed every known person, who saw 
Johnson on the day in question. They 
have considered every contingency, ev- 
ery po.>isibility. which might give them 
the key to the puzzle, but they admit 
that without further developments, 
they can find no solution. Robbery 
wasn't the motive, if the injuries were 
inflicted by human hands. Johnson had 
$45 In his pocket, when he lost con- 
sciousness and every cent of the money 
was intact, when he again secured par- 
tial use of his clouded faculties. 

One week ago today Johnson w«j 
employed on a buihling at Third ave- 
nue east and Second street. About 11 
o'clock In the morning h« left the 



building to g«o to Bunker's lumber of- i 
fice oil the comer fJf Lake avenue and i 
Buchanan street, for some small p'ieced 
of finishing lumber, with which to com- 
plete the job. on- which he was em- 
ployed. For over an hour his move- 
ments have been clearly traced. 

He arrived at Bunker's, buit some of 
the lumber he wantjed was not on hand 
and hf was given 9 note to Radford's, 
at 112 East Michigan street. He called 
the-re just ab.jut iv>on, secured the lum- 
ber he wanted and went from there to 
John LandaJil's saloon at 107 East Su- 
perior street. At Landahl's he had a 
drink and signified his intention of go- 
ing to one of the res-taurants on the 
}3owery to take dinner. Landahl was 
ju.st about to go to dinner and he left 
the saloon with John.so. Landahl turned 
east and he saw Johnson proceed west 
along Superior street. 

.\t Lake avenue arvd Superior street 

Johiuson met Ivor Wisted. an old fri.md. 

and they stopi)ed for a moment while 

Johnson agreed to do .lome carpenter 

work which Wfcsted desured. On Jtrfin- 

son's suggestion, they went into Jim 

Wolford's saloon at 1 We^t Superior 

street and had a drink. Johnson pay- 

t ing for it. On^ drink was all they had. 

[They left the sakvon together and 

Wisted. who was about to tak-e a car 

I for the East end, had to hurry across 

I the street to take a car, which was 

! just stopping. Wisted l+^ft Johnson 

standing on the comer. Johnson re- 

Tnemben-^ Wisted leaving him. and there 

the trail ends. 

.Jii.<*t l>tsapp«^nr<»<l. 

Johnson disappeared from the face of 
the earth, as far as any human being, 
who has yet spoken up. knows. He 
didn't know that anything struck him. 
he doesn't know that he fainted, he 
doesn't knok anything but that his 



FANCY COMBS 



Our great 
.specialty. 
iThe kind 
that fit and 

\v>-ar well. 
Latest fancy 
mounted. 

i.'weled, 
French bril- 
liant studd- 
i*d; plain or 
carved; shell 
and amber 
back. 

Chignon and 
side combs 
la very 
dainty and 
tasty pat- 
terns. 
7&C. Sl.CO and 




Sppcial values at SOc 
up to J20.00. 



MISS HORRIGAN. 

OVER GlDPINlLiS STORE. 

(Take Elevator.) 



mind became a blank and whatever 
may have happened later was without 
his comprehension. For all he knowa li .' 
vanished Into tliin air. 

Pnjbably forty-five minutes latei 
Johnson came to himself after a 
fashion. He found himself at the cor- 
ner of Lake avenue and Superior 
street, just where he had left Wist;^d. 
His head was beating furiously, his 
face was covered vi ith blood and hib 
steps were shaky and uncertain. He 
wasn't drunk, but was dazed as by a 
blow. Scarcely knowing what he was 
doing, he made his way to Landanls 
saloon, over a block away, and en- 
tered. Landahl had already returned 
from dinner and he was surprised to 
see the man, whom he had left but a 
short time ago. entering the saloon in 
an almost helpless condition. 

Landahl assisted Johnson in cleaning 
j his face of the blood and then sent him 
on his way. Johnson was able to walk 
1 home, where he told his wife the same 
j story he had told Landahl. with but 
' few variations. He was able to ac- 
count for all of his movements, for the 
I number of drinks he had and every 
I other incident of the day up to the 
time he came out of the saloon with 
Wisted. Everything el.se was blank, 
until he recovered his sen.ses partially 
at that orner some time later. 

The first physician, who was cailei 
to attend the injured man, couldn't 
find anything wrong with him. except 
a few cuts and bruises about his hvjad. 
There was no fracture of the skull, 
and it was thought the dazed condition 
would pass away, as the effect of a 
blow. But in a few days he began to 
grow worse and another pViysician was 
called. He sent Johnson to St. Luke's 
hospital and performed an operation. 
Although the skull was intact, about 
half a pint of watery fluid was ex- 
' tracted from under it. 

Conditon Serlou'^. 
The man was in a precarious condi- 
tion for a few days, but he is now rap- 
idly on the road to recovery and is evi- 
dently in almost normal mental condi- 
tion. His story, however, is identical 
with what it was immediately follow- 
ing the occurrence and can throw no 
further light on the complicated situa- 
tion. . , 
At first the matter was not reported 
to the police, but when the operation 
disclosed just how serious Johnson's in- 
juries were. Chief Troyer was notified. 
That was Sunday and for two days a 
thorough search has been made for 
clues, without result. The entire dis- 
trict from Second avenue east to tne 
ends of the Bowery has been traveled. 
but nobody can be found, who saw 
J.,hn.-on. or anybody of his description 
between the time Wisted left him la.st 
Tuesday noon and the time he again 
regained con.sciousness. 

The possibilities that he might nav^ 
struck by a wagon or street car, while 
attempting to cross the street have 
been considered, but he doesn t le- 
member stepping off of the silewalk 
Tn event of his being .so injured, the 
most natural proceeding for those a.-.- 
sisimg him would be to ring for h^^ 
ambulance. No accident of me kind 
have been reported to the street rail- 
way company, nor was anybody carried 
Tn^o any business place at that corner 
at the time in question. 

A^ It has turned out, Johnson will 
recover and the caae may be dropped. 



But the narrow escape fn^m death, 
which he had. put a serious aspect on 
the ca:?e for a few days and tiit mys- 
terious circumstances are just as pe- 
culiar and mystifying. 

This is the season of decay and weak- 
en-d vitality; goid health is hard to 
retain. If you'd retain yours, fortify 
>.>ur system with Hollister's Rocky 
Mountain . Tea. the surest way. 33 
cents. Tea or Tablets. Ask your drug- 
g-i.«». 



NOTICE! 

First regular meeting of the 

HC'EN!»ED TIGMEIV'S PHOTKCTIVK 

ASSOCIATION 

Will meet Friday evening. Deo. aoth. at 
the Labor World office. 

C.\FT. MARTIN COLE, Pre«. 



NEW SHOP 

Tin, .Sheet Iron and <'orper W.»rk a 
specialty. Estimates furnished on steel 
ceilings, brick siding and corrugated 
iron rooting (all kinds). Prices i^eason- 
able. 

H.\RRY POI'KIV. 
18 eth Ave. W. \>»v 'I'hone 1K."5I-X. 



son; chief messenger. J. H. Schrader; 
Junior messenger. Victor Joiinsoii; Ian 
keeper. Josepii Miller; centurion and 
watehman. Dave Belden; treasurer. 
Fred IJritts; organist, R. Johnson; 
tru.-<tet».s. A. A. Farrlngton and A. Lof- 
gren; delegates to grand council at 
Minneapolis that meets in March. Joe 
Nelson Oscar Anderson. R. Johnson, 
jjaek Hulquist and C.us Hulquist: alter- 
nates C. E Dice. Joe Miller. J. Olson, 
Otto Johnson and Capt. A. Farrlngtoa. 
, A smoker was enjoyed after the elec- 
tion. 



«% 



i SAMARITANS ELECT. 

I 

I Beta council. Modern .Samaritans, held 
i their annual election last night and 
I elected the following officers for 1908: 
^Good Samaritan, Gus M. Hulqiiist; vice 
'good Samaritan. Joseph Olson; past 
I good Samaritan. Chris Anderson; scribe, 
i Joe Miller; financial scribe. R. Johnson; 
high priest, W. W. Allen; levito, J. Ol- 



Solid Gold 

And high grade gold filled lockets. A 
beautiful assortment. Our prices are 
right. M. Henricksen Jewelry com- 
pany. 

$25 Suits and Overcoats $16.75 

At the Fitwell Clothing Parlors' an- 
niversary sale. Store open evenings tlU 
Christmas. 








Holiday Buyers Would Do 
Well to Examine Our Full 
Line ol the Following Goods 
Suitable tor Christmas Gifts. 

Toboggans, Skis, Skates and Sleighs 
for Boys and Girls. Hockey Sticks, Pocket 
Cutlery, Carving Sets, and also the famous 
Safety Razors of all makes. 

See our line before buying. 






Duluth Hdw. Co 



rdi 




-4 



iiilll 



'^r'^ar 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17. 1907. 



RAW FROM m 

I 





With Eczema— When Indoors, Itch- 
ing IWas Fearful — Prescription 
pid No Good — Followed Friend's 
Advice and Found Speedy Relief. 

I 9 

A PERFECT CURE BY USE 
OF CUTICURA REMEDIES 



**I was raw from my shoulders down 
to my feet. As soon as I went into a 
warm room I could not stand the itch- 
ing sensation. I tried several remedies 
with no relief, and I consulted a doctor 
^ho told me that I had eczema and 
fave me a box of ointment. I used it 
about two ■weeks and got no benefit. I j,j,j,j, 

then tried another ointment with the i w^***''^fi*WMf '^- IWf'ft?'^#*'Sf'#^?^^ 
Muue result. Then I was advised to ' S 



SEHLE ON 
SALARIES 

Report of Finance Com- 
mittee, With Amendents, 
is Adopted. 

Council Takes No Action 

on Revocation of 

licenses. 



try the Cutieura Remedies. I got a 
caike of Cutieura Soap, a box of Cuti- 
eura Ointment and a bottle of Cutieura 
gesolvent and commenced to use them, 
y the time I had usetl about half of 
•ach of them I could see an improve- 
ment. After that I continued to use 
them until I had used four cakes of 
Soap, three large boxes of Ointment, 
•nd two large bottles of Resolvent in 
four or five weeks' time. At the end 

{)t this period, my skin was as clear as 
t coukl be. It is now three or tout 
years since I used them and I wish to 
State tl:at the Cutieura Remedies are 
the greatest in %he world not only for 
eczema but for female trouble, from 
Which my wife has been a sufferer for 
years. Cutieura Remedies, used in 
connection with one of the Cutieura 
fyrinRes have done wonders for her. 
Fred K. Baker. It Grotto St., Water- 
Vliet. N. v.. Nov. 30, *0G,andJan.20,'U7." 



THE cor VCIL PROCEEDINGS 



CUTICURA 

The Great 5kin Cure and Purest 
and Sweetest of Emollients. 

A single anointing with Cutieura Oint- 
ment, preceded by a hot bath with Cuti- 
eura Soap, and followed in the severer 
cases by a dose of Cutieura Pills, is often 
■ufficieht to afYord immediate relief in 
the most distressing forms of torturing, 
disfiguring, itching, burning, and scaly 
humors, et^eraas. rashes, and irritations, 
permit re.st and sleep, an<l point to a 
ifxKiv- rure, in the majority of cases, 
when ail else fails. 

Cutinira Kprai»<1ips are sold tbrouRbflnt the world. 
Ci' utiriir» OliitniPiit (50c.) t uti- 

e»r lor In the form ct Choool.iti 

CtJii..-. . -, - . ,.. . vlai i.f r.Oi. Potter Drug a 
Cbeni I I :;> . .-^tiU- Prr.!'s., lesion. Mass 

mr Uaiied tree. CuUcura Book on Hkia DlseMca 



* 



Report of niiau(*c conunJttee 
on saliiry I'lulget for next year Is 
fiiinlly ado ited. 

Action on revocation of license 
of Joseph Rums iM)stpone<l for 
one week to secure more wit- 
n<'sses. Action against Joseph 
Koziarek dropped. 

I^ourd oi' public work.s direct- 
ed to continue coufirniatlon of 
assessnieiii for Forty-ninth ave- 
nue sewei' two weeks from 
Dec. 20, 

Ordinani'c pa.sscd providing 
for tlie Is-iuaiic*' of certificates 
of l>on<led lndebte<lne.ss a^ain.st 
the as.<<essinent for the sinkiiif; 
fund next year, for the retirhig 
of bonds. 

First rtadinf; of ordinance 
chnn^ing name of Go«iuold 
street to Itoosevelt street. 

\\ater iiud llglit conunlsslon 
reiMirts prog^vss in construction 
of water and g:as sygtem on 
HilLsdalc, with notice that water 
and Kas m >uld be turned on in 
it almost i nunediately. 



* 



AN ECCENTRIC 

MILLIONAIRE D1E8, 



Pomprvnic. Mass . Dfc 17.— Benjamin 

Hi'!'' 1 eccentric nijlllnna-ir*- dieil in 

Ills home In East .Somer\ il'e >■ 
of old agP. He u.-i?-- 90 y. .i!>- c, ■. una 
never \va.s inarri«-.l. He wa." i.orn in 
Uomfcrvlllt and it is «ai(i Uuu only on 
^' ' " '^ ■ ' , •..,.■ r irtlier than 

' :;m that he 

3 Kiiiil <.f urbanization, 

J- ■ ■ - ■ ■ - :•-■ ;n-~^urc<.l. lu-. »'r pur- 

ehiised a ticket for any sen .tcr- 

tainm.iif npver ate a meal ,.. ., Hotel 

or I nt. and did not spend more 
thn ..... ,i..i;ar ■■■ '■■■: r---.- .<fe foj. p^^j.. 

fare. Hf li f,,r forty 

years. He w..:, ,i ...lar and necktlo 
«nly on si.ei'iai occa^iuns. 



:*Iu-(ular Pain Cured, 

"Purintr the summer of 1903 I 

was trcubN '' ^^ifh niupcular pains in 
the in.'^tt-i- f... t."" t^avs .Mr. S 

Fedlar ■ • ■ .to. . .nt. 'At limes 

It was litifui I could hardly 

walk • n::i!i«it-riain .s Pain Balm was 
recommended to me, so I tried it and 
'W'^ ■ ■ ly cured by one i?mall 

t ve since recommended 

It ' "f mv friends, all of 

wh(. liiKhly of It." For 

sale h\ ail drug,<i.<t.s. 




Can You? 



Add of these 

niimbeib aiiU tiave for 
tile result twenty-ono 
<:ii? If so. call and pet 
tweiity-fUe {S>> luc Cl- 
ears free. 

Xmns ••jpars, special Vrands by the 
box. Plpis. 20 IVr tent Off. 

BLACKWOOD BROS. 

TU O STOHKS. 

27 and 'M'> \\ «-hI «ii|Mrior Mrect, 



F. H 

L.K, 

rrovtde 


J^HBfcSliiliiiMB ^^ r«Ai 

Kanisni ol Trijli E.\i .insicri Loi 
f..t Lti!;:. r-. Siuiie and Strong 

. LOUIVSBERRY & 

Printers and Binders. 

«t Le.it 1 't ■ ■ ,(i .Suppi 
iic« BuUding. B«lh P 


■ie 

CO. 

ics. 



Pure Food 
Liquor Store 

102 Lake Avenue South, 

Is wliore you wntit to get j'C'iir 
holulay wines and liquors. We 
deliver t'v any part of the city, 
or we will prepay expre>>s for 
out-of-town patrons. 

HENRY GASMIRy 

PROPRIETOR. 

Zenith 'phone 311-A. 




ICs a Hard Eiample 

! ealize how cheap- 
ly you might h a-v e 
protected that jewelry 
and those papers after 
a fire ur theft. 

Safes $10 and Upwards 



iKELCE'lQHARDWAREGj), 



********* ?**************** 

After fumithlng the aldexmen with 
a subject of lisoussion for three suc- 
ccwSi-ive meetiags, the report of the 
fin.i.nct> comriilttee, fixing the salary 
a pi>ix>p nation.*, for th« diffcren.t city de- 
pai-tments. wa-s atlopted last night. An- 
other spirited discussion, continuing al- 
most aa hour, pu*ecetled the action 
adopting the eport, and for a time it 
l<x>ked as though the aldermen would 
ag\iin throw he:ms^l\-ea into the mire 
'f tangled ainendments and flounder 
helplessly, as they did last week. The 
i plan of taking up each amendment sep« 
I arately was adopted, however, and 
everything wi tit smoothly. 
I In taking i p the report, Alderman 
Haven again brought out liis amend- 
ment, which ivas laid over from last 
we^k. It was in the nature of a supphx 
imentary report from the tlnance com- 
mit te<\ ».>me of the items having been 

nittcd from the original report by 
- versight. It provided for an Increase 
of $6.0lKt In tile original recommenda- 
tion fcT the water and light depart- 
ment; an Incj?ase of $1,500 in the city 
attorney's office; small Increases for 
s<jme of the nemb^Ts of the Are de- 
partment, and the tLxing of the salaries 
of telephiwie opersi-tors in the police 
department a; $75 a month for first 
grade ajid 170 for second grade. 

After somio discussion. Alderman 
Haven's amondnient was adopted and 
the aldermen aunched in on a discus- 
sion over the increase of $300 a year 
In ihe assessor's office. Alderman Ken- 
nenly led the fight against the item, 
■holding that the clerks and comptrol- 
ler's t»ffipe.s are on the same plane as 
the iu«i»?>ssor's ■►fflce; their salaries come 
out of the Si. me fund, and that the 
first and s^.-ccn d deputies In the asses- 
sor's oflloe should not be increased, and 
the deputies i 1 the other dei)artments 
entirely Ignon d. 

By an amenCmcTit. Alderman Foubis- 
ttT attempted o have the $300 switched 
Into the spccl.iJ deputy fund, but the 
am€-nument wis voted down. Alder- 
men Wilson. Moore, Flldatrault and 
McEwen tiwk lart in the warm discus- 
eion. but it al! ended by the commit- 
tee's rt.pi:>rt, a-nendjnent by Alderman 
Havjn'a am.'nd.me-nt and the substitu- 
tion of $115 for $120. as. the salary of 
the second asistont chief of the flre 
department, bt ing adopted. 

• * • 

Joseph Kazij rek, 111 First avenue 
west, had a rather uneasy session on 
the carpet, while the council made up 
j its mind, as ti< whether or not his li- 
cense should be revoked, he having 
I been convictee of keeping his saloon 
jojen after hours about two weeks ago. 
Kaziarek told a plausible story, witJi 
evident sincerity. He said he had re- 
peatedly given his bartender orders to 
I close the saloo 1 promptly at 12 o'clock, 
and presumed hat he was doing it reg.! 
ulurly. Offlcei Westerlund said that 
on the night i 1 question, he found the 
bartender in tlie place with eight men. 
He supposed at the time the bartender 
was Kaziarek ind the warrant was is- 
sued for the proprietor, who pleaded 
guilty and pai.l « fine. 

Kaziarek said he had dismissed the 
bartender soon after the occurrence 
and regretted it exceedingly. He has 
I been in business for about twelve years 
[at the same location, had never been 
t arrested befon and no complaints had 
been made to the police of his case. 
Aldermn McE ven took up jhe cudgel 
for Kaziarek. vho, he said, was an old 
schoolmate away back in the eighties 
and, as Kaziirek was evidently sin- 
cere in his des re to adhere to the pro- 
visions of the law. Alderman Moore 
dropped the prshlng of the case and it 
went by the I oard. 

The case of Joseph Burns was also 
up for consid« ration. Attorney Alex- 
ander Marsha 1 represented him and 
presented affid ivits, which showed that 
the man. who informed the police of 
the place being open, had received a 
drink from the bartender and it was 
served in the home of Burns, in the 
rear of the sal x>n, against Burns' ord- 
ers. Burns U deaf and can neither 
read nor write and he stated in his af- 
fidavit that, wlien he pleaded guilty and 
paid his fine, he thought it was for 
selling liquor Aithout a license. 

Chief Troyer told of the man calling 
on him and giving him the informa- 
tion against Burns. The case was put 
over for a we« k, in order that the wit- 
nesses may be brought before the coun- 
cil to tell thei stories. 

• • • 

A resolution was presented from 
people living and owning property on 
Gosnold street West Duluth, request- 
ing that the name of the street be 

; changed to Rcosevelt .street. An or- 
dinance, provl.ling for the change, was 

I Introduced and sent on its first read- 

;lnK. 

• « « 

Pilchard Little offeretl to supply all 
the boxes necessary for the depositing 
of waste paiK-r at the street corners in 
the business <listrict, if the council 
would grant 1 im the exclusive privi- 
lege for ten years. 

• • • 

City Enginee ' McGilvray prsented an 
estimate of $7,760.55 as the cost of an 



Moored 
Stovi 



107 WEST SUPERIOR 
STREET. 




JIII2 



WE TRUST THE PEOPLE 



TWO STORES— BOTH 'PHONES j '%Vb%{oT 



32 WEST 
STREET. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE 

CHRISTMAS STOCKING 

Will be found at our TWO STORES in abundance. There is a growing 
tendency more and more each year to give useful presents and it is more 
pronounced this year than ever before. In useful presents FURNITURE 
takes the lead over all other presents and this store takes the lead over all 
other stores by supplying the new up-to-date Furniture of a better quality 
and at a lower price than any other store. 

A .PARTIAL LIST OF USEFUL PRESENTS 



Cfi 



:z 



DINING TABLES. LIBRARY TABLES. 
SIDEBOARDS. BUFFETS. CHINA CLOSETS. MORRIS CHAIRS. 
ROCKERS. LEATHER COUCHES. BRASS BEDS. DRESSERS. 
LEATHER ROCKERS. DRESSING TABLES. 
CHIFFONIERS. MAHOGANY BEDS. A NEW RANGE. 
A NEW KITCHEN CABINET. CHINAWARE, SILVERWARE, Etc. 

STORE OPEN EVERY EVENING THIS WEEK 



i»k% 



:Ui 



m^jiism'^*^^ 



1 



Stoves 
Ahnya 
Hmm 



A 

$12.50 
MORRIS 
CHAIR EX. 
ACTLY LIKE 
CUT, ONLY $T.T5 




m/Hw*. 



Tins CARVING SET $2.95 



Here's an Ideal Christmas gift for the "Folks-at-home." This 
Carving Set complete, as you see it, packed In a nice leatherette 
box, satin lined, fine quality of material, silver mountings — a pres- 
ent that will make any woman's heart glad. At this price it is 
one of the best values ever offered in the city — 
special for 



$2.95 



A 

NEW 

"ELWELL" 

KITCHEN 

CABINET 

FOR CHRISTMAS 







This chair Is made of finest 
Quartered-sawed oak — frames 
finely polished and finished. 
Choice of best imitation leather 
cushions, as In cut, or rever- 
Bible velofur cushions In reds 
and greens, back 
adjusts to four dif- 
ferent positions; a 
chair you positively 
cannot equal at 
112.50 elsewhere. 

Special Christmas 
Bale price 



sr.rs 



LEATHER FURNITURE 




of Leather Couches and Chairs. 



makes the most 

ideal Christmas 
gifts. What a 
handsome addi- 
tion to any home 
Is a nice Leather 
Couch, a com- 
fortable Turkish 
Leather Rocker 
or Chair! We 

want you to seo 
our elegant line 



Fine Leather Couch at $25 



feet. 



Here's a value we want you to see. This Couch Is 

made with a fine quarter-sawed oak frame, with claw 

all steel spring construction, upholstered in GKX- 

LH^THKR. Dont buy a "XO N.IME" Couch, 

\ when you can get this one at this price. Special $25.00. 



; nxE 



CHINA AT HALF-PRICE! 

Why not take advantage of this sale to get a pew 
Dinner Set for Christmas? We are closing out every piece 
of china in the house at HaJf Price, which affords you a fine 
opportunity. Note carefully these prices of 100-piece 

DINNER SETS 

$10.00 Sets $5.0 
$12.00 Sets $6.00 
$13.50 Sets $6 .75 
$15.00 Sets $7.50 
$20.00 Sets $10.00 
$36.00 Sets $18.00 

A $15.00 SIDEBOARD $9.r5 

Here again we make Christ- 
mas buying easy. A hand- 
some, large, elegant Side- 
board In finest Imperial 
Quarter-sawed Oak, French 
bevel plate glass. Best 
value in Duluth at $15.00. 
Special $9.75 

NOTE THESE PRICES: 

$18.00 .Sideboards $12.75 




The greatest gift to a man is employment. The 
greatest gift to a woman Is an "ELWELL." In fact, 
an "Elwell" is a gift to the entire household, as every 
member of the 
family shares In the 
benefits of an "El- 
well" In the home. 
Be sure to see our 
line of Kitchen Cab- 
inets, priced from 



$24.50 


SidelK>ards . 


, . .$18.75 


$27.50 


Sideboards , 


...$21.75 


$29.50 


Sideboards . 


. . .$23.75 


$30.50 


Sidebaard<} . 


...$27.50 


$45.00 


Sideboards . 


...$33.75 


$59.50 


Sideboards , 


...$43.75 




$5.?5 



UP 




A MOORE'S 



Should be in your kitchen to 
cook your Christmas dinner 
on without fail. We have 
them all ready to deliver on 
short notice. Then, too, If 
you have an old stove to dis- 
pose of. 



WE TAKE 
BACK YOUR 
OLD STOVE 

as part payment on 
"MOORE'S" Range in 
house, and will allow 
full cash value for it. 
balance you can arrange 
pay at 



5TEEL 
RANGE 



$1 A WEEK 




extension of the Woodland park sewer 
system on St. Marie street to Wood- 
land avenue, and the construction of 

septic tanks. 

• • • 



tlon of taxes for the sinking fund for 
1908. for tht retiring of old bonds. 

• • • 

The board of public works was di- 



Btructlon of the reservoir main from 
Ninth street to Fourteenth street, and 
the erection of the tanks, will be laid 
over until the season of 1908. Water 



rected to extend the time for the con- 1 and gas will be turned on almost im- 
An ordinance was passed providing flrmatlon of the assessment for tij©' mediately in the pipes that are laid. 



for the issuance, framing and sale 
$5T,fKH) of certificates of bonded 



debtedness in anticipation of the collec- 



of Forty-ninth avenue Sewer two 
lu- from Dec. 20. 






weeks the head of water being deriver from 
the Normal system, which has a head 
of 485 feet. Until the completion of 
A communication was received from | the reservoir pipes and tanlcs, which 
; the water and light department, sum- 1 will give a head of 550 feet, the head 
MORNING HEADACHE* ima^izlng the work dot*. In the exten- ! of the Normal system will be given 

jslon of the system, ihrtjughh the con- and will supply all within its scope, 

jstruction of the hllslde.''s>-stem during i or all of those pipes already laid. 
' the past season. The commission re- | ,— __^—.— ^-i^^..^-^__^— ^—^ 
ported that all lined ©f the hillside ad- 
dition have been conapl'rted, including 



A I'nlTrrMiil Remedy for ■ Common 
Mnlatly. 



Sixth, Seventh and Fifth streets, be- 

fh« ui,,A ti,„-. ^^..^. -», ,1,^^^^^" Fifteenth avenue tast and Thlr- 

tne Klna tlint conies Phorlly .^i,^,,.!, „,,„_,,^ „.„ . ' j' _ii .i. i- 
after arising. Women especially are^^"^^ avenue west. and. all other Imcs 
liable to suffer from attaeks which : ^.^^^ ^^ ^.^''^ avenue l|ave been com- 
sometlines last an entire day. if the P'^^^". with the exception of the fol- 
proper remedy is not at hand. Many lowing: Ninth street, I^ke to Second 
will be glad to know that Beechams , avenues west; Second avenue west, | blood. Improve the' complexion and' pre 

.K ■- HyJ^^i^'h*^"""^ i^*^, "^''"^ '°^T•'' o' Seventh to Fifth streets; Sixth street, vent the fo " " - 

th«se headaches, which are usually an Second to Third Bw.«iie\v«. 
indication of stomach or liver disorder. ; „fiLlt 'r2r,tK f^ V^YL ?k 
Headache, biliousness, sallow skin, con- I "'^^®*'^*"*" *** Thirteenth avenues 
stipatlon and all digestive derange- I ^'^^t; Third street, Eighth to Elevenih 



The most distressing form of head 
ache Is 



The beauty of 



be:a.vty. 

a slender form Is the 



desire of every woman. If you are too 
stout, there is a simple home remedy 
which you can procure at any drug store 
for a small cost, and it will rapidly and 
harmlessly reduce your flesh, purify Iho 



th street, ' vent the formation of wrinkles. Get one- 



ments disappear after a few doses of i avenues west. 
Beecham" ' 



sapi 
■ P 



Ills, 



I This work, together with the con- 



Fourth ' ^*lf ounce Marmola. one-half ounce 
' Fluid Extract Cascara Aromatic, three 
and one-half ounces Syrup Simplex. Mix 
these together at home if you wish and 
take one teaspoonful after meals and at 
bedtime. 



A TREASONABLE 
ORGANIZATION 

Is Western Federation of 
Miners, Say Mine Own- 
ers of Goldfield. 

Goldfleld, Dec. 17.— The Goldfield idlne 
Owners' association yesterday submitted 
a statement to the commission that Presi- 
dent Roosevelt nas sent to Goldfleld, 
which declares that the Western Federa- 
tion of Miners Is not a labor organization, 
but a combination in restraint of trade; 
that It Is. In fact, a treasonable organiza- 
tion, and in the statement are quotations ] members of the Western Federation o 
from the preajnble, constitution and by- i Miners arrived yesterday at noon fro 
laws of the Western Federation of Miners " •- • 
in support Of the contention. This state- 
ment has been officially read by the com- 
mission and certain parts will be con- 



sidered later. Yesterday was spent by 
the commissictfi in going over the Infor- 
mation obtained by Gen. Funston and 
Governor Sparks. 

Gen. Funston and Governor Sparks will 
leave Goldfield Wednesday morning Gen. 
Funston to return to San Francisco and 
Governor Sparks to go to his ranch t5 
recuperate. 

Last night President McKlnnon of the 
Goldfleld Miners" union was called before 
the commission and asked to give hla 
version of the trouble. No intimation of 
what passed during the session Is given 
out. but after the meeting it was learned 
that President McKlnnon stated to the 
members of the commission that the 
members of the Western Federation of 
Miners have been peaceably inclined at 
all times, and declared that no necessity 
has existed for the presence of federal 
troops. He has promised to prepare a 
comprehensive statement of the Wester© 
Federation side of the controversy, to h4 
considered later. 

The first Installment of any consider* 
able number of men from other minin* 
districts to take the places of the strikinS 



California. The men, to the number of 
thirty, were taken to the camp of th« 
Consolidated mines. No demonstration 
was made. 



t 

.4..,. 



.. I. ..II, f 





' W ' 





^ * — ^ ■■ IP ■ ■ ■ ■PT^ 



i'»— ■ > '^' 



-■ " ^1 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1907. 



THE EVENING HERALD 

AN INDKPKXDENT NKWSPAPKR. 



Publlslied at Herald Bldg.. First St.. Op P. O. Square. 
THE HER-\LD COMPANY. 

•Phoneii: Countlnic Room. 324; Editorial R ooma. 112 6. 



TEN CENTS A WEEK 

EVEKY EVENING — DELIVERED BY CARRn^:R 



daily. 



Cinglt^ <"*»py. 

One month 

Thref raonths (In advance) 
Six months (In advance).. 

One >ear (tn advance)... 

Entered at Duluth Po»tofflce as Second-Class Matter, 



.09 

.45 

1.3U 

2.(>0 

5.00 



a good deal of 
it has taken .i 
victory is final 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD. 



per >■• ir 

ftix ni<)nth8. . . . 
Three months. 



.$1.00 
.50 
^5 



LARGEST CIRCULATION IN DULUTH 



paper 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 
It is Important when desiring the address of your 
hanged to give both old and new addresses. 



»t 



"KEEP THE POT BOILING. 

The Christmas shopping croud,, the^c crisp winter 
days, hurry along the streets bent upon their 
erran 1>. and as they go they pass, at frequent 
«pcci . Ic ihat should excite their interest. 

.\t !:k- edge of the sidewalk is a tripod, from which 
depends i ^mall ir^ni kettle. Near it, moving about 
keep warm, a a man ..r a woman wearing the red 
of the Salvation Army .ui the military cap or sober poke 

bonnet. 

Tluit •-;H-ctacle is intended to attract your 
your atlciuion and your generosity, 
furni-h a means whereby you 

•iblc : >r kjivmg the ix-'jr a3 merry a Christnia-, as you 
expect lo have in yo-tr .>wn 

Yoi: haven't time, perhaps. 



pleasant 
intervals, a 



to 
ribbon 



mtcrcst, 

It is intended to 

can make yourself rcspon- 

mcrry 

lioine. 

to go out looking 



t. the legality of scalping, but to find out whether a pcr- 
n ament general injunction could not be had. The state 
supreme court held that an injunction could be issued, 
a id the federal supreme court has upheld this decision. 

The decision is that a nontransferable ticket is the 
p -operty of the purchaser only. The ticket scalper has 
d sappeared from the face of the business world, and so 
It ng as the laws remain as they are he will not reappear. 

The railroads always resented the ticket-scalping 
b isiness very bitterly. They have spent 
n oney to drive it out of existence, and 
li ng time to do it. Now, however, their 
a ul complete. 

It is nevertheless true that many laymen never could 
u iderstand just what right a railroad had to limit the 
I'ic of a railroad ticket to the original purchaser. Hav- 
ii g sold the ticket, and received the price it asked for it, 
nany believed that it should not make any diflferencc to 
the railroad whether it was used by the person that 
bxtght it or by somebody else. It represented a ride 
a lyway. and the cost of carrying the passenger was the 
s ime no matter whether that passenger was the orig- 
iital purchaser or another. It was felt by such people 
that it would be as sensible for a milkman to refuse to 
r .cognize milk tickets except from original purchasers. 
However, since through scalper^ people often got re- 
duced rates when they would have had to pay full rates 
t'» the railroads, especially on the return coupons of 
r )und-trip tickets, the practice did lose them money, 
V liich is reason enough to account for their opposition 
t > the practice. 



HOTEC tiOSSlP. 




warring 
siand a 



for the 

see that they are not 

Christmas cheer. Per- 

-lender that you could 



Chri-tuias, even 



tUKl 



(1«> 



homes oi the poor, m order to 
overl tokcd m the di-inbution of 
baps, too, your own means are -,. 
not r'l'up :i poor family with a merry 
though your disp<)>ition is the best. 

The Salvation Army folk have time tn 
That !, part of their business. .\nd n 
■hare, and the rot 't us do n-,r^, their 
ample I'l bnnt,' good cheer for one day at least into the 
homes where the gaunt wolf sits at the door, 
keep the p"t boiling. 
hurry that you haven't time to dig 
into the pocket where you keep 
Yi>u can surely find something there 
'.! he!i>; for the Salvation .Army folk will tell you 



the 
yon 
means 



poor. 

}-our 

will be 



somber homes 

So d 'n"t forget to 

D >t:'t he ;••! such a 
a g''i\ •! hand down 
your spare change. 
that vvi 

that every little bit added to what they've got, makes a 
little bit more." Your dime, and the dimes of nine 
others, make a dollar. Your dollar, added to the dollars 
of a few others, will make some poor home bright and 
happy and warm on Christmas day, provide a' 
mas hnncr, and enable Santa Claus to 
little ones. 

K.- . 

used; you may depend upon 



THE CRUISING SQUADRON. 

The heart of every American must thrill with pride 
as he pictures in his imagination the ituposing spectacle 
presented by the sixteen handsome battleships of Ad- 
miral Kvans* white squadron as it is starting on its 
voyage of 14,000 miles to the western coast of the United 
States. Armed cap-a-pie, bristling with formidable black 
gun muzzle, clean as a whistle and tU for "feast, fight or 
frolic,'" the squadron started on schedule time yesterday, 
and the best wishes of eighty millions of Americans went 
v.ilh it. 

It will never come back. 

That is, some of the battleships composing the squad- 
return to the Atlantic coast, but it is a safe 
that never again, after the big guns fire their 
in front of the Golden Gate, will the Pacific 
as nearly unprotected as it is today. It is a 
and it involves no hint or threat of war, 
knows that its possessions in the western 



ron may 
assertion 
^ reetings 
I oast be 
{■ractice cruise, 
but the nation 



W. A. Gill. wh6tl»IM^ the St. L.ouls, has 
traversod nine states this fall, and in 
discussing the politteal situation, leans 
to the opinion that "In the event of the 
Democrats placiUjg ^ suitable candidate 
! in the field. one,.wlw can combine and 

harnioinse the conftlCLing and 

I elements of th« party, lliey 

I very good chance uf winning. 

; Uown In Ohio ttiey liave a regular poll- 

I Ileal kill of joy in the person ol Foraker. 

, says .Vir. McUill. Of course, this state 

' is a rock-iibbed Republican stronghold 

whfui it eonit»« ft li^ a national election, 

but the carryings on of this Foraker 

party have pigue^ uud .shoc^Kod the Ke- 

publicun maciiine uMii. The things he 

iias sajd about Tafl, make those German 

i farnurs down in the Buckeye state -stiako 

, iht'ir heads. They are certainly having 

I a polifical Jaml>oree down in little 

I old tjnio that renuncl.s one of the L.incoln- 

i Dougl.Ls debates in the early uays of 

j Illinois. 

i'lit-n Wisconsin has her favorite son. 
' sav.s the traveler. They have a lov^- for 
i l»oo l^a FoUftte, down in the Bj-dger 
I country, and they have never quite given 
up the idea of seeing the little politician 
1 In the Willie House. But at tlial. Mr. 
I MeGill gives it out at as his opinion that 
I a ct-rtain Democrat, who Is being Uiscus- 
, sed vt ry seriously at,, tlds time, and who 
' does not reside very far from ihKs city, 
i would cut a very big swath In the neign- 
borins state. It n.Hjuires the right man, 
I of course, and that man does not liappen 
to be William Jenning.s Bryan, he claims. 
1 Over In Missouri, of ci>urse. they are 
I Democrats day in and day out. Inelud- 
j Ing Sundays. But even in this old re- 
liable l>eraocratic stronglvold. according 
to th.> ixjiltical propht-t. they have not 
too much love tor Mr. BryaJi and his 
third time candidacy. U is nuue true 
that you have to show tho.se people from 
that slate, so thty want to be shown 
wliere William Jeimliigs possessed any 
mortgage on the party made famous by 
Tliomas Jefferson. They are sure true 
Democrats, says Mr. MeGlll. but when it 
conu's to being spunky, those people in- 
herit some of those qualities that have 
made the Mlss<juri mule not unju-sUy 
famous, or infani.jus. as the view point 
may happen to be. ,, 

In Iowa they, too have their favorite 
son. but the favorite son down in the corn 
belt Is not prominent enough to seriously 
count. Of cours". Iowa will swing into 
line as a staunch Republican stronghoUl. 
When Iowa goes Deaiocraiic. look -tor the 
millennium. 

over In Illinois the Rr«er Sullivan fac- 
tion of the state Democi-aiie committee Is 
daily rehearsing the anvil chorus act for 
II Trovatore. They aro swinging their 
sledges against William Jennings with a 
ghoulish glee that Is exceedingly mlrlhtul 
for the Republlcanji. The Roger 
vanlte.s don' I love Mr. Bryan any 
than the house cat loves the 
bull pup. says Mr. McGlll. and 
thing that they can do to 
success of his thlot" time 



Valley; A Putman, Minneapolis; A. P. 
GllUs, Power; R. H. Cameron, Hlbblng; 
B. Criggs, St. Paul; Miss Maud A. Ra- 
well. Fort CoUln.«i; Mrs. Bjorn Christian- 
sen. Aurora; Samuel Shapiro and wife. 
Milwaukee; Mrs. Austin Q. Johnson, Two 
Heurbors. 



THE WEATHEK. 




TWENTY YEARS AGO. 



Taken From the Columns of the Herald of This Date, 1887. 





'.fc.' 



erty 



between the Seaton & 
be generally fair tonight and ! claim and the Pioneer and 

shafts adjolningr Hartman's 
to Ely. 



Though the 
are dull and cloudy, 
though scanty snov/ 
sifts down, the tem- 
perature Is mild and 
bracing, ajid the 
colder weather has 
brought sple n d i d 
sleighing, it threat- 
ened snow all last 
night, and bega.n to 
snow a little this 
morning, but the 
weather man ex- 
pects It to - _ 

tomorrow, with tonight's temperature 
about 5 degs. above zero. L,ast night's 1 
lowest was 17 degs. and yesterday's high- . 
est was "25 degs. | 

A year ago today It was cold, the high- 
est temperature being 4 degs. below zero. 

The sun rose this morning at 7:49 and ! 
sets tonight at 4:::o. making 8 hours and 
31 minutes of sunlight. The sun is now ! 
sotting later each day. but it will con- i 
tlnue rising later for several weeks. ' 

Says Mr. Richardson of conditions: 
"The Arizona disturbances has advanced , 
Its center to Oklahoma. During the past ] 
twenty-four hours It was the cause of j 
warmer weather In the Lower Mississip- | 
pi Valley slates and rain or snow over , 
most districts lying between the »5th , 
and lloih meridans. The Western high 
pressure area has movt>d southward from j 
Alberta to Wyoming, attended by colder 
we.ither throughout the Northwest gen- 
erally, and in the extreme southwest. 
Zero temperatures prevail this morning In 
Wyoming and Lo the northward of the 
Oklahoma low pressure and the Wyoming 
high barometer areas will Ix' attended by 
generally fair weather in this locality to- 
night and Wednesday, and temperatures 
will be somewhai colder by Wednesday 
morning." 



•••Mrs. C. H. ClagRie has returned 
skies from a visit to Hudson, Wis., ac- 
companied by her sister. Miss Hall, who 
will spend the winter in Duluth. 



building an addition 27 
adding a third story. 



by 50 feet «ii4 



•♦•Paul Wood, who fell and fractured 
a bone in his leg a short time ago, is 
Improving rapidly and will soon be i^ut 
asain. 



j •••With a continuation of the present 
I superb weather in Duluth, lake ex- 
; curslons and moonlig-ht picnics may be 
, resumed. 



•♦•Chief 
partment 



Hathaway 
has moved 



•••Operations are to begin this 
on the Home Mining company's 



week I 

prop- I 

Merritt i 

Zenith ' 

additioi 



street engine 
there during 



house and 
the winter. 



of the Are d«»- 
to the Second 
will remain 



♦♦•Senator Truax of the contracting 
firm of J. S. Wolf & Co., says It has 
been clearly demonstrated that sewer 
work in Duluth can be done cheaper In 
winter than in summer. The necessity 
of cribbing in summer it a very nig 
item, and there are other advantag-^is 
in winter. 

♦♦♦It is reported that, pending the 
building of a line of Its own from .St. 
Paul to Omaha, the St. Paul & Du- 
luth road will form a combination witn 
one of the other lines and begin rua- 



'finc Christ- 
remember the 



I the pot boiling, 
money will be v\ell 



The 

to 
th.iit 



methods 

yoii in a 

they 



.1. 



Tu 

that. 

appeal 

ihovMi 

class w 

to say, 

them. 

not u 1 

for it^ 

•imp! 

to « 

Chn 

prov:.| ' 

clothe-- 

little ->: 

it were 

dnl!ar> 

Salvatiniisti. 

"InaMuuch as ye 
did it not to me." 
Ki p thu- pot boi 



of the Salvation Army may not 

religious way, but experience has 

are the most effective in reaching the 

h the Salvation Army labors among while, sad 

of the rich churches never reach down to 

s a vast amount <>f good. It will 

, ,r :^e it in providing rich living 

wan; >rs content themselves with 



< -cean are not now properly guarded, and it is not to be 
i xpccted that after making its visit the entire squadron 
^vill turn about and sail back the way it came. Perhaps 
the friends of a big navy will see to it that new vessels 
: re built for the Atlantic squadron, for so long as the 
norld powers continue the anachronism of war, this 
I ountry should be well equipped with war implements. 

Here's good luck to the fleet. May it never have to 
lire a shot except in practice or friendly saliUe, but if the 
teal business of war should ever come, may it fight in a 
just cause and may victory perch upon its banners. 



They 
for the 
may be that they 
emblem of peace 
the elephant has 
lied to the start- 
of the country's 



many 
The i\rmy 

.: <• > >'.ir in m; 
..Idlers. It 

-.;, and every cent ->t their surplus is devoted 

, , ( )ne of their finest institutions is this 

ti- i> p.t which they expect yn\ to keep boiling. It 

I , Chn-,tnia> dinners and coal and wo-,>d and 

md dolls and hooks for the poor, for hordes of 

s uliotn S:int.i Claus wouM never hear about if 

n.>t for thi.. Chri=.tnia., p't and your dimes and 

1 the humble but cari'.cst Chri>tianily of the 



mil 



ye 



did it not to one 



i"g- 



of the Ica.-it of these. 



THE SNOW SHOVELERS. 

Recently, just in passing. The Herald printed 

paragriph the day alter a sn««wta!I; 



thi: 



Now 
his back 
suow. 



the merr- 

niusolei '. 



lUS'-haldtT 
iiioro to ; 



p.ilnfuUy 
lie labor of 



'customs 
ilioveling 



Tr.e mails promptly returned to 
anonymous correspondent, a slip of 
paragrapli pasted in it- 
scribbled below it in a t >r 



I 



T '-iri 



n 



•-,it 

■lai. 



The Herald, from an 
paper with the above 
center, and with this legend 
efiil :^crIpt: 

•dsl it looks .something like 



■ 1 !■ :.• i. .n Di' 

Pedestrians in the residence districts will agree that 
tins >'.irp c tmnuiU is not uncalled for. There are 
houieh.'idcrs. altogether too mnny of them, who do not 
*'accust..m their back muscle, to ihe labor of shoveling 
snow " In many blocks the sidewalks are impassable 



after a he ivy snowfall, and the pedestrian has to take to 
tl;.' street, where teams quickly wear down the snow 
so a.-, to make fair traveling. 

Perh.nps The Herald should have sai<l. on the former 
,1)11 lii.it hrouk^ht out the caustic remark quoted 
>w tile merry householder should accustom 
les t.. the labor of shoveling snow." 
ought to be cleaned. The householder 
or have it done. It is good exercise any- 



THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. 

Now that the national committees have tixcd the time 

.ind place for next spring's presidential nominating con- 

i-entions, the campaign is fairly open. For six months 

he question will be who shall be nominated; for six 

nonths more, thereafter, the question will be who shall 

be elected. 

It is a merry game, and it is open to everybody. Not 
that everybody can become presidential candidates, but 
that everybody can take part in the game, according to 
his ambiti.)ii and hi> capacity. It is a game that every 
voter in the land should enter into freely and with spirit. 
Indeed, it is the duty of every voter to enter into it, and 
to bring to it all his patriotism, integrity and intelligence. 

Every voter should have his choice for the nomina- 
tion of his part}-, and when the nominations are made, 
every voter should have his choice as to the one that 
>hould be elected. Furthermore, he should know, in 
each case, why he has made that choice, and be able to 
explain and to defend his views wherever they may be 
questioned or attacked. It is good mental exercise, 
wholesome and healthy, and makes for the best results in 
elections. 

In the meantime, in case you want to speculate upon 
next year's proliabilities, here are the materials. The 
tabic below gives next year's electoral votes in each 
state, based on the apportionment act of 1900, with the 
addition of the new state of Oklahoma: 



of 
into 



the 
the 



his 

will 
his 



Alabama 11 

Arkansas 

California — 

Colora<lt» 

t'onneetli-ut .. 
Delaware — 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky .... 
Louisiana — 

aiaine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Mlehism 

Minnesotii .... 
Mississippi 



Nebraska 8 

Nevada 3 

lOJNew Hampshire 4 

5 New Jersey 12 

7New York 30 

.. 3INorth Carolina 12 

.. SiNorlh Dakota 4 

..laiOhlo -^ 

.. 3 Oklahoma 

..27iOregon 

. .IS'iPonnsylvania .. 

..ISRhode Ishind... 

..10 South Ctirolina. 

13 South Dakota... 



. 9 Tennessee 

, . fi Texas 

. 8ltah 

,.b> Vermont 

..14!virglnla 

..Ill Washington ... 
. .lolWest Virginia. 



Missouri ISIWlseonsIn 

Montana 3) Wyoming 



7 
. 4 
.34 
. 4 
. 9 
. 4 
.12 
.18 
. 3 
. 4 
.12 
. 5 
. 7 
.13 
. 3 



occa 

above, that "n- 
his back inu-.c 
The walk 
ought t.i do it 
way. 
his n 



in I hcides it is a duty that each householder owes 
■;iih!> or-, and his fellow-townsmen. 



THE TICKET SCALPER'S FINISH. 

The ticket scalper's business in this country is ended, 
unless percl.ance congress should do something to legal- 
ize it, which is very improbable. 

Owing to the injiincti.jus secured by the railroads 
against ticket-scalping, the business has been out of com- 
niissii>n it -. »ine time, and now the supreme court of the 
t'n t>' 1 Stitc,-. has finally dealt it a death blow by up- 
holding the decision^ of the lower courts that it is un- 
lawfid, :infl that a permanent injunction against its con- 
tinuance may be held. 

tlecision closes f)ne of the longest and most bit- 
;i;!!t Ic^al battles in the history of the railroad 
m this country, and the victory for the railroads 
is complete. The ca.-e decided by the supreme court was 
originally brought in Loui>iana, where the railroads 
secure<i in injunction from the lower courts restraining 
scalpers from dealing in non-negotiable passenger 
tickets. The lower coiirt held that the practice is illegal, 
but that legal redros could be secured only in individual 
case*. The railroad companies were not satisfied with 
the decision, but wanted a permanent blanket injunction 
issued restraining the practice. This move relieved the 
railroads from the necessity of proceeding against every 
indivi.lual who sold scalped tickets. The case was taken 

tu the supreme court not only 



If .Arizona and New Mexico should be admitted to 
statehood, it might change this table, but that is utterly 
improbable. There is little reason to doubt that the 
electoral college will be composed as it is in the above 
table. 

If it amuses you, there is no reason why you shouldn't 
begin now to figure on the results. Certain states, you 
already know, will go for the Democratic nominee, who- 
ever he may be. Certain others you are certain will go 
for the Republican nominee, no matter what his size, 
shape or predclictions. But in the debatable states, a list 
that is growing every year, it makes much difference who 
is nominated and what he stands for, and these debatable 
states are the pawns for you to play with in your little 
game of speculating about what is going to happen next 
year. For instance, if you are able to line up to your 
own satisfaction such states as New York, New Jersey, 
Indiana, Ohio. Nebraska. Missouri and Kentucky, you 
will be in a position to predict the result. At least you 



Sulll 
more 
butcher s 
any little 
listurb the 
Idea will be 
meat and drink lo this clan. Tlu^v love 
William Jennings not. All chariial>le pre- 
cepts of the Holy Book ar- «h^^"ered 
when it comes to ih-^ sentiments held by 
the Roger SulUvanlles for Ihe groat com- 
moner. ... t Wl . o. ^ 

Kentucky, he says, will probably^ go 
Democratic by a .small majority, 
have been showing a fondness 
elephant, lately, and it 
will decide that ad an 
and general prospiTity 
the more plemian mule 
ing post, as a badge 
p<jlltlcal complexion. 

Down in ihe hitherto impregnable 
Solid South, which was invariably re- 
turned a crushing Democratic majority. 
Mr. McGill says party lines are weaken- 
ing. Just as they are in other parts or 
the country. It is Democratic, of course. 
South of the Mason and Dixon line the 
pollilcal managers can always count on 
a tremendous Democratic vote. \et at 
tho coming elecUon. he believes, that 
the question of the perwjnallty 
candidate will enter largely 

question. ,^ 

A n.w candidate, naturally, would cap- 
ture a heavy Democratic vote. Mr. Mc- 
Gill predicts. In all the states that have 
been visited by him. He thinks that the 
sue -ess of either party depends largely 
upon the candiOTte they nominate. He 
believes Mr. Bryan stands little chance 
of being returned la winner. As to 
Governor Johnson, he expresses the opin- 
ion, that it is raOier early to judge of 
his strength y<t. but adds that if 
boom gathers strength he certainly 
be the most logical candidate of 
party. 

The corporation papers are c<»rtalnly 
knocking Pr<>sident Roosevelt down in 
the land of the bloated bondholders. Mr. 
MeGill says that in the East It Is not so 
much of a secret that It would require a 
Hawkshaw or a Sherlock Holmes to 
unravel the skein of the plot, that many 
of those papers doing the frenzied yell 
act over every act of the president's are 
petting their Uttlo bit from the swollen 
fund that Is being quietly distributed to 
flYeetively quash any ambitions Mr. 
Roosevelt may entertain regarding a 
third term in the villa down at Wa.-^hlng- 
ton. He says that it will require the 
right kind of a Democrat to align th.; 
conservatives down East and again, 
that Mr. Bryan is not this man. 

H'l llgures that the D»?mocrats have a 
good chance If th^'y pick out the right 
kind of a banner bearer. 

• • • 

At the Lenox: A. C. Kuhfeld. Minne- 
apolis: Thomas P. Page, Grand Forks; J. 
E. Fleck, Minneapolis; B. H. Theisen. 
Minneapolis; E. Alu.ssey, Milwaukee; C. 
W. Waelley, Chicago; C. H. Johnson. 
Chicago; W. B. Heath. Chicago; D. P. 
Thomas. St. Paul: George Bnulford. St. 
Paul; J. W. R-isin, St. Paul; Oscar D. 
Williams. Pittsburg; J. C Byeas, An- 
oka- Edward Aiirt.TSon, Brainerd; C. J. 
Olson. Chicago; J. A. MacBain. Battle 
Cre.'k- W J. Rvan. Princeton; \Mlllam 
A. Stephenson. S"t. Paul; John B. Mlche- 
ler Iron Mt.; R. CInUnson Michigamme; 
M.' D. Kelley. St. Paul; D. Hlckey. St. 
Paul; S. Seellg. Milwaukee; C. M. John- 
son. Milwaukee; Nete Ellis. St. Paul; 
Joseph Mantel, E:1.v; William Donahue 
and wife. Tower; li. B. Bell. Marquette; 
John G. Nieml. Blwabik; F. B. Gordon. 
Minn^-apolls; T. W. Gove. St. Paul; H. P. 
Cullum. Chicago; C. F. Wlllnson. Chi- 
cago- R W. O'Nell. Marquette; Miss E. 
Van. Chicago; D. Carrol, Detroit. 

* • * 

At the St. Louis: Ferry Naughton. St. 
Paul- J. H. Sullivan. St. Paul; John Wal- 
quist. Minneapolis: C. F. Gllby. St. Paul; 
M Wldes. Hibbing: C. H. Seaman. De- 
troit- W. J. Davis. Two Harbors; A. H. 
Wigdahl. Philadelphia; W. A. McGlll. 
Detroit; A. Schneider. St. Paul; Thomas 
Sullivan. St. Paul; W. J. Oibbs. Bow- 
string Minn.: G. G. Rogers. Minnt'apolis; 
A. M. Ferris. Grand Forks; Thomas 
Bagley. Minneapolis; t^^eorue I.,ydick, 
Cp,8s Lake: James Cardie. Cas.q I^ake; 
James Hurlev. St. Paul; E. J. Bush. Vir- 
ginia: Joseph O'N-'il. Cyloquet: Mrs. E. 
J. .Mtklns. Tower; Mrs. Charles Libby. 
Palmi-r. Washington; Mrs. M. Grant. 
Two Harlx»rs; A. H. Markhanen. Flood- 
wood: Alfred Katin. Galeshurg. 111.; Miss 
H. And.-rson. Hibbing; Charles Spring- 
ier, Marquette; Mrs. A. O. Larry. Grand 
Rapids: Mrs. C. Belden. Grand Rapids; 
C. H. Gardner. Stillwater; J. J. Rus.sell. 
Minneapolis; M. J. Bell. Bellwood; S. 
Field. Ashland; Mrs. Ada George, 
ginia: G. A. Blodget. Minneapolis; 
McI>onald St. Paul; Thomas York, 
bing: J. W. Gilboy. St. Paul: H. 
Namara. Eveleth; J. A. Ross. Marquette; 
D E. Shea and wife. Virginia: J. M. 



Following were 
temperatures: 

Abilene 

i Asheville .. . 

Atlanta 

Battleford .. 
Bismarck .. . 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Cairo 

Calgary .. .. 
Charleston .. 

Chicago 

Cincinnati .. 
Concordia .. 
Davenport .. 

Denver 

Detroit 

Devi la Lake 

Dodge 

Duluth 

Edmonton .. .. — 4 
El Paso 40 



last 



.38 
.« 
.32 
. 
. 4 
.52 
.28 
.36 
. 
.40 
.30 
.32 
.28 
.26 
.14 
.tS 
.10 
.30 
.17 



night's lowest 
Hat 



ning a train through 
Omaha in May next. 



from Duluth to 



••♦Alderman Kennedy will enlarge 
Michigan hou.se at the West end 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 



the 
uy 



•••The most important improvement 
to be made in Duluth this winter waa 
begun at the old blast furnace site. It 
is the immense new coal dock of. the 
Pioneer Fuel company of Minneapolis. 
The contract was awarded to W. B. 
Sharp of this city. The dock Is to b« 
1.000 feet in length by 850 feet in width, 
having a capacity of 500,000 tons, and 
will cost about $75,000. 

•♦♦The following real estate transfers 
have been recorded: 

M. W. Goodrich to George R. Simp- 
son, lot 4, block 83, Endion division, 
$1,600. 

J. R. Myers to Charles Stohl, lot 8, 
block 105, Second division, $100. 

Frank Bonack to W. W. Sanford, lot 
1. block 109, Third division. $6<>0. 

Jesse Mayer to Charles H. Clague, lot 
Vi. block 90, Endion division, $3,800. 
' William McRea to J. T. Bredeson, 
lot 38, block 127, Third division, $800. 



LAUGHING GAS. 



Medicine 
Memphis 
Miles City . 
Milwaukee . 
Mlnnedosa .. 

Modena 

Montgomery 
Moorhead •• 
New Orleans 
New York . 
Norfolk .. . 
Northfleld •• 
North Platte ... 

Oklahoma 

Omaha 

Phoenix 

Pierre 

Pittsburg 

Port Arthur — 
Portland. Or.. . 
Prince Albert .. 

Rapid City 

Reglna 

.St Louis 

St" Paul 

.San Antonio .... 
San Francisco . 

Siinta Fe 

Sault Ste. Marie 
Shreveport .. .. 

Spokane 

30 i Swift Current . 
. ...82 ! Washington 



. 1 
.42 
.16 
.30 
. 
.30 
.34 



Red Lake Falls Gazette: The Princeton 
Union sugge.s^t.s leaving the politicians at 
home ana sending the country editors lo 
the national conventions. How forl-a- 
na'te thai none of the editors Is a poli- 
tician. 



Washington Star: "It is a great hon<vr 
for the office to seek the man." 

"Yes," remarked Senator Sorghum; ' 
a rule, the office that seeks the man 
all honor and no salary." 



as 



Fairmont Sentinel: Thousands of Min- 
nesota Republicans insist upon Roo.sevelt 
for a third term. In fact iho third term 
idea seems lo be very popular in Minne- 
sota amongst men of all parties, and 
there is a reas<jn. 



Balt>moro 
that young 

"He has. 
me that he 



American: "Marie. hasnt 
man of yours a past?" 

father. He confessed t» 
used to deal In futures." 



.10 
...54 
...26 
...16 
... 8 
... 8 
... i 
...16 
..38 



Escanaba 

Gah'tston .. 
Grand Haven 
Green Bay . . 

Havre 

Helena 

Houghton .. 

Huron 

Jacksonville . 
Kamloops 
Kansas City 
Knoxville .. 
La Crosse .... 

Lander 

Little Rock . 
los Angeles ■ 
Marquette .. 

Departure of Agriculture, Weather 
rcau. Duluth, Dec 17.— Lo al forectvgt 
twenty-four hours ending fit < p. 
Wedne.sday: Duluth. Superior 



...44 
...32 
...32 

...-22 

.20 International Falls Border Budget: If 

38 you really understand farming, every 

!!."« t>wner of 160 acres of land in Northern 

. !!3t> ' Minnesota will have a bigger income tiian 

!!l6|he can spend when he gets his land un- 

!!!28'der cultivation. A farmer in an adjoin- 

... 2 I ing county recently brought to town a 

] 36 ' load of clover seed and when he re- 

i.'. 6 (turned home ho had $608.26 In his Jeans. 

...10 I There was seventy-five bu.-sheU in the 

..61 load and It was taised on ten acres of 

land which the farmer purchasi-d a few 

years ago at $5 per acre. This will be a 

frequent occurence in K.>jchlchlng county 

in a few years. 



Chicago Tribune: "Talking of short 
measures," said Uncle Allen Sparks, 
"there are lots of people that never 
seem to have got their share when lh« 
milk of human kindness was handed 
around." 



s very true.*^ 
•that men. llk« 



Philadelphia Press: "It 
said the tiresome talker, 
wlno. Improve with age." 

"Yes," said Mrs. Waters, "and some 
men like wine and do not Improve with 
age." 



.22 
!-6 
..40 
..48 
..14 



Wichita .. . 
Wllllston .. 
Wlnnemucca 
Winnipeg .. 
Yellowstone 



.34 

.22 
.50 
.4«1 
.14 
.14 
.40 
.16 
. 8 
.36 
.32, 

.12 Mora Times: 3<omeb)dy 
.24 I name of Thom;is Shevlin 
. 4 i as a candidaie to th<? 
convention. Th 



, Washington 
[ Uncle Eben. 
I dey suffer as 



ty -dollar 
heart." 



bill 



Star: 

"Is so 

mucii 

as dey 



"Some ni'^'n." said 
close wlf money dat 
f'um a brok<-ii t wen- 
would fum a brok«n 



Hutchin.son Leader: Our advice to 
Frank Eddy: Brush the gubernatorial bee 
from your bonnet and stay on the tem- 
perance platform, where you can do your- 
self and your fellow men the most good. 



and 



Bu- 

for 

m., 

vi- 

Ver- 



clnity. Including the Mesaba and 
mlllon Iron ranges: P?-rlly cloudy to- 
night and Wednesday. Colder tonight 
with lowest temperature close to 5 
above zero. Fresh westerly winds. 
H. W. RICHARDSON. 
Local Forecaster. 



suggests the 
>f Minneapolis 
national R-publican 
name ShevUn is a good 
one for the Republican party of Minr.L- 
sota to forget. The disgnvceful scenes 
at the Duluih convention for which he 
was responsible, have not yet been for- 
gotten. 



Cleveland Plain Dealer: "Ladles!*' 
called the president of the afternoon 
whist cluiv. "ladles, it ha.s been moved 
and seconded that there shall be no con- 
versation at the car.l tables. What shall 
w.- do with the motion?" 

"I suggest that we discuss It while w 
play, " piped a shrill voice from table 
A. and the suggestion wa^ adopted. 



degs. 



Chicago. De.-. 17.— Forecasts until 7 p. 
m.. Wednesday: Wisconsin: Party 
cloudy with possibly snow flurries in 
south portion tonight or Wednesday. 

Minnesota— Generally fair tonight and 
Wednesday. Colder tonight. 



Brainerd Tribune: A fir.'»t lesijon in 
forestry has been impressed on the 
United States. In writing on timber 
prospects the word "Inexhaustible' Is 
TUi longer used. 



Vlr- 
J. J. 
Hib- 

Mc- 



St. Paul; W. C. Gerberlch, St 



L>lckey, 
Paul. 

At the Spalding: M. 
F. Huher, Milwaukee; 
son. New York; S. E 
Judge Ira B. Mills. 
Bradley. Mlnneaj>«ilis; 
wife, St. Paul; W. H 



MinneHOta in tlif Limelight. 

Minneapolis Irish Standard: Minnesot.x 
is being made conspicuous by some of the 
men who now represent it in public life 
Until recently it took no pi-ominent part 
' In national affairs. Alexander Rumsey 
In war times. William Windom In the 
late '70S and early '80s, and Cushman K. 
Davis In the '30s. were the three men of 
Influence and power that Minnesota had 
.sent to Uie national councils since Us a<l- 
ml-ssion as a state. 

The state is now making up for its 
former paucity of numbers. From a nat- 
ional political standpoint Minnesota is 
now an Important state. It has a gover- 
nor whose ability and standing has at- 
tracted the attention of the nation. He 
has not only made a good governor, but 
when he has mingled with the Ix'st the 
nation can produce, he has honored him- 
self ard the stale from which he hails. 
Several of the metropolitan papers re- 
mark that he made the best speech made 
at the Gridiron club. Others say that he 
and Minnesota's great railway magnate. 
James J. Hill, made the best speeclie.s 
that were made at the wat-rways con- 
vention. In the national house of repre- 
sentatives Minnesota's congressman from 
its nrst district. James A. Tawney, is. 
n^xt to the speaker of that body, the 
leader of the hou.se; chairman of its 
great appropriations committee; the man 
who handles and plans for the distribu- 
tion of the millions of dollars which 
Uncle Sam annually expends in all parts 
of the country. Minnesota furnished to 
the department of Justice, when It sought 
a man to prosecute the great trusts. 
Frank B. Kellogg, a man born and reared 
within its borders. ,. _ 

Not only In the field of pilules, but 
In other lines Minnesota is fast coming 
to the front. The pioneer days are over. 
Minnesota is no longer a new state. U-i 
citizenship, while no better than those 
hardy pioneers who conquered the forests 
and subdued the prairies. Is nevertheless 
more enlightened politically and insists 
upon higher political ideals. It will no 
longer do for a man to be simply a 
"good fellow." or wealthy, or sectlonally 
available to aspire to and win political 
honors In Minnesota. He must pos.sess 
the abilltv and training that will enable 
him to measure up to the best that there 
Is In national life. Every one of the 
nine congnissional districts in Minnesota 
should be represented by a man as able 
and indu.strious as the congressman from 
the first district. Especially should the 
great city of Minneapolis, which consti- 
tutes the largest and most influ.'ntial 
congre.sslonal district in the United 
States from point of population and point 
of wealth, place in the congress of the 
United States and keep then-, a man of 
commanding inriuence and power. Min- 
nesota . has the .soil and the climate 
which produces good men as well as good 
I crops. Heretofore the good men have 
I been so busy In developing the state that 
I they have had no time for politics. In 
1 the past politics went by default. In 
the futiire Minnesota ■will insist upon 
I putting forth its best men. The ability of 
I seme of Its present representatives will 
compel a high standard in the future. 



Luverne He-raid: Somehow, no on.-> 
ff>el3 very sorry for the Iowa brakeman 
who withdrew $4.i)00 from a bank, because 
he thought It unsafe, piaced It In an old 
discarded snove and- had IC destroyed by 
hi.'j house burning. 



Two Harbors Iron Trade Journal: A 

man who r>'cently ticked off 117 years 

attributes his long life to the fact mat 

I he didn't marry when young. Still, some 

I credit is undoubtedly du-' to the fact that 

I he never slept on railroad tracks, wisely 

! refrained from rocking a boat and always 

kept the muzzle of unloaded guns pointed 

away from him. 



Chicago Tribune: Mrs. Pnecr— You're 
putting nearly as much wrapping paper 
as beefsteak on those scales and making 
me pay meat prices for It. 

Marketman— Yes. ma'am, and I'm let- 
ting you have all tlia: wr.ipping pap»r 
with a full knowledg.^ of the fact that 
the price of it. owing to the .soulless 
gre-d of the wood pulp monopoly, is go- 
ing up right along. Anything else thie 
morning, ma'am? 

Washington Herald: "Cheer up! old 
man." said the invalid's friend, "you n» 
not going to die yet." .,..„,„• 

"You bet I ain't: declared the Invalid 
with a new determination. 

"Tiiat's tlie way lo talk." 

"Yes. I heard the doctors quarreling 
about which one of them should perforrn 
the autopsy, so I'm Just going to fool 
'em." 



.till 



Warren Register: Th-^re are plenty of 
Republicans who would be willing to 
make the run for govern.ir. if they could 
feel a.ssured of being Iraeked during tne 
campaign ard on ^lection day by the 
practically .solid support of the P'i-rt> 
With the Ies3<jn3 of l'.>')4 and 19i>5 
fresh In their minds, it is but natural 
tiiat they should hesitate .about making a 
noise like a. candidate at this time 
pecially as talk is frequently heard of giv 
ing Bob Dunn, Judge Collins. Bill 
Sam Van .Sant or A. L. Cole a 
for "vindication" at the polls, 
trouble seems to be that 
.squabble that culminated 
IWM are not yet forgotten 



Harjer's Weekly: Mrs. 
- Can you .send me up a 
Dwjer?" 

Head of Intelligence 
can't accommodaii* you, 
have only one in tiie office. 

Mrs. A.— But why mayn't I 

Head of Intelligence Office- 



A. (over 'phone) 
cook today, Mr. 



Offiee— Sorry I 
Mrs. A. but we 



have her? 
-Oh. we have 



to keep her as a sample. 

Cleveland Leader: "Get many ducks? 

"Naw— this guns no good. Whenever 
I'd shoot at a bird, the report was ao 
loud that it scared him away." 



es- 1 



Eustis. 
chance 
The c'aief 
th-" faction 
In the split of 
and that there 
are not a few who are doing all they can 
to keep the fire of discord wUliin the 
party burning at a white heat. 



Thi- 
terly !"■ 
business 



will imagine yourself to 
much the same thing. 



be in that position, which is 



\*ou have until 9 o'clock tonight to cast a ballot for 
Emil .\. Tessman, who will give the city an administra- 
tion full of character and purpose and \yho will work for 
a better and bigger and busier Duluth.^,^ 



If you 
now, and 
election. 

If you 
the result. 



haven't voted at the primary election, do so 
you will be registered for the general city 



don't vote at the primaries don't complain of 



to secure a decision as Vote tonight if you have not already done so. 



Aurhack, Chlcago- 

Georg-' H Petnr- 
Arn'ild, Chicago; 

Moorhead : R. R. 

E. H. Morse anJ 
Lowe. Minneapolis; 
J A. Percival. Minneapolis; S. L. Harris, 
HoughtPn; G. A. Saylor. Milwaukee; Mrs. 
George M<-Kinney. Be.sseemer; Paul R. 
Gruen. Chicago; Mrs. C A. Slmp.«on. 
Washburn: Mrs D. M. Marcy. Washburn; 
L M Rolv-rts. Little Falls; F. D. Lyons. 
Minneapolis; J. Kelly. Mlnn.apolls; G. H. 
Thompson and wife. HibV>ing; Charle.i 
May St. Paul; J. U Jennings. Mlnno- 
apoll's- E. J. Thoma.s, Minneapolis; H. H. 
Wilkerson. St. PauU J. C. Catlln St. 
Paul: Fred M. Pr.-wca|t, Milwaukee; L. B. 
Miller, Cleveland. ; 

• e- • 

At the McKay: Bi ^ Jame.son. Two 
Harbors; P. J. ConWay. Elroy; Ge..rge 
Holland. Chicago; W. B. Mealone, Minne- 
apolis: C. E. Burgess, Devils Lake; Henry 
King Virginia; Mrs. Charles Olson Sk bo; 
Miss' Anne Olson. Sklbo; Clara E. Syning- 
ton. Sklbo; Marie Synington Skibo: Grace 
Svnington. Skibo: F. F. McOnadI, Two 
HarlM.rs: Mrs. L. M. Dunn. St. Paul; A. 
F McDermott. Minneapolis; C. H. Bernet. 
Minneapolis; P. Murphy. Barnum; James 
C.-illahan Coleralnee; C. E. Culvar St. 
Paul- Mfss Beatrice Fleming. Sauk Rap- 
Ids b A. Levlnc. D«trolt; Charles Malt 
land. Fond du lax, H. B. 



Mixed Plckle.s. 

R«5che8ter Herald: Edwin Markham. at 

a dinner, said of mixed metaphors; 

'•When I was teaching in Los Angeles I 

used to read evry Week a little country 

paper whose editor's metaphors were an 

unfailing Joy to me. Once. I remember, 

this editor wrote of a contemjxirary : 

I 'Thus, the black lie Issuing from his 

I base throat bei omes a boomerang in his 

' hand, and. hoisting him by his own 

i petard leaves him a marke.l man for lite.' 

He safd in an article on home life: 'Tho 

1 faithful watchdog or his good wife, stand- 

! ing at the do<:»r. welcomes the master 

home with an honest bark.' In an obltu- 

' ary of a farmer he wrote: The race -was 

I run at la.st. Like a tired steed, he crossed 

I the harbor bar. and. casting a.«lde whip 

I and spur, lay down upon that bourne 

from which no traveler returns.' " 



Kettoctions 

New Y'ork Press: 
pictures for 



it's 
stump 



of a Bachelor. 

A man who can hang 

a woman without cussing 

isn't married to her. 

If a girl objects to beln^ kissed 
because it tastes so n 

The most succcs.sful love letter Is the 
one thxt .says the same thing over again 
the most limes. 

\ woman can learn a lot about 
h^r husband doesn't know by 
him try to explain P. to her 
The premier a man is 

children the madder the bills, 
raise t'-iem make him. 



Philadelphia I>edger: "At any rate I 
am a by-product of your boasted elviliza- 
lion," said a man convicted of .-elUng his 
vote. 

"You mean bought product." corrected 
the court, and sent lilm up for three 
years. 



what 
hanng 



about having 



lot of 
costs to 



.Second Choice. 

Philadelphia Ledger: There is a Wash- 
ington lad who. it would appear, 
to the old proposition that It 
have more than one string 

The boy was being eatechtsed one day 
by a well-meaning visitor to the house. 

"Well. Harry." said the lady. ' 
think vou have a chance to be 
of the "United States?" 
"Oh I don't know," answered 
u,mr,».B -«=..- carelessly. "Maybe I'll try for U 
I^lch Spring get tW Old W be a pitcher. 



assents 
is well to 
to on ''s 



don't you 
president 



Harry 
after I 



The Gn'-atest I^ke Sca-soii. 

Cleveland Pla:n Dealer: The last lake 
cargoes are coming into Dort and clo-Irit 
the greatest sea.^on the* traffic ot the 
lakes has ever known. More than 41.00<J.- 
000 tons of Iron ore makes the largest 
item in such a movement of merchandise 
as the world never saw anywhere else on 
fresh water. Coal, grain and lumber 
have all made remarkable contnbiitlons 
to the wonderful total for the year. Fr.mi 
earlv In the sprinK to the clnsmg weeks 
of navigation record-breaking was .-om- 
mon. It was most astonishing after many 
bu.siness conditions became adverse in the 

Vor the month of October the gain in 
the traffic of the lakes, compared w th 
Ihe like period in the sea.son of l»»y, was 
about 28 per cent, a truly a"}azing rate 
of mcreasVover a volume of business so 
great that it seemed, a year ago. n^ar the 
utmost limit of the capacity of lake ports 
and lake channels. Many l^^e cities 
scored new records this year in almost 
every test of vessel commerce. 

There win have to be a great change 
from sucl^ conditions before the general 
st^t^ of the country's trade can be con- 
sidered In ^y respect discouraging or in- 
dicltlv-e of industrial or commercial un- 
s.iundness That change Is not commg 
n "is more likely that the s^on of !.<« 
will again score new records for the ti-af- 
ttc of the gr eat lakes. 

Ijct the Stales Do Tlwir Slmre. 

Buffalo Express: George Clinton of 
Buffalo presented the New York position 
very •well when he told the rivers and 
harbors congress of the way Ne-w- York 
is rebuilding her canals, and said that 
this state asks of the federal government 
only a just .«;hare of the money appropri- 
ated for harbor improvement. 

A similar attitude should be required of 
all states, with the condition that rivers 
forming natural highways between several 
states such as the Mississippi and the 
Ohio, 'should be maintained by the nation- 
al government. 

The trouble with most demands ror 
river Improvement is that the advantage 
of getting a federal appropriation is given 
more consideration than actual commer- 
cial needs. What the Mississippi re- 
quires, for example. Is not a 14-foot 
channel, but the maintenance of a fairly 
uniform channel, free from obstructions, 
and the uniform strengthening of the 
banks against floods. The 14-foot Idea Is 
based on the dream of letting ocean and 
lake shipping Into the river. That dream 
never will be realized, because, even if 
the channel is providied, it never would 
pay the ocean or lake v<?swel to make the 
v<?yaj;e. 



Polnt<Ml I'arasraplis. 

Chicago News: Nothing is well that 
doesn't end well. 

Tli-> woman who trusts all men is shy 
of experience. 

Jealousy bears a lot of fruit that la 
preserved in f.amily jars. 

Writing poetry is easy enough; the 
unea.=!y part is to get it printed. 

A woman who speak.<i but one language 
usually talks enough for two. 

One can Judge some men by their dende 
and .some others by their misdeeds. 

The man who accomplishes things has 
learned to la)>or while he waits. 

Fortunalelv the world isn't able to sea 
a society woman as her maid sees her. 

It Isn't always the man who acquired 
tlie most information who knows the 
most. 

best way to make money 
is to have nothing to do 



a woman to persuade her- 
is right when she knows 



is unable 
expert at 



Perhaps the 
cut of stocks 
with thera. 

It's easy for 
.Self that she 
site Is wrong. 

A Cincinnati woman, who 
to write her own name, is an 
figures. She is a dressmaker 

When a widow gets the Idea m her 
hea<i that she can't live without another 
n.an. she hasn't much to live for. 

You would probably have more frlenaa 
If they were sure they could use you 
before you had occasion to use them. 

Of course, the wife has Just as much 
right to start something as the husband 
has to come home in the early morn. 

For Harrlman. 
No gaudy, gilded thing of worth. 

Like Kaiser BlUiam's gorgeous throne* 
But just one simple little earth 
That he can really call his own. 

— CARLYLE SMITH in Life. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TONIGHT and \%ED. M.\T. A NIGHT 
Kdwln Milton Hoyle'it 



t< 



frie:nds 



ff 



Last 



pie 



Half of \^'«*k Opening Thom- 
day. Return liy Request. 
Beneflt Temple Aid Soelely ofTem- 
Emanuel. No Advance In Prlce«. 



Comlna ^Xma- Day. "YANKEE RE- 
NewVear> Day. «ROYAL CHEF.- 



MSTROPOLrlTAN 

"The House of Mirth." 



ALL. THIS WEEK. 

"THE NIGHTINGALES" 

Fifty Fair, Famona Flirts tn 
THE BEST SHOW^ YET. 



Next Week — KENTUCKY BELLES. 



1. 

\ 



M 



'« 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALDU JTUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1W7. 



S^t^t^^^^^^^^^^^^t^i 





OF lUE mn 




% M. HENRICKSEN JEWELRY CO. | M. rfliNRICKSEN JEWELR Y CO. 



SPECIALS 




FOR THUS WEEK 



DRESSING TABLES 

Every woinan appreciates a 
Dressinj;:: Table. They are the 
rii^ht height an.l the mirrors are 
j)erfect. Here are some of the re- 
<luctions to be found at this great 
store : 

$18 Bird's Eye Maple Dress- 
ing Table Now $10.98 

$20 Mahogany Dressing 

Table Now $14-50 

$23 Bird's Eye Maple Dress- 
ing Table Now $16-50 

$23 Mahogany Dressing 
Table Now $16.50 



LADIES' DESKS 

Here ynii w'U (in<l the most com- 
plete >ho\viny; of Ladies' Desks in 
tile city. .Ml the newest styles 
ariil tnii-^he>i. X'>ie the special 
\'alue> ; 

$5.75 Golden Oak Youths* 
Desks Now $3.48 

$9.50 Golden Quartered Oak 
Ladies' Desks Now $5.95 

$9.50 Mahogany Finished 

Ladies' Desks Now $5.95 





WILL FIX 
BUILDING 

New Duluth Property Will 

Have New Front of 

Steel. 



MUSIC c:abinets 

Some great \alues in this line. 
\\ e have a cot iplcte showing of 
Record Cabinet ; (Disc and Cylin- 
der). They are all on sale at spe- 
cial prices. He'e are some oi the 
vainer : 

$7.75 Mahogan^' Finished 

Music Cabinet Now $495 

$7.75 Weathered Oak Mu- 
sic Cabinet Now $4.95 

$10.50 Mahogany Finished 

Music Cabinet Now $5.95 

$14.50 Quartered Oak Rec- 
ord Cabinet Now $9.98 



Hungarians Arriviug to 

Work on Steel Plant 

In Spring. 



New Duluth, Minn., Dtc. 17.— (Special to 
i The Herald.)— Repairs on the Provinske 
I building were started Monday. The 
' brick front is being inm oft and a steel 
! front will be put in. The whole build- 



'1 t 
lowing a quarrt*! .In ; which Anderson. 
Scott and Olson wer»> participants. It 
was claimed that Ql^^l^■n and Scott way- 
laid Anderson In ^d^r to get even for 
a punlshmeot admttilstfored by him earlier 
in the evening. ■ 

The defen.se in Vie 9c>tt case took uj 
but two hours' time While the state in- 
troduced no rebuttal testimony. 

HAS OSrAR^sTlGNATURE. 

Crystal FjiIIs Minister Treasures 
Memento of Late King. 

Crystal Falls, Mich.. Dec. 17.— iSp»^clal 
to The Herald. »— Rev. J. J. Hoikka pos- 
aes.ses a document containing the signa- 
ture of the late king of Sweden. King 
Otcar. This document is treasured highly 
by Rev. Hoikka and coastltuteJ his ooin- 
niission wlien he was appointed as one of 
the ministers of the state church of 

SW( den. 

The paper is entirely in long hand 
script, written by one .jf the secretaries 
and the king's signature is afflxed above 
the seal. The writing is very legible, but 
shows that the hand which held the pen 
wag feeling the weight of years. 



SAMUEL CONCiDON DEAD. 



Resident of Copper Country for 
Forty Years, Heeds Summons. 

Houghton, Mich.. Dec. IT.— (Special 



Mich.. Dec 
The Herald.)- Samuel J 



Congdon, aged 



Ing Is to be hxod up in the best shape I ® years, is dead, at the residence of his 

son. William Congdon, West Houghton, 
where he has resided for the past six 



possible. 

J. J. Palmer of Wells. Minn., has rented 
the building and will move his drug 
store in as soon us the place is ready. 
His family will live up stairs. 

Six Hungarians arrived in town Sat- 
urday and are living in one of the land 
company's houses on Ninety-eighth ave- 
nue. They will cui wood for the Thomp- 
son Furniture company this winter and in ' 



weeks. Death was due to a complication 
of di.seases and old age. 

Mr. Congdon was born at Plymouth. 
Eng. In 1S3S. and came to America and 
the Copper country forty years ago. H.' 
resided at the Franklin mine the past 
thirty years. 

The "leceased leax'es a widow and six 



the spring will go to work "at" tiie 'steel i chlldnin. who aJ-^/, \Vf"'t^n» Congdon of 
ni mt rw ►•St Houghton; Alfred of Hancock; Mrs. 

*^ I William Hosking of Quincy, Mrs. W. J. 

Uren of .\tlantic; Mrs. W J. Cocking of 
Vineland, N. J. ; John Congdon of Han- 
cook. H*' is also survlv-d by one sister. 
Mr.s. W. H. Newcombe of Houghton. 






OPEN 



All Cars 
Lead to 
Kelly's 



i:vi:.\i\r,s. 



\^^S^^X^Y^Mi!^\ii^ 



Your 
Credit 
It Good. 



226-228 West Superior St., Dulutli, Minn. 




RUNAWAY HUBBY 
CAUGHT BY WIFE «'" ^^'•■iJKL c 

Gay St. Paul Man Ar- 
rested In Eau 
Claire. 



LOSED. 



Big Falls, Minn.. I>ec. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— To prevent a further rapid 
Increase ' o€ diphtheria, the local h.>ard 



EXPENSIVE TREAT. 

BaloonktM*]!**!- Fliifd $100 for Ojieu- 
iiig Pla«e After Hours. 

Int 17.-^ - 



m. 



Sa''»:i is 



•qi; 



Mi rill.. 
Sund;* 



■1 to 

a. L 1 i '»Mi to it 

ing. after they 



I tot It ilo«>r 

' l».ir rtKwn 

- ileitnei 



Eau Ciaire. Wis.. Dec. 17— (Special to' 
The Herald. >— Joseph Talllefer. aged 30. j 
and Mary Glynn, aged 2S, were ar- ; 
rested here by the local police and lodg- 
ed in ih-j county jail on a statutory 
charge, the arrest being made under I 
in-slructions from SherilT Gerber of j 
Ramsey county. Taillefer's two sons, ; 
agfd respectively 6 and 4, were also , 
taken care of by the sheriffs office, j 
Deputy Sheriff Hanson from Ramsey ; 
county came down yesterday and to«jk j 
Taillefer and the Glynn woman and i 
the two children back to St. Paul. ■ 
where the man and woman will be ar- I 
raigned on a charge of unlawful co- j 
habitation. 

When arrested the couple agreed to I 
go back to St. Paul without requlal- j 
tion papers. j 

The complaint against them was 
made by Elizabeth Taillefer. who 
claims to be the wife of Taillefer. She ] 
came to this city Saturday and poured j 
a long tale of domestic woe Into the , 
ear of Chief O'Brien. She said that • 
her husband. Joseph Taillefer. had de- 
1 serted her last August for the Glynn i 
m Triiro; J!^ h'"""'^, 1« woman and had taken their two chil- 
. • . :. ..n of the Quick home, late , ^^en with him. They then disappeared.! 
.u :.:.:. ... .stop h.. meant It. The ^[^"jjy^Y warrant sworn out for his 
prowi, I i>aid ,o atteiLtion to the warn- *'l^ "^^ that time but up to the pres- 
ui«. and youig Quick rirt>d two -^hots ^"-^fj^; rht\uthorities had been un- 
at h,m The man f^Il mortally wound- | ^J^^^^i^^t/^^^^Tru^^^ ^n^] 

^.s^'-^^H.^. 'Z.^V%.r^'.^. S^alfJgl^rWamour. She had not given! 
who had h. -mplo.ved by the t:*hicago 
LumWi mpany. Quick .surren- 

dtred hi....-- .: and aj? public .sentiment 
is on his sidt he will probably be ex- 
-"' ■••■.}. 



D. E. H.. Dec. 17. IW. 

suspended for the 




AP()LO<JIZES TO roi RT. 



eitnet 0j-,^.„,ii„g, ,|i„^,^ .Attomcv A(imits 



.f 



J 

:.i.ty. 1;. ivnu.-:- vnivi. lie 
y to "lifiing: the Sunday 
..i.'i ;i fine of $1W. 



SHOOTS AND KILLS. 



Mail Seen Prowling .Aruiiiid iu His 
Back Van! at Night. 

M . . - .\: I ■ .17 --(Sp-^.(?.ial 

t-j The Herahl.j— When Herman Victor 
Qukk, aeed 2'\ a band sawyer in one 

of :!•!•' l->ra.l mills, an.l a son of John 
Qiii.-k I u.-;l kiMvvn citiz.-n. sh-<>uted 



He )la(U Serioii.s Mistake. 

Bi.Hmarck, >.. l» . r>ec. IT.— Attorney B. 
II. Ui.i>ii"')rd •>r Minot wa^i before :he b.ir 
of the stipr-'iri • ci>urt Saturday aftern<>o:i 
to show < ail.- wliy iie and his partner. 
Arthur Le S- ler, should not be punislud 
for contempt, because of the language 
us'-(i in the appeal for a rehearing in a 
ca.s li'oidf'd igain.st hlni. Bradfoid'j; at- 
torneys .statefi that he was a young and 
in«-xperieneed attorney .so far as supremo 
court u.-^ages vent. an<l offered a humble 
apology, whu'i the court acepted af:er 
admonishing Bradford and the other at- 
torn»^ys of tli » slate against the use of 
indecent iangs age to the supreme or any 
other court, a id furihf-r proo»edmg.s Wfre 
dismissed. At orn^'y L«' SeU'-r. Brailford's 
partner, did iiOt api>ear, b^'ing in Califor- 
nia, and liavlig had no pait in the pre- 
paration of th'> offending paper.s. 






To Heat 
a Cold Corner 

Don t sit in the cold — a touch 
ol a match* — a steady How ol 
genial warmth and in the cor- 
ner that s ha d to heat you 11 
have real solid comlort with a 

PEREECnON 
00 Heater 

(Equipped with Smokeless Device) 

Jusl what you need to help out in 
a cold snap c between seasons. 
No smoke — no smell — no bother 

— it's the smokeless device that docs it. As eas/ to 

operate and clean as a lamp. Brass font holds 

4 quarts — gives intense heal lor 9 hoius. Finis led 

in nickel and japan — every heater warranted. 

■^ ^^■^ r * round lamp m.ide. 

Equipped with 
latest improved central dralt burner. Made ol b ass 
throughout, nickel plated. Just the light to read 
by — bright and steady. Every lamp warran cd. 
H your dealer doesn t carry the Perfection Oi! 
Heater and Rayo Lamp, write our nearest age icy 
lor descriptive circular. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

(lacorporatcd) 



up her search for her husband, how- 
ever, and was finally rewarded with tho 
inew3 that he and the Glynn woman 
and the tw.j children were living in 
this city. 

REMAJNDEROF 
LIFE IN PRISON 

Toncy Duley Must Pay 

Penalty for Fiendish 

Murder. 

Marauette. Mich., Dec. 17.— ^Special to 
The Henild.)— Doomed to spend the re- 
mainder of his days within its gloomy 
walls. Toney Duley is the latest arrival 
at the Marquette pen:tentiary. The deed 
I for which he la n<»w behind the bars was 
! thf" fiendish murder of John Ferris, a 
steamboat agent, whom he cruelly slew 
ai .\u Sabl>» only a few weeks ago for a 
paltry sum ot money. 

Duley is a form'=-r convict, aged 35. and 
a native of Alp«nui. He waa generally 
characterized as a "bad" man in the i 
lower portion of the state, and he was 
well known to the police of various cit- 
ies having been arrested on numerous oc- 
ca.«ions for different crimes. It was while 
lurking about the lake front at Au Sable 
in Ijroad daylight, awaiting a chance to 
steel a ride to Detroit, that Duley delil»- 
erately shot down Ferris. His victim | 
was the dock agent for the Oscoda & Au 
Sable Steamship line, and it was when 
Ferris resisted the attempt of the man | 
to rob the office that he received the | 
revolver bullet that put an end to hbj 
hie. Gathering all the ca.sh in sight, 
a.nountlng to only two or three dollars 
In change. Duley fled fri>m the scene of 
tl:e tragedy. Ferris had just strength 
enough to crawl to the teleplione and 
give the alarm. When help arrived, he 
was dead. 

An exi iiing man hunt marked the pur-, 
suit of Duley. and only for the interven- 
tion of th'' .-^^eriff it would have culmin- 
ated in a lynching. His capture was ef- 
f€ct»*d in .\ swamp six miles south of Au 
Sable twenty-four hours after the com- 
mission of the murder. 



Values not 
iaka ot looks. 




EDWARD scon IS 
SOON CONVICTED 

Of Killing Lars Anderson 

and Given Eight 

Years. 

Val>y City, X. D.. Dec. IT.— tSpecial to 
The Herald. )—.\fter deliberating a few 
hours the Jury thai tried Edward -Soott 
for killing Lars' Anderson found him 
guilty of murder in the second degree, 
and recommends ;« sentence of eight years 
in the peniientiarj-. 

Alb -rt Olson. Scott's supposed com- 
panion in the murder, which occurr>'d at 
Wimbledon on July 2 and in which L^ars 
Anderson was the victim, is now on 'rial. 
The evlden-e will b^ much the same a* 
that in the Soott .trial, covering the .same 
details of the crime all rhe way through. 

The murder of I,irs Anderson 'Occurred 
about 12 o'clock the right of July 'i, foi- 





Holiday 
Suspenders 

25c to $2. 

From the hard wearing 
wire buckle suspender at 
25 cents to the silk ones 
with silver buckle at $2, 
everything in the suspen- 
der line is here. 

The most popular ones 
are the lines selling: at 50 



cents and $1. 
the most 
values. 



These are 
economical 



Christmas Qi/ts Bought Now 
Will be Laid Away Until You Want Them. 



I 



Late Shoppers Will Find Complete Stocks Here | 

Buying Direct From tiie Manutactiircr We Save the Middleman's Protli. | 






IF YOU WANT OUR 

Reliable Catalog Mailed Free 

Write fur it today. It will enable you to select 
just what yuu want to get for Xmas. 



NAME 
STHKET 
CITY . . 



STATE 

Fill in this Coupon and niail to us 



I Money Bacl i If Any Article Pnrcliased Does Not Prove Just as Represented. | 

I M. HENRICKSEN JEWELRY CO. j 

I Providence Building, Fourth Avenue West and Superior St. | 



At 50 cents we show 
beautiful suspenders put 
up in individual boxes, 
with fancy covers, ready 
to be presented. These 
are not the good-for-noth- 
ing suspenders made just 
for the eye of the buyer, 
l)ut disappointing to the 
wearer. They are the ap- 
pn^ved Columbia "50 cent 
values, boxed right here 
in the store without tak- 
ing the value of the box 
out of the article. 

Our $1 Suspenders are 
also boxed and represent 
correspondingly better 
values than the ones at 
50 cents. 

Mohair, cotton and silk 
webs of full length. 
Leather ends or detach- 
able snaps. Some have 
rubber only in the back 
straps. 

Boys' suspenders of all 
sorts. 






TWO STORE.S 
DULUTH AND SUPERIOR. 

Every Columbia article is absolute- 
ly gu.ar.'^nletr'd. If not satisfactory, it 
iiay be brought hack at any time 
and exchanged for a new one. 



of health has pri>hibited all public gather- 
ings, and clo.sed the village schools. 
Eleven cases are now under quaranane. | 
most of which are adults. A dance two 
weeks ago was the di.stributing point of . 
the present epidemic. Dr. Withrow of \ 
! Ituornalional Falls is co-operating With , 
[ the local physician. 

j KILLS HIS FATHER. 

j Slays Parent to Protett Mother 
From Murderous Attack. 

Fort Atkinson. Wis., Dec. 17.-(Special 

to The Herald.) — Frank Popke, aged 19. 

is in Jail charged with killing his father 

at th.- Popke home. The eld-r Pnpke had 

been drinking and was in an ugly mood. 

He quarrelled with his wife and is said 

■ to have pursu'^d her with a knife. She 

! fled away from him, but was unable to 

I get out of the room. She ran around. 

managing to avoid him until her son. 

' hearing the noise of the chase, enterea 

I the room. , , , 

Immediately the father turned his rage 
I from his wifp to his son. it is said, and 
' made a dash in his direction. Before he 
I could reach the b.iy the latter drew a re- 
: volver and fired twice, the bullets lodg- 
I ing in th<' head. The father started to 
I run from the room and was crossing the 
' thn-shhold. it is said, when the son fired 
) again, striking him in the back and kill- 
ing him instantly. 
I The slayer Immediately went to the po- 
lice station and gave himself up. 



PENINSUi-A BRIEFS 




Negaunee— The employ.-s of the Xe- 
gaunee, Maaa and Jackson mines were 
paid Monday for last month's work. 
The Cleveland-Cliffs Iron company's 
men on th'> Swunzey range will be 
paid .Saturday. 

Ishpeming— The saloon conducted by 
John Ayotte w'as entered after the 
closing lii>ur Thursday or n*-arly the 
n^xt morning. The thief carried off $30 
in rash, some liquors, a revolver and 
some cigars. Entrance was obtained 
througli a window on the west side of 
the building. 

Mar(iuette— The new Marquette band 
l.s now fully organized with fifteen 
pieces Rehearsals are being held regu- 
larlv. It is announced that the band 
will give a series of dances and the 
first of these will be held on the night 
of Jan. 15. , ^. 

Crystal Falls— August Johnson, a Fin- 
nish farmer r<*siding two miles west of 
Am.asa droped de.ad while on his way 
home from visiting a neighbor Sun lay 

Lake Linden— Mrs. D. Carr of Duluth 
lias arrived in town and will spend a 
f<-w diys here visiting with relativi-s and 
friends. „ . 

Calumet— Prof. Edward Quiv ron, for- 
merly d-rector of the CaJumtt & Hecla 
band and at present director of the Ste- 
phenson military band, leaves for El 
Pa.so, Tex., the latter part of the week, 
where he will join a concert company 
u!:ioh is to tour Old Mexico during the 
winter months. 

Hancock— The funeral of the late Mrs. 
Kdward J. C'udihy of Calumet was heUl 
nn :\iijnday morning, with servic.s at tli-.. 
Sacr»-d Heart church and InicrnieuL at 
the Lake View cemetery. 



of Christ" to 5<X> people in the evening. 

Callaway — Edward Bliar. Sr.. aged 
about TO years, died, very suddenly at his 
home three miles east of Richmond. He 
had be»-n working as usual during Ihi- 
day and as late as a o'clock was ffiling 

quiet well. 

Uertha— Postmaster Payne :s again on 
dulv at the office, greatly niiproved in 
htallli. but not entirely well. He doe.^ 
liltle of the actual work of the office and 
lias securt-d the services of Mrs. Guy 
Williams as assistant. 

Roseau— Alfred Enger. .son of Sven En- 
ger, who resides six miles north of town, 
was accidentally shot by his brother with 
a -'.'-calibre revolver Saturday afternoon 
and was in the city for treatment. Dr. 
Norin drt-ssed tlie wound, which was in 
the back of the right hand. 

Mmneapolis— A small coin, probably a 
pennv. caused the death of Howard A. 
Harvev. ll-vear-old son of Peter J. Har- 
vev, who died. Saturday, at the family 
ri-sidenc<'. ZTis Eleventli avenue south. 

JaCk.«on — The Llum Lake creamery, 
owned and opt-rated by C. E. Kendall, 
was burned Sunday night. The loss is 
total and partly covered by insurance. 

Rochester — George Forrest, the Olm- 
sted county man who disappt^ared mys- 
teriously from Seattle about a month 
ago, has turned up again .safe and sound 
at liis home, after more than a thou.sand 
doolars has been spent searching for hini. 

Fergus Falls— Mrs. Sophia Holt, of thi.s 
city, died. Sunday night from compli- 
cations incident to old age. She was born 
in Sweden and was 75 years of age at th'- 
time of her death. 

Fergus Falls— <;ust Holt, the village 
marshal at Posston. Polk county, filed a 
bankruptcy petition in the United States 
court here. Monday, placing his assets 
at $S0. all exempt, and his liabilities at 
$4,851. 

Crookston— Joseph Gauche of the town- 
ship of Crookston reports having pur- 
chased the Arnold Webber farm in that 
township which is one of the best in that 
locality. 



I'apineau. between Woodruff and Min- 
o-qua. and escapf^ with $2.:;<>». They took 
all the money in the safe, wiiich was 
open. 

Jeflterson— The large steel bridge over 
the Crawfish river, al>3ve here, was wa.sh- 
ed ciut by high water yesterday morning, 
is the report Ijrought Jieie by famiers. 
The ri\-er is high and olher bridg^-s are 
in danger. 

I.a <'rosse— Fire in the barn of W. W. 
Cargill destroyed the building and three 
automobiles, entailing a loss of about 
JIO.OIHI Two employees wer<> badly 
burned in an effort to get the machine 
out. The hor.ses and buggies were re- 
moved. The fire started from an explo- 
sion of gasolene used in the autos. 

Eau Claire — Thomas Brengaard, agel 
6S, night watchman for the John H. 
Kaiser Lumber company, and residing at 
Si"? Chippewa street, was found dead 
early Sunday morning in the company's 
barn. 

Chippewa Falls — Mrs. I./eopnld Flug, 
aged li.l. and recently married, was shot 
by her brother, an ll-.vear-old boy. and it 
i.-* not believt-d slie will live. The boy 
was playing with a 22-caIibre rifle in the 
yard near Mrs. Plug's home. The weap- 
on was accidentally discharged, the bul- 
let crashing through the window and 
striking Mrs. Flug in the head. 

Eau Claire— The patatial new clubhouse, 
said to be the finest outside of Mil- 
waukee in this state, will be dedicated 
with a grand concert next Friday even- 
ing. The building was erected and fitte.i 
up at a cost approximating SlM.iWO. 



DAKOTAS IN BRIEF 




[MINNESOTA IN BRIEF 



I Glencoe— Archbishop Ireland confirmed j 
' 13N in the churches here Sunday; assist- [ 

lUo' priests were Fathers Hass and Ques- 1 

nell. Glencoe; Mead of Hutchln.son; 

Pichy. Sliver Lake and Goelert of St. 

Paul. Tiie bishop lectured on "Divinity 



Chippewa Falls— p:mil Eiickson was 
wound around the revolving shaft of the 
grist mill at Prairie farm. Death was 
instantaneous. le is believed that the 
man's clothing had been caubht in the 
shaft, pulling Erick.son to his death. A 
large number of bones were broken, and 
his feet and legs to the knees had been 
pounded to a pulp. 

Kenosha— Telegrams received here an- 
nounced the death of Dr. Edgar F. North- 
way, a well-known young physician of 
this city, which occurred Sunday at 
Lordsburg. N. M. Dr. Xorthway was 
about 3o year.s of age. 

Green Bay— The Hashek Manufacturing 
company, with a capital of $l.'i.OOO. has 
been formed to manufacture cabinets. A 
two-story brick factory is almost com- 
pleted, and it is expected that the plant 
will be in operation bj' Jan. 1. 

Marinette— Thomas Coffey of Marinette, 
who has l>ee nin Rhlnelander to attend 
the funeral of his son. has been stricken 
ill and is not expected to live. 

Menasha— The eighth anniversary of the 
organization of Company I was celebrated 
with a banquet and smoker, at which 
several speeches were made. 

Merrill— Mrs. Eva S. Foster was granted 
a divorce from Edgar Foster Saturday in 
the superior court before Judge Helms. 
Mrs. Foster is to resume her maiden 
name. Eva Scott, and ha.s'the custody 
of the child. They formerly lived In Ash- 
land. 

Ashland— Ashland council. National Fra- 
ternal league, has elected the following 
officers: Chief councilor. J. A. TlTorson; 
vice councilor, Mrs. Minnie Pugsley; sec- 
retary. W. G. Nohl; treasurer. R. W. 
Parsons; warden, Mrs. Minnie Doucetie; 
inside guard. Alfred Parker; outside 
guard, IxJuis Miller; trustee three years, 
D. E. Canty. 

Rhlnelander— Two highwaymen, with 
jnasked faces and armed with Winche.s- 
ters, held up ttie rocMlhuu«e o£ J&mes 



C 



Larimoro, N. D— Tiie Eagles have 
elected the following officers: P. W. 
P., B W. Hastings; W. P.. William 
Mortimer: W. V. P., A. P. Rounsevell; 
W. C W. H. Morrison; W. S. O. A. 
Hagen: W. T.. L. F. Mason; W T. O., 
Fred Olmes; W. O. G., R. Bissell; trus- 
tees. William Dresden. H. Buyer and 
R. W. Hastings; physicians, Drs. W. 
H. Welch and A. P. Rounsevell. 

Cando. X. I).— Three cases of smallpox 
have developed among the boarders at 
the Leiand hotel here. They are all so 
mild that the afflicted experience 
scarcely any inconvenience. They were 
promptly removed to Isolated quarters 
and placed in quarantine. 

Grand Forks, N. D.— At a meeting 
held Sunday afternoon, the Grand 
Fork.s Barbers' union. No. GOl. was or- 
ganized. Thv^ charter membership is 
about thirty and the following are the 
officers named: President. A. E. Elast- 
land; vice president, W.-fi. .Sand; sec- 
ret.'iry. L. H. Bell; recorder and treas- 
urer. George Jorsche; guardian, R. D. 
Tucker; guide, William Marble. 

Minot. N. D.— A meeting of the offi- 
cers of the North Dakotta national 
guard will be held here soon, for the 
purpose of deciding on the date of the 
meeting of the guard in this city dur- 
ing the winter. The annual session 
will very probably be called for Janu- 
ary, and delegates will be in attendance 
from all of the companies in the guard. 

Arlington. S. D.— The newest paper In 
South Dakota tournnnsm is tiie Lako 
Norden Leader, the initial number havln,j 
been issued. J. K. Coe, editor of tlie 
Bryant News, is t!ie proprietor. The paper 
will be Republican in politics, but Ind^-- 
pendent of the factional questions now In 
issue in this state. 

Mandan. N. D.— It is rumored that sev- 
eral members of the late grand Jury Insist 
that the fln.al report made to the court 
was "railroaded" through the jury, and 
that several voted for It not knowing its 
full importt. 

Ellendale. N. D.— George Strohl Is con- 
fined In the county jail on the charge of 
murder in the first degree, and he has 
confessed to the killing of hig new-bom 
babv. 

Minot. N. D — A verdict of guilty In the 
ca.se of the State vs. Peter B. Mounts, 
charged wit hshootin£*off an arm of Thor- 
vald Emilson. near Ryder, was return d 
la the districa court Saturday af teroooo. 



,JCl 



wtsmem 




' j ' A- ■ 




I 
III 




A Real Christmas^StoreMEverybody 



Our store will remain open every evening until 
Christmas. Willi the abundance of light evening buy- 
ing will be as satisfactory as buying in the day time. 



The articles iilvstrated below Are by no means an attempt to show the 
extent or variety of our stock. They are intended as suggestions to help 
Christmas gift-buylng and show that THIS IS EVERYBODY'S CHRISTMAS STORE. 



The reputation of this store is the result of our 
upright methods of selling only the best jewe!ry at 
the lowest consistent prices. 



p«wrv«t^»-l 



*3Ji; 



.»i*? 



^y 












Bolid Gold Signet 
Rlnp. set with two 
eparklingr diamonds- 



Solid Gold Pijrnet 
Ring for gentle- 
mtn. Rose finish— 



$15 



$7 



A Word About 
Our Gold Rings 



The TROCrS-' Toilet iet is the 
greatest value to be found in any 
jewelry store: bru«h. 
comb, and mirror— price 
per set 



$5.00 






An array of Pet Rings that cannot 
be equalled outside of New York 
city. All the latest designs, secure- 
ly mounted— 




$3.50 to $12 



It has been our pleasure to 
enjoy the title of "The 14- 
Carat Store." This name was 
__^ bestowed upon us by our pat- 
rons, who, by dealing with us 
year after year, have realized what we so often say — that none of our 
rings are gold filled, or plated, but SOLID GOLD. Time alone can tell 
the value of solid gold as compared with gold filled. The rings we 
have sold in past years prove our assertion that they are solid gold. 



Cuff Links, sterling silver, 14-carat 
gold filled and solid gold; p/\ 
plain or chased; per pair, ^IIC 
upward from *^ ■v^^i' 





Solid Gold Signet 
Ring, ladies" size— 

$3.50 



Bar Pins. 14-rnrat gold 

filled— upward 

from 



$1,00 



J-^ 



m 





F. D. Day & Co. 

FASHIONABLE JEWELERS. 

315 West Superior Street. 




Mesh Purses, Ster- 
ling Silver, 14-carat 
filled and 14-car.at 
Gold— upward from— 



$10 




Match 
—plain 
— upwa 
from... 



Safes, Sterling Silver 
or chased 
rd 



$1.00 



sterling Silver Thim- 
bles, upward from— 



15c 



Solid Hold, 
from »4.50. 



upward 






>i:: 






An eUjrant display 
Back ruiiih.-^ lo stlect 
from. Pries upward 

from 



of mount e(l 

$1.75 



To a frknd out of the 
city nothing could bo 
more approprlato than 
a Soiivmfr Spoon of D\i- 
luth. PricB* upward 
from— 



TTiit r:n = , ?5ter- 
linp ?iivtr, or 
g o I d platfd. 
Also many Art^ 
and Crafts pat- 
terns; p r i c •' a 
upward from— 



$1.25 



50c 





LIbbey's F. D. Day & Co.'s 

Famous Cut Glass Word for a Dia- 

mond is an 
Abso lute 
Guarantee 





The largest assort- 
ment of perfect 
watches In the city. 
Prices from— 



At one time Amerlc 
to produce Cut Glass 
•with th»- product of 
America leads Austri 
are the foremost cut 
United States. We h 
sale of Libbeys Cut 
Our dl.'^play is uneciu 
ricty, quality and pri 
executed designs In 1 



a vied with Austria 
which could compete 
that country. Now 
a, and Libbey & Co. 
ters of glass in the 
ave the exclusive 
Glass In Duluth. 
aled In beauty, va- 
I «•. Some beautifully 
urge bowls at— 



$5, $6 and $7 

$3.50 up Sugar and Creamers, Set, $5.00. 



So conBi.>-tent have been our methods 
and so liberal our policy of handling Dia- 
monds that we are the acknowledged au- 
thorities of Northern Minnesota. We go 
direct to the diamond cutters and select 
the perfect stones— perfect both In cut and 
color. Our direct method of buying and 
selling eliminates several extra profits 
find as;-urf s the quality of the diamond. 
Diamond Rings from 

$15 to $1500 




Gentl men's Watch 
Fobs, complete; 14-carat 
gold filled— 

$3.50 

Solid Qold, $12.50. 



cigar 

shaped 
Pocket 
Humidor- 
one of the 
latest 
novelties 
for men; 
kept in 
pocket with 
cigars to 

keep them 

moist. 
Made in 
Sterling 

Silver, 
oxidized 

finish. 

What a 

man who 

smokes 

wants. 

$1.75 



im 




Small Toilet Articles 
n:ounted with Ster- 
ling Silver handles. 
Nails Files,' Shoe 
Horns, Buttoners, etc. 
—upward from— 



Pocket Knives In leather cases— probably the most ac- 
ceptable plft for a man. Many styles of (t < '^ CT 
handles — the best steel blades. Upward Ji I ^ Z,^ 
from **^ * •MK^ 



CARMKN BRACELKTS — the first 
adjustable bracelet ever sold; 14- 
carat gold filled; u.«ually sold at J5 
and $6. In two styles— 



50c 



$3.00 and $3.50 




REPUBLICANS CALL FOR 
DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 



Are Getting Into Primary 

Fight in Large 

Numbers. 

Total Vote for the Day 

Promises to be 

Heavy. 



Voting proniisf s iv 1>» i xf < ptlonally 

heavy in Iiuluta today i>'i -l primary 
election. 

Appart niiy th- II' i .,Mi. .uiv in Duluth 
arc a iniinun .n.iMiiy i \^ t-it in the 
Wiirds vvh< re tlitri- are alUt rnuinic con- 
tists and the Democratic ballots are 
j; ti.-Lit (h< ..] 1\- ■■;,■ - .11 d*'Uiarul. 

an L>iiiut!i 11.:-:'' ■ f'ir cxainp!>'. 
wlu-rt' till- linirnal \ I'oiit 125, tlii.- 

< Uy < Ivik Still up liXi I'tmocrallc bal- 
lots uid t w-i iity-fivf R«pulili>nn. Short- 
ly aft<'r 1(1 o'clui k li>is 111' :'e 
« . Slurry Ciill tor mure i 'fino'-rat ir 
I'ractirally .ill of litiem iiad 
1 • > li ii-'d by th:it time, the majority 
of tlie residents «>! tin- H«ighls votinp 



hitw liic vote is go] 
fact liial tlie niayora 
ter of attention. 

At ll::iO o clock th 
tin- TesHiiKin worker 
six prei lnct.s in the 
portid that L'5o vote? 
wliit li a built 75 per 
era tic. 

Clianllengers 

Challengers have 
both factions In th 
Au,[ where a m.'in is 
publican, his vote 1 
eral cashes were r*p 
ward thi.H morning 
was destroyed. 

There is no quest It 
pulilitiins arc get tin 
hirsi- numbers, and 
ii.ii\ocratlc ticket. *. 
ward wht re the vot« 
ninp about even, thi 
percentage of R»pul. 
for. In the t\T>'t pr» 



ig. aside from the 
Ity race Is the cen- 

s morning one of 
* made a circuit of 
■Jixth ward and re- 
Iiad been ca.«»t, of 
cent Were Demo- 
Are liusy. 
been sent out by 
; mayoralty fight, 
knc>wn to be a Re- 
! challenged. Sev- 
(>rt«d in the First 
where the ballot 

n I'Ut that the Re- 
< into the fight In 
are voting the 
Uitside of the First 
is apparently run- 
re Is a very small 
lican ballots cnlb d 
clnct of the Third 



than we could yesterda>v" said Mr. 
Tc.>5sman this morning. ■Thfre will be 
a heavy vote, but we expected that. I 
believe we have tliem beaten, and don't 
concede them anything but the First 
ward." 

•I can't make any further prediction 
than I did yesterday.' said Joseph Rey- 
nolds, numager for Mayur Cullum. "I 
I concede them the Tlilrd ward, but no 
i others." 

I A Herald reporter spent the day gath- 
ering stati.»;ti<s of the vote in the vari- 
ous precincts. The results published 
below wt-re gathered between the hours 
of 11 a. m. and 1 p. m. In thos=e pre- 
cincts where the early morning vote is 
the heaviest, the results were gathered 
I before noon. In other preein< ts where 
; th vote at noon is heaviest, the totals 
! were secured at 1 o'clock. The polls 
will remain open until S o'clock to- 
night. 
Following are the rcs\!!ts: 
tlrst Ward. 



City bank of Durango, a state institu- 
tlon, capital 130,000. failed to open this 
morning. No statement of its assets or 
' liabilities has been given out, but the 
' deposits are believed not to exceed JK\»,- 
000. 



Fine Leather Goods. 

Card cases, purses, shopping bngs, 
pocket books, address books, portfolio.^, 
etc. A choice collection at very low 
prices. M. Henricksen Jewelry com- 
pany. 



Rep. 



78 



Precinct. 

First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 24 

Sixth 

Second Ward. 



Normal 
Dem. Vote. 



Buy Him a Fancy Vest 

For Christmas. The "Fitwell" Cloth- 
ing Parlors are showing a swell line 
at from 12 to 15. 



74 
'26 



WANTED 

Competent Carpenter;, riumberi.. Electri- 
cians, Sheet Metal Workers, Roofers and 
Pla.-terern; steady uork; good wages; 
I op. II shop. Apply iCmp. I>ept.. Duluth 
' B!;1d* rs" Excliange. M)i Dyceum building. 



76 

50 

Tliird Warci. 

'I 
, t* 

8 

5 



before tiiey vv n' 'o 


\v< 


■ rk '(lis Tiicrn- 


Ing, aiid all •■allii.".^ i 


•! 1 


'■ .,•■■ Wvl i'- l..(l- 


lots 






Til. r<- is. of roui'^--. 


:io 


way of telling 



ward, for instance, t iure were only two 
Republicans and lilnety-eight Demo- 
crats at about noo i today. The Re- 
puMi";in vote is co respondingly light 
in oilier wards, and mly a few hundr«d 
Republican votes w ill l>e cast in the 
entire city— probablj less than l.CKX). 

The headquiirters of the two candi- 
dates* are deserted oday. the workers 
all being busy aroui d the city, hustling 
oat the \otfrs. 

We eant tell any hing more about it 



Fourth Wnnl. 

!!!!"!!!!!!!! "2 
3 

8 

4 

Fifth Ward. 

25 

28 

4 





m mil 




Are you puzzled to know what to do for your 
son or daughter for Christmas? 

Why not call us into the council a id let us 
sul)init a scheme of room decoration ' Some- 
thing dainty for the young miss; something in 
line with his taste for the lad. 

Can you think of anything that wiuild give 
greater pleasure? 

Floor Polisliiiie. Wall Decorating. Wot;i Finis^hing. 



IHI. k. yiLL 



119 East Superior Street 



First .... 
Second . 
Tliird ... 
Fourth . 

First .... 
Sec\ind . 
Third . . . 
{"Njurth 

First • • . • 
Second . . 
Third ... 
Fourth . 
Fifth ... 

First .... 

Sei-ond . 

Third ... 

Foui-th 

iFiflh 2 

Sixth Ward. 
The total vote for the ward at 

was 2.'iO. of which 75 per cent 
I Deniocrats. A normal vote for the 
' is about W»0. 

Seventh Ward. 

First 

Second ••• 

Third 

P'ourth 

Fifth 20 55 

Ktghth Ward. 

First 2 54 

Se<'ond 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 



60 
iOO 



04 
85 



63 
60 

24 

100 

90 
IIJ 

TO 



350 

ioo 



375 



200 
275 
190 



225 

^4 
175 

.IfiO 

200 
200 

iii 

11:30 
were 
ward 



Hat Pins. 

Solid gold, gold filled and sterling 
silver. A very large assortment nt at- 
tractive prices. M. Henricksen Jewelry 
company. 

Fountain Pens. 

Our stock of fountain pens is the 
largest in the city. We sell them from 
$1 up. Also fancy gold pens with pear] 
and ebony holders. 

LUNDBERG & STON'E. 



$25 overcoats now $16.75. "Fitwell." 



DR. SIMONTON BURIED. 




Half fentnry Resident of St. Paul 
and Noted as Astronomer. 

St. Paul, Dec. 17.— (Special to fhe 
Herald.)— The Central Presbyterian 
church was thronged this afternoon at 
the funeral of Dr. Thomas D. Simon- 
ton, for fifty years a resident of St. 
Paul, who died at his Summit avenue 
home Saturday afternoon in his sev- 
enty-seventh year. 



COLORADO BANK CLOSES. 
Durango, Colo.. Dec. 17.— The Smelter 



Give An 
Umbrella 



We sell the kind of Umbrellas 
you nted — tlu: kind that will 
pronounce yott as having good 
taste and good judgment. 

One opportune thing that 
stamps them superior is their 
strength. It's the way we make 
them — best materials, frames 
and covering put into them. 

We have them all — fine gifts 
for Christmas they make, too. 
Suitable for men, women and 
children. We sell them at 

Low8r Prices 

Than similar qualities can be 
had for elsewhere. 

Free for One 
Year 

We guarantee all our up- 
brcll.'is and will keep them in 
repair for one year absolutely 
FREE. 

Don't wait until the last min- 
ute — leave your order now. 
A SMALL DEPOSIT will lay 
aside any umbrella you may se- 
lect until Xmas. 
BUY FROM THE MAKER, 

Wc do re-covering and re- 
pairing on short notice. 



A. Giitgold 

Umbrella Maiaufacturer, 

125 EAST SUPERIOR ST. 

Opposite City Hall. 

Open Evenings. DULUTH. 



SENATORS 
ASSIGNED 

To Serve on the Vari- 
ous Committees of 
the Senate. 



ties. Democratic senators were award- 
ed chairmanships as follows: Cor- 
porations in the Di.«trict of Columbia, 
Mallory; engrossed bills. Bacon; wo- 
man suffrage. Clay; useless papers in 
I the executive departments, Money; 
private land claims. Teller; revolu- 
tionary claims, Taliaferro; public 
health and national quarantine, Dan- 
iel; addition accommodation for the 
library of congress, Martin; five civ- 
ilized tribes, Tillman; transportation 
and .sale of meat products, McEnery. 



Good Positions Given 

to Senators Nelson 

and Clapp. 



I-ROM THE HERALD 
W.XSIHXGTON BUKEAU 

Washington, Dec. 17.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— The committee on committees 
I this morning announced the various as- 
I signments of senators for the work of 
j the Sixtieth congress. Senator Nelson 
I retains the chairmanship of the com- 
j mittee on the "Missiissippl river and its 
I tributaries." and is assigned to a place 
on the following committees: Addition- 
'al Accomnf.cdations for the Library of 
I Congress, Commerce. Judiciary, Public 
j Lands, Railroads, and Territories. 
, Senator Clapp still remains at the 
! head of the committee on Indian af- 
j fairs, and his other committee assign- 
ments are upon the following: Claims, 
: Cuban relations, interstate commerce, 
I'aciflc islands, and Porto Rico, and 
patents. 

! A large number of changes were made 
; in assignments to chairmanships, in- 
cluding the following: Senator Knox, 
i from coast defenses to rules; Senator 
j Kittredge from patents to inter-oceanic 
canals; Senator Hopkins from fisheries 
to enrolled bills; Senator Smoot from 
I weights and measures to patents; Sen- 
\ ator "William Alden .Smith from dispo- 
, sition of documents to national banks; 
Senator Bulkeley, from civil service ex- 
amination to railroads; Senator Nixon 
from national banks to coast defenses. 
New senators secured the following 
chairmanships: Bourne of Oregon, fish 
■ eries; Dixon of Montana., civil service 
examination; Borah of Idaho, weights 
and measures. 

The cliojirmanships of the committee 
on library was reserved for Senator 
Wetmore. 

New Conimltteos Created. 
Severa-l new oommittees have been 
created for tihe purpose of giving chair- 
manships to ne^v Republica.n senators. 
The.se come in the list known as "select 
committoes." Senator Sttephenson of 
Wisconsin is at the head of a new com- 
mittee on expenditures, in the depart- 
ment of agiiculture. 

Senators Burkett and La Follettc 
leave the oomnxittee o nclaims. and 
Senator Stephenson, Borah and Gug- 
genheimer take memberships. Senator 
I..a FoUette will be with th*- committee 
on military affairs, and Senator Rich- 
ardson of Delaware goes to Pacific 
islands and Porto Rico. 

After the caucus adjourned and the 
senate convened. Senator Hale offered 
a resolution for the reorganization of 
the senate committees, and the com- 
mittees were appointed in accordance 
with the caucus action of the two par- 



Souvenlr Spoons. 

We have a splendid line and engrave 
your initial or monogram free of 
charge. M. Henricksen Jewelry com- 
pany. 



BAD OAK PARK FIRE. 
Stillwater, Minn., Dec. 17.— Fire in the 
village of Oak Park did damage of 
over $10,000 Sunday night. The general 
store of Alex C. Robertson was entire- 
ly destroyed. The fine dwelling of 
James Sinclair was burned, although 
the furniture was saved. Two larg« 
barns and the dwelling of Andrew 
Jamieson were damaged. There is no 
water system in the village. The firo 
department from this city went to ih*; 
scene and saved adjacent buildings. 



Open Evenings. 



Commencing Wednesday, the 
well" Clothing Parlors will be 
evenings until Christmas. 



"Fit- 
open ' 









M 



iMi 



Hanclsonve CKrlsfmas 
Gifts for Men 

A moment's reflection dictates that it was in the Spal- 
ding Haberdashery that you saw very elegant furnishings 
last Christmas. Quite so. This season the new ownership 
offers you a selection amazing in tastefulness, quality and 
price. 

FANCY VESTS $1.50 TO $7.50 

WHITE VESTS $1-50 TO $6.00 

SUIT CASES $1.50 TO $20.00 

FANCY HOSIERY 25c TO $2.50 

WALKING GLOVES $1.00 TO $3.50 

HOLIDAY UMBRELLAS $1.50 TO $20.00 

SCARF PINS 50c TO $1000 

UNDERWEAR 50c TO $12.00 

DERBY HATS $3.50 TO $7.00 

SILK HATS $8.00 TO $12.00 

OPERA HATS $7.50 TO $10.00 

DRESS GLOVES $1-50 TO $3.50 

SWELL NECKWEAR 50c TO $3.50 

PAJAMAS $2.00 TO $6.00 

FANCY SHIRTS $1.00 TO $3.50 

SMOKING JACKETS $5.00 TO $15.00 

Every gentleman appreciates handsome furnishings, and 
at no other store can you be served so well as at 

The Spalding Haberdashery 

426 W. Superior St. (Spalding Hotel Block). 



..-« 



•> «'* 



\ 

f 



^Bi^r 





HUSBANDS 

Advice is Given in Lec- 
ture on "Love and 
Affinity." 

Chicago Man Says Women 

Should Have Right to 

Propose. 



Chicago. D<*c. 17. — Beware of drawing 
ft "luve blank" In tht* inairimoniiil lot- 
tery. Same men are 1> irii d-vi>;d of ability 
to love. 

Mjirj 1 man whi» i.s well dt'veloped au 
tnrh and a half behind the ears, where 
thf phrfnolojjsical "love bump" 13 l>caied. 
1 -ad if necessary. 

^- -w J..L ijr the man braad b-hirid the 
«*ir3 and full under the eyes. H-- makca 
a. iutrivisonie husband. 

• a care about tyinic up with a 

ar man of highly nervous tem- 

l ' < apt la turn out a brute 

. k A . before marrying a highly 
b; 1; He is apt to become mel- 

a: : ikt,' lo drink. 

i . liud a round-fac d man. 

nau iiini jti I he spjt. Ilound-facfd men 
make thf Iwat husbands. 

lir. \t>a BeniaiHT's Advice. 1 

1" :* ; wa^i ilie practical advice r 

g cago womeii by Dr. Julius 

^ : In a iecture an "Love and 

• re the i**yciio-Phy.siological [ 
. jditorium recital hail yea- 

ihe right man 1-s nitre 
•!■■ rU-ht age," said Dr. , 
man is honest, | 
:.s. ambiiiouii. so- i 
.:<! nut less than 25 

-n he casita about 
X a cook, wajsh- 
t care 
. . .^.. He 
lU. Tho American ' 
;>ver and a nuptial i 
. d cultivate good j 
ness and h.>alth. I 



A" 

ft" 



w ^ 






■;»..: i :..-.-., C 


»■ 






>i ^ ^ ■ .. . 


' 


lo 


1 : 


i'r, l: ;■ gave 
;h to n-'iu a woman 
1 her; 




_^ i 




..I tne kitchen." 




. > * 


y- 


iv w.U-'s d'Jjnesiic ar- 



a.5 



our w 

your 

.■ inijrii 



--■ .iuAU-sly 
..ju go 



I ;■ 






0- 



u-fsh anil t>ii'i win , 

plrase you." : 

ichelor.s cowards. \ 

:it of women to j 

.■•V love. 

>v t.irl. 

iiappi- ] 



release ivt irom 
will be honest ■ 
;ifr live will make its, 
The nfvr man will ac- I 

;.' ■ ■ ■, '-.i- V to his 

• f a.s- 

;■!, In- 
.-, the 
■i ihi- 
Trial 
■ rig to 

■ a tile *i- ! 

..i man jr 



■ rfni:! v 



^c ur 
with- 



Liirge iiiuiuoud Imj»oii>. 



s at Uie poil 
was over 43 



> only 

■•.illion. 

I that 

.. •:. .- i.-^ eon- 

.1 in thJ-s lat- 

npart^d to th« 

■ r Hostel let' 3 

I very humble 

- gvown until 

of iu-* cla!*.««. due 

.1! merit. Try i-t 

1, |>x>r apprtite, 

:nili£r**stioii, chills 

! IHin't for- 

a rfi{>y of 

I well 



CUMMINS STILL 
IN TOGA RACE 

Says Boom for President 

is Just a Secondary 

Matter. 



r 

ti 
1; 



I 
1; 

^ 

I 



l>:v 1, ii,-f'. 17.— Gover- ) 
' ly, rlorrint; to 
the Repub- ' 

.*;iit of surrendering 

l'tnt<*'l Slates sena- 

U the presi- 

■ •)ugh I havrt 

; 111 oiiirr stale*!. I .1 > 

fi> anvthintr '^i.it ^\ ill 

tor.' 

:...x : public 

in Washington, 

.tii. . Cummins In r.Ls 

governor, wherein he 

mdldate for Sena- 

'le governor says 

was not at that time, but 

in lie never would be. 

■ ipital here, a stand-pat 

•d upon Governor Cuin- 

.■ the $1.0«X> he said In 

would give if shown a 

!; hv promised not to run 



H<v 



< - 

«,i 



I 
I 

at 
A- 



»-.• <»f lYeqiient Colds. 

1 ..f colds or a pro- , 
: aimr»st certain to 
itarrh, fr>>m which 
•r whidly recover. 
the attention It 
I may avoid this 
isf. How can you j 
W hy not trv Cham- 
.-■h It.in.-dv? It is; 

'1 was bothered with I 
lo"c- ^ >meone told' 
igh Remedy. 

i-!::tj ii wifj ii relieved tne j 
.\">w my throat and lungs 
nd well." For sale by all 




The largest ; 
Furnishing stor 
larged and witi 
for allowing go 

By purchasin 
wc get the lowt 
vantage of beiii 
very lowest pri« 
choosing from 
where, and yoi 
beat. 



•urnitiire and Complete House 
• in the Northwest — greatly en- 
1 the latest improved facilities 
)d9. 

^ goods in immense quantities 
St prices; this gives you tlie ad- 
g able to purchase here at the 
es; gives you the advantage of 
a larger assortment than else- 
i are always stire o£ the very 




It would bt 
ueful or mor 
I'ougall Cabi 
and with mor 
— the cabinet 
^e^vice when 1 
— no puur j<ji 
j>o<>r wood. ] 
made and br 
h'»me. Sold 



hard to think of a gift more 
e practical than a fine Mc- 
ict — the cabinet better made 
• conveniences than any other 

that will last and give you 
he others are split and warped 
)t:i, no loose drawer work, no 
Ivery cabinet comvenient, well 
ilt to till the space in your 
jn easy payments. 



Pricei' From 

$10. 75 Up 




^HE GREATER 
FRENCH & BASSETT STORE 

The Largest Retail Store of any Kind In Duluth 
with a Stock of Furniture Greater than 

all Others Gomblned. 

THE LARGEST CARPET AND RUG STORE IN DULUTH 
THE LARGEST PIANO STORE IN DULUTH 

THE LARGEST TALKING MACHINE STORE IN DULUTH 
THE LARGEST DRAPER Y STORE IN DUL UTH 

THE LARGEST CROCKER Y STORE IN DULUTH 
THE LAR GEST STO VE STORE IN D UL UTH 

THE LAR GEST BEDDING STORE IN D UL UTH 

Also Complete and Very Carefully Selected Lines of Table Linen, Lunch Cloths, 

Laces, Household and Bed Linens, Portieres, Etc. 

8,75 



Very artistic decorated pitch- 
ers — some splendid values in 
)eautiful designs — shown in oitr 
ivenue salesroom. Pitcher sim- 
ilar to cut — handsomely decor- 
ated, only 

38c 



Beautifully 
Decorated 
Lamp and 
Globe 

With large burner, burnished 
brass trimmings and very hand- 
-■ime decorations: rei^ular price 

^f:=;.. .*■:""' $I.U9 

Decorated Lamp and Globe, 
highly tinted, very artistic 
>liape; regular price $J.85. 

r.""' $1.98 

Handsomely decorate'! Lamp 
and Globe, that sell regularly 
here at $.2.98. ^^ tf^ 

Special only ^j^mM^y 




Our warehouses, 314, 316, 318 
and 320 West Michigan street, 
where cars are unloaded directly 
from the factories — this saves 
cost of drayage and handling 
and gives you lower prices. 





$1.85 




This Fine Qombina^ 
tion Boole Gase 



A good, solid, comfortable Rocker, 
in golden oak or mahogany finish, 
with pressed leather seat, shaped 
arms and turned spindles in sides 
and back. The ordinary store asks 
$3.50 for ond similar. Our price. 




Easy Rocker, upholstered in genuine 
leather, seat and back, well made, well fin- 
ished frames in quartered golden oak. Early 
English and birch mahogany. 



In golden quartered oak, heavily 
carved top, bookcase with ad- 
justible shelve, fine, well ar- 
ranged desk and cupboard un- 
derneath. Sells everywhere for 
$16. Our price 



$1,85 



Special 

Prices on 

MORRIS 

QHAIRS 



A very fine solid quartered oak Morris Chair, 
or birch mahogany finished chair, with re- 
versible hair-filled cushions, in the best grade 
of velour — frames are polished and finely fin- 
ished, seats have nine coil springs, and the 
chair would sell in ordinary stores for $14 or 
$15. Our price for one 
week only 



$8.75 



r 



^ 



Japanese Tea Pots 




Blue decorated Tea Pots— 4-cup size— in 

quaint Japauese patterns. These tea pots 

are little gems— have tea strainer— all 

complete — sell regularly at 

35c — extra special 

at. 



I 



Swedisli 
Art Pottery 

Something entirely new and strikingly handsome, 
at the same time quaint and odd — this pottery at- 
tracts attention at once because of its odd shape 
and design. Vases, pitchers, bowls, etc., from 



50C to $5.00 



etiild*s 
Rociiers 

Fine little arm Rockers, in maple or 
red, with woven seats and strong, 
well made construction — just the 
thing for the little ones. These 
rockers are special value 
at 



95cj 



I8e 



A six-cup size, in same decoration — only 

larger— that sells regularly 

at 38c — special 

at 





eut Glass Olive Dish 



Burrows Billiard Tables 

The thing to buy for Christmas. You can spend i|v*ning after evening playing 
this fine game and many others on these tables.' TTables are complete with 
balls, cues. etc. Be sure and see the $6 tables They are fine ones and afford 
many evenings' entertainment. Tables are priced at 

$6, $25, $U5 



Graftsman 
Furniture 



Affords the finest of Christmas gifts. Rockers from $5.00 up. 
Large arm rocker $7.50. Tables, bookcases, chairs, dining room 
sets, all combine to make handsome and worthy gifts for Christ- 
mas. Our stocks of the beautiful furniture is most complete. 




Bed (Comforters 

One of the most useful and practical presents 
you can make. We have all styles, qualities and 
at all prices. You will find our prices are lower 
than others ask you and the quality better. A 
good comforter, filled with pure white cotton and 
in yellow, blue, lavender or rod coverings: 

$1.50 Values for ' 65c 
$6.00 Values for $U.75 



Shirt Waist 









Boxes 



Always convenient — make good, practical gifts 
and lasting ones. These are extra well made, 
serviceable boxes, covered with Japanese matting, 
15x28 inches in size and sell regularly at $4.25. 
Special for only 



$2.75 



SKIRT BOXES— Plenty long enough to hold 
skirts or dresses — made of seasoned wood and mat- 
ting covered — sizes are 20x45 inches long — regular 
price was $8.50 — special for 



$6.00 



A Fine Gutter 

In either dark red or white enamel 
trimmed with gold — a fine, strong cutter 
and very handsomely finished. 



$2.75 



Other styles in red, dark green or 
white, upholstered with nickel rail at 
back— these sell at $6, $8.75, $9.75, etc. 
Other stores ask you $12, $14 and $15 
for similar ones. 



/ \ 

Fur Baby Robes 

Beautiful white lamb's wool Robes, 
heavily lined — fine fur robes lined 
witli quilted and brocaded silk — priced 
at $2.50, $4.25, $6, $8 up to $25. A 
fine special robe, long thick fur, 
warmly lined, at 

o^''y$i.75 



Genuine hand i 
tive pattern: th 
l> 'Mb'Mis. etc.; 
\\ cek only 



ut glass, hnely polished and of a very attrac- 
ese dishes are suitable for olives, ^i^ ^^ 
regular price $1 50. Special this %^qC(^ 




Gut Glass Bowels 



Rare values and handsome pat- 
terns, a heavy 8-inch bowl, very 
beautiful design; regular valv.c 

H'':..^'''''] $2.28 

Gut Glass 
Pitchers 

These were specially low priced at 
$4.50. A splendid ^O OiQ 
bargain at %p Jmrm ^^^9 




This very handsome, richly designed Bread Tray, in the 
very best heavy plated ware, is a rare bargain at our price. 
Beautifully finished in French gray and burnished silver. In 
any other store it would be priced at $3 75. Our Christmas 
special at H 



$1 



Genuine 
Leather 
Rockers 

Tufted backs and plain seats and 
arms, full Turkish Rocker of genu- 
ine leather, upholstered over heavy 
spring seats; a good-sized comfort- 
able leather rocker, golden oak 
frames. Extra special value at only 

$15. 75 




THE MOST LIBERAL 
GREDIT 

Is always gh dly extended to you here. We have a gradual 
payment plan unlike the regular installment stores. Our plan 
is broader, more liberal and far reaching. Use it whenever 
y.'U like. Do I't be afraid to »sk for credit — it is yours. 
Tiie storr will be open every evening until Christmas 




Corner First Street and Third Avenue IVest. 
Complete House Furnishers and Reliable Piano Dealers. 



Store Open Every Evening this Week 

To accommodate the many Christmas shoppers, we will 
begin Tuesday evening keeping our store open until Christmas. 
Don't forget the big store open every evening. 

You Will Find This Store 

Offers you more and better values than you can find else- 
where and at lower prices. Come and compare prices. We al- 
ways welcome visitors 



/ 




^T- 




19 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1907. 







SSJi 












9 00 Drops 



ALCOHOL 3 PER CENT 

AVcgclable Prcpnmion forAs 
similaiiiigiheFoodandRetjuia 
ting llic Siomadis andCowcls of 



^ Infant^Thrdren 



f^ 



Promofcs DigcslionjChterfy 
ncss and Rest.CoritainsneittiEr 
Opium .Morphine norMiocraL 
Not Narcotic. 



CASTORIA 

For Infants and Children. 

The Kind You Have 
Always Bought 

Bears the 
Signature 



DmfJtiaSeid' 



.JticSbma* 

AeMtSdh- 

jkdstSttd*- 

aSSmakimt* 



Apcrfect Remedy forConsfipa- 
tlon , Sour Stoniach.Diarrlwea 
Worms ,Con\Tilsious.fe\Trish- 
nessandLoss OF Sleep. . 

FacSumIe Signature of 
NEW* YORK. 




Atfemonths lo\A 



raarantcctl under tT«Fb^ 
Exact Copy of Wrapper, 



Thirty Years 

(ASTORIA 



CITY. 




JUDGE TELLS OF 
FINDING BOMB 

Goddard an Important 
Witness in tiie Petti- 
bone Trial. 

Bol5e. Idaho. Dec. 17.— Documentary 
•Vldeni t> in corroboration of Harry Or- 
Chardv^ ttstiniony was introduced at i 
the Fel'il"ini' trial y.jstvriJay !>>• the 
proftculii'ii. 

Judge Lut!'- r M. Gndaara i.f Den\ r 
was tlir niui^t uni.ortaiit witness I'-r 
the state, bting on the witness stand j 
most of the afternoon session. He told' 
of the lindiug of the bomb which Or- 1 
chard testitied had been planted near, 
jbis fence fur the purpose of kiUing him.; 
The testimony of Former Sheriff, 
Nichols pryoved disastrous to the state. 
After he had t.dd of receiving a letter 
addr. s-sed Lo Tliomas Hogan, copying; 
It and giving it to Orchard, he testiflid 
on cro.'?i=-exaniinati<>n that the letter] 
ivas^f net in tlie handwriting of George; 
A. Fettibone, the defendant. He said he 
became familiar with Peltibone's writ- 
ing wlrilc tile defendant was in jail at 
CaldwelL ■ 

Orchard had testified that this letter 
•was written by Petiibone. On redirect 
examination Nichols failed to identify 
the handwriting of Haywood with 
which he said lie was also familiar, 
stating that it loolted like that of I'ettl- 
bone. 

G. H. Hackett, local manager of the 
Western Union Telegraph company, 
produced an application for a mon;y 
order from the LH-nver officers. The 
application was signed by W. D. H.iy- 
wood, sending $75 to Steve Adams at 
Ogden. W. V. McCartney, former Den- 
ver cashier of the Postal Telegraph 
company, identified an application for 
a money • rder. The application was 
Signed J. \V<dfe. The amount tra..s- 
lerred was $l>7. and It was sent to H. 
Greene. 211 Taylor street, San Fran- 
cisco. It was dated Sept. U*. 11»<'1. 



ing of the boat 
hattan borough 
day to elect a 
Ahearn, who w; 
flee of presidi 
Manhattan by 
called by May* 
The call follow 
injunctions, wh 
Ahearn to prev. 



d of aldermen of Man- 
to be held next Thurs- 
successor to John F. 
s removed from the of- 
nt of the borough of 
Governor Hughes, wa.s 
r McClellan yesterday, 
'd the vacating of two 
ch were sought by Mr. 
■nt his removal. 



Notice to 

We are plea 
Foley's Honey 
colds and lun 
fected by the 
and Drug lav 
opiates or otln 
we recommend 
for children a 
all druggists. 



Our Customers. 

sed to announce that 
and Tar for coughs, 

5 troubles la not af- 
National Pure Food 

/ as it contains no 

•r harmful drugs, and 
It as a safe remedy 

nd adults. Sold by 



TO ELE( T .\ SI (TESSOR 

TO PRESIDENT .\HEAR\, 

New York. Dec. 17. — A special meet- 



Postal Savings Banks. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

Bravo, and all hall to you! The Even- 
ing Herald is th« one paper that. throug)» 
thick and thin, has steadfastly, persist- 
ently and couBis ently hammered for pos- 
tal savings ban 4S. For years when the 
subject set-med moribund. The Herald 
was the onlv p tper that responded and 
used the matter I sent out in the forlorn 
hope of revlvinK Interest in my pet hob- 
l.v, one that I v rtually supported, as tar 
as money and W'rk were concerned, alone 
for a cnnskleral le period of time. 

Our late and alas, we might as well 
term it, our pr sent squoeze in money 
matters has awakened popular Interest 
In this movemeit; people have evlneed 
some slight laclt of confidence In their 
banks and the number of suicides of bank 
oflicers. and confessions of others and 
prosecution of s-till others, have brought 
to Ught such rruel mismanagement of 
other people's money by the bankers of 
the countrv thai It is doubtful If we will 
ever feel that cMldllke contidenct- in them 
we were wont te. It Is almost universally 
conrtiled now t lat postal savings bank.) 
would give us Just exactly what was 
luedi-d, and besides would place those be- 
positories when they are most needed 
and where private capital would never 
put them. 

Unfortunately, however, this session of 
congress will be a purely pa.sslve one and 
we may not lope for any legislation 
anent our pet project. But our vvlse 
men, (it is courtesy at least to call our 
legislators so) vill have h«ard a popu- 
lar and wirespi cad clamor ;ind ere an- 
other year will have come to the con- 
elusion that, the banks to the contrary 
notvvithstandinK the noise made by The 
Evening Herald and echoed l>y the other 
papers and tina ly taken up by the plain 
■■pepul" means hat definite action is the 
order of tho da> and not to be postponed. 
We may hope lor postal savings by 1*W 
and we will ha e to thank the panic of 
\Wi for advan- ing that consummation 
just txactly tei years ahead of what I 
txpected it to b- ! More p«»wer to you. 
F. W. FITZPATKICK. 

Washington, I'ec. 14. 



The Business Man 




J"?^NLV V hen the break. 
M4MM Jng point IS reached 
fiMcieof does the busy busi. 
ness man realize the 
disastrous effects result- 
ing from mental con. 
centrationand over- 
work. 

Digcsto Malt Ex- 
tract vised regularly 
(every day repairs the 
Continued waste of the 
body. It tones the 
system making it pro- 
ductive of the greatest 
amount of work but 
without loss of vitality. 

At All 
Diug Stores 

i;.;is?;B.cr ,. ♦•Leads them AU'* 



THE RULERS 
OHERVIA 

Were of Irish Origin, Ac- 
cording to Legend 
and History. 

Obren Thought to Have 

Been an Adaptation 

From O'Brien. 



London, Dec. 17.— Waa the royal 
house of Servia, which a few years ago 
ended In the bloody slaughter of Dei- 
grade, an Irish family? Such la the 
tradition, and certainly it docs not take 
much imagination to change Milos 
Obren to Miles O'Brien. Obren was 
the name of the family, Obrenovitch 
meaning descendant or son of Obren— 
one belonging to the Obren family. Tho 
C>brens were a great family in Servia 
and Montenegro long before the swine- 
herd. Techo, married the widow an J 
cousin of the last Obren, and, perpetu- 
ating the name, made the O'Briens, 
who had been kings In Ireland, mjn- 
archs again in Servia. * 

There is nothing improbable In this 
legend of Irish origin of the Obrens. Th.i 
Irish race has wandered far afield, and 
nearly every country has at one time 
or another been governed by an Irish- 
man. In Don Juan ODonojue, the last 
viceroy of Mexico, It is ea.sy to recog- 
nize John U'Donoghue, and Marshall 
O'Donnell, the celebrated duke of Tt- 
tuan, was repeatedly the. premier of 
Spain, and for many years controlled 
the destinies of that country. A Mac- 
Mahon was marshal and president. of 
France, and a Taafe long premier of 
Austria and Hungary. 

Irish asKuIcrs. 
Numerous other cases will be re- 
called where transplanted Irish families 
have become prominent in the country 
of their adoption, and there is reason 
to believe that the Obren family fur- 
nishes one of those instances. In 
Strongbow's time the O'Briens suffered 
exceeding;y and such as were not 
killed "lay low" for a while, or fled the 
country, where they had no longer 
wealth or safety remaining to them. 

At that time the fourth crusade had 
resulted in the establishment of a 
Latin empire at Constantinople, and 
Latin princes and their followers took 
possession of the provinces which ac- 
knowledged that city as the capital. 
Among those who flocked from West-, 
ern Europe into the newly founded em- 
pire were fugitives from Ireland, seek- 
ing In a strange land to regain what 
they had lost in their own. Among 
the Irish were representatives of the 
O'Brien family, who found plenty of 
fighting to suit them and ample re- 
ward for their service in tliat part of 
the empire which bordered on the east- 
ern coast of the Adriatic. Not long 
after the arrival of the O'Briens in thai 
region we begin to hear of the Obrens, 
of their dash and bravery, and, as they 
had not been mentioned before, there 
Is every reason to suppose that tiie 
UBrleiis and Obrens were one and llie 
same. 

Mentloncil in F'olk Soiig.s. 
The f*Jlk songs and legeiid^s of Servia 
and Montenc-gix) are full of the doings 
of the Obrens, and in legend and stmg 
they are endow».-d with characteristics 
which are genuinely and unmistakably 
Irish. The O'Briens b<:ca,me volevodes 
or hereditary govenwrs of Dulcigno, a 
port of Montenegro, and young Djuro 
O'Brien or Obren, who rule<l therein at 
the end of the fifteenth century, was 
lenmrkable for his beauty. This got 
him into troubk*. Old Ivo. who ruled 
as prince over Montenegro, had sought 
the daughter of the doge of Venice as 
a bride for his son. and had gone in 
great state with much gold to arrange 
the match. He took with him "three 
loads" of gold, and it was one continu- 
ous chowder party in Venice until the 
money v\"as all gone. Then Ivo started 
for home, to sober up and let the moun- 
tain breeaes play over his fevered brow. 
An old song of the Country says that 
Ivo, "who was wise, uttered » foolish 
words." when h^ went away, which, 
considering the time he had had, is not 
at all surprising. He said; 

"I will come back for the girl. doge, 
and will bring with me my son ..ind 
600 boon companions. If among thes<* 
600 yoM csin find one handsomer than 
my "boy Stanislia, I will claim neither 
maiden nor dower." 

His Beauly Murreil. 
Soon after Ivo had returned to his 
home his son came down with the 
smallpox, and when he rtxxivered he 
was so badly pitted that his beauty 
had vanished. So Ivo was afraid to 
send the young man to Venice, and 
spoke to him no more of the marriage. 
S<»me years elapsed and then came a 
imesisa«e from the doge, saying that if 
Ivo wanted his son to marry the girl 
he had better send him along, as she 
wa^ getting tired of waiting, and had 
had several several good offers. Then 
Ivo determined to put up a Job on the 
doge. He assembled the 6tH» young 
men, the b<K>n companions of his son, 
and explained to them that he was, as 
it were, "in a hole" because of his 
boast to the doge of his son's good 
looks. He proposed that the young 
man who was voted the best looking 
among the 600 should personate the 
afnicf^d Stanisha, and go to Venice to 
fetch thf' bride with his c«:>mpanions. 
For thus playing the bridegroom he 
was to have had the dowry the bridt 
brought with her. 

By unanimous vote of the assembled 
bot»n c>miianiona the O'Brien of Dul- 
cigno was declared the handsomest man 
in the crowd, and selected to personate 
the bridegroom. The Montenegrin bal- 
lads call this young man DJurno Obren, 
but the Servian ballads gave him his 
ntime as Mllosh Obren, which Is Miles 
O'Brien. This Miles O'Brien was a 
bnnth of a boy, and played his pan 
well, until upon his return there was 
a row over the division of the girl's 
dowrj'. The doge's daughter, of course, 
fell m love with the bold Irish lad, an l 
she was wroth when he tried to turn 
her over to the plainlooking .Stanisha. 
Figlit Deadly BnttJe. 
Miles laughed at hir love, and then, 
like I'otiphar's wife, she urged on Stan- 
isha to kill O'Brien, and one day the 
gc»sscH>n being takcin off his guard, up 
rides Stanisha and throws a spear into 
him. Two cousins of Miles, Obren 
Vouk and Obren Beg, came up to 
avenge the murder, and a free fight en- 
sued, which lasted all day. When dark- 
ness and a dense fog desoendfd upon 
the field the old ballad die<?lares that 
"The fpw survivors walked up to their 
knoes in blood." But the two Obren 
cousins sur\Mvc^d and Stanisha also 
escaped from the battle. 

To this day there la a feud between 
the Montenegrins and the people of the 
r*>gion where Stanisha and his follow- 
ers settled after the I>attle. aod thiey 



miR DARK ON THE BOWERY 



A 



Incidents of the Nightly Life of the Woodsmen's 
Req^zvous Gleaned From a Reporter's 

Notebook. 



a-a^i 



>5Vl*#*-J&*«*****'J!f*#ilW^*!^#T¥«^^ 



Chrlstma^ time comes but onc5 a 
year, of cotjrse, and that Is presumably 
the reason ^why you see so many peo- 
ple going home with packages. Follow- 
ing out the package hunch, a Herald 
reporter selected a new leaf In his note 
book and sought the classic bowery for 
an inspiration. Here, indeed they have 
the package Idea. They don't seem lo 
believe in the Idea of giving being bet- 
ter than receiving, though; for most 
of the packages that are being taken 
home of an evening, from the flaring 
shops along the Bowery are individual 
ones, that have been accumulated after 
many scattered purchases. 

One of the first purchasers that met 
his gaze was an ancient Hollander. 
He was purchasing Holland gin. Tears 
of bitter reminiscence were flowing out- 
ward as copiously as the holiday cheer 
was flowing Inward. In fact, the salty 
brine of his eyes seemed to keep an 
even pace with the flow of the holiday 
cheer. 

The emotions of this wreck of a man. 
pitiful to behold, veered between the 
pathos of despair and the pathos of 
venal, craven desire. He wept, per- 
haps with genuine regret over the past 
and despair for the future, because of 
the wreck that Iquor had made of him; 
he wept with the repellant, simulated 
grief of the hypocrite, wnen liquor was 
refu.sed him. 

He conjured visions, that groupe.l 
up from the fumes of the liquor. Life 
assumed a rosy hue. Into the blood- 
shot eyes, into the hard, dissipated 
countenance came the look of light; the 
drunkenness of vanity, of shallow, un- 
holy joy; the drugging of manhood, the 
muffling of sensibilities. 

Slowly the frowsy head sank on to 
the dirty bar. Mercifully intoxication 
came to drown the despair of sober- 
ness, the knowledge of failure, and 
servitude to vice. Like an inanimate 
hulk he was dragged into a dirty corn- 
er. 

Here was sordid framing for a Christ- 
mas picture. 

• * * 

Again the reporter peeped in on the 
Bowery Christmas purchasing. Here 
the knights of the spigot were working 
overtime. Cheer was being dispensed 
with a lavish hand, by orders of a huge 
blonde lord of the vvood.«, who varied 
the even monotony of his ordering— 



still occasionally take each other's 
heads In memory of the handsome Miles 
O'Brien. The descendants of Obren Beg, 
cousin and avenger of that handsome 
Miles O'Brien, are numerous In the 
country about Ipetk. Turkey, near the 
Servian border, and are known as the 
M ah 1 no ud - Bo u ex> vr t ch . 



though the simple process of ordering 
a drink has the rymthmic grandeur of 
Beethoven beaten in the minds of the 
habitues of the Bowery thirst halls— by 
reciting Norse poems and breaking into 
song, deep-toned and roaring. It must 
have been the folk songs of the ancient 
Norse sailors. Amid his incongruous 
surroundings, debased by corroding 
liquor and craven desires, he brought 
to the fllth and stench of the saloon, 
a breath of fresh air. Romance, ad- 
venture, the rousing, rollicking song of 

i the Norse sailor; the breath of the sea, 

I the grasp of imagination, the touch of 
poetry; the unconsciousness of the 

j blonde giant, amid his surroundings of 
prosaic vice, and the discordant lights 

I of th picture. 

"Ain't you goln' to come through with 

! another drink," came the thick voiced 
query from one of the motley hangers 
op. 

The breath of salt air, the spirit of 
romance, the tale of adventure and the 
poem of imagination were routed by 
the desire for liquor. The blonde giant 
stepped from his reverie and descended 
to the level of his surroundings. The 
poetic recital of Norse poetry, the tale 
of the ancient voyageurs gave way to 
ribald jest, to profanity and bestiality. 
Yes, the Christmas shopping was 

booming here, at this shop. 

• * • 

Again, the reporter passed on. He 
encountered many pedestrians return- 
ing with their packages — albeit, the 
hour was waxing late, yet not a few 
industrious purcha.'sers still lingered at 
the supply counters. Some staggered 
under the weight of their near-Christ- 
mas shopping. Perhaps the sidewalk 
was slippery. He saw heated faces 
I emerge from the glaring light of open- 
I ed doors. He beheld unsteady figures 
shunt off into the engulfing darkness, 
bringing Into the clear atmosphere the 
reeking odor and stench of stale liquor. 
He heard ribald oaths and frenzied 
mouth fiilling curses. He saw, livid 
faces, blood-shot eyes and reeling, tot- 
tering bodies. He beheld the spirit of 
Christmas being celebrated in a man- 
ner sickening and revolting. He saw 
[a profanation of the beauty and sacred- 
I ness of its deeper meaning. He saw 
this and more. 

Yes, they are purchasing Christmas 
presents with but little thought of the 
future, or to sorrow or misery, down 
on the Bowery. 



tat Ives that the necessary legislation 
may be had. _ „, „», 

GEORGE RUPLEY. 

Duluth, Dec. 16. 



REFORESTING 
S TATE LANDS 

Why Not Reseed State 

Lands Not Fit for 

Agriculture. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

The question of forest reserves In 
Minnesota has been frequently and 
fiercely agitated. Extremists have 
claimed that practically all Northern 
Minnesota Is worthless for agriculture 
and should be set aside as forest re- 
serve. Their opponents retort that it Is 
all good agricultural land and that none 
should be reserved. The truth lle.s be- 
tween them. 

Northern Minnesota has a large 
acreage of agricultural land which, ow- 
ing to its fertility and nearness to good 
markets, will yield to agriculture as 
manv dollars per acre as any land In 
Iowa. It has also a large acreage unlit 
for .-igrieulture, fit only for growing 
timber. Tills land, when cut, is quickly 
covered with a growth of varieties un- 
fit for timber and is useless. 

The state of Minnesota owns a large 
amount of timber land. It sells the 
timber from a partion annually, giving 
but a short time for removal. After the 
timber Is removed, the land Is offered 
for sale. Such as is unfit for agricul- 
ture is unsold and is held idle by the 
state, paying no taxes, producing no 
revenue and contributing nothing to tho 
common good. Our forests are being 
deple ted. Already alarmists are worry- 
ing about the timber supply for their 
grandchildren. 

Why should not the state of Minne- 
sota re-seed such of her lands as are 
unfit fgor agriculture? She owns the 
land. The selection can easily be male 
bv a commission. The re-eseeding Is a 
matter of very small expense an<l prac- 
tically no other expense is Involved, as 
the state pays no taxes. A very small 
fr.ictlon of the- money received annual- 
ly from timber sales will do all that Is 
necessary and prove an excelh nt In- 
vestment, yielding a perpetual Income 
beside providing a future lumber sup- 
ply. 

A long time, longer than the average 
life of man. Is required to grow mer- 
chantable timber. The Investment pays 
handsomely, but collection is <leferred. 
This fact "and taxation will probably 
prevent individuals from engaging In 
the work. Neither of these objections 
■ would have any weight with the state. 

Every community In the timber re- 
! gion ought to be Interested In this as It 
i will prevent the extinction of the lum- 
I ber industry. It seems to me that the 
whole northern region of the state, re- 
gardless of party, ought to agitate this 
matter and so Instruct their represen- 



Good Cough Mcdlclnn for Children. 

The season for coughs and colds is 
now at hand and too much care 
cannot be used to protect the chil- 
dren. A child is much more likely 
to contract diphtheria or .scarlet fever 
when he has a cold. The quicker 
you cure his cold the less his risk. 
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy is the 
sole reliance of many mothers, and 
few of those who ha\e tried it are 
willing to use any other. Mrs. F. 
F. Stareher of Ripley, W. Va., say.'?: 
"I have never u.sed anything other 
than Chamberlain's Cough Remedy 
for my children and it has always 
given good satisfaction." This rem- 
edy contains no opium or other nar- 
cotic and may be 'iven as confidently 
to a child as to an adult. For sale 
by all druggi.'-ts. 

MISSING CHILD 
PROBABLY SUIN 

Searchers Point Suspi- 
cion's Finger at the 
Father Himself. 

Rosalie, Neb., Dec. 17. — Lillle Olson, 

the 4-year-old child of Olaf Olson, lost 

for a week, is not yet found, despite 

the fact that a thousand men, on 

; horseback and afoot, on Sunday 

i scoured a vast Nebraska territorj'. 

Men and women here are hinting 

j freely at foul play, the finger of sus- 

] plcion pointing to the father. In the 

I possession of Dr. Grant Johnson of 

this place is a club, four feet long, 

which bears bloodstains and hairs the 

color of the missing child. 

It was picked up near the place of 
the girl's disappearance. The clothing 
of the child was freshly washed when 
bloodhounds were brought to obtain 
from it the scent with which to track 
her. The seeming impossibility of the 
girl's being lost so near her home, the 
father's violent temper and his con- 
stant use of pure alcohol, are facts 
used in stirring suspicion against him. 



Orino Laxative Fruit. Syrup, the 
new LaxatUv, .stimulates, but does 
not Irritate. It is the best Laxative, j 
Guaranteed or your money back, i 
Sold by all druggists. I 



Florida 

Through Sleeper 

Chicago to Jacksonville 

and St. Augustine 

Without Change 

Big Four Route 

via 

Cincinnati, Chattanooga and Atlanta 

Latest Departure 
11:30 p.m. 

Arrive early second morning. 

Winter tourist tickets now 
on sale. For full inforniation 
address 

I. P. SPINIHfi, GenM Nortlrarn Agent 

238 Clarii Street, Chicago 



BET $500 OX RAINDROPS. 

John W. Gates and Fellow Plunger 
Make Peculiar Wager. 

New York, Dec. 17. — John W. Gates 
was riding w ith a friend and fellow- I 
plunger the other day in a Pullman 
car. It was raining, and the rain was 
coursing down the window panes. 

', Gates watched the drops. Two were 

> trickling down side by side. 

j "Bet you |500, " said Gates, "that 
my drop reaches the bottom of the 
window before your drop gets there." 
"I'll go you," said the man. Gates' 
drop made a final spurt and nestled on 
the bottom sash. 

"I win," said John W., pocketing 
the yellow backs, which had been 
hastily counted out while the drops 
were dropping. 



YOIXG BOY BEATS MARCONI. 



Operates Electric Lights by Wire- 
less at Distance of 900 Feet. 

Worcester, Mass., Dec. 17. — Harry 
M. Grout, a 19-year-old Spencer boy, 
has gone Marconi one better and has 
succeeded In operating electric lights 
and motors by electro-magnetic waves 
at a distance of 900 feet or more. Ac- 
cording to the authorities at the 
Worcester Polytechnic institute, this 
is something that has never been ac- 
complished before. Power has been 
sent through the air for a few feet, 
but nothing to approach the distances 
at which young Grout has success- 
fully operated his lights and motors 
b" wireless. 



Stop 
That G>iigh Now 

There's danger ahead if you let it run on. Coughs lay 
the foundations for thousands of cases of all kinds of sick«^ 
ness every year, and are the indirect cause of a great number 
of deaths. 

It's just as dangerous to experiment with unknown cough cures 
as it is to neglect your cough entirely. Get a remedy that yott 
know has ciued coughs for 77 years — 

DR. D. JAYNES 
EXPECTORANT 

There's no experiment about this old reliable remedy. It bat 

been curing coughs for four generations, 

Jayne's Expectorant is also an invaluable medicine for 

Croup, Pleurisy, Inflammation of the Lungs or Chest, 

Hoarseness, Bronchitis, Asthma and other diseases. 

Sold in three sizes — $1.00, 50c and 25c 

Jayaa't Teaie Tenaifotfe is a reliable, all* 
around tonic and bealtb-brinser. 



I 



WHOLESALE 

Jobbers and 
Mamifaeturers 

OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA, 

Reliable and Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a Strictly 
Jobbing and Manufacturing Business. 



ASBESTOS. 
A. H. Krieger Co. 



BAKERS AND ICE CREAM 

MANUFACTURERS. 

Crescent Bakery. 



BLAST FURNACE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 



BREWERS. 

Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. 
Fitger Brewing Co. 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 
Bridgeman-Russell Co. 



CEMEN TAND PLASTER. 

D. G. Cutler Co. 



CIGAR MANUFACTURERS. 

Duluth Cigar Co. 

Ron Fernandez Cigar Co. 

Tom Reed Cigar Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

Duluth Candy Co. 

National Candy Co. 
(Duluth Factory.) 

CORNICE MANUFACTURERS. 

Dcetz & Co. 
Duluth Corrugating & Roofing Co. 

CROCKERY. 

Duluth Crockery Co. 

DRUGS. 
L. W. Leithhead Drug Co. 

DRY GOODS. 
F. A. Patrick & Co. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 

Clyde Iron Works. 
National Iron Co. 



GLASS, PAINTS AND BUILD- 
ING MATERIALS. 

Paine & Nixon Co. 



GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Twohy Co. 

Stone-Ordean-Wells Co. 

Wright-Clarkson Mercantile Co. 

HARDWARE. 
JCelley-How-Thomson Co. 
Marshall-Wells lidw. Co. 



HATS AND FURS. 
Blake & Waite Ca 



LIQUORS. 

Frerker Bros. & Co. 



LUMBER, SASH & DOOR MAN- 
UFACTURERS. 
Scott-Graff Lumber Co. 



MATCH MANUFACTURERS. 
Union Match Co. 



MEATS. : ' 

Elliott & Co. ■ " 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND 
MAN'F'RS. CLOTHING. 

Chribtensen-Mendenhall- 
Graham Co. 



PAPER. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery Co. 

Bemis Bag & Paper Co. 

Zenith Paper Co. 



FURNITURE. 

DeWitt-Seitz Company. 



PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 

Crane & Ordway Co. 

PRODUCE AND COMMISSION. 

Fitzsimmons-Palmer Co. 
Haugsrud & Markkancn. 
Knudsen Fruit Company. 
Thomas Thompson Co. 

SADDLERY. LEATHER AND 
FINDINGS. 

Schulze Brothers Co. 



SHOE MANUFACTURERS. 
Northern Shoe Co. 



For space under this heading apply to F. H. G;f en, Secretary Jobbers 
and Manufacturers' Association, Duluth, Minn. 



I 



Tenipie Roller Rink 

Second avenue east and Superior street. 
Open every afternoon and evening except 
Sundays. Matinees Tuesday and Satur- \ 
day. La. Brosse's band. Children's day 
every Saturday from 10 to 12. 



OLDSORtSi&UREIX 



ALLEN'S ULCERINE SALVE. 

Cures Clironic I'loera, Buae I'lcers, Varicose 
Ulcers, Scrofulous L'lcers, Mercurial Ulcers, 
Fever Sores, Gangrene, Blond PoUonini;, 
WbiteSwelllng, Milk Leg. Poisoned Wounds, 

AU Sorei of long atandlng. PofilrlT»;]y iiev«-r failsi. 
Drawl out all polnoa. Saves expengo and Buffering;. 
Cures permanent. For sale br Artiftflsta. Hall ifc nnii 
Ma. J. P. ALLAN MEOICIKG CM.>.. Br. PaVU Mlvn 



Disease 
kand Health 




REVIVO 

RESTORES VITJtLITT 

"Made a 
Well Han 
of Me." 



Old Remedy. -^«^) /&n;.. 

KBVKB KXOirai TO VAIX. 

Tarrant* Extract of Cuboba and 
Copalbs ta 

CAPSULS8. , 

gonorriJo«a, tleet, wh.t«8, etc Eany 
to take, conranient to oar;;. riiiT 
years socceasful n«e. PrloafUa* 

Borce't. w> W. Superior St.; WIrth"*. i| 
W. Suparto* 91 , Duluth; or by mail from The T»rr»nt Co., 44 
|U4ios St.. New York. 




prodaoea fine reKuIta in 30 days. It acts 

Powerfully and quickly, ture.s when others fall, 
oun^' men an regain their lost manhood, and 
old men may recover their youthful vigor by 
using BKVIVO. It quickly and quietly re- 
moves Nervousness, Lost Vitality. Sexual 
Weakness such as Lost Power. Pailing Memory 
Wasting Diseases, aod effects of self-abuse or 
excess and Indiscretion, which unfits one for 
study, business or marriago. It not only cures 
by starting at the seat of disease, but is a great 
nerve Ionic and blood builder, bringing 
back the pink glow to pale cheeks and re- 
storing the fire olyontli. It wards off an- 
proach ing disease. Insist on having REVIVO* 
°° ?}-^J-7 ^«* ^^° ^ carried in vest nocket. By 
mall.^L.OO per package, or six for $5.00. Wo 
give free advice and counsel to all wHo wisli It. 
with«narant«e. Circulars free. Address 
ROYAL f4ED!CINE CO., MarinP Rirto.. Chip«n«. lit. 
For sale in Dulittli. Minn., by 8. V^ 
Boyco uud Mux Wirtli. 



I 



If 



1 



— 1- 



THE bULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1907. 



Reverend 

Sam Jones's Widow 

Gets $1,000 per Year for Life 

The name and the fame of Rev. Sam P. J mes have 

gone over the nation. V\'hile the noted evangelist 

preached the Gospel with great power, it nov» transpires 

that he provided for his wife with great good s<!ase. As a 

result of this foresight and self-denial 

The Mutual 

Life Insurance 

Company 

is now paying Mrs. Jones $1,000 p*!r 
year, and will continue to do so durii g 
her life. In a recent letter Mrs. Jones thanks the Company for 
the Ah.cn this matter has been handled. This is ail 

goou lur Mrs. Jones, but how about the womai yet unpro- 
tected and the man yet uninsured ' The need s great and 
certain. The Company :> strong and ready. Write and 
learn n >uz how such protecrian can bt secured. 

The Time to Act b NC»W. 

For rhe new forms of policies write to 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of New York. N. Y. ^ 

&r HAITE H. SQllER. Manager. Burrows Buil ling. Duloth, Mino 



TTTT 



PQIRTS OF THE^^AY ] 



RIDERS TO 
BEjiGION 

Many Requests for In- 
formation Received by 
Ski Club. 



CANADIANS 
INDOIBT 

Lack of Rink May Keep 

Them Out of 

Hockey. 



Ole Mangseth Back in Formation of Ice Going 



Duluth and 
Practice. 



The ski riders. look longingrly toward 
Duluth, the ski center of tiie United 
States for the season of li>08. Ishpem- 
ing, Ashiani, Munising. Red Wing and, 
jierhaps. Proctor, will have ski tourna- 
ments, but for real, high-class exhibi- 
tions of the great Scandinavian sport, 
Duluth will be the one best arena of 
interesting events. 

Every scrap of skiing news published 
in Duluth is eagerly grabbed up by the 
riders spread over the Northwest. Ev- 
try day the oiltclals of the local club 
: -;ve reciueats for information on 



on Rapidly in the 
Rinks. 



Former Canadian hr»ckey players, 
now residing in Duluth, met last even- 
ing at the Y. M. C A., talked over 
the chances of getting a team com- 
posed entirely of Canadians in the 
game in Duluth this season, and didn't 
do anything. There was plenty of en- 
thusiasm, but the boys realize that 
they cannot send their skates flying 
over enthusiasm, and must find a rink 
In which to practice before ihey will 
be able to organize. 

The men who turned out to the 
meeting last night have all played 



.-i, events and conditions. From all i hockey in the Dominion in former 



over the Northwest coniri notices .of in- 



years, mostly in the intermediate class. 



AMERICAN WAIF 
HEIR TO TITLE 

Child of Obscure Parent- 
age is Adopted by 
French Marquis. 



Mor ~ <ua! dvrnand was ma.i- 

on . . ir.k.'*, and deposit* we. j 

hi-avi'-r Ihaa wiihlratrahs. 

An.'>'.her Italian was kUl*^ Sunday mom- 

;•« • ir Tr^-moi t. La., by nt-groes. mak- 

' .^ •• rt^e Italiai s to lo.st? their liv^-s on 

■ of prt-jii lie agair.st their repla.-- 

ril lumber mill Tabor at Chatham- 

V ii«. La. Two ' 'h«-rs wt-re wound-d and 

tw^nly-ajx w*>Te robb^-d. 

'.-••'• • ' ie in an autom-jbil* 

<tr—'td of Brooklyn 

. .. vii'tims w^re Elsi<- 

-a »h ipercii.^r. 22 year.«« old. 

Waliact". wh.> has l»een 

•-'ommeroiai Cable com- 

N> cause for tlie tra- 

K-dy 1> it it !a probable that it 

fa thw • ;.)v-» affair. ; 

• 'r-d th- 
> Central 
1 .y Baroi; KothsetiUd 
■ ankers. 

jff of l.'Xoi m<»n bv tho 
•tnpany at John.slowii. 
r-» are now ab .ut l.'/.O 
■n*^t**'l with rhte st*-':-l 
A. Imprjvement is not 
after the first of tbo 



tentlons of entering and the annual , ^-hjch is next only to the great teams 
tourajneat of the National ski ass.cia- , ,,j j^e Dominion. Some of them hav. 
uon Feb. 11 and 12 will see the great- , i<-,ng r^-cords of championship pro- 
test collection of sk! riders the Ualted ^ vincial games on whirlwind team*, and 



States has ever seen. 



they believe if they could break into 



'-iiipluyt'd 
piiny in t 

i-dy i> 

is th- :- 



tournament. 

But Junnam will have successors. 
Ever>' y^ar. the records are being 
stretched and new lights are app<^ar- 
tng in the rimianent of skiing. This 






H. An 



t;,i.' 
W 



r f'f th'* <^ueh'»c 
pl»-ad''<l (iu'lty 
".h" I'oiiipar.y a'.il 
,..i years' imprison 
n, it 

Pa.*i>!W4] Exanitnatlon Sut-i'es^fully. 

NVw Britain. 

several kidney 

•ated by our 

lietes. but did 

tool- Foley's 

v; r the second 

i iiiij'i 'Vr-mTnt. and 

: ipl^tely. I 

i vxaiaina- 

Foieys 

ind all 

able. 



Nearly all of t.-ie men. who have won I the game in Duluth, get the unit., 
prizes in national tournaments In re- , welded together Into a .solid team, and 
,cent year.^ will be on hand to compete ; hav,.- a place in which t.. practice.' 
in the tournament here, olaf Junnum, they would make the native born \ 
a dark horse, who broke all records , Americans look ivell to their laurels. ! 
at Ash lad last year and thrn went to I The outlook ta discouraging, but ;• 
Ishpeming and walked away with an eommittee will cast around and at-, 
easy victory over the stars gathered tempt to map out some plan. The' 
there, is out of the way. for which boys cannot construct a rink of their 
some of the faint hearted riders are de- own. nor would the public rink be of 
voutly thankful. Junnum is a wonder [ much use to them, as ihey would wish 
on ski.-*. His jumps were long and i to charge admission t.> gam >s. Unless 
graceful, his riding finished and to seels-.me sort of a deal culd b^ fixed up 
him descend the hill and take the bump with the North -rn p»-op!e who own 
was worth the trouble of attending any j the rink at the ball park, they are 

lost, as without a place for practice 

or piay they can do nothing. 
- The rink managers have made use 

of the present culd snap to get some 

ice formed. Both in the public rink 
year, with the greatest interv?8t in the at Twelfth avenue west and the rink 
»port and the prospects of closer and I at Athletic park, a thin formation of 

more exciting competition, many new | lee has been formed, and if the cold,., „ ,. r i 

stars are expected to loom up and the . weather continues for a f-^'w days I ^ '^'^^^^^^ ^'''^' ^^^^^V^ 
Ifveter.m riders will be forced to exert more, there will be skating. Some , , „, , i , t 

themselves to keep the prizes In their | vexatious problems face- the rink Ja/ck Blackburn and Ji 
hands. , builder.s. in hi>les in the surfa.-e. butM^^'^^ ^^ Phila.ielphla Dec 

«.>le Mangseth, an entry In several .such defects are being remedied as! 
national i-iutnaments in re'-xni years j rapidly as. possible and by the end of 
and a prize wiimer at Ashlad last year, the week the skaters may have their 
has retu.'-ed to Duluth from Coleralne. rling. 

where he spent the summer. He isi _ 

ft^elmg tit, looks upon the lack of snow TRFUDf VVi IK> PF ATITH 

with disfavor and longs for an oppor- ' il\CjJlOL,rj\{VL.T rj-KltjV. 

tunity t.j get .>ut on the hill at Chester ; ;- 

creek and try himself out. • Canadian LttntftTight Wrestler 

Records will go flying into fragments 
this year. The big ski hill on Chester 



Public Notice 

To Users of 

Calcium Carbide and 
Apelylene Gas 

The Union Carbide Company, the owner of United States Letters 
Patent No. 541,138 of June 18, 1895, for the product crystalline Calcium 
Carbide, cautions the public against the use or sale of Calcium Carbide 
(or carbolite) manufactured by any other person, firm or corporation. All 
commercial calcium carbide is crystalline. 

Especial attention is called to the law which makes the person who 
merely uses or sells an infringing product just g.s liable to damages as the 
manufacturer of it. 

This cautionary notice is given to save innocent parties from, litiga- 
tion and damages to w^hich they will be liable if they use or sell any such 
calcium carbide (by whatever name it may be called) manufactured by 
any other person, firm or corporation. 

The public is especially advised that important suits have been 
brought by Union Carbide Company, and are new pending in the United 
States Circuit Courts in New York and Ohio, against parties using and 
selling the product mianufactured by the American Carbolite Company,' 
and that these suits will be followed by such others as may be deemed 
necessary to protect this company in its patented product, Calcium Car- 
bide. The pending suits are being vigorously pushed by the undersigned 
with all available energy, and such progress has already been made that 
a finding and judgment sustaining the rights of the Union Carbide Com- 
pany may reasonably be expected in the not distant future. 

UNION CARBIDE COMPANY, 

December, 1907. 



of Stanley KetcheU, who defeated Joe 
Thomaa at San Francisoo last week. 

• • • 

Benny YaJiger and Kid Goodman will 

meet Dec. 23 at B^jston. 

• » • 

A'l Kaufman is headed eastward with 



Ja/ck Blackburn and Jack Morgan will 

20. 



WOI LD ABOLISH THE 

PKNSHIN A<iE\t IFS. 



BRIEF TKI Ft-IIAMS. 



•neerning tne pro- 

- and 

. ■. it of 

He stated tha 

..i.y to pay pp^n- 

he matter to the 

Msions or on<? dis- 

oost of payment 



Los<»s to Iharles fnnkle. 

is ready for a heavy fall of sn.»w and Kansas '"ity^ J>«:,- t7.— r^haii^'s r"onkle 
the slide wUl be put in «h^l'e ju^t a.s ^^ Hamilton. Ont.. threw Eugene 
aoon aa there Is material at _ , ., , , ,. . 

hand to cover the - i. Twembley '.f Montreal, champion light- 

Th«» 3()0-foot sT[.if IS iuMg T than any weight wrtstler of i;anada. twice In 
used Ir; national tournaments formerly forty-flve minues here last night, catch- 
and wii: prove a factor in establishing as-cAtch-can style. The ftrst fall w«,3 
a reourd this seas-jn. Junnum's jump secured in 35^ minutes and the se^oid 
of 114 feet at Ishpeming last year was in 9Va minutes. 

irkahle. but some of the men will] _ 

the 120 figure thl« year, or those RFyyVlH <:|rT< IkFrKlUV 
V-.; up In the gam^ will slip up on j DL,l.A^^An ULtiri lFE.i ir51l?.l. 

their prf-diofions. 



OCEAN .STEAM.SHTPS. 



OCE.\X .STE.\MSI«PS. 



:. igv ic;es. 



mnrx ILL WITH TYPHOID. 

Weddins: of >larion Crawford's 
Danffhter H:is Bfen Postponed. 



HBiH SiHOOL .S( HEDLLE. 

Class Ba^k.*tball T«»aras Airanj?-* 



Packie McFarland has signed a c->n- 
tract for a theatrioal tour in the Middle 

W«jt. 

• « • 

IndiaJi Joe Gr^gg ha;3' land«*d in Mil- 
waukee and will settle there for the 

present. 

« • • 

Johnny .Summers of England is want- 
ed by Milwaukee r>r'Mr*otera to nieet 
McParlaJid in January. 

• « * 

John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain 
contemplate a six-months' tour of 
»-Ulxi. Porto Rioo and Panama. 

• • • 
The reoeipta a,t the Baldwin-Keyes 

bout w«re $2,221. The Iwys split 50 per 
'^'-nt of this for their forty-*iven mui- 

uies' work. 

» • * 

Kid Farmer, rv».?ently defwated by 

Pnlwii* %:♦«»» Ti^lit in r!«'li*li D/.>injl Mike <Twin> Sullivan, will b-ox Dick i 
rolue stop Flffht in Eighth ROMnd , J5u.ii,.a.n at MarysvUle, Cal., D«c. IS. 




^^^HERE arc no ocean iiccrj m sct- 
^^ viccthat surpais the New, Speedy 
>nd Luxurious Cui.ard JLmc 
Steamships of 20,000 tot* 

**CAROmA,** Jan. 4, Feb. 18 
**CARMAN1A," Jan. 16 

Calli*! •( Midriri, GibriUir, Gcnot, Napiet and Akexandrit 
^ •New Twin Screw TLarfeai Triple Screw Turbine afloat 

^3^ For aeeommodations and all particaiari apply to 

THE CUNARD STEAMSHIP CO^ Ltd. 

or Local Ateot* NfV VORK BOSTON CHICAGO MINNEAPOLIS 



^ 



"THE BEST IS, AYE, THE CHEAPEST." 
AVOID IMITATIONS OF AND SUBSTI- 
TUTES FOR 

SAPOLIO 



at Huiitinfcton. W. Va 

Hunting: 



. X' r^ ,- t. f < Matty Baldwin of Boston, and Maur 

u. \a.. I.>e0. 1<. Aft.n-|ict; Sayers of Milwaukee, h^ive been 



a; 



^♦rieN of (jane.s. 

■ i.iiS of repre.sentaiives of 



allowing th-.^ boxing contest between i matched to box at the National A. C. 
Gus Bezenah of Cincinnati, anil Philadtlphia, Dec. 21. 



Freddie Fricks o( this city, to proceed 



le of the eighth round, the 



• a • 

Jim Coffroth pr.jposed a match be- 



T!'- 



of the 
'rawt'Til. the' 

I has b-^en pngt- 

::;S man !•< 11; with < 

Kr.'-ca's father la j 

•i!»e in wl'.ioh tho i 

eing tried by the! 



UPTON OFFERS TIP. 

** I £n;^ii.>h Baronet Will iii\e Trophy 
for Or<»»n Rate. 

New York. Dea I?.— Col. David J. 



the middle-weight 
America 



championship of 



differ*»nt high school basketball teams | to the mid<ll 

held laat ►•v»'n5ng at the twys' depuirtTn-'nt ; police interfered and stopped the fifYt 
of th^ Y M. ^:. A., the following Referee Sims, >n 'a qu-sti<»n of poin:*, 
was adopt-^d; jg^ve Bezenah the decision, 

ly. Jan 14, 2-31) p. m.— Seniors vs. ' 
Fre.'^iinien. 

Tuesday. Jan ;M. i 30 p. m— Juniors vs. 
Si'pfiiimores. 

Fri>l ly, J.in. 24. 8 p. m — Seniors 
Frn.s'imen. 

Tur.sJay. Jan. 28. S p. m.— Juniurs vs. i |'q|, 4)<«^«|| Rai'^ 

Friday. Feb. 7. 8 p m.— Freshmen va 
S ■••"•■ -tres. 

y. Feb. 11. 2:30 p m 
s :^ 'Thomas Llpton, in which he offers to 'he ground that Kaufman needed more 

experience before tackling the colored ; ^ ^^Kbt titles are 



j Washington. He always has a bunch ; him. Sharborough. in spite of the oul- 

j of rules to after, but the Magnates are 'lets, advanced until t-o close that Braffff 

about as deaf and dumb s the mem- , seized the muzzle of his gun. After A 

bers of the .senate when a first-termer i lu.ssle, for the possession or tne v.'^.^yjit. 

takes the floor. Sharborough fired, ending the duel by 

• • * I mortally •wounding Bragg. A small 

Gunner Moir didn't want to shake .'boy spectator was slightly wounded. 

hands with Tommy Burns before the i 

fight. Must have been afraid Tommy ' Millions of bottles of Foley's Honey 



itween the Stanley KetcheU and t.ie i ^jght hit him when he wasn't looking. an*d" Tar" haCe" been" so"ld" without "any 
winner of the Papke-Kelly contest tort . , , ! person ever having experienced anj 

■V^liile Pitcher Gehring h<;ads the list 'other* than beneficial results from 
I in Western league batting for 1907, 'its use for coughs, colds and lung 
' Rader of Pueblo is the real leader. Geh- 'trouble.s. This is because the gen- 



Salt Lake City is building an arena; 
with a seating capacity of 4,000, in ' 
which boxing shows will be held at 
regular intervals between high grade 
performers. 



ring hit for 4f)6 in 39 games, while ' uine Foley's Honey s nd Tar in the 

Rader's average was .346 for 62 games. I yellow package contains no opiates 

m , !or other harmful drugs. Guard 

According to Boston fights and fight- i >'«"^ ^^V^- ^'*',,''l!"'''"\f i"^' ^"' 
era there are but two out-andro^ut ; ^^^ genuine. Sold by all druggists. 

Billy Delaney declined a fig.u for ' champions in the ring today. Heavy- 



Juniors v» Austin has received a letter from SirlAl Kaufman against Jack Johnson, on - ^'^'S^^t Jeffries retired without any sue- .Xo. 623.) 

' -essor. The middleweight and welter- ' SUMMONS IX APPLICATION 

doubt and the i REGISTRATION OF LAND- 



FOR 



^ 



4A 



^1^5; 



^cSl^J! 



It 



Friday. Feb. 14. 8 p. in., the two tean.a , , . •, /^.^^ * 

having tne highest standings will play S'^® ^ cup valued- at 51,000 for au 
a series ot three games to decide the; ocean race next strmmer under the aus- 
championship. ^ ^ . ,u Pices of the Brooklyn Yacht club. A 

tetni*'w,n;i:nr%:"fintl '"s^A^rand iSe ' --ting of the cmmitt.e will be he.l 
oth-r t^ams will tender th-m a banquet, "'^^''e '-'J Consider the pr.p«.sit!.m. 

Th-.> program for i.he holidays i.s b»"ing 

planned ar.d will b- ready in .i few, AVfil'S PlIIVTFR DFAH 
days. Th«» boys department will b^ , --tAUl .-> ri^l.^lCH UD.-\ir. 
Of*»n evrv ,i.v 'i,-t ■,v,..^T 't I t;;. and 9:30' ^— 

p^. -J^ ?i.? «i»e«"e p,t,.ing <;iMdinff. With Mark 



in 



man. 



• • • I championship. The two undisputed 

Teddy Murphy, the first manag«»r to j ''^htweight champions are Joe Gans 

bring Bat Nelson into fame, is making : :" the lightweight division and Abe At- 

money with Tony Caponi and Grejrge j ^<^H '^ the featherweight class. 

H>^rberts, the latter a clever California 



same is true of the bantamweight* S^*^*' ^^ Minnesota. ^County of St. Loui» 



DIEL IN STREET. 



will h.^ - 



day. 



of 



A. 



^i 



\J^\ 



[trrrj 



^^>l> 



Ji 



■»f:5=;-: 



• ^---in- 






It Comes from Old Kentucky 

tiir- <! ate faraons for OT?r a century for producing the llnej^: whisktcs in the 
w :-:j Here lae gram grows the ricbest. here the w»ter flows the purest. 
tk r-.- itie art of JlsuUatloa has reached its zenith in 

Sunny Brook 

THE PURE. FOOD 

Whiskey 

Ag« only has mellowed and softened Its flavor. Kid it con es to you bottled 
u'ter the Jireci supervision ot U. S. Internal Revenue offl 'ers^ Er-ry •.or;tl« 
r -,unnr Brwlt is sealed with the Government Ot^en Sunnp c^'-f^i^ to 
I u xact«fn?— proof— ar.d -quantity within the bo.t.e F© • sale by all Flrit- 
Class Dealers. 

SU.NNY BROOK DISTILLERY CO., Jefferson County. Ky. 

Ask Your Dealer for It 



[ PLAY TWO r.AMES. 

Bemiilji and < rook>tnn BaokHhall 
Team Will Mi^et. 

B^midji. !->*'•:. 17— Sp- il t> Thf- H'^r- 
ild. > — Thn 'Big Bvmidri" Basketball 
team will plAy two games against the 
i'.,k,v,*tfiTi T^<sjkeiball team, on n^xt Sat- 

•.g and Sunday afternoon. 

ar** on th.^ regi:Vir 
th" local t'»ani ^ - 



a ■ I'l'iit.sii'n team, iii -jtie -'i wh:rti it <•■: 
rh- ^■.'?;'.•■■»^«t vithou' a si->re. The lo' - 
• • ^ h.tp^;.* if taking both of • 

^ - •« and TO ti:-it enl will ; 

•.-*ry oeat line-up in the field, aa 

i.i^ B-Tiilg': H «>ei'. and J. Mark- 
ham, fir«ards. L. Heffr-jn. center. \V. 
)•..!!■,;•« .r..( c, Peterson, guards, F. 

:■:■■•■ -e. 

- : • .^ - itii: Watian and I>^nen. 

furwinl!* • -driaon. cent-r, McL.aughltn 
and B-'4ud;n. guards: Moulton. aubatt- 
tute: EJ«l.«on Jer^ime. manager. 



2:»! U Had ^iood Season. 



One Man Killed and Another is 
I Wounded at Laurel, Miss. 

, Laurel. Mis.s.. Dec. 17.— A dejiber.itely 
! planned and sensational duel (Xicurred 
!on the main str»et of Laurel yesterday. 



welter-weight. 

• • • 
Fred Landers, the California light- 

1 Weight, who is now making his head- 
1 quarters in Philadelphia, is after a 

Lebanon. N. H.. Dec. 17. -The pacing i F'^'^^''^ "^"'^^ ^ji^'^ Fitzgerald. In their 
,..^ . , , ^ l«ist meeting Fitz won on a knockout 

gelding. Angus Pointer (Jion**. owned j^ twenty-nve rounds, 
i-y Senati>r G-^orge E. Whitney. died • « • 

here yesterday. The horse was sent to ^ The ten-round bout between Sam 'In which Edward Bragg was killed, and 
a recent sale in New York by .-Senator ; La ngford and Jim Barry has been | g ^- Sharborough. former stale s?aa- 
Whitney and was bid in by him fir Postponed until Jan. 1. They were to | wciinded 

$SJ00 '''^.ave boxed on Dec. 16, but a.<* Barry i ^^^' ^.^^ ^'^cunaea. 

' : I has only had ten days of tiaining ne ' The two had a quarrel over a busT- 

isked that the contest be put back un- ! ness matter during whi<..h Bragg is said 
New Year's afternoon, and Match- j »r. have advised Shargorough to go md 

; get his gun. Sharborough went to a 

• • • ! nearby store and purchased a shot- 
Bill Papke. the "Western middle- gun and sheila, while Bragg wait*»a. 

weight, is certainly -an idol among his, When Sharborough reappeared, Bragjr 
friends at Spring Vailey and Ki?wanef;, loopened fire, hitting l.-.i? man tiuee 
III., for as .xo.:>n as they learned that I times without dangerously wounditi« 
a pool of $5,y00 had been raised in Chi- «_^_^»___«________„^^_^_^._^_. 



S3. 



Dis- 



OF 



OOM 



.maker McCarey consented to the 

change. 



The St. L'>uis American league teajii'cago to bet on Hugo Kelly to beat Bill 
will train at Shreveport, La., after on Dec. 30 at Milwaukee they immedi- 
spendinj two wt*ks at We-st 3a<den. • tely started out. and In leas than twelve 

I hours had together Jo, 000, which they 
whose! are ready to wager on Papke. 



• • • 
Daji Kelly of Portland, Ore. 



NOTICE TO MEN 



record of :09 3-5 for th- l'>0-yarda is dis 
puted, has left the University >f Michi- 



WALKING r.RIND. 
Six-Day Meet for Pedestrians at 



Men, Go Where You Are 

Sureof getting a Cure. 

gan, which he entered this fall, ajid 1 ^sked forrfranc^lse in"*ordl!r"V place ! ^% 

will go to work in Detroit. He may re- ^ ^^am in Kansas City. Kan. ' Sf^^u/rKJli ^iu' 

■urn to the \%ohe««|e institution next . ■ . .. 



year. 



• ..J • 

Joe Gans has puffed down the 1500 
he p<>3ted to back Packey McFarlajid 
against Battling Nel.«on. Nelson Jvas 
Kansas City. Dec. 17 —A six-day i al*} posted SSOO, t>iii(ihe stipulat--d ISl 

as the weig'ht. and lians bucked. 



Kan.saH City Next Month. 



walking match, with drntestanta en- 
tered from various parts of the coun- 
try, is to be held here in Convention 
hall commencing Jan. 27. The match 
will be giv.>^n under the direction of 
William D. .Shoville. and several well- 
known pedestrians will. It is expected, 
take part in it. 



The Western league magnates will be 

"^ ' - - • 1 tlie North 

H.IJ (fpt furc'l 

c-fceape-t i* 

at iii^tcreaX Ueidel(>er({ Me'il 

^. , 1 » .,.1. /-. 1 .1. 1 c*l Institute. &t. h'aul. Hun- 

Another knock for the Osier theory. ; est. f»ittifui sen-i".}. new, ^/i- 
Jake Becklev leads the American Asso- »*i"^d tte»tBient. expert 

^_.. ■„ !,_,.:_„ », - icut'7 I fltin r»pid cures, reasonable 

I ctation m batting for 1907. ] chai-tre^ 

t * * ,^V ^, . i We will cure you Secretly 

I Indianapolis has a Gliggy Blue sooi- ... ' ... . ' 

etv. They are willing to go against ,»"«• Cheaply— a wiSit Willi 




Hold "Kinfi:"' f ole. 



Lincoln. Neb.. Dec. 1".— At a meeting 
of the university athletic board y^^ster 
day. W - 



.Mik*> *Tw:r.i .-^Liiv.in 1.=? 



anything in the Hoosier metropolis In convince you 



Latest Style. H and-made. Norway 

SKB 

of hlakory. birvh, whfte o.-ik. white ash 
or Norw.iy pine. ii^aJ^sizf*?. for .s.ale by 



, • , an effort to break the baseball hoodoo. 
he heels 

I • • • 

"^"^™'™ i II Packie McFarland should lose a rrom 
battle whom could Joe Gans pick for tu™ 



the lightweight champion. 

• • • 



Xbe Best bjieciiLlii,: in toa 

Nortliw est for Men 

Ve&TH of experiencse In treating Nen ong, Bl'xid aixl 

L^roaic Diseases, grieg uh many advanta^res over 

other 'loctunj. We cure Ner'uu* Debility. I>i-<charsref 

a painful swellJng-s. pus sores. Blood Fol^on. Uup- 

, Mydrot-ele. Vario-.se Velna, Kidney. Bladder an<! 



HroBtatic Troubles, Piles, irutula and Kectal Affection*- 
Rlieumatibm. Bad Uabita, <_;at<UTh. fcerema, Kcnituti 
and other Btuljbum cbroiilc maladies of Wt-n. Writ* 



P. H. 




■Pr-ark Mantell who ha<» a de<-'i<!!on ^e^^ribing your case if tou cannot call. Over l-JO/XX 
..», »,-,,^j-. — mee' '^--'- 

part 



l'*^?l^i 



TEIM, 

I 1 iiuike all of 



over 'Honey" Mellbdy, will meet Rube r«ncMit^ii«n c«9»:n<i«s». ..a k^..:.>. cocc 
Smith at Denver the latter part of the ConsulUtion^ Examination and Advice FREE 

month. 



Heidelberg Medical Institute 



,512 Seventh avenij _ 
< ole was re-elected coach [my own skis, un^l Si*?^tli.n) direct, thus , George Dovey of Boston has about the i 
at a salary ot $1.8«0. 'saving you the dealer's profit. | same experience as a new senator at' ^"^ 



» ., vr .1 *, ,' • . o , Cor. Fifth and Robert St ST. PAUL, MINN, 

^Ai:''U^.ill°^?'j!!^^."?!^il'^1^2l:*10u,00fl Caplial. incorporated under iL SUU 

lj».vi0 of ifjime&ota. 



District Court, Eleventh Judicial 

ti-:ct. 
In the matter of the application 
of Th')ma8 Murray to register 
the title to the following de- 
scribed r^-ai estate situated in 
St. Louis County, M'.nne.<?ota, 
nami*lv: West hnlf of Southeast 
quarter (W^ of SE^i of Section 
Tliirty-four (34». in Township 
Forty-nine (Of) North of Range 
Fifteen t1'>) West, sub'.ect to the 
right-of-way granted to the Du- 
luth Transfer RaHway Company 
and its assigns by tliose two 
certain deeds exe'-uttd, one by 
V/illlam H. Davy and onr- by 
New Duluth Land Comoany, 
dated March Kth. 1S93. and 
April IStli. 182?, respectively, and 
rf'?.>rded in the nfficr of tiie 
register of d^eds in and for .«?aid 
St. Ijouis County, in B<.ok W of 
Deeds, page :">13. and in Book 1*7 
of Dt-'.'ds. rage 179. r-^spectiveiy. 
tij v.-hich deeds and to the record 
thereof reff-rencc Is hereby made 
for gri:at<-r certa;nty, 

Applicant, 
vs. 
NorthTn Pacific Railwav Com- 
pany, th^ Mercantile Trust Com- 
pany. Tru.itee: \hf Farmers* 
Loan S^ Tru.st Company. Trus- 
tef-: .Guaranty Trust Company 
of Xew York, Tru-tee. and aU 
other person.^ or parties un- 
knewn. -claiming stny rlg+»t. t«tie. 
estate. lien or Interest in the 
real estate d»»scrlbrd in the ap- 
pl cation herein. 

Defendants 
The Stat« of Minntyj.ota to the above- 
named 'j<'fendarts. 

You ar,; ii rebv .summoned and required 
to answer the application of the applicant 
in the ai.jve entitl*^d proceeding, and to 
file your answer to the said application 
In the office of the Clerk of said co^srt 
:n said DJunty. within twenty <20) days 
aftar the service of this summons upon 
you. exclusive of the day of such 8'»rvlce, 
and if you fail to answer tiie said apoU- 
cation within the time aforesaid, th" ap- 
plicant in ihi.^ pr.ic-eding will applv to 
the court for the r.-lief demanded therein 
Witness J. P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court. ar,d the seal ther-^of, at Duluth In 
said county, this 7th day of December. 
A. D. 1907. 

J. P. JOHNSON, 

Clerk. 
By V. A. DASH. 

Deputy. 
(Seal of DL-^trlct Court, St. Louis County 
Minn.i '* 

CRASS WELLER & CRASSWELLER. 

Attorney.s for Applicant 
J. B. C0TTO2C and F. D. ADAMS. 

Of Counsel. 
Duluth Eveaing Herald— Dec. 1(^17-24, "W^ 



/ 



3 













1 


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► 










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14 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUgS^pAY, DECEMBER 17, 1907. 




' Store Open Evenings From Now Till Christmas. 

Best TimC ^^ Trade is in the Mornings— You Get Better Service, 



Take 

IVest Ditluth 

Cars. 




2 1st Avenue 

IVest and 

Superior St, 



Just One Week Lcft-rHurry! 






I 



r ISX'T well to put off till the day after what you can do tomorrow. 
Christmas l)uying is heing done with a vim. X'ery many people are 



^1 licediticr the advice to "shop early" and are doing themselves and us 
a got.d turn. Brini;- in your list tonntrrow morning and see at what ad 
vantageous prices J. & ^I. can till it. Won't you? 



Our 

Toy 

Dept 

is the 

Very 

Best 

Ever. 




Xmas 
Post 
Cards, 
Books, 
Calen- 
dars, 
Etc. 
Easy 
Prices 





Our Men's Dept is Well Stocked ! 

The scroll above- suj^gests a number 'A things that are first rate for Xmas giving. 
Tif<. Suspenders and other necessary items I'f everyday use have a habit of wearing out. 
.V man will alwavs need more. 



Little Tots Wait in Vain 
for Failicr's Re- 
turn. 




Missing From West End 

Home for Several 

Days. 



L^avJner his motherlees children to 
shiver around ili-fed fires and to get 
food as best they could, Ole Dahlstein, 
formerly a collector in the employ of 
P. W. Gallag^her, a West end grocer, 
has disappeared and the little ones will 
probably be taken to the children s 
home. 

Since the father's flight, the children 
have been cared for by neighbors. 
Tiuy have lieen giving the youngsters 
food and shelter, expecting that tiie 
fatiitr would return soon and look after 
them once more. But Dahlstein has not 
been found, although the police have 
joined in a search for him. 

It is said that recently Dahlstein 
has been drinkiiig heavily and that he 
frecjuently k f i hidj children alone for 
daya and night.s ^fja time. The grocer 
for whom he wrfrlAd claims now that 
l>ahlstein was $!(« behind In his ac- 
counts when he departed. It is said 
that he collected about $10(i for tlie 
firm, wiiich lie never turned in. 

While the police S,ne looking for Dahl- 
stein, tlie humane society is looking 
after the childrc?n. Their mother died 
about a year ago. All of them are lit- 
tle tots, the oldest fof the three being 
a girl of 11 years, i 

STENBERCrMl PREACH. 



CHICKERING 
PIANOS 



1 1 



New lli'Iiday Neckwear at 25c, 50c, 75c. $1.00. 
New Oblong Muftkrs, 50c, 75c, $1.00 up to $2.50. 
New Suspenders in bci.xcs. :it 39c up to $1.50. 
New Dress Gloves. 75c. $1.00, $1.50 to $3.00. 
Plain and Fancy W..-! I lose at 25c and 50c. 
Niglit Shirts, tl.-innel or muslin, 50c to $1.50. 



Linen Handkerchiefs, loc, 15c, 19c up to 50c. 
Slippers, in finf kid, black and cclcr, fi.25 up. 
S:lk Handkerchiefs, plain and initial, 25c, 50c, 75c. 
Bath Rc'tjes, extra values at $4.00 and $5.00. 
Smoking Jackets, $5.00. 
Fancy Vests, $1.00, $1.50, $1.75, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00. 



^ 



Bring in your Premium Coupc»ns promptly if you wisli to use 
tliem before Xmas. None ivlll be accepted Monday and Tuesday. 

^^tesss a iiiii iii iii iii iii "i i ' i """" iiii s ' l aa" . " !! ""'" ! iiii "~ " "" ' 1 ■ -^ 




Temperance Serm«ii at riiion Ex- 
ercises ill West End. 

Rev. John H. Stenbcrg, pastor of the 
First Norwegian Lutheran churcii, wIH 
be the speaker at a big union temper- 
ance service to be held next Sunday 
evening at the First Swedish Methodist 
church. Twentieth avenue west and 
Third street. 

These exercises will be the regular 



Tf incrican Exchange gank 

OP DULUTH 

Incorporated 1879. 

£apitill $500,000 

Surplus ana Profits (earned) $700,000 



end of the bed. fracturing hia toes by the 
force of the blow. 



ANTI-SALOON LEAOl E 



Hiis Formally (Opened Its Campaign 
in Polk County. 

. Crocfkston, Mmn., Lee. 17.— (.''r,*c:al to 
The Herald.)— The campaigrn cf the Anti- 
Saloon leag-ue was duly launched in this 
City Monday. Two meetings wert held. 



one an executive session held behind 
closed dc<ors where a plan of action was 
adc'pted by representatives ol churches 
from every part ot the county, and some 
temperance oriranizations to 




REV. JOHN STENBERG. 



ENFOUCE STATE LAW. 

Attorney (Jeneral Not Winking: at ' 
\ iolation of tiie Lau. 

St. Paul. -Minn.. !'.-■. IT. ~ ' ' 

Jlf riW.l Tli.' «=tat.. law r.'.f!:- 



Mich., wht re his ^< ^ \v:,s born. From 

there he nuvved '< ^a, where he 

ifiriiiiii. d until fit; 's :>.f.o, when 

h. <,ii..' ;•' ;:•: :•■ . !■-■•. with his 



w • 1 1 . 1 - < . .- . >\ . ■ i ■ , - ■ ' - • . 

\ 1: :..'|-.il is '.oil' ■ ■■;!. li. .\ 

-.g nit-n Ir.'Mi this 

■inp and ur^ed thai 

■■( qiiiriuK sa- 

.. r tlie situ- 



OLIVER MIMNO COMPANY 

LAYS OFF SOME MEN. 



monthly temperance services of the 

Pulutli Union Temperance association. 

assist tiie I antJ ''^''H **" attended ly members of 

iea'srue^in its 'workT A mass'mee tinu was < many different churches in the city. 

held in the rwzv.'.x^. and l^oth meetings, R^v. Mr. MonberB is considered a 

were addressed by Supt. A N. F;:lniTr I vf ry pood speaker and It is understood 

of the «tate league and As^istant Supt. '< that he has i.repaitd a strons sermon 

Youngdalil. At the Sunday services. | ^^— '^^^™ "?^^^T'^ *"^^^^~^^^^— '^ 

lc»th spoke about and aKiut $5(iO was 

subscrii ed to further the work in Polk 

county. By the time the next s-tate cani- 
I paign in on. the leaders stale that an 

organizatii-n wiil have been perfected that 

can (iifeat any candidate for orfice wiio 

is not open and a,bc've board fcr the 

temperance cause, and sptcJaily pledged 

to a county option law. 



.M I 



■ p'li' ,1 th.it it w.i< ';:- duty 
;.i' s*att law, .i;.d in an- 
nounced that he would call upon the 
mayur and tiu' chief of police to enforce 
that statute. If they do not do so. he 
M, il he will bring prvH-eedinsrs to oust 
* : (.'111 1,'ff !'"'*'. 
•I\ ;i c.^inmitt* »■ n pr«-s*'ntinK the 
•; Endeavor sovi>ty of St. Paul 
.,1 A petition t«> thf attonu-y K»'n- 
-Kiiii; him to eiif.'i- ■ :h<.' 11 o'clock 
- law. 



PASSED CENTURY MARK. 



<!■ L 



-. X 1' . 1 1< .'. iTMo.v. .« .«^.l. 
I'f \\\t ol.l.-t m.ti in Nortli 
I-.. IV. 1., liitd at ta*- luiine of his son 
IM..! ii< r»-. iiKeil M vears. Mr. St ideKC 



>reg:aunee, Mi 
Tlie Herald.- 
Superintendent 
Oliver Ir(>n .M 
erti< .s to rt(UK« 
the mines on the 
me almost as in 
minp. In the ne 
wert* laid off Si 
ReK» nt Ki'Hip. bu 
there will be no 1 
ford, whicii is ; 
over SCK) men. Th. 
unexpeetcd. M;in 
urday nipht are 
most likely k;.v. 
in Europe. 



. 17.— (Special to 
'!er received by 
Jr-hnston of the 
ompanys prop- 
in working forces at 
range affects N» pan- 
ic h as 11 does L^lipe- 
Khborl.ood of 1(1' men 
t urday night at the 
it is understood that 
I duction at the Hart- 
l present employing 
curtailment was not 
of those laid off Sat- 
foreigncrs. who will 
for their old homes 



MENOMINEE STORM-S>VEPT. 



SOMETHING OF A KI( KER. 



Maniuotte. Mk 1 , Dec. 17.— Because of 
a peetiUar mishap a well-known resident 
of Negaunee is co ifined to his hf>m»' with 
two fractured to. s. He had a dream 
durinp the night in which he Imapi.^.ed 
he was txing i lurdered. and m the 
strupele to fre. hi nself from his assailant 
li. kict.'-d a hoi. through the wall at the 



Gale That Struck (itv Fridav. Most 
! Disastrous in Years. 

Menominee, Mich., Dec. 17.— «Speclal to 

The Herald. *- Friday's storm was one of 

: the worst that ever struck this city from 

the northeast. Storm signals were 
I hflsted and none of the boats left the 
I harbor. The sleet hampered the tram 
; and street car service, while at 3 o'clock 
; the city was without telegraphic com- 
I mumcation with the outside world. 
' Great danjape was done to the dock 
] projerty along the shores ol Green bay. 
I Local prc>perty ciwr.ers estimate the dam- 
. age done tc the local docks at $3f>.000. 

Nc action hae been taken by the en- 
gineer depe.rtment of the war depart- 
ment regarding the building of a break- 
water to prevent the destruction of the 
, dncks and local marine rnen arc veiy 
sevtre in censuring the government of- 
hcials for this delay. 




-^^ORN SYRUP 



The 
Seit 
Spread 
for Sread 



More! More! More! comes the call for 
Karo. Children love and thrive upon it; 
fcver\"body delights in its wholesome good- 
ness. Nothing half so g(X)d for all sorts of 
sweetening, from griddle cakes to candy. 

IOC, 25c and soc in air-tight tins. 

CORN PRODUCTS 



MFG CO. 



■^v^r 




FALLINO TREE KILLS 

;John Marhoo of Minneapolis in 
Lumber (amp Near Walker. 

■V\'a;k<.r. Mi:i!i.. Lec. 17.-1 Spvc.al to The 
Herald.)— John Marhoc, aged 46. of Min- 

neapc^is. employed at caiap No. € of the 

North Cone Luml er ciiupany. near here, 

met a. tragic death while cutting a tree. 

As the tree fell to the ground a liuib 

struck the untortunate woodsman on the 

head crushing his skull. 

I Ttie voron'r of Cass county looked into 

i the ca«e and a jury found that death 

I resulted Jrom an accident. 



ORDER S( H(M>LS CLOSED 

BElAlSE OF DISEASE. 



St. Paul, Pec. 17.- The stair board of 

health has ordf-red the public Brhools at 

I F*armingt<>n. Minn., cloctd t»e-cause of 

' the prevalence of scarlet fever there. 

' many cases of which were reported 

measles. Bec-ause of diphtheria at Big 

; Falls. Minn., the lo -al board of health 

has closed the schools there. A special 

to the Pioneer Prt s» says that the liigh 

schc'ils and one grade roo.ii at New Ulm 

I have been closed because four teachers 

I came in contact with a small pox pa- 

I tieTit. 

I • 

I CAUGHT IN MISSOURI. 

nickinson. N. I'.. 1*1. 17.— I»ell MtCuI- 
. lorn liap bei-n airtsted at Chilliccthe. Mo.. 
ion a chirpe of embtzlempnt. preferred 
I by parties of tliiscity. Slurilf Hnrtung 
I ami deputy are now c>n the w.iy to 
gt t M 'Cullom to bring him to Dickinson 
for trial. McCollum w.is formtrly teach- 
er of country schools in Stark county, 
wher*^ he marrieel a year ago. A di.nmond 
valued at $300 figures in the ch irge 
against him. 




■•iiiiiiiil 



IS one 
award 



of the 
ed the 







Can Be Purchased by Mail Advantageously. Our Inexpensive Mail Order 
Department Affords you the Convenience of Buying a Chickering Direct 
and Avoid the Annoyance of Dealing With Agents. 

THE CHICKERING 

very few artistic pianos made in this country and has unquestionably been 
highest honors of any piano in the world. ^ Chickering & Son, Boston 
(makers of the only genuine Chicker- 
ing piano), have the distinction of be- 
ing the only pianoforte manufacturers 
in the United States awarded the Cross 
of the Legion of Honor by the French 
government. From an artistic and 
tonal standpoint the Chickering has 
maintained its supremacy during the 
entire 84 years the factory has been es- 
tablished. It is one of the most expen- 
sive pianos made, if price is the only 
thing considered, but w^hen rightly 
judged — by durability and tonal charm 
— it is one of the cheapest pianos on the 
market. .It is made for those who de- 
sire and insist on having the best 
money will buy. 



Why Not Give Her a Chickering Christmas? 

If you will write our Duluth Store, catalog and full particulars will be mailed to 
you immediately, and you will be able to solve the piano question without any annoy- 
ance whatever. 

HOWARD, FARWELL & 

120 East Superior Street. 



W. J. ALLEN, Manager. 














for the occasion. An elaborate musical j 
program Is being arranged by Alex ; 
Enna. choir director of the chureh. 1 

SAD RITES FOR ERICKSOX. | 

Funeral of West Ender Held at the 
Swedish Baptist Church. 

The funeral of Walfrld Erickson. who 
died Sunday from consumption, after a 
long illness, was held this afternoon at 
the First Swedish Baptist church. Nine- 
teentli avenue west and First street. 

The services were in charge of Rev. 
Hjalmar Hendrickson, pastor of Bethel 
Swedish Baptist church in the East end. 
The church was well tilled with friends 
and relatives, as Mr. Erickson had a 
wide acquaintance in the West fnd. 

The interment takes place at Union 
cemetery. 

Mr. Erickson was 38 years of age and 
leaves a wife and two children, 

anmalTieeting. 

Observation of North Star Benefit 
Association to Convene. 

The annual meeting of Duluth observa- 
tory, No. 39, of the North Star Benefit 
association, will be held this evening at 
Lundholmns music store, on West Supe- 
rior strct, near Twentieth avende. 

The work of the society during the past 
year will be reviewed, tlie reports of of- 
ficers heard and officer.s selected to 
serve the organization during the com- 
ing twelve months. 

The officers to be elected this evening 
will be installed some time in January. 

Ladies at Banquet. 

At the regular meeting held last even- 
ing, members of the Bema club decided 
to hold their annual banquet on the first 
Monday in January, although the place 
was not decitled upon. 

Members will be allowed to invite their 
wives and sweethearts to the feast and 
after the spread, the Bemaites will show 
the ladies wlial public speaking is. 

Political discussions occupied most of 
the time at the session last night, which 
was held in Dr. Oredson's office. 

West End Shortrails. 



CHRISTMAS SVGGKSTIONS 



AVatch our windows next 
things electrical for Christmas. 



week. They will contain many new 



Bfortherrk Klectrical Cotxipsiny« 

210 WKST FIH.ST .STliKKT. 



I. 



Norwegian-Danish M. E. church w;ill nnet ] friend in the penitentiary on Black- 



Thursday evening at the church. The] 
young people of tlie congregation have 
been especially invited to this meeting. 

For fountain pens and fountain pen 
supplies go to J. C. Eckman, ::yl9 West 
Superior s-treet. 



wells Island, 
less a person 
mel, 

A little ever elevtn years ago 
cago was taking a great interest 



and that friend was no 
than Abraham Hum- 



Chl- 
in a 



The funeral of Robert C. Sloan of 601 , ijttie 7-year-old girl who could play the 
North Twenty-sixth avenue west. whoL^j 1:, „.i,i, fu,. ^uiii nf an o^fiot ti,. 
died Sundav. will be held Thursday after- .^"1" . ' "\ ^i^"^^ t Z- ^"^^'^^""t- ^h* 

noon. The iv mains will be sent to Nor- ''"le one wa.s Josephine Brown. A 
wood, Ont., for Interment. The late Mr. j yt^'ar or two later she came to New 
Sloan was a brother of Richard C. Sloan. ; York with her mother and, added l» 
owner of the Sloan block at Twentieth her fame as a violinist, was her rei»ii- 
avenue west and Superior street. tation for childish beauty. 

liKil imported cod iiver oil. A. E. Swed- | ,, -^. ,,,,,. 

berg, 3 E. Sup. St. and 2015 W. Sup. St. | Airs. Brown secured for her daughter 

'the leading violin teachers and very 

yg,^,^ ._ A r>rkmr mm Ami soon musicians and artists were at- 

I 11 H/IaI/UV II/IAI\I Itracted toward the little Western girl. 

I \/ 1? |ril\|\ I l*|/lll Artists besieged the mother to allow 

I Josephine to pose for them. A littlv* 
lUIZT mi nmCAlkf ^'^'tr ^ year ago one of these artist:* 
iTir I llv r Kill fill ^^'"t his portraits of her to London, 
• ■*^" ■'■ ■ ■■■•^^» ■ [Berlin and St. Petersburg, and entered 

I them in beauty contests and in every 

jcitv the judges were unanimous Iji 

Chicago Girl to Wed Phy-i" wS^-:i'4'''iir„£;r';v£%\'„\'''s 

, , , , -- 'prison many of his friends came for- 

ciri^tn in Rl5)rHlA/0ll C I ward to tell of his deeds of kindness 
JlClClll 111 lliGvIlTfvll 3 and foremost among them was MioS 

_ - , Brown, w ho owes her success as a 

l^l/inn musician largely to the kindly interest 

l3IUIIUa of Mr. Hummel. Miss Brown was ana 

of the first to hurry to him in his cvill 

New York, Dec. 17.— Miss Josephine with flowers and fruit. During thcso 

Brown, who charmed Chicagoans as a, visits she met Dr. Matz. tlie physician, 

on Blackwell's Island, and this ac- 



girl violinist some years ago, is the 
heroine of a romance that has just bo- 
come public with the announcement 
that she is to marry Dr. Philip B. Matz. 
Although honored by keen judges in 
the beauty contests of three great Euro- 
pean countries and pestered by many 



quaintance led to their engagement. 



Public SiM'akcr Interrupted 

Public speakers are frequently in- 
terrupted by people coughing. This 
would not happen if Foley's Honey 
and Tar were taken, as it cures 
coughs and colds and r>revents pneu- 



Oscar Spence of Tw< nty-eighth avenue 
west and Fifth street, has gone to Hams 
L^ike for a visit. ,.,,'■ 

Nick Plojeck and Stans Kopjeski left 1 
yesterday for New York, where they will 
sail for their native Finland. They ex- 
p< cl to be gone several montlis. 

Rudolph Wilson has returned from 
Zanesville. Ohio, where he went to at- 
tend the funeral of his moiht r. 

Harry Kelly of the Esmond hotel leaves 
today lor New Orleans, where he has ac- 
cepted a position. 

Take no chances, have your prescrip- 
I tions filled at the Dion Drug Store. 
: Memorial services for the late King 
Oscar of Sweden were held In s-everal of | 
the Swedish churches in the West end : 
Sundav. At the First Swedish Bapti.'^t 
church John Hurtig and A. Thoren gave 
short talks. 

Rev. A. Edstam. pastor of the First 

gweuieh Baptist chuicli, who is ill with 

smallr<'X. is reported as madi imprL.ved. 

He expects to be able to resume his duties 

I by New Years. 

For weak lungs, use the Norwegian 
Cod l^iver Oil, sold at the Lion Drug 
Store. ^ ^ 

R« v. Roderick J. Mooney, rector of St. 
Luke's Episcopal ehurch, is hard at w.^rk 
arrangine for the annual Christmas nee 
celfbration at St. Luke's parish, to bo 
held in the v«str\- rooms of the church 011 
ChristmaJ= eve. Bishop Morri.*-on will bJ 
present and give a short talk to the 
youngsters. After a britf r-iogram, pres- 
ents will be distributed among all the 
' h^fdren. ^ . ^ 

Members of the First Swedish Bapti.-t 
church will hold their annual "p-'und 
party' Friday tvening. They do not 
talk much about this function, but it is 
Cine that is always observed in the church 
at- the holidays. Ever>'one brings at bast 
a pound of .«ome sort of eatables, or 
mcnev. and the collection is distr.buted 
among the poor families in the congrega- 
tion and out of it. 

Us worth while to see our hats: none 
better; bring your old hat— we'll make it 
r^ew. Pearson's, 1814 Piedmont avenue 

west. . . . f, 

T»:e W'omen s Foreign Missionar> bo- 
cietv of the First Norwegian-Danish M. 
E church met last evening at the home 
of Mrs. A. O. Anderson, 1:612 \\ est Futh 

Charles Albright of IS-'T West Sup; rior 
street has gone to Ashland, ^ Wis., for a 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the FiiHtl 



proposals, she has given her hand lolmonia and consumption. The genuine 
a young New York physician, whom i contains no opiates and is in a yellow 
she met while she was visiting a fallen I package. Sold by all druggists. 



I 



It Seems Impossible 

To sell pianos, really high grade, finely 
made instruments at the prices we sell 
them at — especially during this sale. The 
LOW PRICES and splendid vahies are 
evident to everyone who sees our immense 
stock. They know they re getting bargains , 

Our big Piano Sale is placing hundreds 
of fine instruments in Duluth homes. 

If the cjuality, value, make and price 
w^ere not right, we wouldn't be doing the 
piano business w^e are. It's to your ad- 
vantage to buy now. 




I 












V 




1 

i 







THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1907 



To take frost out 
of nipped ears, 
rub snow on. 
To keep it out, 
put on a 
GORDON CAP 

Fits the head 



Any style that becomes yoa, in finest im- 
ported fancy suitings or plain Kersevs. 
With fur band. $1.50, Hand made, $2.00; 
DeLuxe, $3.50 
Ask your hatter. 



m TiHiE moi BMi 




MAKE TRIP 
OVER LINE 

Virginians Ride on First 

Passenger Train to 

Ranier. 



KIRBY IS 
ON jllS WAY 

Will be In Duluth to 

Participate in Labor 

War. 



Public Meetings Will be 

Held by the Labor 

Unions. 



the National 

iri- 
lifs. He 
'.;y n-ui.LMi :»'iu until the 
Ued one 'Auy oi" the other. 
. ur<: pf -'paring t"'>r a. 
i>ub:ic nu-.-tings to be held in 
alls of the- city, for the pur- 
giving the general public 



President Kirhy i>r 

p.'- :' Buikltncr ''■ 

: Dul'ith 

a Willi 

matt-. 
L'iii-»ii 

IS'./" 



Smith, also former sheriff of Becker 
county, and for years one of the leading 
men of this section Is dead. He was a 
native of Waltham, Ma.s.s., aged 49, and 
came to this statp In 1S79, locating here. 
He was at the head of the J. H. Smith 
company here in Detroit, one of tho 
largest mercantile concerns In this part 
of the state, also president of the Clay- 
tun-SmUh company, a mercantile concern 
at Frazee. and president of a wholesale 
liquor house with headquarters here. Mr. 
Smith was prominent m Masonic circles 
and the members of that order will have 
charge of the funeral, which will be held 
tomorrow. 



Surprised at Amount of 

Timber Along New 

Road. 



Virginia, Minn. Dec. 17.-(Speclal to 
The Herttld.)— Th< party of Virginia busi- 
ness men who vere guests of General 
Manager M. A. Murphy on the first pas- 
senger train to r la direct from Virginia 
to Rainer. leavi: g here at 9:30 a. m., 
Sunday morning, retured home on the 
pa.ssenger which arrived here at ll:3l» 
yesterday mornlr g. Six of the party, 
however, remained over until morning 
that they might Have better opportunity 
to see the sight < about International 
Kails. Fort Francis and Rainer. Those 
who rema.ined ov r were M. T. Savage. 
l> E. CuppernuU Capt. Arthur Stevens, 
B. F. Smith and W. H. GiUmore. The 
others in the party, who arrived home to- 
day, were Mayor Elect Andrew Hawkin- 
son. Norman McDoaald, J. D. L.amont. 
Victor Pett-rson, Otto A. Poirier, A. C. 
Osi»rne, Dr. C. V. Malmgren. \V. E. 
Hunnaford and .1. Murpiiy. The tram 
stopped at one «f the Virgmla L.umb.'r 
company's camp; up the line and the 
party had dinner, and reached llani>r 
at i o'clock In the afternoon. A half 
hour lau-r sleigh ) arrived and conveyetl 
the party to Iniernational Falls, where 
they had supper. They were then con- 
veyed across the river to Fort Francis, 
where they rema ned over night, depart- 
ing at 7 o'clock i 1 the morning for home 
on the first ng ilar through pa.ssenger i 
train to be run 1' "om the border town to I 
Virginia. The ti Ip was made m fairly | 
good tune, and tie bed of the new road i 
was found to be in very good condition. | 
All who were in the party were favor- , 
ably Impress, d with the future prospects I 
of the town.s at t ti*' northern terminus of i 
Ihf n.w ruatl, although their short stay 
did nut give tht m opportunity to view | 
all the lnterestin;{ points of the district. | 
They were agreeably surprised at the 
large amount of KO«Jd timber still stand- 
ing along the Hi •• of the new road and 
in close proximity thereto. 



SUED FOR SLANDER. 

Sparta Man is Alle^d to Have In- 
jured Eveleth Police Judj^e. 

Sparta, Minn., Dec. 17.— (Special to The 

Herald.)— Morris Stein, a local merchant. 

who has figured in the courts and nt^ws- 

papers rather extensively of late, has 

more troubles on his hands. He b<'Ui been 

sued for $6,000 for alleged slander by 
Judge Prince of Eveleth. 

The case will probably come up for 
trial at the next session of the district 
court on the range. 



a 
l„ i.,a of •>rt<'amzed labor's side 

tji stion. \\ i:. McEwen, George 

B. Haw ley, Mr. Sclia.i.lt, Mr. Kirby and 
others will addnvss the meetings. 

In rt'yrard to the »igna.ture3 that have 
lie. n wiUidraun fr>m the petition cir- 
cu!at^-ii ammi? the business men by the 
taiioiis. dt-pl' »»■'"& the faot that Ouluth 
Bihould l>f ftng-aged in so serious a con- 



tr- 

!■' 
a: 

h 

M 



>t th' 



present time, and ex 

.[.■-i!,. that, all troubles 
,1,1. ubly adjusted, by g'etting 
, arrive at some agreement. 
I said this morning that the 
:ila who did ask that their 
sigtKi.iure-s b'i wlthdr.iv.-n, did so be- 
oans.- ^f thi-^^at.-? ni.i i- by the Real 

i: 

■■!() signature" 

\v.T>- a'. to llie petition." .s:iiJ 



\T, 



M 
I 

upon all morchant.s, 
■ : 'hem to 

■he list. 
>v . , . : the 



LIGHT PLANT CRIPPLED. 

Two Harbors iJetting; Along Partly 
in Darkn 'ss These Days. 

Two Harbot-s, Minn., L>e<;. 17.— (Spe- 
cial to Th« He -aid. )— The city powei 
plant has Iwen badly ci-ippled by the 
breaking of th- .shaft connecting the 
engine and big dymanio, and has been 
compel'bxl to sih it off the current to a 
large numl>er ol custoniers. To supply 
the storts aixd busines^s hoixsea with 
lighting during the evenings, the cur- 
rent has f>een j< applied from the amall 
dviiamo. which is not of sulficient oa- 
l.ueity to trtiipp y current for all tho 

..J .>-v. »,v...v.. lights needed. It Is uncertain if the | 

M. •iiV)"rs of the lit al broken .shaft c; n W repaired, or if it 

will be necossar*' to .send to the factory, 
in New Jersey t ir a new part. 



EVELETH IN BRIEF. 

Current Personals and Other Events 
Gathered in Range City. 

Eveleth, Minn.. Dec. 17. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— The favors at the hast 
meeting of the Euchre club at Mrs. 
Greening's residence were won by Mrs. 
George McCormick and Mrs. V. Prince. 

Martin Larson, formerly superintendent 
of the Drake & Slratton's mine here, 
was in- the city en route to Angora to 
bring his family In from his homej<tead. 
He Is at present employed al the Mahon- 
ing mine, near Hlbbing. 

Phil Irwin, brother of Manager Irwin 
of the electric plant, left for Duluih 
after a vi.^U here. Mr. Irvin will enga-ge 
In the telephone work In Duluth. 

Mi.ss Emllis.sa MaudevlUe was hostess 
to the Teachers' Bridge club at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Arnold. 

P. Kealy returnini from Muiocqua. Wis., 
where he attended the funeral of a 
brother-in-law. P. J. O'Malley. who died 
ol heart failure. 

Mrs. George Harvey has left for Du- 
luth for a visit with relatives. 

•Mrs. Guy Baker and her brother. Ed 
Fuller, were In Dulyth Saturday. 

Mrs. O. H. Haehuke of Sparta and Miss 
Hat'huke of Milwaukee are to leave for 
Milwaukee. Mrs. Haehuke will be away 
until after Christmas. 

Friday ihe menib'-rs of the Ely school 
board, Messrs. Glea.son. Chain and 
Holmes, were here Inspecting the local 
schools. 

The accumulation of drunks In the lo- 
cal police court Monday were as follows: 
Ambrose Moobeidlala, George Nygr^n. Joe 
Skull. Alex Hill, James Quinn and Matt 
Mattson. Each were fined $j and costs. 

Monitor lodge. No. 33, will give a grind 
dance and social Thursday evening. Dec. 
26. In Monitor hall, to celebrate the 
holidays. 

TIk- R'hS Men are planning a grand ball 
for New Years. , „ ■ . 

The next dance of tho Eveleth Social 
club win take place in Vail hall dur- 
ing the latter part of January. 

TWOllARBORS BRIEFS. 

Two Harbors. Mirvn., Dec. 17.— (Spe> 
cial to The Herald.)— J. E. Chandler 
went to Akoley, Minn., yesterday to 
see his brother, Fred, who is in tha 
hospital there, the result of an acci- 
dental .shooting. It is expectt>d tho am- 
putation of one of Ms le^gs will be 
necessary. 

The di-^trfcct court convened here yes- 
terday to take up the cases .s«-nt to it 



•y learned o£ 
, .;iint\ttee to call 
in :in efl'ort to pre- 
hiive their nani'.'S 
Threatening them 
patronage of con- 



ti. ■; -0 city if they allowed 

lh»;ir .signatures to remain, they se- 

1 i;i'.> nromise of a few men to act 

i. M'lsi >i tliese were hard- 

,. ;». \V.- have received only 

;ix letter.** asking that ih-- ."ig- 

'> 'vi-h i'-awn from the peti- 



11 



li 

r 

! : 
• 1 

I ; 



EXHAUST JURY PANEL. 

Criminal Trial Halts Until More 
Men Can be Summoned. 

Grand Rapid.s. Minn.. U*-c. 17.-(Sp»cial 
to The H.ral.l.i Tli-' jury panel was ex- 
haust><i IkIui.' 1 jury was selected to 
try J. J. McDon.ild of Swan River a sec- 
ond time in the district court yesterday 
of as.sault in ti.e first d»-gree. and tj.e 
court nut the ras > over until 3 o clock tm.-> 
1 Hi.- >ia-il'. We hive S'-"-" afterno..:;. to k v the sheriff time to 
iu.-n tluy have bi-ouglu in from bring m a .s[vc al venire. McDonald l.s 
the uuLside. and have observed their 1 alLg.-l to havt ^'h'-'t "^I?,, Riv. i" In 

..v,,rk. All wo have to say is. that if , ?J^^I>^'^-^1'1 %«?'"•«" /^\,..^,^tied at the 
. vviMIni? to uav the December. ISKfo. He wa>, trit i .ii me 
' v\i,ing to pa> ^"f J t.rm of c )urt and eonvic;ed, but; 

tin.on wage >'f*l«. i te"m.«, » new t, ial. As County Attorney 1 
u i: 1 to pay local j .p^^yj,,.^, ,, mc, pacilated. having »>een 
union .seal", for couns.T for the defendant at the former 
trial Roval A. Stone, from the att.jrney , 
genfrars'olTio". it conducting the prosecu- , 

Tlif oa.s-e of th. State vs. Almee Fontak. ' 
indicted t'.r forgery, was dismissed upon; 
motion of the state, after the defense had i 
c.HKhKb-a its ttstimony. , 



^lalm they are 
1^3 men they i 
We hive seen '■ 



t, 

XI 



1 !1'!I U' 'Li ■ 

■'•rtiiinly 



orth moi-f tlian 
.;.• men imported." 
■.iv.l no answer yet to 
, Mr Drew for a 

p, . open ahoji i-Hif<- 

tion. ijeorge B. Ha why, presi.lent of 
the Minnesota Slate Federation of Lab- 
or, ha.s requested m opportunity to 
meef with the biiiM-r>' fxrhange and 
learn Its side of :,5l.- .•ontn.v.Tsy. Tho 
matter will be brouijlit uji at the next 
meeting of the exchange. 



D. E. H.. Dec. 17, 1907. 

Henew old ties of friendship. 



^ 



KlX-1 AND QUEEN RETrUN. 

L.> ; M I»ec. 17.— The king and -iiieen 
o: N . .V, who have been on i visit 
to KiKLind, left here today for Copen- 
hag-ii The infant prince. Olaf, is with 
them 



SPRY AT 77. 

Maii«' Younir by Chane^e of Food. 

An V r<'"l or combination of f<>>d.s that 
■will f. stotv vigor to the digestive or- 
gan.-- 'I a [K r.-4on 77 years old, whi> had 
bt.-en iroublnl with indigestion for 
years;, is worth looking into. 

This Karv-? >.-...<.-i" <:,v<- 

-1 am 7. ■ for :i;any 

year."* luid ^uiu-i-'-n i:'>iu uKhgt'.-^lion, 
which I supp>j«e<l was oaus»t>d by old 
age. Though! th-- -veakentMl .organs 
would never d-» i;->l .-service any more. 

••I iH^canie so weak I could hardly 
g»et about, my breath came with difH- 
I was really in a bad way. I 



BRANI>ED AS FAKE. I 

Sensational Story From Eveleth! 
Was Only Pipe Dream. j 

County Comm ssloner Neil Mclnnls of 
Eveletli. who v as In Duluth yesterday 
to attend the m> eling of the county Ixiard , 
to consider plat s for an ajditlon to thf 
courthouse, .say.s that ffie sen.sational 
story sent out [ om Eveleth relative to a 
Swede being lo» nd bound and Kaggeil on 
the railroad tnick is a pure fakf. Mr. 
Mclnnis says tliat the man simply laid 
down on the trfi^k to sleep oft the eflfect.s 
of liouor. H.* s lys that the track is one I 
not frequently used, and that thert- was 
no train due ovt r it until some umc aftei 
daylight. 

FARMER^S~TEAM KILLED 

By Iron Ran^aje Train at Tower, | 
Owner ISarely Escaping. | 

Tower, Minn., Dec. 17.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— A valuable team of horses be- j 
longing to Wll iam Jackson was killed 
yesterday by u Duluth tS: Iron Range 
train on the k rossing near McAlpine's j 
culty. I vvas really in a t>aa way. i ^amp, south of this city. The driv..r de- 
lived a.^ I always had. ate meat and (.jart-s tht-re was no signal given at all. 
other things that were clearly too ' uelth.r whistle nor bell, and on on.- sid • , 
heavv {'*r my digestion, but I dl6n't of the crossing Is a high embankment 
nea%> . i .. j « which hides th ' track from view until 

one drives rlgh^ upon It. The team had 
emerged from the cut and were directly | 
upon the track when the unseen train 
bore down upoi them. 

Mr. Jackson i* om' of the thriving far- 
mers south of t le eity, and will be great- 
ly inconvenienci d by the loss of his team 
at this season. 



know any better way 

Five months ago I came to the CN>n- 
clu»ion that I would not liv« much 
longer without help of some kind. I 
was l»adly discouraged, until one day I 
iv£-ad about Grai>e-Nut3. what 1: had 
done for others, and finally I conclud- 
ed to try it myself. 

"Wonder of wonders, what a change 
It made. I eat three heaping teospoon- 
fuls with cream for breakfast arul the 
Bam,, am )unt for supper. Of course I 
«at fruit and something light to make 
up a nu-al, but 1 can eat a heary dinner 
— leaving out meat. 

••How gtKxi I fetil. I can do nvore 
■work in a given tlnie than for the past 
five years. I can walk two miles or 
Oiwtre and can hardly believe nrty own 
•en&^s as to the change. I did not have 
much faith at first, but the next thing 
I knew I would get up In the nio-ming 
end rush around and do things so 
easily it surprised me. All tbls change 
fa clearly due to Grape-Nuts, and I am 
thankful." Name gl\"^n by the Postum 
Co., Brittle Creek, Mich. Road the 
little bookle-t, "The Road to WeJlvllle," 
in packages. "There's a Reason." 



VETER.AN EDITOR DYING. 

Biwabik. Mini.. Dec. 17. — (Special to 
The Ht-rald.i — Former Editor Arthur J. 
Myers of the 'iraphlc Sentinel of Lake i 
City, Minn., oi »■ of the veteran editors ' 
of this state, w lo recently sold his news- 
paper and camt here to spend his remain- 
ing days with F. B. and A. L. Meyers, 
his sons, is nt-ir to death's door, of his 
old aliment, st-mach trouble. He is af- 
flicted with ca icer of the stomach and 
the Doctors .-layo of Rochester and 
other specialist I have been unable to af- 
ford him relief 



Such a ])n3fusion of 
styles, patterns and qiial 
ity is at this store that it 
would 1)e useless to try 
to descri])e or even men- 
tion all of them. 

There is nothing, absolutely 
nothin.tj, ma(le in Neckwear 
that cannot be shown here. If 
it's not in the show cases it 
may be in the stock room. We 
added a new show case again 
this week. 

Manufacturers have asked 
us many times: "For Heav 
en's sake, what do you do with 
all the neckties which you buy 
from us and others?" \\'hy, 
our customers wear them. Soll- 
insr so manv, we can buv manv 
and buy at advantageous prices, 
while at the* same time show 
ing greater selections than any 
otiier store. 



Neckties in any style from the 
String to the Ascot, from 2 5 
cents to $2.50, put up in Xmas 
boxes, without extra charge, if 
desired. 

One of the Christmas specials 
are the beautiful Bengallnes at 
50 cents. 



EX-STATE SENATOR 

JOHN H. SMITH DEAD. 

Detroit, Minn , Dec. 17.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— Form ir State Senator John H. 




TWO STORES 
DULUTH AND SUPERIOR. 

Every Columbia article is absolute 
ly guaranteed. If not satisfactory, it 
may be brought back at any time 
ind exchanged for a new one. 






IVnisieal Gilt Suggestions 

The Gift of All Gifts is a PIANO! 




f 



New Pianos 



ONLY 



$150 




Warranted for 
10 Years 



t^t^t^ 



SOLD ON EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS 



Wcbcr 
Steck 

Wheelock 

r ■ ■■ - 

Pianola Themo- 

dist Piano and 

Pianola 

Reduced Prices dur- 
ing month December 




Latest , 

Pianola 
Music 

noiv in stock. 

1000 Rolls of 

Music at 

^ Price 



Our Victor and Edison Parlors 

Are the largest, best equipped and most convenient in the city. There's no Christmas Present you can think of — for an equal 
amount of money — that will give such lasting pleasure and be such a constant reminder of the donor. 



-7 



■'•'V- 



» 



Our Victor Talking 
Machines 



Sell for 

$10 to $500 

Terms arranged to suit. 



The Victor Victrola 

Is the mo.st compact and de.sirablo 
Instrument for the music room. The 
tone volume is controlled so it can be 
reduced from the loudest sound to a 
whi.sper. PRICE $200. 



Edison 

Phonographs sell for 

$12.50 to $125. 

Terms arranged to suit. 



Record Cabinets, Horns and Cranes of all Descriptions. 

LATEST RECORDS NOW ON SALE. 



DULUTH MUSIC CO 



EDMUND G. CHAPMAN, Manager 



222-224 West First Street, 



•9 

Duluth, Minn. 



8 # # #y #^ ^ f0 1 f^ f * i 



C 



V',^/ 



by the recent grand Jury. Judge W. 
I A. Cant Is presiding. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Van Valkenburgh 
are the happy parents of a baby boy, 
l><irn Sunday the l.'.th inst. j 

Conductor John Behbein, who was 
'seriously ill with appendicitis, was^ 
j operated upon at the Two Harbors] 
I. hospital, Sunday evening, and is re- 
ported much Improved, and recovery 
is expected. 



RANGES IN BRIEF 



Two Harbors— Hen Woolen, tho young 
man who aceidentally^fchot himself while 
cleaning a loadod gun. is reslmg easily 
at the Two Haiburs hospital, It'llnwing 
the operation performed, and Is expected 
to recover. , , . , 

Biwabik— The city council Monday night 
directed the village attorney to procet d 
against the blind pigs forthwith. He was 
esp«-clally Instructed to look into the re- 
ports that ll<iuor wa.s being illegally sold 
In the old P.ter Foss residence. 

Two Harbors— Wednesday afternoon and 
evening there will be an exhibit of the 
drawing and sewing work of the childnn 
of the public schools held at the high 
school building. 

Hlbbing— Only two new cases of small- 
pox have been reported in Hlbbing the 
past week, and as nearly the entire popu- 
lation has been vaccinated, thtr.- seems 
little danger of an epidemic. The board 
of health l»B.s taken hold of matters with 
a will and Is doing its best to stamp out 
the disease. 

$20 Ovcreoats Now $13.75 

At the "Fitwell" Clothing Parlors' 
great anniversary sale. Open evenings 
till Christmas. 



A- F. OF L- ENJOINED 



(Continued from page 1-) 



tion whether the boycott came wlttiin 
the Inhibition of the interstate com- 
merce law. Owing to the preliminary 
nature of today's proceeding there 
was no notice of appeal by the coun- 
cil for the Federation of Labor. 
Quotes >lany Decl.^lon.s. 
The court made numerous citations 
of deci.slons in cases involving similar 
I issues, including references to rulings 
by Judge Taft, the prisent secretary 
I of war, then Judge ot the circuit court, 
i in the action of the ^'Toledo etc. Rail- 
1 way vs. PennsJ'lvania company," and 
! proceedings brought* in various states. 
I Judge Gould declaqed that it was not 
surprising that there was so little dif- 
ference of opinion among the courts 
upon the question Involved and that 
I conclusion that such combinations as 
i that disclosed by the affidavit filed by 
. the Buck Stove company in this case 
: were held to be unlawful was based 
upon an appreciation of the fundamen- 
! tal rights of free metj in a free coun- 
I try. He said there was little room for 
'argument oc discussion ^of the question 
i whether the plaintiff company had 
shown the existence of an unlawful 
combination and conspiracy to destroy 
his business and that the record leaves 



no doubt that the plaintiff has beea ; 
and still is the object of a boycott, 
using that term, "in the most obnox- ; 
lous sense, viz., an unlawful conspiracy | 
to destroy its business, such a conspir- ' 
acy as has received the condemnation 
of every federal court in the country , 
before which it has been brought for i 
criminal action, legal redress or equit- 
able injunction." 

SELLS DECAYEDlfiGS. 

Man From Fertile Pays $50 Fine in 
Crookston. 

Crookston, Minn., Dec. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— E. J. Erickson of Fertile 
was arrested while in this city at the \ 
instance of Inspector E. B. Heiberg of \ 
the pure food department of the state, | 
and entered a plea of guilty to the - 
charge of selling rotten eggs to a local ; 
hotel. Ten dozen were found to be bad 
in two cases and Erickson admitted 
they had not been candled. 

Judge Wilde Imposed a fine of $50 
which was paid. Mr. Heiberg will stay 



here and satisfy himself that eggs mala being brought onto the track Im- 
shipped to Crookston are all in good | mediately m front of the engine. The air 
shape, together with meats and there 
may be more arrests. The eggs were 
bought for fresh eggs. 



Rosaries and Catholic Prayer Books 

They make very appropriate Christ- 
mas presents, buy them at 

LUNDBERG & STONE'S. 



brakes faJled to work quickly enough, 
and the mule was caught by the cow- 
catcher, just as the animal was in the 
act of rearing on Us hind legs in an at- 
tempt to .'^ave itself. The mule was jerked 
loose from the" harness and hurled 
through the air, entirely over its mate and 
the wagon, the driver 'ducking " to avoid 
being hit as the animal sailed over his 
head. Nobody was hurt, and the mule 
got up and walked off. 



CHILD FATALLY BURNED. 

Played With Matches in Mother's 
Absence, W ith Usual Result. 

Hendrum, Minn., Dec. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Alice, the 4-year-old 
daughter of K. A. Knutson played with 
matches while her mother left her 
alone and setting fire to her clothing 
was burned so seriously that she died 
In a few hours. 

The child was buried yesterday after- 
noon from the Emmanuel church. 



Even inexperienced cooks have "good 
luck" with Hunt's Perfect Baking Pow- 
der and Extracts. They never disap- 
point. 

THREE LYNCHINfiS 

OCCUR IN TEN DAYS. 



Cure Yourself 

Of Cons tipation 

A Simple Prescription of Tropical 
Fruits That Cures Chronic Con- 
stipation and Bringfs Back 
Youthful Vitality. 

Anyone Can Prepare It At Home. 

Constipation wears away the nerves, for 
surrounding the stomach and bowels lie 
the great nerve centers that control every 
vital function and organ of man and 
woman. , - , . 

Correct the stomach and bowels ana 
furnish food for the depleted ner\-es, and 
you have conquered nervous debUUy, 
mental lassitude, female troubles, loss of 
sleep, etc., etc. , . 

This simple prescription, prepared by 
vou In your own home, will surely ac- 
complish the revitalizing of your nerves 
and will remove constipation: 

Mix one ounce of Oblfruit Compound 
F^xtract and seven ounces of port wine, 
or If vou prefer, unfermented grape 
juice. Takt' dessertspoonful three or four 
times a day, before meals and at bed- 
time. .,, _ , .,, 

This home remedy you will And will 
build up the nerve centers quickly and 
gently, and by Its natural effect will 
cause a most beneficial and rejuvenating 
Influence to act directly upon the nt-rve 
plexuses. 

Obi f rut is composed of the active prin- 
ciples of rare tropical fruits, contains no 
alcohol, narcotics, animal or mineral sub- 
stances. All first-class druggists carry 
this simple prescription, and you should 
see that you got good port wine or un- 
fermented grape juice. This home treat- 
ment will be t)oth pleasant and speedy 
In Its relief, and can be used for any dif- 
ficulty or trouble arising from the nerves, 
stomach or bow^els. 

Our readers can get the above prescrip- 
tion filled at any first-class dmggists. 



Tessinan or Cullum 

Can save money now by buying their 
clothes at the "Fitwell" Clothing Par- 
lor.s* great anniversary .sale. Store open 
evenings until Christmas. 

MULE WAS NOT HURT. 

Struck by Locomotive, Long Ears 
Escapes With Life. 

Arlington, S. D., Dec. 17.-A railroad 
train and a mule were parties in a re- 
markable collision at Wentworth. Jast 
as the South Dakota Central pa.ssenger 
train was pulling Into the depot a dray 
team, belonging to the-Fader line, became 
frightened and wheeled, one ot the ani- 



Shraveport, La., Dec. 17. — A negro 
member of a traveling minstrel 
troupe, who gave his name as Homer 
Rogens, was hanged by a mob in 
Morehouse parish last night and his 
body riddled with bullets. As far as 
can be a.scertained the lynching re- 
sulted when Rogers resented a remark 
made by a white man declaring that 
he was a "Yankee nigger and did not 
take any impudence." This is the 
third lynching in Morehouse parish In 
ten days. 

Danger in A.^sking Advice. 

When you have a cough or cold 
do not ask some one wliat is g^ood 
for it, as there is danger in taking 
some unknown preparation. Foley's 
Honey and Tar cures coughs, colds, 
«,nd prevents pneumonia. The gen- 
uine is in a yellow package. Refuse 
substitutes. Sold by all druggists. 

$18 suits now $11.75. "Fitwell." 



CAPITAL . . . $500,000 
SURPLUS . . $1,000,000 
Undivide d Profits . $125,000 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF 
DULUTH. 



k 



^L 



ss 



16 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY. DECEMBER 17, 1907. 






WHEAT HAS 
A BIGBULGE 

Bearish News Stiffens 

the Market at the 

Close. 



Flax is Soft at End 

of the Session 

Here. 



Flax, 2o,000 bus 
Plax, 10 cars .. 
P^lux. 7 cars ... 



.. 1.12'.4 
.. I.I2V4 



U. Dec. 17.-Wheat 

Hi .lU vt the Anierioan 

Thf tone was easier at 

flilTeinil quickly r.ii un- 

lii'm abroad. 

ii.aiJd for cash 

shorts ill tilt- 



l"irts 

:>. .It 



,111: i'\ 



I>uluth Boar>: 
had a big bulK- 
markets today, 
tht! opening. Init 
favorable irci' 
hlK^i't > .11 
wheat arid > ■" 
domestic niark< i^. 

The foreign crop summary showed the 
b«!ir2sh tone on the continent and the 
continental cables? reflected it as well. 
The strength there caused a Jirnier feel- 
ing on this side. 

The short intere.«ts were hravy buyers 
during the latter part of the session. 

The foreign ciemaiid for American 
Wheat continueF goitd. Offerings were 
somewhat scane during the latter part 
of tht 1. iut some spring and 

durum A .IS worked lor export 

here. 

Liverpool closed unchanged, Berlin 
%c higher and Budapest l*j,c higher. 

The iHct mber option closed :;%<-■ Uig«i- 
«r In Duluth. 2V' up in Chicago. l»4c 
higher in Minneapolis, .'14c higher In 
New York and :^c up In Winnipeg. 
The May option closed 2*«c higher in 



THE (HI( A(»0 MARKET. 

VMieat Opens V/eak on .Account of 
a Decline in Liverpool. 

Chicago. Dec. 1 '.— The wheat market 
opened wc.ik tot ay beciuse <if a de- 
cline at Liverpo'il in face of yester- 
day's advance in the local nuirket. 
Favorable report.* of harvesting in Ar- 
gentina alsM fori 'led a bearisli fat;tor. 
May wh»at opent d v^e to *fec lower at 
|l.«fci» to ll.Ol'i/i an I sold at V.0-\. Min- 
neapolis, luiluth iind Chicago reported 
receipts of Tt* car.i against 909 last week 
and 5^7 cars one j ear ago. 

The market bec.ime strong in the last 
half of the scsslc 1, because of repoi letl 
rains in Argcntln i. that are Interfering 
with the h.irvesl Ing. Sliorts were ac- 
tive buyers and prues advanced with a 
rush. May !-cllinK up to $1.0d',4C(j>t4. The 
close was strong with May ll^c higher 
at $1.05'.4. 

The corn mark 't opened steady, al- 
though at a slij. ht decline from the 
clo.se of yesterda:'. Cables were lower 
anil local receipt i somewhat larger. 
May corn opened \c to *8C lower at 
57^4C t<i 57Tsc and sold at 57»^i-. Loc.il 
receipts were ■¥iK) cars with 21 of con- 
tract grade. 

The strength ol wheat was reflected 
in the corn pit ; nd May advanced to 
K»'tic. The close wus strong witli May 
up P'sc at 59ih«' 

Th<^ oats n»ark« t was weak, ohiffly 
because of large local re( eipts. May 
lower at 54c and sold 
ul receipts were 405 



mixed, |4.;<,w4.85; heavy, $43(yfH.8r.: rough, 
|4.3("'ai4.4{»; pigs. $a.75<f«4.tiO; bulk of sales, 
$4 fiGCgM.SO. Sheep— Receipts,^ about 12lXI0; 
i.'.arket steady; native. $2(U4.0O; western, 
$2ii4.55; yearlings, $4.{K.>«i>5.i:6; lambs, $a.75 
lii).3(i; western. $3.75(ii6.25. 

THE copper" STOCKS. 

The following are the closing quota- 
tions of copp«r stocks at Boston today, 
reported by Paine. Webber & Co., Room 
A, Torrey building: 



Stocks- 



Bid, i Asked. 



oats opined ^^&t'4t 

at .'i3^4<vi53'BC. Lo. 

cars. 
The provisions 
I cause of an advai ce of 20c in 
I of live hogs. Ma ' pork was 

113.30. Lard was unchang«'d 



narket was firm be- 
the price 
up 10c at 
at 17.92^. 



Ribs were 2»^(Si>c 1 igher at $7.10 to $7.12»i. 
Close: Wheat— :4ay, $l.i5»<t; July, Wii- 
Hf. Corn— May, 59 4(; July, 5S^c. Oats— 
Mav, 53V4C; July, old, 4Saic; July. 4t;c. 
Fork-Januarv. J12.t57%; Mav. inv.%. 
Lard-January, r.75; May, $7.82>V(« 7.a>. 
Ribs— January, $« 77; May, $7.(»5. Rye- 
Cash, 7Wi7&c. Barley— Cash, S4^i9»;c Tim- 
othy-Casli, $4.(». Clover-Cash. $11.0t'(9 
|15.€0. Cash wheat-No. 2 red, 97%(&W;-: 
No- 3 red. Uti'S^ftSf^c No 2 hard, $l.flO«rl.03; 
No. 3 hard, 97%f( tl.02; No. 1 northern, 
$1.10; No. 2 norti em. JlCVnl 11; No 3 
spring. J1.02<'(«1.C9. Corn— No. 2, nothing 
d(ji:;i: N't 3. ne^/, 63ViC. 



•4-%c 
X«\v 



Duluth. 2>i;C higher in Chicago. 
higli'T i;: M :tineapi)lis. 2V4C up in 
York ;.- .i :\ iiigini in Winnipeg. 

M. ;.>std Use higlier in Chi- 

cag lower in Liverpool. May 

oats t .--\f higher in Chliago. 

Brooi: ai'ied from Liverpool: 

"Whea- v^,^^ iiini ul tht- start with val- 
ues 'id liightr, being influtnced by the 
firr .s;- .1 >Mier(ca. yesterda>. Kollow- 
.•■i, there was a period of 
ti 1 to a lack of support, 

stimulated by the bearish official report 
of Ku."!'''' rin<i the Argentine exportabl." 
«ur; • n out by our agent, and 

pri. • ,1 to Mstl- At midday, how- 

ever, a t:c.'ul!tr undertone developed on 
a good dem;ind for spot. Prices at tills 
time were *»d higher than Monday. 

"Corn was quiet at the opening and 
unchanged. Later the market beca-^ 
weak losinjr '^d in ^•vnlpathv with w ; 
and the tact that the first arrival.'. . : 
New .\n rican corn are in good condi- 
tion. St..; wheat was firni wiili red 
winter -sd and La Plata Id higher. 
Wheat cargoes are steady with a better 
Inquiry. Corn quiet and unchanged.'" 

Car receipts -it I'uluth were 211 
against IM last year, and at Minne- 
apolis 44(; against 2^7 last v^iir. making 
a total for the Northwest of K>7 against 
last year. Chicago received 51 
■ ■• 'Mi last year. Winnipeg recei.ed 
rijit l^i: last year. 
ry re»eipis of wheat were '.'42- 
last year 700,ft00 bus. Shipments 
lis. \.i.st year 304,0<iO bus d.-.-ir- 



Diiliitii Cur Inspection. 

Wheat — No. 1 tioillorn, ::?. No. 2 north 
ern. 4;^: No. 3 sprit g, 2»); N«>. 4 spring, 9; 
rejet ted, a; no gr; de. 1; western red, 4, 
No. 1 durum, 25; Mo. 2 durum ^\; No ;< 
durum, 15; No. 4 dirum, o; rejected and 



no giad 

niiM-ii, ;. 
181. 

Flax-No. 
8C; last 

Oats, 

Total 
to(hi V. 



durum. ; total of durum, 97; 
t<'t.il (f wheat, 211: last year. 



1, 



year. Ti^. 

n; barley. 10. 

of all carl, 324. 
136. 



total of flax. 



Cars on tra k 



Minneapolis Wtioat. 

Minneapolis, Dei . 17. — Close: 



May, 

11.10; 
ern. 
?] 03. 



Jl.in^: July $1.11=*; 



No. 1 nortlic n 
$1.03Ufri«l**; 'Jo. 



$1.08; 



No. 
No. 



Wheat 
1 hard 

north- 



3 northern, $1 01^ 



IJvcr]»<M*l Grain. 

Liverpool. Itec. 17— Citi.se; Wheat- 
Spot steady; No. '. red western winter, 
.steady. 7s '^^d : fu lures steady; 
her. nominal; Maich. 7s 105*d 
lOd. Corn— Spot steady; prime 
American. 5s 5<1; f itures. <iulft; 
ber, nominal; January. 5s 3'4d. 



Decem- 

May. 78 

mixed 

Deceni- 



44S 



New y.irk (>rafn. 

New York, l>ec. K.— Close: Wheat, May. 
Jl.ll'- .T'.jlv. $1.W^^. Corn, December, 71c: 

M ■ ■■-■:, 



anc es if \vi....t and floui agfi.;-, •..! 
467,*," x"' 1 

Br reports a ise of 

1,66.- the world It -sup- 

ply of wheat. 

Primary re-'t-ifjs • f > orn were 670.000 
buf'. 1 • ':.<NH' bus. Shipments 

44:.<'<' i . ar 2ti7.00O bus. Clear- 

an«;es or ^<<vu \v«:-re 1;.'7,094 bus 

The worlds visible supp!;. ' : ■ ■ • n 
Increased l,32.S,(Wi bus. 

Wheat trading was light, but stead.v In 
Duluth. December wheat opened %i: low- 
er at ?l.(>l»i bid. advanced to $1.04% and 
closed at that pr.ce. a gam of 2-'^c over 
ye.«terday. May wheat opened He lower 
IX* «1 09 .ndvancKl to tl.W^. declined to 
5 ; to $1.11% ana closed at that 

] .11 of 2^»c over yesterday. 



r'scernt 
Open . . . 
High ... 

Low 

Cltisc 

C 1»»s>' 1' 

.M . ^ 
'[■ 



Anif^rican AVheat 

r>u- Minne- 

luth. ; polis, 

, , ,• __ 

$1.01i^B $1 04 



1.1-4'' 



! 



<i;;N 



1 fl5^4 

1 08»fe 

1 o:.%ii 

} 04'4 



Market. 

C1»I- 
cago. 

S6% 
9SH 
96 



New 
York. 



$; oe'iB 
1.04»4 



American-Saginaw 

.Mlantic 

Arcadi.in 

Adventure 

Allouez 

Arnold 

Ahmeek 

Arizi>n.a Commercial 

Balaklala , 

Bingham , 

Black Mcuintain 

Butte vt Huperior , 

Boston Cons « 

Butte Coalition , 

Copper Range , 

Calumet & Arizona 

Calumet & Hfda 

Cumberhmd Ely , 

Comanche 

Copper Queen 

Centennial 

Davis- Da i.'y 

Denn Arizona 

Dalv West 

East Butte 

Franklin 

Granby 

Oreene Cananea 

CJIobe Consolidated .. .. 

Hancock 

Helvttia 

Isli- Royule 

Keweenaw 

M.'i.ss. Gas 

Michigan 

Mass 

Mercur 

Mohawk 

Nijdssing 

North Butte 

Nevada Cons 

Nevad.i-Utah 

Old Dominion 

Osceola 

Ohl Cidony 

I'htienlx 

I'arrott 

Quincy 

Raven 

Rhode Island 

Santa Fe .' 

Shattuck 

Superior Copper 

Shannon 

Superlt>r & Plttsburjff... 

Trinity 

I'nion Land 

Utah Consolidated 

United States Mlnltig... 

do preferred 

Victoria 

W'arrcn 

Winona , 

Wolverine 

Wolverine & Arizona... 

Wyandot 

Amalgamated 

Auacimda 




I osafc-i.^ $1 02%-% 1 W% 



C;u>ii t-j.iiug wheat 
closing firmer on a 
May for No. 1 m i ' 
clo-^ed 2c high* ; 

Flax wag irre^uirt.r during 
and closed easier. December 
unchanged at $1.11^, went off 
rallied to J1.12 and closed at 



was In good demand, 
basis <»f 31/4C under 

;,• rn. Diiruni wlieat 



High 1 11% 1 nr>Vi-% 112 

Low 1 0N% 1.12% 

Close .... l.n-« 1.11% 1 0.V4A 

Close. 16. 1.09% 1 08%-% 1.02*4 

July- 
Open 9fi% 

High 1 11% 99% 

Low 1 0M% 9H% 

Close . . 1 11%B 99-% 

Close. 1 0914-% $)7 

In Wii.i.U'g Iiec ruber wheat 



$1.05% and May wh( at at $1.13%. 



1.09% 
1.12B 

1 .Oii\ 



1.04 
l.'C% 
1 041^ 
1.1 6% B 
1 04% 
tlo:red at 



Copper Gossip. 

Olobe, Ariz, to Gay & Sturgis: L. D. 
Ricketts, general manager of the Greene 
Cananea company and still consulting en- 
gineer of the Old Ltominion comp,'iny of 
which property he wa,«i in charge previous 
to going ic> the Greene Cananea, was in 
Globe, ye.sterday and visited the Old 
Dominion undrrgroand. He says that the 
showing of the new strike at the sixteenth 
level wag much better th.i.n anticipated. 
Tht y are only fifteen f e« t in the vein 
and are now drifting west a certain 
length. Then is no certainty as yet 
whether or not the strlkP 1e Sulphide 
Vein No. 1, ts investigation has not 
progressed sufficiently as yet. 

Of the fifteen feet in the vein, ten feet 
Is -fine concentrating ore and five is In 
lump sulphide, which can go direct to 
the smelter, averaging 10 per cent copper, 
and It carries sufficient iron to make an 
excellent flux. The ore on the sixteenth 
level is better ore In copper contents anj 
in sulphui than on the lourteenth. 
« • • 

Boston to Paine. Webl>er & Co.: Am- 
algamated Copper was under pressure 
and is talked for lower prices. Anaconda 
Hnd Ansalgamated will probably pass 
I heir next dividends and Mohawk is al- 
ready two weeks over due and we hear 
that it is extremely doubtful if they can 
pay anything until metal market im- 
proves. North Butte and Copper Range 
are as strong as ever. Greene-Cananea 
is fixed at the $6 level. 



the sts.sion 
flax opened 
to $l.liv 



I 



t huafif Oats Com nn«l P«»rk. 



los.' of 1*,' fri>n". ye 
at 



aiictianged 

11 > aril] 



ened 

•Dff 
%C 

C- 

I^ , . 

Wi:. 

arrive- 
no rt hern, 
ern, $1.«)' 
ceil! ber. 
northern 
in store 
87e; v^ 
Ma 
P ' 

-) 
c 

LSI, 
yeM- 



fluju, i4,::i:. 



$1.11%. ti 
'ttrday. May flax op- 
$].1K%. Went to $1.1.H''4. 

<■•{ at $1.18%. a loss of 



Flitigii 
lyiw . 



jats. 
May. 

'A 

■3%-% 

.4% 



Corn. 
May. 

57»4-% 

r.9% 

57>4 

59'fc 



Pork. 
May. 

$13.30 
13..W 
13.00 
13.12 




' ; unchanged. 

!^- •.'.':> thi* dcsijig prices: 

.\ 1 hnrd. on track. $1.08% to 

No thern. $1.0>;%B: No. 2 

$! . - .in track. No. 1 iiorth- 

mB. .Nt. 2 n irthein, $1.04%B; !)• - 

$1.(4%H: May, $l.n%B: No. 1 

in store, $10.4%; .v.- :' ru>rthern 

«l.«)2ii: duruui on : n. No. 1. 

, V-,, '■.■i'Tiber d-itu:ii, S4%cN. 

-X Flax— Tt' arrive. 

;...-.-.. ;jl.I2%: December. 

Gals— To arrive. 



Logan 
vices «jf 



thi 



May. 

ir:..- k 



Jl.lS".. 
4sii.-, 

■ : W: 



Ry. 



u. 



1*79. 



No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

N«,>. 
No. 
No. 
No 

No 

SI 

No. 

No 



No 
Ni, 
No 
No 



1 

Dui 
!■ 

1 

Dur 

D'." 

1 

J .. 

Dur 

Dur 

Dur 

Dm 

I ■ ,■ 

i 

I'u: 

Dur 

Dur 

Dur 

Dur 



t a<-'i Si»l«'~ 1>ie»«la\. 

1 n< r tiler !i wi ■ 
I Iionhelli, . 

1 nt-U'thern, 
1 northern. 1 
I north 

2 nor; . 
J riori ;,.. . ;.. 
^ r I . ' !■ t 1 1 i ' f : I , 



1 . .,: 
■ a ; 

'<> bus t. 

'.;»lt bus 

two-' 






2 nor tiler 



Jl.eli.. 

. 1,I»V»4 

. 1.04% 

. 1.06 

. 1 t'5'.i 

. I.IC'^ 

. 1.0;: 

. 1 fV'i-" 



! («: 



Grain Gossip. 

Brjan Chicape- <Mir .'id- 
s' moriing to anticipate a 
reasonable break : nd then take hold of 
ttie market on the buying side for a 
still stronger adxanre, based on the 
less news f re m Aigentina and renewal 
of inquiry f'^r wl cat on this side by 
foreign hcu.sts, pi oved absolutely cor- 
i-t Pile news Kept coming bullish, 
the l.iiv. IS of wheat had their back- 
bones stiffened a little, the shorts took 
alarm and late ir the session it was 
an excited bull nuuket. Looking ahead 
to the time when wheat supplies will 
be inadequate to meet all demands, the 
sitii.itioTi is very bullish. In view of 
the s;iaip advance we have had in two 
(1 i.ss, we suggest securing profits on 
lorifi wluat and getting in, if possible. 
:;t ;i good reactioi . 

Corn— Early in the session December 
corn moved up quirkly. This was a hint 
to the siiorts that (here might be a repe- 
tition of action in the oats trade a few 
months ago. Belor • the dose the Decem- 
ber prue w»nt u0 sharply to 59»iC. 
Weather conditions are against free 
movement of the i ew corn, the country 
back of the bull sh feeling, but this 
should prevent no body from securing 
prohts cm the lor g side 
strong upturn. 

1 mui ii less gain than 
i nd the strength was 
irom the old. maikets. 
t le market is consider- 
psices are not likely 
after the other grains 







One Cent a Wortl Kach Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less Tlian 15 Cents. 



Dr. Lucy A. Daily, pioneer Osteopath, has 
moved to 603 Burrows bldg. Zen. 3»4-X. 

Tile Duluth Bedding Co. iiaa moved 
from 2l8t ave W. to the new Seekins blk. 

Fashionable hair dressing, manicuring 
scalp and face ireatmenla. Miss Kelly 
opposite Glass Block, upstairs. 

SITUATION WANTED-POSITION BY 
married man as collector. E. 34, Henild, 
or Zenith phone, IStw-Y, 



FOR RENT — SMALL BUSINESS 
place. 121 West First street. 



(>ats— Prices t!:;i 

wliMfit and corn. 
I la rifely borrowed 
I The me;vement to 
I iiuly enlarged, and 
I to hold the advance 



on this very 



ern, 

•lern. 



1 . 



0- 



sliow signs Of reaction. 

Frovision.s— Packing Interests appear to 
b> .^"tniwhat agaii St the price, and this 
i.-- tlie only b'.arisii feature in the situa- 
tion. There is go >d buying by outside 
pa' kers tor investnient oa each setback ol 
■' .- !;ind. 









.M-4 

.M 



■r 1 



i.iii, 
luri. 

1 1 rn 



-.: ^ S 
■ - . \ 
. -- .V I 



i 

Ba 

Ba 

Ba 

Flj 

Fl; 

Fli 

Fl 

FI 

Fl; 

F 



rley, 

rley. 

IX, - 

IX. ; 

IX, 1 
IX, 
IX. 
I X, 

1.x. 



1 ' .l!- 

1 (A: l«i;.>- 
30i» bus 
2,0(:'<> bus ... 
>* bus 5 lbs 



- 4 

.S3 I 

..S2- „ ' 

.N2-^ ; 

>2\! 

.s:{-.i i 
.S3 I 
.81^ 
.82 ( 
..^)% i 

;t7 i 

.48'^. 

,71 

76 
.80 

Sfi 
i I2I4 

12>^ 
1 12 
1.12 
1 12»4 
1.12% 

: 12% 



Tlu> (oil 

.\. w V.uk, De,. 
ket opep.td steady 
to a -decline of 4 i 
e.iiiy sessi(>n sold 
to !• points on tiie 
liquidation, local 
selling of March 
houses, presumabl 
of 8i>ot cotton in 
Wiis not more th: 
and there wa.s no 
seciuem e with pn 
from the biwest < 
the jiK.ining. Liv< 
as due on the Ne- 
terday, and whib 
freer interior <iff< 
tangible i-hjinge 
Southern spot ne\ 

Spot closed set* a 
11.90: middling gulf. 
Futures closed stea 
c ember, 11.27; Jam 
10.rt7; .March, 10.77; 
June, 10.83; July. 1( 



«in Market. 

17.— The cotton mar- 
at uneaanged prices 
oints and during the 
off to a net loss of 7 
active months under 
bear pressure and 
ana May by spot 
y against purchases 
tlu- South. Trading 
n moderately active 
bull support of con- 
ces only a point up 
urlng the middle of 
rpool was Just about 
V York close of yes- 
there wa.s talk of 
rings, tiiere was no 
m the character of 
.vs. 

dy; middling upian.' 
12.ir.: sales. 2,500 bales, 
dy. Closing bid*: Do- 
lahy. 10.57; Februarv 
April, 10.79; May. 10.81; 
78; August. 10.6t>. 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED FRO.NT 
room and use of piano, on East First 
street, to one cr two ladies. Address 
I 31. Herald. 

BOARD AND ROOM FOR TWO IN 

private family; room modern. 10 West 
Firs I stret. Flat F. 

FOR RENT-ROOMS, FURNISHED OR 

unfurnished. 427 Seventh avenue east. 

FOR SALE - SECOND HAND GROc" 
ery sleigh. Johnson & Moo, Twenty- 
first avenue west, Superior street. 

FOR RENT - NICELY FURNISHED, 
steam heated room, 'phone and Lath. 
219 Fifth avenue west. 

WANTED — CATHOLIC GIRL FOR 

genera! housework at 8t. Peter's 
church. Tenth street and Eleventh ave- 
nue west. Call between 10 and 12 a. m. 

FOR RENT-TWO FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping, with bath and 
electric liglit. 823 East Third street. 

LADIES' TURKISH BATH AND HAIR 
dressing parlors. 24 West Superior 
street, upstairs. Knauf Sisters. 

THE SPALDING TOILET PARLORS, i 
Manicuring, massage. shampooing 
Room and phone 19. 



Chleago Livestoek. 

Chicago. De( . 17 - Cattle - Receipts 
about 4tiOt>; niarke steady; beeves, fc 15 
«f««.10; enws ami heifers. $1.10Ji4 50; 
Texans, $3Ti;3 8i); cjilves. $4.7.i(rK;.75; west- 
erners. $3.10«i4.70; .'tocker-s and feeders 
$2.20<ii4.15. Hogs-Heceipts. about 17,000; 
market 30c higi^ier; light. $4.35Ct4.75; 



BIRTHS. 

CAMPRELL-Bom. to Mr. and Mr.=. 

Harry Campbell, 580S London road. Dec. 

10, a girl. 
GRAVELLE— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. 

Fred CJravelle. 1102 West First street, 

Dec. 10, a girl. 
ECKLUNIi -Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Arvld 

Ecklund, 116 West Seventh street, Dec. 

10. a girl. 
JOHNSON-Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Will- 
lam Erick Johnson. 17 Mesaba avenue, 

Dec. .", a boy. 
DANlF:LSON-Born. to Mr. and Mrs. P. 

B. Danielson, 1131 West Superior street 

Dec 16. a girl. 



DEATHS. 



SILVER-Baby Silver, aged 29 days, died 
Dec. 14, at 2J(t% East Second street. 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR. 



€.0 



Ship Your Grain to 




DULUTH. GRAIN COMVIISSION. MINNEAP3LIS 



M. J. Flliatrault. Both "phones. W. DuL 

FLORISTS AND DECORATORS^ 



El.^CHEN BROS., 121 WEST SUP. ST. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

A permit was Issued to W. Bu- 
chanan for repairs on a frame 
barn on the north side of West 
First street, between Thlid and 
Fourth avenues west, to cost 



)3C0 



DECLWES 
IMTOCKS 

Market Was Irregular 

and Closed at About 

Low Point. 



Steels Steady on Denial 

of Reported Cut 

in Wages. 



New York. Dec. 17.— Prices of stocks 
were Inclined to Pag In the opening deal- 
ings today, the higher quotations in Lon- 
don having but slight influnece. Read- 
ing declined IV4. Amalgamated Copper 
and American Smelting 1%, American 
Sugar and Mackay companies 1 and Now 
York Central %. 

Supporting orders and some demand 
from the short interest caused full re- 
coveries in -\nierican Smelting and Am- 
erican Sugar, but the rally in these 
stocks did not help tlie rest of the mar- 
ket, which continued to sag. Large sell- 
ing orders in Reading exerted an unfav- 
orable infiuence on general sentiment 
and there was a systematic decline in 
other Eeastern and Western railroad 
stocks. Federal Mining preferred broke 
9-\; New yt)rk Air Brake. 8; Minne- 
apolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie 
preterred, ti; the common, 2; Texas anJ 
Pacific Land Trust, 3; Reading. 2%; 
Pennsylvania and Colorado & Southern 
first preferred, 1%, and Union Pacific, 
Northern Pacilit. Southern Railway pre- 
ferred, Chesapeake & Ohio, Western 
Maryland, and Brooklyn Transit, 1. 

Prices had a substantial tally in the 
second hour, which restored the average 
to about yesterday's closing lavel and in 
tiome of the most active stocks, above 
that. American Ice rose V,^ over la*t 
night; American Sugar, 1%, and Internat- 
ional Paper preferred, 1; Illinois Central 
and West ins »iou.se Electric fell, l. The 
rally was not fully held at noon. Bonds 
were steady. 

Reading was bid up to above 89, which 
reduced its icoining loss to a small 
fraction. Elscwlure the rise did not 
as a rule amount to much. Just before 
the hour expired there was a reaction 
which had its origin in American 
Smelting and Reading. 

The decline was checked and another 
rally started which carried Reading 
to above 90 and lifted the western 
stocks fraVtionajly above yesterday's 
c losing. The metal showed more stead- 
iness, the support to American Smelt- 
ing having a good effect on the rest 
ot the group. 

The market dosed irregular. New 
weak pointb developed and prices fell 
back all around in sympaliiy. Dis- 
tillers' Securities fell 3%; New York 
Air Brake, lu'.*, Iietroit United Rail- 
way, 2%; Great Northern preferred, 2%; 
Southern Railway preferred. 2^4; Mis- 
souri Pacific. 2; United States Pipe, l',; 
Northern Pacific, 1. National Biscuit 
rose 1. 



Pallinie,WeltiBiieirSCo 

BANKRRS AND BROKKR8. 



Members IVew York and 
Boston Stock Exchanges 



DULUTH OFFICE^ 
Room A, Torrev Building, 

Sl6 AVcst Soperler 8tre«t. 



DULUTH COPPER CURB MARKET 

WAI^TER W.CARR, 



202-204 MANHATTAN BL'ILDING. 



Privflte tVirea. 
City 'PhoneM, 1805. 



Rrrrr<enoe« t 
CITY NATIONAL B.4NK. 
Uulatb .Minn. 

DECEMBSIl 17, 1907. 



Private I^obk Dlmtanor. 
'Pbunrv, 1657-1805. 



I Rid.l Ask. 




M Comarrcas St.. Boaton. 

Members of 
Boston Stock Exchange. 

Direct nad ExoIumIt* 

Private Wlrea to 

BOSTON. NEW YORK. < HICA«0, 

CALCMBT «Bd UOIUHTON, .MICH. 

Dulntli Office t 328 yv. Superior St. 

Old 'Plione, 1S67. 

R. O. HV'BBELL, Manaser. 



WANTED! 

4 Steam Shovels 
4 Dinky Engines 

And other Outfit. Any per- 
son having these for sale, 
please advise at once, 



EASTERN CONSTRUCTION 
CO., Ltd. 

DRYDEN, OTIT. 



Anioriean-Saplnaw 
Ariz-C<niinu'r<ial . . 
Black Mouiiiain.. 
Butte Coalition. '.'. 
Butte & lidiidon 
Butte & Superior. . . 
Calumet & Arizona. 
Cal. & Montana 
Cal. & Sonora 
Carman Cons 

Cliff 

Comanche. . . . 
C<}pper Queen 
Calumet & Globe 

Daly-West 

Davis-Daly 

Denn-.Arlzona . . . . 




I BId.l Ask. 



East Butte 

Globe Cons 

Greene-Cananea. . . . 

Ilaneock Cons 

KcM eemiw 

Xipissiiig 

\ational 

North Butte Ex. . , . 

North Butte 

Old Dominion 

Sup. & Pittsburg. . . 
Superior & Boston. 

hihannon 

Shattuek-Arizona. . 
Tonapah Common.. 

Warren. 

Wolverine-Arizona . . 



6.00 


6.12 


5.93 


6.00 


4.75 


5.00 


5.25 


5.50 


6.12 


6.25 


.47 


..-vo 


37.25 


3 7. .50 


1.00 


1.08 


26.00 


26.50 


8.62 


8.75 


2.25 


2.37 


9.00 


9.25 


14.50 


15.00 


5.75 


6.00 


13.25 


11.00 


4.00 


4.25 


2.25 


2.37 



ZENITH 1464. 



DULUTH 1871. 



MARTIN ROSEN D AH L, 

COPPER STOCK BROKER. 

414 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 102 MANHATTAN BUILDING. 

Reference: City National Bank, Duhith. Minn. 



For Short Time imfosimenis 

We sell choice commercial paper, 3 to 6 months tlm.e, at Rood rates of interest. 
We also handle other forms of good Inv estmcnt Securities. Government, Munic.p- 
al and Industrial Bonds, etc. 

4%, 5%, 6%, 7%. 

A^ Rm Mbc Farlane & Com 

203 AL WORTH BUILDINGm 



(•V€T, wajited Olson in connection with 
the holding up of Joseph Chaniag-o, 
el tile entrance to a c-hop suey house 011 
Superior atrt^'t la,st Thursday night. 
Olson came to Duluth \\ithout requisi- 
tion, and was given hia hearing thi.-? 
hiorrilng. 

Chaina^o and the Chlnamem who 
conduct th.e restaurant Identified Olson 
as one (►f the three men who had been 
hanging around the pla<;e. Olson made 
no defense. 



Quotations furnished by Gay & Stur- 
gis. grokers. 31* West Superior street: 



Stocks— 



IHighlLowlCIose 



Smith k Smith. 

Special Christmas candies. 



Atchison 

Amalgamated Copper ... 

Smelting 

Baltimore & Ohio 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit 
Colorado Fuel & Iron ... 

Chesaptuke & Ohio 

Louisville & Nashville.. 

Anaconda 

Missouri Pacific 

New York Central 

Pennsylvajiiu Railway .. 

lUading 

Ro<.k Island 

St. Paul 

Southern Pacific 

Sugar 

U. S. Steel 

do pfd « 

Union Pocific 

M. K. & T 

Northern Pacific 

Great Northern 

American Car Foundry . 



70 
43Mi 

38% 

90 , 

:*■>•* I 
{•0 I 

111 

90 I 

14Vi.| 
101 M> 
72 
96"^ 

25 Vi 
87 

114% 

24H 

114% 

115141 



42% 

80 

87 V4 

\m 

2S% 

26 
471,4 

iiovt 

14 

10(>V4 

71 

94% 

25 

86 
113% 

24% 
113% 
111'% 

29% 



42Ti 

68 

80 

37% 

18% 

fSK, 

i9% 

:»% 

47% 

93% 

110% 

14 

100*4 

71%; 

'J5% 
25%! 
86% I 

11?-% i 
24>4 I 

113'6 I 

112% I 

29% 



(( 



Stock Gossip. 

New York to Waller W. Carr: The 
market has been featured by the drop of 
about 2 in Hill securities and a break of 
10 points in Air Brake. Other issues have 
been fairly active at a range that per- 
mitted of sculping operations. Missouri 
Pacific was heavy on more adverse divi- 
dend gossip. Call money ranged 10 to 17 
f>cr cent. New York Central gained a 
ittle on the announcement of Lake Shore 
dividends, but weakened. Copper metiil 
was again weak. The Steels were steady 
On denial of the report that wages of <m- 
ploycs are to be cut. Tlie rate for call 
loans indicates that the ttnanclal situa- 
tion Is against larye commitments on the 
long side. 

New York Money. 

New York. I>ec. 17.— Close: Money on 
call, firm; 6^(116 pf-r ctnt: ruling rate. 12; 
closing bid, 6; offered at 8. Time loans 
firm, but dull: W days. 10 to 12, and 90 
days, 8 to 10 per cent; six months, 7 to 8 
per cent, Prinif mercantile paper, 8 i>er 
cent; sterling exi hange. sitrong with ac- 
tual business in bankers' bills at 4.8fj.l0$' 
4.St;.15 for demand and at 4.80.15(&>4.S0.2O for I 
60-day bills. Commercial bills, 4.80$!' j 
4.S0.25; bar silver. 53%c; Mexican dollars. 
4S< ; government Ixtnds, steady ; railroad 
bonds, heavy, 

Oetoi^enarian Dies. 

Thomas Whugill, an old resident of 
Lakewood, passed away at his home 
there this morning after a long illness. 
For some time past his advanced age 
had been weighing him down and his 
death wai? for long expected by his 
family. He was S4 years of age. The 
funeral will be held tomorrow after- j 
noon, and the remains will be sent to 
his old home at W'aterford, Mich., fori 
intermtnt. Mrs. C. O. White, a daugh- 
ter, will accompany the body. 

Fist Fight Averted. j 

Political fervor narrowly missed boil- 
ing over in the Third irecinct of tho 1 1 
Second ward this morning. Tessm;in| 
supporters claimed that a CuUum fol- j 
lower was marking ballots for Culiumj] 
voters without being sworn in, and 
they invited him to come outside and ! 
settle the matter, man to man. It \ 
looked for a time as if there would be ! 
a free-for-.all between eight or ten of; 
the workers in the polling place, bull 
the judges finally calmed the would-be 
covnbatants. 

Home Baking | 

And home-made preserves. Lundmark- I 
Franson Co. Both "phones 97. 



THE LONE 
STAR KID" 



A man, whom the police believe to be 
Fred Boland, "The Lone Star Kid," a 
notorious North Dakota bandit, wanted 
for the murder of a policeman at Val- 
ley City, N. D., a year ago last August, 
is being held at the central station, 
ayaiting a more complete description 
of the man wanted by the Valley City 
authorities. 

The suspect was arrested on the 
Bowery this morning by Officer John 
Roberg. He didn't look any too an- 
gelic to the officer, who thought that 
he recognized in him a man wanted 
somewhere. He arrested him and at 
the police station, it was found the sus- 
pect answered fairly well to the de- 
scription of Boland. He was held and 
the Valley City authorities" notified to 
send a more complete description, or 
an officer, who could identify Boland. 
In the meantime, the man at the sta- 
tion denies all knov.ledge of the crime 
at Valley City. 

When the North Dakota policeman 




J. S. Ray & Co. | 

Dealers In Safes, ! 
I'csks, Ch-iirs, and I 
Wood and Steel 
Filing Cabinets, 
Leather Furni- 
ture Office Rugs, 
Ofrice Railing. 
Iron Fencing, Fire 
ICxtingulshers. 

Old 'Phone 713-R. 
New Tboue 162. 



was killed over a year 
to arrest "The Lone 
sation was caused in North Dakota. 
City, county and state offered rewards 
aggregating about $2,500 for the cap- 
ture of the bandit, but he made good 
his escape and dropped entirely out of 
sight. 



S. liOTOIHIELL 

COPPER STOCKS. 

All TRANSACTIONS CO.^FlOENTIAt.. 
B04 FlUST NATIONAL BANK 
mil.UI.NG. DULITH. 

Zenith. 1989 PHONES Duluth, 1028. 



't^^,?^".^i"y'"s i $500, or any part, 5 to 

ytar Kid, a sen- ' , . 

" ^ 3, on Cullom s nomina- 

tion, 

N. S. MITCHELL 



Swedish Bibles and Psalm Books 

And other Swedish gift books. Our 
stock of these goods is tht largest this 
side of Chicago. 

LUNDBERG & STONE. 



FESLER IN WASHINGTON. 



Bert Fesler, the city attorney, is in 
Washington, lo bring up the Lake 
avenue viaduct case, before the su- 
preme court. Mr. Fesler expects that 
this case will be reached by the su- 
preme court some time before the end 
of the week, but if it does not, it will 
have to lie over until after the usual 
Christmas holiday recess. 



(ST-OC^ 




WHY NOT 

Protect the voter 
at the primary as 
he is protected by 
the Australian bal- 
lot, on election 
day? One ticket. 
H.. 12-17--07. 



New 
from 



OCEAN STEAMSHIPS. 

Liverpool— Arrived: Carmania, 
York. 

London— Arrived: Minnehaha 
New York. 

Glasgow— Arrived: Furnessia from New 
York. 

Bremen— Arrived: Krcn Prlnzessin Ce- 
cille from New York. 



DROWNS OFF BAYFIELD. 



Bayfield, WHs., Dec. 17. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Theodore Aibon was 
drowned and William Thibeault had a 
narrow escape from a similar fate 
when their boat capsized off this har- 
bor Sunday night as they were rowing 



to the Madeline Island, where one 
owned a farm. They were changing 
places in the boat when it upset 
throwing tliem into the icy wat-z-rs. 
Albon sank, while hJs companion 
managed to hold on to the boat until 
rescued. Alb(?n's body is being 
searched for. 



NOTICE TO STOCKHOLDERS- 

The regular annual meeting of stock- 
holders of the City National Bank of 
Duluth. Minnesota, will be held at the 
bank's office, Tuesday. January Ht.*!, 
1908. during the honr.s oetween 10 o'clock 
a. m. and 4 o'clock r. m. 

The object of the meeting is the elec- 
tion of a l>()ard of eleven directors who 
«!hall have charge of the affairs of Iho 
association during the ensuing ye.ir, and 
for the consideration of sucli other busi- 
ness as may properly be presented. 

W. I. PRINCE. 
Cashier. 
Duluth Evening Herald. Dec, 13-14-16-17- 
18-19-20. 




SELMAR OLSON 
IS BOUND OVER 



Selmar Olson was arraigned in mu- 
nieiiva-l court this morning on a cliargo| 
of robbery in tiie secxind degree, waai 
given an examination and bound over 
to the grand jury. He is the second 
allegod member of the Christlania , 
gang to be committed by»the municipal 
court, and the grand jury will have an 
opportunity to investigate fully the 
•methcds of the band. 

Olson wa.«« arre^sted in .Superior Sun- 
day night, charged with robbery. With 
a companion, it w'aa said, he held up 
and robtied a man in the Wisconsin 
city, but the victim was unable to 
identify him. The Duluth police, how- 



Christmas Present 

of an 

Overcoat 

For Your Husband 

Suit 

For Your Boy 

Skirt 

For Your Wile 

Fur Set 

For Your Girl 



$1.00 

A WEEK 

PAYMENTS 

Or Monthly, to Suit Your 
Pay day 

FRED W. 

EDWARDS 

DII.ITH. SIPEHIOR. 

Over (•iddlDK'a Koom 219 
tut .\ve. W. & Trunx Blk. 
Superior St. :1024 To»vcr .\v«. 

TAKE ELEVATOR. 

OPEN SATliRDAY EVEKINGS, 




TIHI 




Offers a Rare Opportunity for Ctiristmas Purchasers 

H. H. Grays Son.s', Laird-Shober, Nettleton's and 
Strong & Garfield makes included. EVERY SHOE 
AND SLIPPER IN THE HOUSE, without exception, 
on sale at a big reduction. 

Men's $5.00 and $6.00 Shoes— tf* ? jO '? 

onl^ • ^y yJmOj 

Men s $3.50 Cavaliers— C* O JS ^ 

only w9 ^m O J 

Men's $3.00 Slippers— ^ ^ ^f /J 

only w^ ^ • ffj 

Men's $1.50 Slippers— C* f O IT 

only ^ Am j£fJ 

Women's $5.00 and $G.0O Shoes— ^ ^ JQ 'T 

only S9 ^^ • ^^ ^^ 

Women's $4.00 Shoes— ^ff^ er ^ /T 

only w9 \^ m\J J 

Women's $3.50 Shoes — ^* ^^ f^ £^ 

only %^ j£t^ O J 

A similar cut on Misses' and Boys' Shoes and 
Rubbers. 




WM. Lynch, Mgr. 

218 West Superior St. 




-V 



t 



I 




CT 




$1,200 — A good five-room house. 
In good r«»air. West end. 

$3,<H>i) — A fine aeyen-room house, 
with hardwood lloors downstairs 
— well and sink In kitchen — 
stone foundation. hot water 
heating plant. On West Third 
street. Central. 



220 West Superior Street. 



C.P.CRAIG&GO.il G. H. GRAVES & CG. 



Are Y<[iu Going 
to Take a Trip? 

• We wrlto a p illoy covering all ef- 
fects of family or servants, wlille en 
route, or in anr kind of building. 

Call and get ates and particulars, 
or telephone an 1 we will make a call 
on you. 



2MO First N'l tlonal Bank Bids. 



STREET CARS. 

NOXiCli TO TliK k'Vtii.iC. 

This company opera les a street railway 
Hue m Uif cuy ui L»ulutu tK-iwoen Third 
ft\ ttliue L'.LSL a.ud tile eliti ui Kicc a PulnL. 
^j.a iJi, i- laiiway imc ux tli*j city 

Of Su; v «-tn ivveuiy-arsi sireei 

aijd I. ui Coniiur & i'uini. Tncse 

plies d LiULtU liy llie waters oi S'. 

Louus i>ti> . ^ud are oyeraied as two dls- 
tltU'l aiiii St p*>^t'ate liiies. 



^^>V^^'^^^^^^^\^»^>l^ < 



T 

dii' 
•ii.. 



:ous ride In one 
iwo points ua 

IS ueitfuy noiitied tliat this 

^ !!OL, uy uitdcrtaking to 

c;i ; .,er, or oy atctptiiiB tare 

lui ^^..... =.-, assume any responsib«- 

Iliy beyuud luai oi carr>uis sui-u paa- 
ungtr aaleiy beiweeii poiuis vn tiie above 
nieiilioaea lines. 

This eouivany Is not responsible for 
■■•JUS, nor saie iiaiiapo.talion, 
bove mciiuoned uueb by any 
trii L.oa.1 ui olliei rneanji ot uansporLa- 
tion. While lUe enjpioyt-s oi luia com- 
-H insitucieu to ktep ihena- 
. and give uiKju retjuesi al* 
....o...v>n ini> can as to lUe prol»- 
iji coiuieciions being made witU 
iransporiciiion lines, ilie company 
has uo better means of foreseeing unex- 

£i-.. : (1 iaterruptior.s in the service vl sucb 
1. n telling how long such inier- 

',v':! c«>niinue, ttian the public 
! e, cannot be responsible 
.1 interruptions. 
ia;i.L.lIi JJIKEET KAILWAY CO. 
By HEliHErtr WARREN. Gen. Mgr. 
Dpcemht-r 10, lyt'O 



pu- 
tt': 
11.. 



ha.- 
foi 



JIM DANDY 

A 100-fnot corner on East Third 
street and Tw nty-flrst avenue; no 
rock, beautiful view. 

$3100$ 

Harrison & Jamar 

InterHtale l.an I A Inventment Cow, 
3IO-11 Ki-ovldein'e Bids. 



fDONf 

ifS ?AYf 



\\ill..\ \Ot t.V.N ULV 

a new home in LAKESIDE for a 
small cash payment, and the bal- 
ancr on monthly payments. JIST 
WHAT YOf WOULD P.\Y FOK 
HK-\T| or we will sell a lot and 
build vou a home on the same easy 
conditions. BUY FOR YOURSELF. 

LAKESIDE LAND CO. 

than. P. <ralK. Gea. >l|tr., 
2aO Wfitt Saperlor .street. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

OM PAGE 18. 



(Hii 



BUSINESS <rHANCES. 

WANTED $5,000 IX)AN ON NEW 



o 

o 

s 

g 
s 



$20.«00 BUlVlfc^NG. 

Wish to negotiate direct with 
private party. Write at once to 

J.-M.. Evening Herald. 



BU.Sl.NESS CHANCES - FOR SALE— 

Small stock of groceries and notions; 

I also fixtures to be removed, or store 

can be rented at reasonable price L. 36 

Herald. 






A BARGAIN ! 



S4500 



Will buy a 7-room house. 

bath hot water heat, gas 
;iii.i lity water, stone foundation, 
full basement with concrete floor. 
Lot •!(» hv ]i"i». Central. Property is 



lUIL.KOAD TI.HE TAHLES. 

Duluth& Iron Range RR 

EffecUve Nov. 24, 1907. 



SEE 



J.D.H(!«ARDiCO. 

O 



?I6 « Sup«iorSt 



$3,400 — New 6-room house. Nine- 
teenth avenue west. 

$6.300 — New 8-room house. East 
Fourth street, near Eighteenth 
avenue. 

$84!00 — Brick flat. Jefferson St. 
Rent per month $80. 

$1.600 — 203 East Seventh street. 
Easy terms. 

PULFORD, HOW & CO., 

.•?09 EXCHANGE BLDG. 



DIAMONDS 



ON CREDIT. Old. 12.14-K. 



TENTS AND AWNINGS. 



POIRIER & CO., 108 Ea.st Superior St. 



MILLINERY. 



M. A. COX. 330 EAST FOURTH ST. 



Dulv Ew-ept >UDday • Dai'y fxcept ^unday 



II :cc;i 

llici- 

li 






! ^;outb bound 

Lv.. Duluth _.Ar I2»cm t);45pn> 
... .Ar K.niti.Kiver Lv ii :134m 
111 .Ar. iwu Hbrs Lv loiSjaiu 
111 Ar... Alien Jet.. Lv 9;0S''ra 
.III .Ar-.tvel<ftli . Lt 7;4oam 
!n .\r.. Virginia. .Lv T-AS^tn 



;4:-t 



..Lv 
.-..Lv 



5:S-pm 

3;4£>pm 
a.isptn 
2:2opm 
8»7arD 3:4SP1> 
:i:ani 2»cpin 



fkPKCl^I — SVMOAY ONI.Y. 



Duluth 
Tw o Harbors 



. . Ar 12 :5<) pm 
. ..Lv 11:50 am 



l 
1 
J. 
1.: 



..Allen Junction.. ..Lv lo:'5 am 



Evf ifth 

Tower 
Ely . 



...Lv 8:15 am 
. ..Lv •:15ani 
, ..Lv biSiam 



Here is Something 
Attractive. 

Lot 5. block 72 Endlon- CIQAQ 

LotsSand 6, bl'.ck 66, En- CQiinO 
dlon— only •O'fUU 

If vou are it! the market for good 
re.«ld<!nc*' lots in the East end, the 
above prices i ught to interest you. 
Terms easy. 

Clarke-Hepworth Co., 

Fire loanianoe nnd 

Real Estate. 
224 Manhattan Bids., - Uuluth. 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



The cheapest and best centrally 
located 50x140 foot site for flats 
on upper side of Second street. 

S2000 

R. P. DOWSE & GO. 

Goiierul Insurance. 
106-7-8 Providenoe BUlg. 



MRS. BRANDT. 114 WEST FOURTH ST. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

"enqTneerTng" 



MINNESOTA ENGINEERING CO.-D. 
A. Ret-d, consulting ongineer. Suivcys, 
plans, estimates, speciflcations. Super- 
intendence. Zenith, 6S3. 40S-409 Provi- 
dence building. 



WANTS 

BRING 
^ QUICK Cy 



^uwv 



LOST AND FOUND. 

LOST-dMALL SILVER WATCH AT- 
tached to pin, between Nineteenth 
street. Park Point, and Congrega- 
tional church. Reward if returned to 
A Ibt-n berg's. 



HERALDS WEST DILUTH DEPI 




BRANCH OFFICE-J. J. MORAaV, 

405 North Central Aircniic. 

Zcaltk 'Pkone 818S-A. 




MEDICAL. ____ 

LADIES - DR. LA FRANCOS COM- 
pound; safe, speedy regulator: 2o cents. 
Druggist or mail. Booklet free. Dr. 
La Franco. Philadelphia. Pa. 



FOR 



Court, Eleventh Judicial 



Le«ve 

* 4:00 9. m 

* iioos.m 

^ »:IS * m 

Lrave 

* tiooi.m 

* l:5>p.m 



Athland and East 

.\ihianJ and East 

Minu. and Dalcota bxpresa 
...Nurtti Coast Limited 



Du.uth bhnrt Lina. 

ST. PAUL 

MinifEAPOUS 



ArT\ye 
*II:I5a.m 

* »:30p.iii 

* 7:55 *.ni 

Arrive 

* 6:30 a.m 

* 3:03 p.m 

* 7:00 p. a 



• I 'ail r Except Sunday. Phoors 214 



\^ --.: .«.>cr:or ' tr-?f 



fMORfi^WESf ERN liNE 






Ar 



4 50 am I 

- ii-> am !■ 



is 40 am a 1 : : pm 

( c 3 Am 3 jp pm 

i 10 pm a *o p(B 

« 05 pm i 1^ pm I 

I pv>(^» and ctialr 

a- ,: >, Tarlor and 

.1 J * .n ' itiei. Office 

~ iijj W. ^u|>erior St., iU^ucti 



$1500 

CASH 

For double corner. I(»xl40. corner 
Nineteenth av>nue east and Fifth 
street, upper s de. This is one of the 
most desirabU- building sites in the 
nur.'iial disiric . 

W. C Sherwood & Co., 



us Man liittan Building 



Buy a Home 

lor Youp Wife 

for Xmas. 

We have a large li.st to 



IXSLRAXCE. I.O.\\S, BOND.S, 

••!>" Palladio Bldif. 
Diiliitli. l.S()6. Zfulth. 700. 




& Hawkins, 




OULUTH. SOUTH SHORE* ATLANTIC 



X-i »<. 



A 
ii 

ii 

!■ 
m 

a 

a 
a 



Dtilutli 

Suji-r^or 



I^lip.t'Tntng 
Murquf '■ 

- S. ,M : 

. Montr 



(No. 7. (No. 6. 

A M. P. M 

. .Ar'hlO;3')la ♦;:5'«i 

iblO:l.".a 6 -t; 

'P. M ! 
Lv • 




,i' .M .\. M. 

.!b!2:ir.la 7:55 
!>ll:a)a t>:4^ 
b 5:30 

. bl0:15l 



M5, 



B.»st(jn .!;!;!lbl():00| 



A. M 

a S:.>' 

P M 

H 

i 



P. \h* A. M. P. M. 

b TID Lv.. Montr.-al . Ar b 7:3iValt':i:) 

\ \( IP. M.|A. M. 

Ar..New Y->rk..L v;b 7:Q 0ia i>:45 

Dining 



I>ally e.\c. Pt Sunday 
ill Trains N03. 



and 8. 



Factory Building 



For rent, located on East 
Michigan street, suitable for 
any kind of small manufactur- 
ing busines .. 



G.G.Dickerman&Go. 

LONSDALE BLDG. 



Land and 
Lots. 

We hav.» for sale, hundreds of 
acres of choice land near Duluth. 
.in'l on go<.d ro.ids, very chi^ap. Also 
tiinb.r. stumpag**. Building lots 
.vorywhere. Easy terms. Square 
dealings. 

L. A. Larsen Co. 

211-1.". phovide:vck bi.u<;. 



OULUTH, MiSSABE ft NORTHERN RY 



p. M. 
3:50 
4;05 
4;2U 



r:io 



«;5c> 



A.M. 

T:40 Lv 
7:55 Lv 
8:15 Lv 
U:i.l At. 
10:40 .Ar. 
10:37 .Ar 
10:29 Ar 
10:56 .\r 
llL20.\r 
10:5o Ar 



^i Aliu.Ni 
..Duluth.. 
.37lhAv.W. 
.. Proctor. 
Coleraine 
. M'i'n.lron, 
. Virtifinia . 
..Eveleth . 
._ Sparta.. 

Biwabik. 

Hibbing. 



A.M. 
Ar 10:30 

LvllO:15 

Lv> 10:00 

Lv| 631) 

Lv 

Lv 

Lv 

Lv 

Lv 

Lv 



7:00 
7:42 




7:15 



13:20 
12:40 
I2:4r 
12:24 
12:03 
12:ir 



Dai'v ciivtfpt Sunday. 

i~jja Du:iith malces dtr»cl 
tieii:-.:i di K.iiii> Junction with D. V. Jk R. L. &y 
lor Ashiwa »nd points n.irth ot V'iririaia. 



For a lot on the lower side of 
Third street between 'Sixth and 
Seventh avenues east. 

This is a bargain. 

R. B. Knox & Co. 



ORDER LI.MITIXG TI.ME TO FILE 
CLAIM.-?. AND FOR HEARING 
THEREON. , „ r 

.State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Andrew 
Gowun. Decedent. 

Letters testamentary this day having 
been granted to Mary A. Gowan. Lillian 
B. Gowan and Henry P. Gnwan. 

IT IS ORDERED. That the time with- 
in which all creditors of the abovp 
named decedent may present claims 
against his estate in this court, hv. 
jind the same herefcv is. limited to six 
month"* from and after the date here- 
of; and that Monday, the Sth day of 
June. 1908. at ten o'clock A. M.. In the 
Probate Court Rooms, at the Court 
Hou.se, In said Countv. bo. and the same 
herehv is, fixed and appointed as the 
tlm.^ and place for hearing upon the ex- 
uminatlon. adjustment and allowance 
of such claims as shall be presented 
within the time aforesaid. 
Let notice hereof be given by the 
I ..itcation of this order In Duluth 
Evening Herald, as provided by law. 
Dated at Duluth. .Minn.. Dec. 2nd, 19t)7. 
J. B. .MIDDLECOFF. 
Judge of Probate. 
(.*!pal Probate Court. St. Louis Co.. 

ih Evening Herald. Dec-3-10-17-lB0T. 



(No. 624.) 
SUMMONS IN APPLICATION 

REGlSTH.\TION OF LAND. 
State of Miunesota. County of St. Louis 

District 
District. 

In the matter of the application 
of Thomas Murray to register 
the title to the following de- 
scribed real estate Situated in 
St. Louis County. Minnesota, 
namely: North half of North- 
east qu.irter of Korthe;\8t 
quarter (N^ of NE^ of NEV4) 
of Section Thirty-four t84», in 
Township Forty-nine i49) North 
of Range Fifteen ri5> West; 
subject to the estate granted 
to the Duluth Transfer Rail- 
way Company and it.S assigns 
by Henry Weckcy and wife by 
deed dated February Tth, 1S93, 
and recorded in the office of 
the Register of Deeds in and 
for said County. February 28th. 
1SS>3, In Book 18 of D»'ed3. page 
3»»i>. to which deed and the rec- 
ord thereof reference Is hereby 
made for greater certainty. 
Applicant. 
vs. 
The Northern Pacific Railway 
Company, The Mercantile 
Trust Company. Trustee. The 
Farmers' Loan & Trust Com- 
pany. Trustee. Guaranty Trust 
Company of New York, Trus- 
tee, and all other persons or 
partks unknown. claiming 4 
any right, title, estate, lien or 
interest in the real estate de- 
scribed in the application 
herein. 

Defendants. 
_ The State of Minnesota to t*e 
- I named defendants. 

You are hereby summoned and re- 
quired to answer the application of the 
api>llcant in the above entitled pro- 
ceeding and to file your answer to the 
said application In the office of the 
Clerk of said court, li? said county, 
within twenty rjt)^ days after the serv- 
ice of this summons upon you. <*x^'i'- 
slve of the day of such service, and if 
you fail to answer the said nprlica- 
tion within the time aforesaid, the ap- 
plicant in this procoeding will apply 
to th"-> court for the relief demanded 
therein. . , » u 

Witness. J. P. Johnson, clprk of said 
court and the seal thereof, at Duluth. 
In said countv. this Tth day of Decern- 
ber. A. D. 1907. ^ ^ joHNSON. 

« Clerk. 

By V A. D.A?H. 
Deputy. 
(Seal of District Court, St Louis 

Countv Mlnn.> ^, , ^t, 

CRASS WELLER & CRAf^SWELLER. 

Attorneys for .\pplKant. 
J B COTTON AND F. D. ADAMS 



in this proceeding will apply to the 
court for the relief demanded therein. 
Witness. J. P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court and the seal' thereof, at Duluth. 
In said county, this Tth day of Decern- 
ber. A. D. 19(^. ^ ^ joHNSON. 

Clerk. 
By V. A. DASH. 

Deputy. 
(Seal of District Court. St. Louis Coun- 

CK^\Sh\*VKLLER & CRASSWELLER. 

Attorneys for Applicant. ^ . .,„ 
J. B. COTTON AND F. D. ADAMS. 

Of Counsel. 
Duluth Evening Herald. Dec-lO-lT-24-1907. 



ORATORY 
FAILS HIM 

Charles Olson no Lon- 
ger Able to Move 
the Judge. 

Draws a Thirty Day Sen- 
tence on Drunkenness 
Charge, 



of officers tomor- 



Its annual election 
row evening. 

The Sunday school teachers of the As- 
bury Methodist Episcopal church will 
meet tomorrow evening with Mrs. 
Thomas Grlce. at the parsonage, 8009 
Raleigh street, to complete their ai- 
rangements for their Christmas tree. 

The Sunday school of the Asbury 
Methodist Episcopal church will hold 
their Christmas entertainment Christ- 
mas eve at the church. Sixtieth avenue 
west and Raleigh street. They have an 
elaborate program planned in which 
both the Sunday school scholars and 
the church choir will take part, besides 
the regular Christmas tree. 

Don't forget the grand opening at th« 
Western Curling Club rink tonight. 

Carl Larkin of Barnum drove through 
West Duluth, vesterday. v^ith a fine load 
of farm produce. Mr. Larkin has u stook 
farm at Barnum, Minn. 

Coal. Coke and Match Blox— W. A. 
Pond Fuel Co.. 411 Central avenue. Bell 
•phone, 3062-L; Zenith. 3052. 

Miss Alice Bailey of Minneapolis, is 
visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. 
Bailey, L220 North Central avenue. 

Don't forget the grand opening at the 
Western Curling Club rink tonight. 

John Berthume of l»y7 Fifty-eighth ave- 
nue west, who was so seriously injured 
some time ago by falling into the new 
Wiscon.sin Central tunnel, is improving 
at St. Marv's hospital. Last Monday the 
doctors had almost given up hope of sav- 
ing him. 

Fine engraving. Hurst. 301 Central. 

Don't forget th"^ grand opening at the 
Western Curling Club rink tonight. 

The Roval l>»ague give their dancing 

partv at "Wade's hall, this evening. It 

will "be one of West Duluth's largest so- 

would brinE tears to xhi cial functions for the sea-son. The Bl«- 

wouia onng tears 10 Lut- ^^^^ orchestra will furnish the music for 

dancing. . ^ ^ 

Big line of ladles' and gents and baby 
rings, in solid gold, at prices from 75c 
up. Hurst. West Duluth Jeweler. 




yPEilOIR iEW! 



'% 



above 



AGED MAN RUNS AMUCK. 

Superior Man Fires Shotgun at His 
Aged Wife. 

Albert Rakowsk^. j^c^ 60 years, who 
re-sides in South Superior, fired two 
ohargtos from a 12-gaug« shot gun at 
hla ag^d wifCs following a family quar- 
rel la.st evening. Mrs. Rakowski and 
her four childi-en had left the house 
early in the evening, following theii 
trouble, but Mrs. Kakowski, fearing 
that her hu&band might harm him- 
self, returned home. It is claimed that 
Rakowski met her at the door and 
ordered her away. After warning his 
wife. Rakowski is said to have pro- 
cured his shot gun and fired twice, the 
first shot going high and the second 
clc!*e to her head. 

Mrs. Rakowski ran to a neighbor's 
for protection, and a policeman was 
summoned. Rakow.ski. when taken into 
custody, declared that as soon as lib- 
erated he would kill his wife and then 
cut his own throat. 

Rakowski is said to l>e of a melan- 
choly disposition. The authorities be- 
lieve him to ]je insane, and it is prob- 
able that his mt^ntal condition will be 
thoroughly investigated. 



The oratorical powers of Charles Olson, 
the same stump-speaking CharUe of West 
Duluth. have failed him. Time after 
time Charlie has appeared m municip.^1 
court and delivered eloquent appeals for 
mercy, which 

eyes of anybody who didn't know him 
and the close companionship he has strjck 
up with l)Ooze in his forty years on < arlh. 
His wife and children were always the 
central figure in his perorations, and In 
recent weeks he has succeeded in making 
mercy prevail over justice and escaping 
from the penally for his numerous trans- 
gressions from the straight and narrow 
path of temperance. 

When Charlie limp.d out of the court 

room last week, und'-r sixty days' proba- 

' tion, some went so far as to tliink he 

I would reform. His plea for mercy on that 

I occasion wag a ma.ster effort. Ho prom- 

; ittd never to touch another dr.'p of 

liquor, and he evidently meant what he 

.said. But the clutch ot the demon is too 

strong, and Charlie was m the line-up 

again this morning. 

The court habitues settled to hear Char- 
lie make anoilier appeal. Sluiky and 
tousled after the night in the coll, he had 
hardly a word to say. He a.sked for a 
light sentence, admitted that booze i;al 
the best of him. and subsided into gloomy 
silence. "Make it ninety days," said 
Charlie when the court hiing a sixty-day 
sentence over him last week, but he was 
very glad to get away dith a tidrty-day 
senieuce this morning. 



Mnsieal Instruments. 

The old reliable and well known mu- 
sician. Mr. A. Haakonson is in charge 
of this department and he will help 
you to select the best there is for 
Christmas. 

LUXDBERG & STONE. 



$15 Black Suits Now $11.75 

At the "Fitwell" Clothing Parlor*' 
great anniversary sale. 



READY FOR OPENING. 



Long Postponed Event Will Be Held 
at Last. 



CIVIC LEAGUE 
DOING THINGS 

Ashland Chief Resigns 

and Lid Will be 

Clamped Down. 



Duluth Evening 
and 24. 1907. 



Of trounsel. 
Herald. Dec, 10, 17 



THE GREAT NORTHERN. 



^ «:C0 a.m / 

• 3:'5p.ni - 

•liucp.m) ^c 

" exSa.m ' Crool^^t'-'PiTand ror^i. 

••:5Sp.iBt Mi i Coast. 

> 2:41 p.m— "»*" ' ■<. Vii»finia„tl2:i5p.m 

* St. Li. .^a. 1. i.iuar and ; .i«.ie- «. 

1 t;eo«.«|_ Sioux aiy piodsp.a 



ST. PAUL AlfD 

icmnEAPOLis 



I* 6:51 p.m 
>• 7:15 A.m 



TVi 



•P< 



Kxccpt SunJay 

• •lite -^ ' I' 



liars 



HOTKLr LrSNOX 

?.I'>.st thor.iughly eqiilpp.-d In the 
Norinwest. Sanitation r*rfect. 
European. Jl.OO and up American. 

li'.t/' and up. 



Must Be Sold 

on Terms to 

Suit Customer. 

li)-room hous.', centrally located, hot 
w.-iter heat, hardwood floors, storm 
windows and screens, cement walks, 
open plumbi ig. two water closets, 
porcelain bath tub. 



Cooley & Underhill 

209-210 Kxchanse liuildiris. 



Nrvt BulldloK. »«▼ Bqaipnient. 
R.\1'K<< — 92.O0 .\>'D Vi.50. 

HOTEL McKAY 

Ccr First Street and Fifth Avenu* 
West Duluth. 



The Miller 

■i22-2-i4 \\ . Superior St. 

American and European Plan 

Fifty Homrlike Rooms. 

JOH>- \\. .MII.1.KR, Proy. 



MIONEY 
TO LOAN 

Iny Awioi int. H9 Delay. 

W.M. PRINDLE&CO. 

luiasdaU Bltfg. 



(No. C25.) 
STMMONS IN APPDICATION FOR 

RKGISTUATION OF LAND- 
State of Minnesota. CoLinty of St. Louis 

— ss. 
District Court. EUventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. . ,, ,, 
In the matter of the application 
of Thomas Murray to register 
the title to the following dt- 
.scrlbed real estate .situated In 
St Louis <!Kjunty, Minnesota, 
namelv: Rosedale .\ddltion to 
Duluth. subject to the estate 
granted to the Duluth Transfer 
Ruilway Company and Its as- 
signs by Everett Totnian by 
deed dated June Sth. 1S93. and 
recorded In the office of th« 
Register of l>eeds in and for 
I said County of St. Louis July 
13th. 1810. in Book 96 of tVeedx. 
on page 15, to which deed a'td 
the record thereof reference Is 
hereby mado for greater cer- 
tainty. 

Applicant, 
vs. 
' Northern Pacific Railway Com- 
' pi\ny. the Mercantile Tru.<»t Com- 
pany, Trustee; the Fanners' 
Loan & Trust Company. Trus- 
tee; Guaranty Tru.^t Company, 
of New York. Trustee. ;uid 
all other persons or parth s 
tinknown. claiming any right, 
title, estate, lirn or Interest 
In the real estate described in 
the application herein 

l'»efendant8. 
The Statp of Mlnnes4>ta to the above- 
nan. ed defendants. 

You are hereby summoned and requ'r<"d 
to ai.sw< r the application of the applicant 
in tlie above entitled proceeding, and to 
flle vour answer to the said application 
in the office of the Clerk of said Ciurt, 
in said county, within twenty (20) days 
after the s-ervioe of this summons up^n 
you. exclusive of the day of such .'■er^•l(e, 
and if >■"" ^^'' ^"^ answer the said appll 



(No. 621.) 

SUMMONS IN APi'Ll(\\TION FOR 
REGISTRATION OF LAND- 

Slate of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 
— ss. 

District Court. Eleventh Judicial District, 

In the matter of the application ofj 
Thomas Murray to register the 
title to the following describedl 
real estate situated in St. Louis; 
Countv. Minnesota, namely: 
Southwest quarter of S<juthwest 
quarter (sw^i of sW^) of Sec- 
tion Thirty-five i36), in Town- 
ship Forty-nine (49> North, of 
Range Fifteen (15) West of the 
Fourth Principal Meridian, ac- 
c«jrdlng to the United States 
Government survey thereof. 

Applicant 
\-3. 
^11 persona or parties unknown, 
claiming any right, tUle, estate 
lien or interest in the real es- 
tate described In the application 
herein. Defendants. 

The State of Minnesota to the above 
named defendants: 

Y'ou are hereby summoned and re- 
answer the application of the 



Shoplifter is Fined. 

Mrs. Jennie Reynolds of 1009 Banks 
avenue wa-s arrested in Lightb<xly's 
store j-^*terday afternoon for sh«ipHft- 
ing. She pleaded guilty to the charge, 
before Judg^ Parker, and paid a fine ot 
$2S. Mrs. Reynolds was detected in 
the act of stealing four towels, valued 
at $1.25 osach. She tucked the articles 
under her coat and started for home, 
but was deiajned at the door of the 
store. \N'lien accused of the theft she 
cried, confessed and pleadt-d for for- 
gi\'eiie&s. The woman could give no 
reason why she took the towels. Her 
fine was paid by a friend. 



Ashland, Wis.. Dec. 17.— (Special to 

The long waited on weather man has jxhe Herald.) The campaign the 

made good at last, for he has furnished ! civic league is waging for better en- 
the Western Curling club with a fl»« i forcement of laws in Ashland, notably 
floor of ice and tonight they will have , ^^^^^ relating to the closing of sa- 
loons, scored a notable victory today 
In forcing the resignation of Chief of 
Police Chailes Moslowski, for sixteen 



their many times postponed grand 
opening. A band, which has been en- 
gaged to play regularly on Tuesdays 
and Fridays throughout the season, 
will enhance th« pleasure of skating 
during the evening. Gay buntings 
draped from wall and celling will add 
color to the scene. 

The Western Curling club has done a 
great deal since last season to improve 
the rink. Tiie entrances' liave been 
changed so as to be more convenient. 
A line big fireplace has been built to 
cheer the chilled curlers and skaters 
and new furniture bought. In all, 
about $2.ij00 has been expended in mak- 
ing the rink more comfortable and 
attractive tlian ever. 

The ice was in excellent condition 
last night and some good exhibitions 
of curling took place on all tliree rinks 
though the games were informal, the 
drawings for rinks not coming off until 
the latter part of this week. 



Conimereial Lights Ready. 

It is expected that the Water & Light 
company will turn the electric current 
on in tlie Allou-ez and Itasca district 
tomorrow, when the business men and 
i^esidc-nts of those portions of the city 
will avail themsudves of the opp.3rtunity 
for lighting their stores and homes. 
Street lights were put in the Tenth 
ward some ytvars ago. but until now 
there were no commercial lights. 



Millimen Claim Exemption. 

W. G. Burress, the deputy state trea- 



qulred to answer tne itiiMiicaii-.., ui liic a^p.nt Is <*tin investieatine the 

annhcant in the above ent tied proceeding »'">' a^enx. is siu in>esLigd.iin^ im 
and to file your answer to the said appli- matter of peddlers" lice-nses in .'Superior, 
cation in the ofhce of the <-'lerk of said but he seems to have run up against 
court, in .said county, within twenty i2ti) 'an obstacle in his prosecution of milk- 
days after the service of this summons ; „^ri for the reason that most of the 
upon you. ;jx<-lusive »'.[»»'; ^'^^y^f'l'f,^ customers buy tickets of their milkmen 
s^id''applic2uon ^wl'^hi'n'th;' time" \V.-e! and give him In-truerions as to when 
said, the applicant in this proceeding will t they want the milk delivered. Lndor 



apply to the' court for the relief demand- 
ed therein. 

Witness. J. P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court, and the seal thereof, ht Duluth. In 
said County, this Tth day of December. 

^- ''• '^'- J. P. JOHNSON. 

Clerk. 
By V. A. DASH. 
Deputy. 
(St-al of District Court, St. Louis (Jounty. 

Mlnn.> 
CRASSWELLER & CRASSWELLER. 

Altomevs for .■\pplicant. 
J. B. COTTON AND F. D. AD.\MS, 

Of Counsel. ,.,-„. ,^ 

Duluth Evening Herald. Dec. 10-1.-34. '(fl. 



FOR 



(No. 02::). 

SU.Vl.MONS IN APPLICATION 

REGI.^TR.^TIO.V OF LAND. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

In the matter of the application 
of Thomas Murray to register 
the title to the following de- 
scribed real estate sHuated in 
St. Louis County. Minnesota, 
namelv: East half of Northeast 
quarter (EV* of NEV.) of Section 
Three (3). In Township Forty- 

Fif- 




ment survey thereof. 



Applicant, 



vs. 



Hotel Superior 

Superior, Wisoons*n. 

Leading hole) of the citv. .Modernized and 
unproved. iiu< meets a I trams. 

Aiiierlrnn Plnn, $2.00 Up, 
Kuropean Plai«, $I.OO hp. 



LOANS 




ON CtTY PROPERTY 
r. I. SAI^TER CO.e 

1 kini Floor UnsiUic Bklg. 



cation Within the time aforesaid, th- ap- I All persons or partitas ijnkn^own 
pllcant m this proceeding will spp'y to] ^-lalmlng any right, mje^jjstaU>^ 



the court for the relief demanded tht re- 
in, t 
Witness. J. P. Johnson, clerk of said ' 
court, and the seal ther»-of. at Duluth, in 
said county this 7th day of December, 
A D. 1907. 

J. P. JOHNSON. 

Clerk. 
By V. A. DASH, 

Deputy. 
(Seal of District Court. St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
CRASSWELLER & CRASSWELLER, 
I Attorneys for Applicant. 

J. B. COTTON and F. D. .ADAMS. 
I Of Counsel, 

i Duluth Evening Herald— D«o. UM.7-24. "07. 



lien or interest in the real es- 
tate described In the applica- 
tion herein, . ■, 

I/^fendants. 
The State of Mlnnlesota to the above 
named defendants; 

You are hereby (summoned and re- 
quired to answer the atppHcation of the 
applicant In the aboue entitled proceed- 
ing and to file your answer to the said 
application in the office of the Clerk 
of said court. In said county, -within 
twenty taO) days »fter the service of 
this summons upon you. exclusive of 
the day of such aerlrice. and. If you 
fall to ansvuer the said application 
within the time aforesaid, the applicant 



the.so conditions the milkmen, it is 
claimed, do not come within the scope 
of the la A- governing peddlers. It Is 
al-JO claimed that the fishermen have 
regular customers that they supply 
with Ii^. and that sucJi bedng the case 
they are not. in the true sense, ped- 
dler?. An old resident of the city was 
arrested yest'Crday, because he refused 
to show Mr. Burress his peddlers' li- 
cense. 



Small Fire. 

Shortly after G o'clock yesterday aft- 
ernoon a small fire was started at the 
b;u k of the Phillips hotel by the care- 
les.s throwing of hot ashes from the 
kitchen so that they came in contact 

with the side of the building. The firei^'^Q^t an application of the 
department was called, but before they 
arrived James Sullivan, the proprietor 
of the hotel, had the fire nearly put 
out. 



years the head of the force, who sent 
his resignation to the fire and police 
board. He has been succeeded by Un- 
der Sherilt W. T. Blair, an excellent 

! officer, whose appointment is inter - 

' preted as meaning there will be no 
half way business with the liquor in- 

: terests in the future. 

i ahe sensational developments con- 
nected with the Hoo Hoo saloon and 

I restaurant .and the digging up of evi- 
dence by the Civic league of a hundiod 

1 violations of the closing law are not- 

lable features of a campaign that is 
being waged here for better govern- 
ment. The league, through the work 
of its detective, a man by the name of 

' Stratton, who has njade a record In 
that kind of work In Allegheny City, 
Seattle and other cities, has secured 
such strong evidence against the sa- 
loonkeepers, that the league Is said to 
me in a position to hold a sort of a 
club over the saloon element to forco 
them to close nights and Sundays and 
this will be used forthwith to bring 

lid. the 



like of which the town has not seen. 
The resignation of Moslowski is con- 
sidered in the light of a sort of a 
scapegoat procedure, -some victim or 
excuse was needed and the chief svaa 
selected. 



Dahlstrojn Funeral. 

The funeral services of Charles O. 
Dahlstrom. brother of Mrs. A. Henrik- 
son. 625 North Fifty-sixth avenue west, 
who died last week in the hospital at 
Minot. where he had been taken from 
his home In Balfour, N. D.. were held 
this afternoon from the Swedish-Lu- 
theran church at 2 o'clock. The inter- 
ment was at tlie Oneota cemetery. 

Mr. Dahlstrom's remains were ship- 
ped from Minot to W. H. Richter's un- 
dertaking rooms. 425 Fifty-fifth avenue 
west. West Duluth. last Saturday even- 
ing by Mr. Henrlkson and Mr. Nyhus, --. 1,^,,..=. i^i^^ 

who went to Minot to make all ar- the lover returned several hours later 
rangements for the shipping of the \ he stumbled over the cold body of the 
" ' bi^ehelor and woman who gave up a happy home and 



DRINKS CARBOLIC ACID. 

Houghton. Mich., Dec. 17.— (Special ' 
to The Herald.)— Despondent because 
her paramour threatened to desert ncr 
because of her fondness of drink. Mrs. 
May Wentworth, who has a husband 
living somewhere in Maine, committed 
suicide by drinking carbolic acid at her 
squalid home in West Houghton. When 



bodv. Dahlstrom was a 
lived alone at his home in Balfour. He 
was an active member of the I. O. O. F. 
and M. W. A. in his home town. 

• Cut Flowers. 

West Duluth Green House, corner 
Grand and 67th avenue. Zenith 'phone. 
3201-D. 



Company Pays Taxes. 

A gn^ss < arnings" tax, amounting to 
Jtr..024.7.5 was paid in to the city trea- 
sury yesterday by the Duluth-Superior 
Traction company. The tax represeat- 
<^ 2V4 per cent of receipts, airhjunting 
to $200,991.90. The strc-et railway com- 
pany is the first of the hig taxpayers 
lo pay Us annual dues to the cit>. 
Outside of the payment mentioned, th,.- 
taxes come in slowly. It is not expect- 
ed that there will be any great rush 
to the tn^LSurer's office until after the 
holidays. 



Pipes and Smokers' Articles. 

The old reliable headquarters 
Christmas presents is at 

LUNDBERG & STONE'S 



for 



FAMILY POISONED. 

Miller, S. D., Dec. 17.— Coroner W^allis 
was called to a farm twenty-five miles 
northeast of here yesterday, where an 
aged woman and her .son. named Kam- 
mel, are dead from poisoning and the 
father is dying. The cause is not 
known, though it is said to be dne to 
eating canned goods. 



husband to join him in his wanderings 
throughout the country. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

The Ladies' Aid society of the West- 
minster Presbyterian church will meet 
with Mrs. H. G. Macfarlann. 512 North i 
Fifty-seventh avenue west. Wednesday j 
afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. 

The choir of the Westminster Pres- 
bvterian church will meet tonight with 
Mrs. McClelland, 231 North Fifty-sixth I 
avenue west. ,,._,. 

Fred D. Rockwell, who has been in 
business in .*^eattle, Wash., for tne last 
half year Is back in West Dulutn 
.staving with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
.Andrew F. Rockwell. 114 North Fifty- 
'foi:rth avenue west. 

The West Duluth M. W. A. will hold 



FOR SALE! 

50 good lots in West Duluth. 
Price $100 to $300 each. Now 
is the time to buy West Duluth 
real estate. It will surely ad- 
vance by next spring. 

L. A. BAILNKS, 

Hou.ses for Rent. 
In.surance Written. 
Suite 3 Woodward Building. 




Black Suits for Christmas. 

Get a black .suit now at the Fitw-ll 
Clothing Parlors. One-quarter off the 
regular price on anj' black suit in the 
house during our great anniversary 
sale. 



I 



SKATES FOR PRESENTS 

We have everything in the skate line at prices that please— 
60c to $5.00. 

BOYS' SK.%TES. only • ^ 

SLED SKATKS. for girls »w 

HOCKEY CL.\MP SKATES JJ-^O 

HALF HOCKEY CL-\MP SKATES .. $850 

F. H. WADE, 

329-331 CENTRAL AVENUE. 



/ 



•■■I'liipii 




™ 





/C 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. ^"^''**^ December 17. 190T. 




?hone 

Your Want 
Adu to The 

Herald. 



J^BJSIZIi 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
AiHiTtlbeinent L.ess llian 15 «.:enl«. 

SHOPPING 
BY TELEPHONR^^^ 

Old New 

Phone. 'Phone, 

MEAT MARKETS — 

B J Tob. ti 22 12 

Mork Brus G07-M 1!^9 

l^rN OKIES— " 

Yale Laundry 4"S <'? 

Lutes" Laundry ;H7 p^ 

Troy Liuindry £; r*' 

Home Laundry im4-M 1U» 

DRrtuiisrs— 

B.y.t 1«3 103 

FLOIUSIS— 

W W. S.ikJns lv»6 1«« 

BAKEKIES— 

The Ht'n Ton 1T2I1-L 11-8 

PIAMHIXCi AN1> IIEATIXG— 

Mc Gurrin * Co «5 »3 

Archie Mv IVuirall LiJ^S^j 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Liss Than 15 Cents. 

^iEL? WAN TED^MALR 

Men to learn barb ir trade; only short 
time required. Ill us. Cat. Iree. Mular 
Barber Col., 27 E. Nicollet -Ave., Mpll«. 



FOR SALE-UNREl 

I'SO unredeemed t 
and cravenettes, 
dies'- and gents' v 
rings; als© a full 
jewelry and musii 
abJt for holiday 
lx>an company, 16 

WANTED - TWO 
sawyers; live km 
bolter; two packei 
ey mill. This ml 
one week. Wester 



JEEMED PLEDGES, 
vercoats, fur coats, 
66 revolve re. 400 la- 
atohes, 300 solid gold 
and complete line of 
al instruments, suit- 
presents. Keystone 
West SujHrior street. 

HAND MACHINE 
t sawyers; one knC'j 
b; one setter in dlnk- 
1 will iipen in about 
Q Labor it Supply Co. 



One Cent a Word E^ch Insertion — No 
Advt<rtii!«einent iiess Than 15 Cents. 

liELP^WANTED^^FEMALET 

{ RELIAiiLE~HEL?'"ALwXYs"T^O^ 
I had at Airs. Callahan's Employment 
! oflice, 15 Lake avenue north. 

I WANTED-EVER\ WOMAN TO TRY 
I Dr. Le Gran s Female Regulator, 
I guaranteed. Kugler, Your Druggist, 
loss West Superior street. 

WANTED - GIRL FOR COOK AND 
gentral housework; family of three. 
Apply IGOS East Superior street. 



, WANTEr»-FOR THE U. S. MARINE 
I corps men betwee i ages 1:1 and Si. An 
cpporJunuy to 8e« the world. For full 
niiorniatioii upply in person or by let- 
ter to Marine llecruiting station. 5 
S*^>uth Fifth avenus west. Duluth, Minn. 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



WANTED — COMPETENT COOK IN 
family of two; best of wages. Appiy, 
liCJO East Superior street. 

WANTED - GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 414 East Third street. 



WANTED- A DINING ROOM GIRL AT 
West Duluth cafe, 327 Central avenue. 



John A Stephenson, Wclvin t'U'Wj"?- 
E D Field Co . 203 Exchange building. 
L" a." Lars'en'Co., 'ilf. Pjton idence buildnig. 
Charlts r t'raig AL- Co.. ili?-' W. Sup. 
Pulioril ilcw Ai Co.. JKft) Excnaug^ 



WANTED — ONE SKIDDING TEAM 
I and two heavy teams. Western Labor 
& Supply company, 4WH ^^est Miohi- 
j gan street. 

[WANTED- PORTE a AT 3(6 WEST SU- 
i ptrior street. 



St. 
Bids- 



'WANTED- EXPERIENCED CROCK- 
i ery salesman, Scandinavian; one who is 
juQuainted In Wt -it end; married man 
preferred. ItV-'S W -st Superior street. 



MONEY TO^LOAN. 

DO YOU NEED Mt>NKY? 
Morsev loaned in Duluth and Superior to 
salaried ptopl,' without security. Also on 
planof", furniture, horses, wagons Ttc. 
Bu.«Inf>3S absolutely confidential Call ana 
get our rates and terms. Monthly or 
weekly payments as de.-ired. We guar- 
antee to save you money. No good "P- 
pluant refused. ,, 

WES lERN LOAN CO., 
VZl Manhiittan Euilding. 
New pUt-nt 93^ t'ld phon^\ 7l.9-R. 



WANTED - COMl'ETENT CARPEN- 
ttrkians. sheet metal 
nd plasterers; steady 
open shop. Apply 
•t, Duluth Builders' 
■un. building. 



ters, plumliers. eh i 
workers, roofers 
work ; good wage.- : 
Employment Ue] 
Exchange. 501 Lyi 



WANTED - GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housew*>rk. 1409 East Superior street. 

MRS. SOMERS' EMPLOYMENT OF- 
hee, 17 Second avenue east. Both 
'phones. 

WANTED-SEE CHRISTMAS OFFER 
on photos. 2& West Superior street. 

WANTED - EVEHre^ WOMAN, MAN 
and child that bas rough skin or chaps 
to use Kugkrs Karnalion Kold Kream, 
the great skin food. '&c. Kugler, Your 
Druggist, lOS West Superior street. 



CHEAP CHRISTMAS MO.XEY. 

Wt vvill loan you on your 

SALARY OR CHATTELS, 

At the following cheap rales. 

Thesi pay both Inteiest and Principal. 

110- Return 45. Weekly. *1 SO Monthly. 

JiSO-Relurn yO Weekly, J3.*>0 Monthly. 
Stu- Return %\:& Weekly. $5.40 Monthly. 
{4fr- Return ?1.M) Weekly, $7.Ut> Monthly. 
50- Return J2.25 Weekly. Vd.m Monthly. 
Oitii every evening until 9 o clock. 
DUi. FINANCE CO . :<tn Palladio Bids. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON STOCKS, 
bonds and guod securities. A. H. Baw- 
den Co. 4IV407 Torrey building. Zenith 
'phone, 2I17-A. 

110 'nJ lUm LOANEL' ON FURNl- 
TCRK llANOS. HORSES, ETC., the 
day you as^k for it. by the old reliable 

MINNESOTA LOAN COMPANY, 
.;viL. I'alladia Bldg. 

M<:)NEY TO LOAN - t>N DIAMONDS, 
Watches-, furs, liflep, etc.. and all goods 
of value, Jl to tl.tW. Keystone Loan & 
Mercantile Co., It; West Superior street. 

MONEY SUPPLIED TO SALARIED 
people Jtnd others, upon their own notes 
witluHit s.curity; easy payments. Ot- 
fltes in .-sixty-three ciues. rolmaa's, W3 
Faliladio bu.lding. 

Furniture and ssilarled loans by Union 
Loan coinjianj. 210 I'alladio building. 



W.^NTED— EVERY 

an to try Nervt 
nerve regenerator 
Your Druyrgist. m 



MAN AND WOM- 
Tablets, the gn-at 
11 per box. Kugler, 
West Superior St. 



WANTEIV- GIRL. ABOUT 17. FOR 
light housework. 'S12 East Fifth street. 

WANTEI)-<300D. .STRONG GIRL AT- 
tending normal school to assist with 
housework; wages fl.50 per week. In- 
quire 1112 East Third street. 

WANTED - EXPERIENCED SALES- 
ladles at Freiniuth s. 



Mirsic. 

.•\.ND MUsIC.'L .MEKCH.^NDISE OF 
tt»ery description. Edi- 
son plionoKrapti!-. band 
land crcheitra instru 
nienlv. pianos & ort;ans. 
Ingvald WEsTCi.^.AKD. 
: and 9 t'irat .Ave. V\est. 



PHONOGRAPH REPAIRS. 
Rep-iirlng done ch .-aply on all lalkins 
niachinei^. C. C. No\eliy Co.. 120 W. Mich. 

r 1 A N O S . PHI »NOGRAPlIS ANL' 
everything in the line of music. All of 
th*. populai songs and two-steps. Send 
us vour orders. Zenith Music company. 
No.' 6 East Suptriir stieet, L>uluth. 




WANTED - GIRL FOR HOUSEWORK, 

three In family. Flat D., Ashlabulrt 
flats. 

WANTED - GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 708>>i Ea.st Fourth street. 



WANTED - COMPETENT GIRL, nit 
East Third street. 



WANTED - GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 

eral housework; small family. 42? 
Tenth avenue east. 



WANTED-AN EXPERIENCED GIRL 
foj general hou^^ework. Mrs. H. L». 
Dresser, 16 South Nineteenth avenue 
vast. 



WANTED— GOOD. RELIABLE GIRL 
for nurse maid in East end family; 
must furnish relerences. Address Z. 39. 
Herald. 



BOARD OFFERED. 

! BOARD AND ItOOM OFFERED- 
' Steam heated re om with board, for 
I ladies 01 gentler len. 313 West Third 
! street. 

Board and room otered— 919 E. First St. 



VALENTINES DRESSMAKING 
SCHOOL. 
Two weeks' free instruction In dress- 
making; easy to learn; Valentine'fe 
1 self-calculating system, cutting and de- 
! signing; investigate; visitors welcome. 
Miss Gray, third floor. Gray & Tallant 
company. 



LK)ARD AND ROOM, $5.50 PER WEEK^ 
modern convenien es. Trie Dakotah, IL 
West Seicind stre t. New p.none, 1445. 

BOARD AND ROC M-122 S. FIRST ST. 



OPTICIANS. 

C. C. ST.\ACKE, 306 NEW JERSEY 
building, lOt) West Superior street. 



OPTICIANS - WINNERLUND & NEL- 
.•'on, V.<3> West Superior street. 



One Cent a Word E^aeh Insertion — No 
Advertiwvncnt Ix's.s Than 1& Cents 



PERSONAL. 

LIQUOR HAiilT CURED. 
Free yourself from slavery. Take my 
cure and in two weeks I will guarantee 
to turn your taste against intoxicating 
liquors or I will refund your money. 
No danyer to health. Price reasonable. 
Call, investigate for yourself and be 
convinced. No charge for advice. Prof. 
John B. Fiste, 3So Lake avenue south. 
Empire house, Duluth .Minn. 



PURE, SAFE AND SURE! 

Dr. kuk'er's lansy lennyruyal 
and Lttton Kool nils, /i test of 
lorty years in France, has proved 
ti:eni to/)osi/(i>e/.tf cure iUFf KEb 
blON Or THE .MENbEs. special 
price reduced to Ji.oo per box. 
Mailed in plain wrai'per. laipcrfed direct from 
t'aris, France, by w. A. .AbBtfr, Druggist 
Duiuth, Minn., 201 West Superior Mreet 




I Fust-rliuss table board, lo W. Second St. 



FOR SALE— HORSES. 

FOR "sale ^ 'tEAm"'"''0F HORSES* 
weight 2,900, and one set cf double 
liai ntsS: one heavy double wagon one 
set of heavy sleighs Adilress Ken- 
wood Park Livery, city. 



I 



MOVING AND STORAGE 

1 • eoTleV^iovin 



pany 207Vfe West 
phones, tiOl. 



.; & STORAGE CC3M- 
iuperior street. Both 



FOK SALE -SEVERAL C;OC>D WORK- DULUTH VAN ft STORACJE COM- 

urA ,. !.-.> c:.ii be bought for $50 and up. j pany. 210 \V est Superior street. 

l.L.i^.wrj .1 ti.k^n at once. Part time 



given it necessary. t»)8 North Fifty-six- [ West Duiuth and Duluth Transfer, 
tJi avenue. West Liuluth. Zenith phone. Central Ave. Zenith, 32. o; i.ld iis,. 

awi. 



02b 



LUMBERMEN TAKE NuTlCE. 
We now liavt on hand at our Duiuth 

bam sev. ra! carlouda of sf)und, young, 
extra ht.ivy Ii.kk'i'c' horses, weiglmig 
from 1 ilHi iV ; S<K; [ounds. from which 
TV ■ .-i.n till y»'Ur i>rder. 
M' ill K'-aianteed ti I i- a.s 
Piirt lii:ie given if dt:»ired. 
site posloffice. Barrett Jfc 
liiluth. Minn. 



Every horse 

repr»sented. 

Barn oppo- 

Zimmcrman, 



STOVE REPAIRING. 

repairs FC>R OVEiT 10.W.'U diffkr- 
ent stoves in stot k. Duluth Stove Re- 
lialr works. Phones. 217 East Superior 
street. 



5 I'ealer in q 

O Hi'i>'s Wagons, and Busfe' • s, o 

ijt I'uluth, Minn. q 

^K^C!•ao<K>ooo•o^ao<K^cKKK>o^:>a<H>oo 



ARCHITECTS. 

W K. I "arsons & Stms Cn , 614 Manhat- 
tan All classes of building solicited. 

FRANK L VOUNC; & CO . 2ttl Pal. Bldg. 



FOR RENT — MISCELLANEOUS. 

FC>R RENT-LAP GE. WARM DRY 
l>as«iuent, suitiil le tor \vt>rksiiop or 
.-^toiage, very It w rent. 219 Fifth 
avenue west. 



TRUNKS AND VALISES. 



save Mill; 
luth Trunk 
street. 



•LKMENS PROFITS- 

f.f 'I'l y. 2ju West S .■ 




FOR RENT— STORES. 

FOR RENT-LARiiE, LlCiHT STORE, 
17x70. in the hear: of the rKail district, 
in fine ct iditicn. recently deinr.tted in- 
side and iront painti-d. Basement space, 
if desired. Mu*t a<t quickly. Address, 
A. W , care Hera id. 

FOR RENT - TWO STORES, N08. 6 
and t» South First avenue east. Inquire 
Murtm Smith. F rst avenuf east and 
Michigan street. 



FARM LANDS. 

F\>R SALE^^^'sEiTecTED FaR.M LANDS 
m the a^"icultural sections of NiTthern 
Minnesota, and homesteads and timber 
claims in the timber districts. Easy 
terms of payment. Correspondence 
solicited. R. C. Mitchell, Jr.. 312 and 313 
Torrey building. Duluth. 

YOU CAN BUY 40. SO OR 1(X) ACRES OF 
farm land, near Duluth. at $6 to $15 
per acre, and on easy terms at per 
cent interest. It is the safest kind of 
an investment, and will make you an 
independent living if you want ti.> go 
to farming. Come in and see oui list 
of lands. Guaranty Farm Land com- 
pany, 416 Lyceum. 

FOR SALE — 3.0(»0 ACRES OF LAND 
on Crooked lake, near Emily, Crow 
Wing touiity. Allnnesnta. lii the drill- 
ing area of the New Cuyuna iron 
range, and with mineral rights intact, 
iS also in an txcellont farming cc>m- 
munity; land well bunched; good soil 
with rolling surface; partly timbered;^ 
well watered and in a beautiful lake ■ 
region. The tract at |10 per aere. Ad- 
dress box 34, Iowa City. Iowa. 

FOR SALE - LANDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actual settlers; small payments 
down and balance on nflt-en years' time; 
on or before privilege. Call or address 
land department. D. & I. R. Railway 
company, 612 Wolvin building, L'uluth, 
Minn. 



PERSONAL — I..ADIES, -^SK YOUR 
druggist for Chichesiers Pills, the Di:i- 
mond brand. For 25 years known as 
best, safest, alwi&ys reliable. Buy of 
yoi»r druggist; take no other. 
Cnichesters t»iamond Brand Pills are 
sold by druggisia everywuere. 

PERSONAL - CHIMNEY SWEEPING, 
and furnace cleaning and repairing. 
Edward McCarthy, ixi23 Grand avenue. 
West l»uluth. Zenith 'phone, 3163-X. 

Private home for ladies before and dur- 
ing conhnement; expert care; every- 
t^ng coniidenlial: Infants cared for. 
Ida Pearson. M. l)., 2W Harrison ave- 
nue. St. Paul. 

GET YOUR SANITOL BEFORE ITS 
loo late; $2.70 worth for $1. Eddy Jer- 
onimus, u03 E. Fourth St. Both 'phones. 

PERStiNAL—Classes in china painting, 
firing done. 2t)ii5 W, 3rd. iien. iyj»-X. 

PER.'^ONAL-BACHELORS-JUST THE 
thing for you; singio iron bed with 
pneumatic air mattress, less than 
wholesale iit $25. 4415 Regent street, 
i'uluth T)tione 5W&2-K. 

Private and class lessons in English. John 
Tanis. A. B.. instructor, 2S WinUirop Bldg. 

Guaranteed Main spring, $1; watch clean- 
ed. $1. Garoii Bros. 213 West F'irst St. 

pf:rsonal,-engraving, jewelry 

and silverware. Duluth Engraving 
Bureau, 9 ■ VVinthrop block. Zenitn 
'phoijc, 21«)-D. 

personal — OLly MIRRORS RESIL- 
vered. St. Oermala Bros., 121 First ave- 
nue west. 

PERSONAL - CENTRAL BATH PAR- 

lois, 24 West Superior street. 

PERSONAL — SATISFACTORY TAIL- 
onng. Sti'ltz, fiJ5 East Fourth street. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — Na 
Advertisement L/ess Than 15 Cents. 

J^OR^RENT— ROOMS. 

FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOM, 
suitable for one or two gentlemen; alU 
conveniences. 220 East Second street. 

FOR RENT — VERY E>ESIRABLE 
room, suitable for two, modern and 
centrally located. Address, L. 43, Her* 
aid. 

FOR RENT - TWO MODERN FUR- 

ritshed rooms for light housekeeping. 
431 East Superior street. 



FC>R RENT - LARGE FURNISHED 
front room, all conveniences. Call 11 
F\>urth avenue east. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOMS FOR 
housekeeping. 210 East Second street. 
Zenith 'phone 878. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Lfess Than 15 Cents. 

FOR^LE — MISCELLANEOUS. 

O 'SNAPS" O : 

<fi FOR LATE BUYERS. O 

O A real opportunity to gel a good Kfi 

■p stove al a big saving. Come and 6 

O take a look at them and be con- -p 

Q vinced. Your credit is as good p 

P as anybody's for anything in stoves. Q 

S furniture, carpets, bedding, etc. Q 

M. SHAPIRO, <» , 

O 12 First A. W. Just off Superior St. Q ! 




FOR SALE-CANARY BIRDS. 107 EAST 
fiuperlor street and 4tt7 East Seventh 
street. 



FO .SALE-HORSE GOOL>S. REPAIR- 
ing done cheaply. L. Kernes, 29 E. Isc. 



FOR RPNT ^nJvT^ RnnM^ wTth : *T^ SALE-IRON AND WOODWORK- 

FOR RENT - TWO ROOMS, WITH jn^ machinery and supplies, pulleys, 

shafting, hangers, boxes, etc.. new and 
second-hand. Northern Machinery com- 
pany, Minneapolis. 



MASONIC. 
PALESTINE LODGE, NO. 79, A. F. * 
A. M.— Regular meeting first 
and third Monday eveningB 
of each month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Dec. 16th. 1907, 
Work— Lodge of instruction 
by custodians of the work. 
James A. Crawford. W. M.; 
H. Nesbitt, secretary. 

IONIC LODGE. NO. 186. A. F. & A. M.— 
Regular meetings second and 
fourth Monday evenings of 
eaeh month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Wext meeting, Dec. 16 1907. 
vv ork— Lodge of instruction 
by cu.stodians of the work 
Jame.s L. Cromwell. W. M; 
H. S. Newell, secretary. 




board, downstairs; recommendation re- 
quired. i;31 West Third street. 

F^OR RENT - HEATED, WELL FUR- 
nished room, overlooking lake. Piano 
in room. 439 Mesaba avenue. 

FOR RENT — ROOM, LARGE AND 

very pleasant; steam heat; telephone, 
etc. 1420 Easi Superior street. Old 
'phone, 252-L. 

FOR RENT-ONE FURNISHED F^RONT 
room, suitable lor two. 19 Seventh a\e- 
nue west. 

FOR RENT-ONE FL'lvNISHED ROOM, 
heated, for }^. 5711 Wadena street. 
West Duluth. 

FOR RENT-THREE ROOMS, UP^ 
stairs, 4207 Gillliit street, Lakeside; 
near street Car line. People without 
children preferred. 



FOR SALE-GENUINE BLISS NATIVE 
herbs. Best cure for rheumatism. F. 
Gabnelson. 15 West Superior street. 

FOR SALE-GAS RANGE AND COAL 
range. Inquire 1121 East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROCJM, 
with bath. 221 East Fourth street. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM; $8 
per month; also one for $6. tor two; 
electric lignt, bath and heal, 33li;4 West 
Third street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED 
East FMist street, flat B. 



ROOM. 321 



FOR RENT - NICELY FURNISHED 
warm room and board; modern conven- 
rences. Ill Second avenue east. 



F^OR SALE-COUNTRY EGGS, SWEET 
cider and honey. We trust till pay day. 
I'hatcner s grocery, 312 W. F'ourin St. 

F-OR SALE-DESK, OF'FICE CHAIRS 
and table, cheap, nearly good as new. 
Address J 22, Herald. 



KEYSTONE CHAPTER, NO. 20, R. A. M. 
—Stated convocations second 
and fourth Wednesday even- 
each month, at 7:3a 
Next rtmvoc.'ition. 
1908. Work-M. M. 
Newton H. Wilson, 
Alfred LeRlchieux, 




>ngs of 
o'clock. 
Jan. 8, 
degree. 
H. p.; 
recorder. 




FOR SALE-LUTEFISK. D. CLAUSEN, 
418 East Seventh street. 



FOR SALE - UPRIGHT PIANO. IN 
good condition. First $100 buys it. Call 
after 6 p. m.. 319 West FifTh street. 



FX>R SALE — FULL SET BALZAC'S 
works worth $65. Cneap. L. 40, Herald. 

F^OR SALE - PHYSICIAN'S CHAIR, 
books and table. 513 Burrows building. 

New and second-hand sleighs. Gilmour 
& Co., Central and Grand, W. L>uluth. 

FOR SALE-SET C>F TWO SLEIGHS, 
also oak bed and .spring. 705 South 
Twenty-third avenue east. 



DULUTH CO-MMANDERY, NO. l.S. K T 
—Stated conclave, first Tues- 
day of each month. Next 
conclave, Tuesday Dec. jp. at 
7:30. Dinner at 630 p. m., 

followed by Order of Red 

Cross and Temple. Wil- 

iam A. Abbett. eminent com- 

ander; Alfred Le Richeux, recorder. 



SCOTTISH RITE. 
Regular meetings every Thurs- 
day evening of each week at 
7:30 o'clock. Next meetings 
I>ec. 19, 1907. Work— Thlrlletlv 
degree.' J. E. Cooley, secre- 
taiy. 

ZENITH CHAI'TER, NO. 25. 
Order Eastern Star.— Regu- 
lar meetings second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 7.;30 oclock. 
Next nutting, Dec. 27. 
Work— Installation officers. 
Harriet Hoover. W. M.; Ella 
F, Gearhart, secretary. 





FOR RENT-2 FURNISHED ROOMS FOR SALE - PRACTICALLY NEW, 
for light housekeeping. 323 East ! large golden oak sideboard. 26 West 
Fourth street. Third s treet. 

FOR SALE-AT A SACRIFICE PRICE, 
almost new sideboard, tables, rockers, 



EUCT JO LODGE, NO. 198, A. F. & A. 
M— Regular meeting first and 
lh;rd Wednesday evenings of 
each month at 7 30 o'clock. 
Next nu-etinf, l»e<.. 18. Third 
degree. J. H. Opperman, 
W. M.; A. Dunleavy. 
secretary. 



F'OR RENT — NICELY 
room. With board: all 
314 East Second street. 



FURNISHED 
conveniences. 



SITUATIONS WANTED— 
I FEMALE. 

SITI^ATIO.V . WANTED*- BY YOUNG 
wc'tnan of culture and refinement, of 
good appearance, position as house- 
keeper or companion for a person of 
means; uighest credentials. E. L. E.. 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTEr>— PLACES TO GO 

out cleaning by the day. Zenith 'phone. 
2177-X. 



SITUATION WANTED— POSITION AS 
stenographer or bot^kkeeper. Have had 
several years' experience in lumber 
business. Herald, 1-26. 

SITUATION WANTED — AS STENOG- 
] rapher by experienced young lady with 
some reiiabit firm. Flrst-cIass refer- 
ences furnished. I. '&, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED - WOMAN 
wants work k>y the day. 110 East F'irst 
strrot. Zenith phone. 1774- X. 



SATIN SKIN SPECIALTIES. 



Seeing is believing. Wateh Satin stin 
i cream heeal < Laps. cuts, crack;? or sor> s. 

I' — — — — — ^— 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



'V\'KITTEX 

('lio1'.\ ..V 

trig. 



l.N- FF:.-^T CO.MPANIE.S - 

ri->i< • ••. -'■' Llxchang... build- 



^R SALE HOUSES. 

FOR SALE-THRU.E-ROOM COFTAGE, 

with pantry anc liall; do;ible floors, 

i storm doi rs. sapless In plait; $:|l.,i, $350 

i cash, balance $1 per wot k. Call any 

i lime. 1412 East 'I 'nth street. 



^WEDISH^ MASSAGE. 

MI.SS MARIA GRINI'KRHKNC;. <;RaD- 
uaied mas.seiise from Iir Arvedson's 
institute. Stockholm Riiom 31, Burro\v> 
Zenith 'phone, 1736-X. 



BOARD AND ROOM WANTED. 

BOAmT'ANiriROOXr^N^^ 
young lady a plate where she could 
have room and work for her board. 
Z. 41. Herald. 

UPHOLSTERING di REPAIRING. 

ED C>TT. 121 W. First St. Both phon. s. 



FOR SALE— Five-i 00m cttage; water, 
sewer, pas. elect "ic lights, with heat- 
iiiK sti.A-- . lnt)un '-• t.X l-:h Ave. E. 



MASQUERADE COSTUMES. 



IF YOU V/ILL BRING 



jCfistumes for dances and theatricals, 50c 
! to $;<.50. Eltgance and variety. Mme. 
' Eloise Jordan, 122 Third avenue west. 



SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG LADY 
dtsires positU>n as assistant book- 
keeper or filing clerk; two years' of- 
flce experience. -F. 32. Herald. 

CLAIRVOYANTS. 

CLATIiVcrYANT^^^^^M^^ 
celebrated F>gyptian palmist, has 
established a real Gypsy camp in the' 
big storeroom of the Ltiwell block. 
11 First avenue east. Duluth. Store- 
rtKim crowded to see her reading daily 
from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. If you have 
alr«ady made mistakes, thrown away 
mtinev and lost confidence through 
dealitig with much-advertised and self 
styled palmists and clairvoyants an J 
thtir cheap claptrap methods. start 
from the beginning and consult this 
famous Egyptian lady. She will tell 
frankly your condition and v/hat you 
may expect. If nothing can be done 
for" you she will nut take one cent of 
your money. 



FOR RENT - PLEASANT F'-RONT 
room with large alcove, lake view, 
nhuly furnished, all modern, suitable 
for two gentlemen. 715 East Second 
street. Old 'phone 1174-M. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM. 2(M 
East Third street. 

FOR RENT— FLATS. 

FOR RENT-7-KOOM FLAT, STEAM 
heat, electric light and bath. Zenith 
'phone 929. Old, 35-L. 124 East Fourth 
street. 



chairs, rugs, bookcase and one set of 
encyclopedia Britanica with Aiucr- 
ican edition. 62» West Fir^t street. 



JFOR BALE-NEARLY NEW CUTTER, 
I $15. 221 East Fourth street. 




FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM FLAT. AL- 
most new. all modern. hardwood 
floors, gas> and electric lights; porce- 
laine bath tub; water free. C»ld phone 
709-M. 



FOR SALE-LIGHT DELIVERY SLED, 
two sets of light single harness. 61i 
Third avenue east. 

FOR SALE CFIEAP — TWELVE SET 
heavy logging harness, • comph le with 
collars at 108 West First street. 

FOR SALE OR RENT-FURNITURE OF 
recent twenty-room hotel. 192S West 
Michigan street. 



CH/'.PTER, NO. 59, R. A. M.— 
Meets at West Duluth sec- 
ond and fourth Tuesdays of 
each month, at 7:30 p. m. 
Next metting, Dec 24. Work. 
—P. M and M. E. M. dtgrets. 
E G. Walhnder. H. P.; A. 
Dunleavy, secretary. 



FOR RENT — 24 SEVENTH AVENUE 
west, three-room modern flat; gas, elec- 
tric light, water and bath room. In- 
quire at store, 703 West Superior street. 
C. Stahll. 

FOR RENT-FOUR-ROOM FLAT. 212 
East Third street. 

FOR RENT — MODERN FIVE-ROOM 
flat. Zenith 'phone 1M7-D. lOlVi West 
Fourth street. 

FOR RENT - 7-ROOM FLAT, FUR- 
nished or unfrunished. Flat F, Ashta- 
bula. 

FOR RENT - FOUR- ROOM PLAT ; 
furnished compltrte for light house- 
keeping. 304 P^ourth avenue west. 

FOR RENT— VERY DESIRABLE FLAT, 
entirely modern, new, fine view, six 
rooms, hot water heat. Intiuire 428 
Eleventh avenue east. 

FOR RENT - FIVE- ROOM FLAT; 
modern, except heat; first floor; imme- 
diate possession. Call 513 East Fifth 
street. 

FOR RENT- FOUR-ROOM FLAT, WITH 
bath, electric and gas light; gas 
range; including water and heat. In- 
quire 1030 West First street. 

FOR RENT~B-ROOM FLAT, WITH 
bath, electric and gas light, gas 
range. Including water and heat. In- 
quire lti30 West First street. 

FOR RENT-NEW FIVE-ROOM FI.iAT; 
all modem; also four- room flat; water, 
sewer and toilet. Call 50b West Third 
street. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-RCX)M FLAT; 
modern conveniences. Inquire Bridge- 
man & Russell company, 16 West First 
street, 

FOR RENT-NE\\\~MODERN, FIVE- 
room flat; very central. Old 'phone, 
1111-K. 



FOR SALE - $475 UPRIGHT PIANO, 
used tour months, $150 lakes It; this is 
a snap; can be seen al room 11, Phoe- 
nix block. 

FOR SALE— BEAUTIFUL XMAS JEW- 
elry; best goods and lowest prices. 
Garon Bros., 213 West First street. 

If'OR sale cheap - FRONT ROOM 
i set and couch. 616>/i W. Superior street. 

FOR SALt-J - MEDDS HOME-MAL>E 
horsehide mitts, the best on the market. 
Never rip. None genuine without 
stamp. $1 at leading clothing stores. 

F'CiR SALE — A NUMBER OF ORI- 
ental rugs and hand painted chhia; 
cheap. 42G West First street. 

FOR SALE-Cod Liver Oil. S wed Wig, 3 

E. Superior St. and 2015 W. .Superior St. 
I . _ 

TYPEWRITERS Fc:)R RENT - ALSO 
I for sale; tzl -up. Edmont, 410 West Su- 
i perior street. 

[situation^ WANTED — MALE. 

SITUATION WANTEI>-POSIT]ON AS 
oftice manager or head bookkeeper. 
Thoroughly acquainted with corpora- 
tltm books; competent to oaien. close, 
and handle any set or books in an up- 
to-date manner. Can show a good, 
clean past record, 28 years of age. L. 
38, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTEI> - POSITION AS 
stenographer or bookkeeper. Have had 
several years' experience In lumber of- 
fice. I 25. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED-BOY 16 YEARS 
of age, desires position in office or work 
around any business building. I. 29, 
Herald. 





MODERN SAMARITANS. 

ALPHA COUNCIL, NO. 1, 
meets at Elks hall every 
Tiiursday evening at 8- 
o'clock. Beneficent Degree 
first and third Thursday. 
Samaritan Degree second and 
fourth Thursday. Frank Noble, G. S. 
Lucy Purdy, L. G. S; T. A. Gall, finan- 
cial scribe First National bank building; 
Wallace V. Welbanks, scribe. All Sa- 
maritans invited. 




A. O. U. W. 
FIDELITY LODGE, NO. 106,. 
meets at new Maccabte i^all 
every Thursday evening at 8 
oclock. H. E. Simons. M. W.; 
W. W. Fenstermacher, record- 
er; O. J. Murvold, financier, 
217 East Fifth street. 



TIMBER I^NDS. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

M R S. HANSON; GRADUATE MIO- 
wife. female compiaint.<?. 413 Seventh 
Ave. ea«t. Old phont. if.94; Zenith. 1225. 



FOR SALE— 300.0rK),(.OO FEET TIMBER 
and 1,500,000000 feet i>ulpwood. Sworn 
Cruiser, Atlantic coast. $13l',000. Box 
4t>2, Sibiey, Iowa. 



A. E. HANSON. 
Jerii'-y buildinj;. 



MASSKI'K 



400 



NKW ; yuits to 16 Ft urth ivenue west, we prt-ss 
tild phone 1.S26-K. ' jt for 50j . pants, 15c. J. Orecki->vsky. 



STENOGRAPHERS. 

1 ESSONS^ U^'^BcJOKTcETrpINcr "anT)" 
sif n«>graphy at any hour. 2815 W, sr 
Third street. 

GRACE BARNETT. FIRST NAT BLIKI. 

L A. HUME, no TORREY BUILDING. 



t- 



FOR SALE— COWS. 

FOR SATE^^T^.^NTNlT^Tus'f ~AR- 
rived with a ra load of fresh milch 
rows. 821 Fourth avenue east. Zenith 
phone 170K-I>. 



L.AURA BAXTER, LENOX HOTEL. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 

FOR^'liENTW^^ 
and five-room cottage, $13. 614 East 
Seventh street. 

FC'R RENT -HOUSK;~ WATER AND 
sewer; $f. pt r month Call on C. Manilla, 
223 Eleventh avenue west. 

FOR RF:NT--FIVE-R0(>M Fl'RNlSHED 
winter cottage. Park P'oint. Old phone 
626- L. 



FOR SALE - A LOAI) C»F FRESH 

milt h cows will arrive Snturday, Dec. 
14. E. Carlstm. Twenty-second avenue 
west and Twelfth street. Zenith 'phone, 
1654- D. 



FOR SALE-S. M KANER WILL AR- 
rive with a carlotid of fresh milch cows, 
Dec. 19. 1219 East Seventh street. 
Zenith "plitine, 13^<. 



FOR RENT-FIVE-ROCKM HOUSE. 415 

East Sixth street. Inquire at U Wtst 
Filth -street. 



PRINTING AND BOOKBINDING. 

Thwing-Slewart Co., 116 W. ^FiTsT'sTreer 



CLOTHES CLEANED & PRESSED 

Suits Cleaned, Pr«.'sed, Repaired and de- 
livered for $1.5t> a month; work guaran- 
teed. Graseenger over Gusser's grocery 

L. TOBAK. CLOT lES CLEANED AND 
repaired. Suits pressed. 40c: pants 15c 
We call and debver. 31 East Superior- 
street. Ztnith 'p;ione. 1746-I>. 

Clark. 113 W. Fir.^ t St., Swanson! .Mgr. 

JOHN Ml'Fn.LER. :>n2 WEST FiR.ST ST. 



Ql'ICK AND C;OOD PRINTING. CALL 
old phone, 1604. Trade News Pub. Co. 

DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFFIN'S NO. 18 LAKE AVENUE 

north, tilth phones. 



PIANO TUNING. 

C. A. GREGORY. JENTrHpPHCiNE.' 606T 



DENTISTS. 

DR. BURNETtT" TOP'^FLOOR.'nBUR- 

rows building. 



Bringing the People 
Together 

Is one of the gfreatest missions 
of this paper, and to show how 
successfully it is being" accom- 
plished, one has only to read the 
WANT COLUMNS of The 

Evening Herald 

In DULUTH there is only 
one way, use 

HERALD WANTS 



WANTED — TIMBER LANL>S. ALSO 
names of owner.^ of stone and tim- 
ber claims or homesteads; give full 
legal description, estimate of timber, 
price, etc. Wadec Investment com- 
pany, Minneapolis, Minn. 



WE BUY TIMBER IN LARGE OR 
small tracts; also cut-over lands. See 
us for quick deal. Hopkins & Ebert, 
300 Torrey building. 

I BUY STANDING TIMBER; ALSO 
cut-over lands. George Rupley, 404 Ly- 
ceum t)U''J'"8f- 

I BUY TLMBER IN COOK OR LAKE 
counties. Also furnish abstracts of 
title. Alex McBean, 406 Burrows Bldg. 

SHELL>ON-MATHER TLMBER CO., 510 
First National bank. Dul. phone. 1501 



SITUATIO.V WANTED— POSITION BY 
young man as bookkeeper or assistant; 
best of references. Address. X. K., 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED-AT ANY KINfJ 
of work around house; will take small 
wages for winter. E. 33, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTEI>— ANY KIND OF 
work, by middle-aged man; has some 
experience as painter. I. 20. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— POSITION AS 
janitor for winter. Addrre.vg 'H. H, " 
I flat A, No. 8 East Fifth street. 

(SITUATION WANTED— POSITION AS 
' contractor or operating millwright. 
i Al rotary saw filer. Address J. M. 
] Walker, Cass Lake. Minn. 

SITUATION WANTBD-SMALL JOBS 
of cutting wood and other chores. Ad- 
dre.ss C. 100, Herald. 

WANTED — THOROUGHLY COMPET- 
eni stenographer and office man, at 
present employed, deslrea to make a 
change. Has ten years' experi'ence 
and can give excellent references. H. 
59, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — PLASTERING 
contractor, non-union, with years of 
experience and plenty of good help; 
will handle contracts large or small, 
in or out of city. H. C3, Herald. 




M. W. A. 
IMPERIAL CAMP, NO. 2206, 
me^ls at Maqcabee hall, 224 
West First street, second and 
fourth Tuesdays of eaciv 
month. J. W. Wood. V. C; 
P. Earl, clerk, box 411. 





DULUTH LODGE, NO. 28. I. O. O. F.- 
Meets every Friday evening 
at Odd Fellows' hall. 16 Lake 
avenue north. Next meeting- 
Dec. 27. Second degree. D. 

J. Dorsey, noble grand. R. S. Forgy, 

recording secretary. 

K. O. T M. 
DULUTH TENT. NO. 1 meets 
every Wednesday evening at 8^ 
p. m. at Maccabee hall, 224 
West First street. V. siting sir 
knights welcome. C. J. Hec- 
tor, commander; J. B. Gelin- 
eau, record keeper. Office liv 
hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. daily. 



I. O. F. 
COURT COMMERCE, NO. 
3283, Independent Order of 
Foresters, meets first ana 
third Friday evenings al S- 
otlock. at Rowley's hall, No. 
112 West First street. Next 
regular meeting. Dee. 20th.. 
Tupper. C. R; W. W. Hoopes, 



NORTH STAR LODGE, NO. 

35, Knights of Pythias, meets 
every Tuesday night. Second- 
rank work, Dec. 10; social 
club party, Dec. 17. WUlian* 

H. Lamstin. C. C; H. Mc- 
Kenzie, K. R. S. 



CLAN STEWART. NO. 50 O. S C. 
vi^ meets first and third Wednes- 
days each month. S p. m., 
Folz hall. West Superior St. 
John R. Ross, chief; Alex G. 
McKnight. sec; John Bur- 
nett, fin- sec, 413 Fir.^t Nat- 
ional bank bldg. Next meet- 
! Ing, Wednesd ay, Dec. 18. 

! LOYAL GUARD, SUBORDINATE Divi- 
sion. No. 132, meets first anJ 
third Wednesdays of eac^r 
month. H. B. McKinley, cap- 
tain general; H. V. Holmes, 
paymaster, 415 FilteentJi ave- 
nue east; E. F. Heller, re- 
corder, 230 Weet F'illh. 

MODERN MACCABEES. 

ZENITH CITY TENT, NO. 
1044, meets fvcry first and 
third Friday of the month- 
at Kalam..zoo hall B. Com— 
mander, C'harles E. Norman, 
1610 Minnesota avenue; rec- 

ord keeper and finance- 

keeper C. H. Loomis, residence 504 East 



PICTURE FRAMING. 

DECKERS. 16 SECOND AVENUE W. 



OLD GOLD BOUGHT. 

OLD GOLD AND SILVER BOUGHT BY 
the M. Henricksen Jewelry company 
324 West Superior street, Providenc 
building. 



COURT 



GUSTAVE HENCKE. 211 E. SUP. ST. 



DYE WORKS. 

ZENITH ClTY"TiYE''wORKS - LARG 
est and most reliable. All work don? 
in Duluth. Work called for and de- 
livered. 'Phones: Old. 1154-R; new, 
1888. 220 East Superior street. 

DULUTH DYE WORKS— FRENCH DRY 
cleaning; fancy dyeing. Old 'phone, 
1202-R. ; new, 1191-A. 330 East Superior 
street. Suits pressed by the month. 



E. E. Esterley, manufacturing jeweler 
Spalding hotel. 428 West Superior street' 

'Phone. 1.SQ6-X. 




WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTED TO RENT — FOUR-ROOMS 
with bath, gas or electric light. L. 39, 
Herald. 



WOODMEN OF THE W'ORI D 
ZENITH CITY CAMP, NO. 5 MEETS 
every second and fourth 
Monday at old Masonic Tem- 
ple, fifth floor. H. Saxton, C. 
r,V' . ?• I-arkin, banker. 201 
West Superior street; Rob- 
ert Forsyth, clerk, 817 East 
Second street. 





A. a u. w. • 

DULUTH LODGE. NO 10 
meets at Odd Fellows' hali 
every Tue.sday evening at 8 
o'clock: R. R. Deichsel, M. 
M.; R. G. Foote, recorder; 
T. J. St. Germain, financier', 
121 First avenue west. 



U. O. F. 
EASTERN STAR, NO. 86, 
meets every first and third. 
Thursday of each month, at 
Maccabee hall 224 West 
First street. Next meeting 
Dec. 17. J. Wilde, aecTetary^ 
1.52 Jftesaba ave. ; J. E. CJel. 
ineau. C. R., 116 W. Pourth- 
^ street ; Harry Miines, treas- 

uroi. "Oltice at hall. 

MODERN MACCABEES. 

ST. LOUIS BAY TENT, NO. 
1045, meets every first and: 
thinl Mondays, at Gilley'a, 
West Duluth. Matthew Bt- 
Itnger, commander, 308 Eigh- 
teenth and One-half avenue 
west. New 'phone, 3099-X. 
Finance keeper, Ekiward Shanks, 23 
North Fifty-eighth avenue west; record 
keeper. C. C. Low, 5712 Wadena street. 





ROYAL LEAGUE. 
ZENITH COUNCIL, NO. 161, 
Royal League, meets in Elks' 
hall first and third Mond» 
evenings, at 8 o'clock. Jame» 
A. Wharton, archon, court- 
house; Andrew Nelson, 41$) 
First National bank bldg. 



■■■■■m i m i 



I 



~ t 



■ . - 

> — 











1 













\ 



I 



* 



I 




32MfiKDULUTH EVENING 



I MINNtWin ■ 

HISTORICAL 



(/. 




TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 19, 1907. 



(ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.) TWO CENTS. 



AGREEMENT TO ADJOURN 
MEETING OF THE ILLINOIS 



WISCONSIN REPUBLICANS 
IN CONGRESS ARE UNITED 
CENTRAL SECURED BY FISH FOR FIRST TIME IN YEARS 

be Postponed at P^^ifflj^^^lf^ i Are Introduced to the 
First Until Thurs- j^^^^^^^^ President by Senator 

Counsel Continues Argu- 
ments in the Proxy 
Hearing. 




... 4, Decision of Judge Not 
''^^ Expected Until After 

Holidays. 



Chicapc. l>ec. S.— Counsel for lUe 

HartMi;.! ni.d F.rh interests in . 'Jk 
IDir.. ^ tigaticn wtre unaclc 

uist n.ghl ic rea. h an agreemtnt oou- 
>rininp a la'Stpouemenl cf tht annuii 
inntii.^. r-nfedukl for todaj'. 

..>. at the pening cf court, A'- 
;. [ ; . F""*rar, i hief counsel for Mr. 



LORD KELVIN. 

Noted Scientist. Who Is Dead at the 
Age of 83. 



DISCHARGE 
RECEIVERS 

Probably be Next 
Move of Westinghouse 
Creditors. 



Affairs of the Various 
Companies Are in Ex- 
cellent Shape. 



\\ unatit to reach an agr?t- 

n.tnt - - ; ight and 1 would like 'he 
cour'- I'l^iipuie the hearing luJcsy 

lor iii. tu ur ami g;«t ut time for fur- 
ther cufifertncL. 

Judge Bi. tu; "I wish .'ou 

". < uid comt .^.e sort of an agre-;- 

t. It lb nut Iht fault of the court 

tht St proctedings were delay-.-ii 

;.: .;s time. I much prefer not to 

u. ■ ., speedy clecifion." 

\\ .,...i!i. NeifOi/' Cromweil, counsel 
: i Mi. H..rrimi n, appeared in iiie 
> ast I'day fcr tl e first time since the 
irtsfiit hearing tegan. 

Am»rney- in Coiifewnfc. , 

j;i -d his chambers at 

ti.t - atturnevh. and vlirr 

. tnferfjjce :or more than asi 

!,i Lir It v.. _ agreed that the 

ting, winch was to oe 
..;... .»; T It lay. should be called 

accordii . tdule and that It 

shun!' ': adjourned until 

r.oor. 

It ifc it.it.tu iiiui Mr. Farrar will 

occupy all cl today and poss?ibly a por- 

', = :i of tomorrow before iu« argument 

• ! oha'if of Mr. J'lsh is concluded. The 

; s for Ml Harriman will closo 

.:ing and t is^ not believed po:j- 

i r t that thty w 11 fin;.fh before Thurs 

d i: evening at tie earliest 




AsK for Appointment of 

Wisconsin Man as 

Auditor. 



TESSMAN VICTORIOUS IN 
HOTTEST PRIMARY FIGHT 
EVER WAGED IN DULUTH 



DECREE 



SIGNED 



Hereafter Act as 
Unit in Distribution 
of Plums. 



iV-' 



SETH LOW.. 
Elected President of the 
Civic Association. 



National 



SEVEN WOMEN 
COME TO WED 

Scotch Lassies Form 

Brides' Club on Ocean 

Steamship. 

New York. Dec. 18.— When th« Allan 
liner, California, whltij arrived in -N'..'W 
York yesterday, called from Glasgow, 
there were in the first cabin n^Tea lone 
Scotch women. They did not know- 
each other, hut beftre the ship /iad 
been out a day they were all acquainlod 
and within another twenty-four hou.-; 
they had formed the brides' club, for 
ina^iiiuch ' *^^ confessions which folic wrd ac- 
a><"judgrBairiodayTndVcated t^at he I <i^«*"««*"^^''-^'P P'"'^^*^*! ^i^%^ ^H .^even 
did not desire t. render a speedy de- ; ^"^ 'i'^'l'^ ^^ America for the. pur- 
ci«ion. final action on the inrai.ction r;;'%;;J^i;^'»f "^amed.^ 1^^^^^ 

obtained by Mr. Fish is hardly expect- l''^^^''^if/'Vr;;'*'':**^^l^^i^„^^':\'^^"' '^I 
1^ I ,.,^.i1 „».^- .», v.,^'A.:,^^o Who had t-een in America for eome 

H..s„.^ ^-^^-J:-^'--^--™;^'^?^^?^*^^U^J^'^^ that no l^^Jra.T;f^e'fne^nfi'^rWt?^ 

but to f^nfl her the money to travel to 



Washington, Dec. IS.— The Repub- 
licans in congress from Wisconsin 
called at the White House together 
today, being presented by Senator Lia- 
FoUette, to pay their res|n>cts to 
President Rocstvelt, hnd asked that 
the vacancy caused by *he resigna- 
tion of Ernest G. Tilr.me, auditor for 
the postoffice department, be filled by 
the appointment of * Wisconsin man. 
It was remarked by members of ;h? 
delegation that they had not been 
united for a period- tf at least seven- 
teen years and th«lr coming to ihe 
White Housf today ^mtant that the 
delegatiiT; had at last got together .xnd 
that hereafter demands fci- the recog- 
r.itifn of Wisconsin fcr federal ap- 
pointmentP would be pre>^er,ted by a 
jnited front. 

The delegation recommended Judge 
H. S. Comstock of Cumberland, Wis., 
for the vacanct audit^rship. 



Forbidding A. F. of L. 

to Boycott Stove 

Company. 

Judge Says That the 
Order Cannot be Mis- 
understood. 



n th. • - . Mi 

cifciUH-rs oi nil.- VVe»tingri"as-t c<-'iiO't;ru.s, 
with .^ view .-.f ctving the affairs of the 
«. . \ ;<. the st'K-khoUk-r.-, 

<;<i<'rgf- WfsiiJ.gtioust, pren - . > f the 
various (-. :TTu^'. r:l^^. said: 

••Wt:- til • ryih^ng k« it. s;.ifntiid 

tM.ndlt.o:. N t i>nlv was the rejort uf 



would be taken it tht annual meeting 



thar the hearlr.g of all arguments 
should go over until 9:30 o'clock to- 

the r^-i-.vtrs sat isfart'" "ut plan* i n-tcrrow morning and that the counsel 



when called. Ju Ige Ball indicated to ^^^^ ^^^. ^^^^^ j,^ ^ fir/t-clase stat.>- 

the attorneys th;t he consid€r^d it ad- room. The weddings will ail tak.' 
v.sabltr that som agreenrient should be I place soon and each n.ember of me 
reached in ordei that the hearing c.ii | ^.j^^^ ^^g agreed to write the full de- 
the injunction might be continued with- jails to all the other members, 
out interruption. It was then agree! 



lormu: 
( ■ !' 
f .-. 
aff 

h<.;,. ! . 
ail " ■ 
hi- 

r 

sn : 
th, 'A • 



York 



■vorkifif 



de tail.s I would u«e the remainder of today in 



.••^■^•r:irl<'i. show a rrn - 

A >:> tii.t d r* f-'Tt on 
- .1 . > 00 iiiatio public 

can-»e a report, 

.i : 111 ' J , la i i ^ t- , Ih;. • - " • ■ "-• hail 

t*<n o'mplete . \ hich 

■ ■ ratioi. ,■,'.' aid be 

,1 thf rt-cfivor-s 

within ten days. 

:sburg was declared 

- snapt , iind it is under- 

tirig will be hfid in New 

■V beiwtren officials of the 

isMi si-me of the iargtr 

[ •.'->(• ir.otropolls. 



. with I t^"- tff^ri tc rearh aji agreormni as to yi'lage comm.tted su.cide by ^ hang 
1 'ho d'.te on wh^ h thf m.-et'riK *fihou'ri ' ^''"''^'^ ^ »\\i>T\. diHtanre from the ho 
,ih \\> * . ", wh. i.n tne meet.ng Tsnou.U ^,f j^,^ daughter. He was 7D years of : 



IOWA'S VOTE HIS 
FOR THE ASKING 



TILLMAN WOULD 
AID PROHIBITION 

Introduced Bill to Enable 
States to Better En- 
force Powers. 

AV^-iington, I ec. 18.— Senator Till- 
iiijiii today intr duced the follow»ng 
It .-M lutiin and . sked immediate coii- 



FARMER HANGS HIMSBLF. 
Fergus Falls. Minn.. lJe<?. 18.— It Is re- 
ported from Pelican Riipid.-^ that John 
Larson, an aged farmtr li'.'ing near that 

Ing 

me 

age 

and no causae Is assigned for his act. 



COMPLICATED 
CONTROVERSY 

Concerning the Marital 
Relations of an Ala- 
bama. ! '.an. 

Montgomery, Aia... L^t. 38.— T. H. T. 
Thoiiii»son, an oid^man of Colbert c-oun- 
ly, .s a party to a complicated marital 
controversy, in whloh.'two women and 
one man, other than' himseJf. is con- 
ce-rfKfd. Hfr married, some weeks ago. 
No. 3. Shortly afterwards they becajne 
dis>»atis»fitd. He then told her that he 
was not legally married to her; fhRt 
his s*~cand wife was yet living, ajid 
that he had never been divorced. A 
charge. of bigajny wa« them brouglit 
against him. Investigatdc»n, however, 
proved that wife No. 8 h«d a husband^ 
when she married Thompson, hence 
that alliance was not legal. Wife No 
1 leing dead, the third marriage was 
lawful. As a rtsult the last wife has 
brought suit for supjHirt. Thompson 
is 75 years old. 



W'ashington, Dec. 18.— After hearing 
arguments on various points in the 
case. Justice Ashley M. Gou]d, in equity 
court, today signed the decree tempor- 
arily restraining and enjoining the 
American Federation of Larhor, its of- 
ficers and all others from interfering 
with the business of the Buck Stove 
& Range company and from declaring 
and threatening any boycott against 
it. 

AH attempts of counsel for the Am- 
erican Federation of Labor to modify 
the decree failed except in one partic- 
ular, and that was to exclude from the 
order the Electrotpye Molders and Fin- 
ishers' union No. 17, against which it 
was shown no specific allegation had 
been made. 

Justice Ciould said there would be no 
attempt made by the court to assume 
Jurisdiction beyond the confines of the 
dis'trict of Columbia, but that its order 
was operative upon all the persons de- 
fendant who are within the district of 
Columbia. An act, he said, committed 
ty an agent or associalr- uf pne of tlie.se 
doft^r.dants outside the district of Co- 
lumbia could be held as the act of the 
pe.-.:on within the district of Columbia 
80 o;Utring it- and subject such person 
to 'h» runitlve power of the court. He 
b€liev<-d tht decree should be very 
broad and that he need not be too spe- 
cific. There was, he said, no likeli- 
hood of the order being misunderstood 
because he was not enjoining Ignorant 
men, but men who knew their right.? 
and knew the law. Mr. Gompers, he 
said, was one of these. 




Carries Five of the Eight 

Wards in the 

City. 

Vote Heavier Than at 

the Average General 

Election. 



"Lid" Candidates Are 

All Successful in Ward 

Contests. 



eMil tessman. 

The Successful Candidate for the i 5^ 
Democratic Nomination for Mayor 



I THE CANDIDATES. 



THE OFFER 
OFJJPTON 

Of $1,000 Cup for Ocean 
Race Will be Ac- 
cepted. 

Distance to be Sailed 

Will be About 500 

Miles. 



-Kmil To^ismaii, 



^ For Mayor 

^ DeiiiotTat: Jl. D. Haviu, R«?- 

;>^ liublicaii. 



% .\I.PERMEN. 

^ F1rs>t Ward — A. G. McKiiight, 

^ Rrpublioan. ^ 

% Second Ward — J. L. Crom- 

iif well. Republk-an: Cit'orge W. 



% 

I 



AnACKED WOMAN. 

Wealthy IVnnsylvaniii Farmer Un- 
der Arrest at Greenville. 

Jamestown. Pa., Dec. 18.— Miss Maud 
McCrumb. 23 years old, a school teach, 
er, is in a serious condition from an 
attack alleged to have been made late 
yesterday by Charles .Summers, 3.T 
years old, a wealthy farmer of Turn- 
ersville. Summers, who was later cap- 
tured by a posse, was taken to Green- 
ville. Pa., to prevent mob violence, 
threatened by enraged farmers. 

Miss McCrumb was nearly choked to 
death while her face and body are 
covered with scratches and bruises. 



^ Biootlel. Doiiioorat. 

Third WumI — C. I.. Rakow- 
!-ky. Kepublii-an: I-1*ank Jordan, 
Democrat. 

Fourth AVard — Tliomag Tro- 
viUoii. Ilt-pubhoan: George Van 
Buryc^K lUniocrat. 

F^fth Ward — %.y\v S. .Meader, 

Kcpiibhcan; John llogau, Deni- 

^ Sixth Ward — Peter Olson. Re- 

;i Iiubiioaui: Cliarle*. Moik. I>cn»o- 

^ trat. 

^ Scxenth Ward — J. J. Moc, Rc- 

^ publican; F>ank Schaflfer. Ut-ni- 

% Ei^hUi Wawl — J. E. Foubig- 
^ ler, Kt'piibMcan: W. J. Ijuuri^, 

^ l)enK>orat. 

In the hottest primary figlit DuluiJi 
has evejr -Witi^^ssed, ^mii .Jessman re- 
ceived the Democratic nomina'OolT for 
mayor yesterday, defeating Mayor M. 
B. CuUum by a plurality of 138 votes. 

It was not only tJie hardest fought 
primary tattle Duluth has ever seen, 

but it was In many ways the most pe- 
culiar election in recent years. 
Saturday and Sunday Tessman sup- 
wil] not be Bermuda, as the mem- porters were absolutely confident their 
ters of the Brooklyn club think this i man would be elected, and this confld- 
would be conflicting with the Corinth- i «•"« continued for the most part, until 

,. . ^ , . u- I, 1 .^ V yesterday afternoon. For some unex- 

lan ^acht club, which already has onj^^^.j^^ ^>^^^„ ^ g^^^^^, ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

its program a race to that place. An I to seize the majority of the Tessman 
open sea course, which may be from | followers yesterday afternoon, and 
Newport to Cape May and thrnce to ^hey were almost in despair. There 
.,,.., .. ^, J „ .,, was nothing to base the fear on except 

the clubs house ||n Gravesend Bay will I (}.p abnormally large vote, but the 

be proposed. The distance for the race ; story passed from mouth to mouth 
will be approximately 500 miles. ! that Tessman was snowed under. Some 

The International cup (iommiitee of i of the Tessman workers went home 
the Brooklvn Yacht club has issued 'after the polls closed, fearing to hear 
I preliminary rules for the Internationa: i the worst. A Superior street merchant 
race for the cup wnich it has offered. J ^^^o had considerable money wagered 
All nations will be invited to enter ! o" Te-ssman, made frantic efforts to 



New York, Dec. 18.— A special meet- 
ing of the board of governors of the 
Brooklyn Yacht club will t^ called for 
the purpose of formally acctpiing the 
offer of Sir Thomas Lipton of a 11,000 
cup for an ocean yacht race. Tiie racf.' 



THE MAN OF THE HOUR. f 



s. deration; 
Th.1t the 



o' m; 



Cummins Can Have Iowa 

Delegation to National 

Convention. 



jiallo!. .> 

I ilbl«: 1 '.' 
P' :.V. ]■ 

jqUoI. 



alway.- 

;.<Tt t,n.i.n evt-r. Th» 
'f which arc ciusinc 



in 



Rur :• 

Sfnat' 



. tJ-.r.' 

. ke gr 



eo: 



i; a let 
.tive wi- ■ 
u.ndidat' 



laiiurc 
<-'i\ in piT)- 
.are<l T; 

-• .'f m-t 



tJit: ^I'V.-rr.". 

gSilKIl if 

h'' d!f!'*-r'^ 



-it tee on interstat^^ 

; ucted to considtr and 

( therwlse. what legi.s- 

or necessary to e.n- 

i the exercise of their 

control the commerce 

11 alcoholic beverages 

within their bor lers so as to aid tne 

cause of temperance and to prev« nt 

the encour^tgern- nt by the United 

States govrinrii- •• f . "Icit ueaiing in 

the same. 

Explaining his purpuse, Mr. Tillman 
.'iaid It was to prevent, if possible, the 
I ircun.venlion of the laws in the in- 
terest of prohibition, which are being 
fe-enerali> ... ct- : .:. the Southern 
-tates. 

I'ourt- shadf Law. 

"Congrtss atompted enacting the 

Wilson lav to protect the people in the 

t ! enfoicemi nt of their state laws, but 

hr rojrts havi shaded and shaded 

e protect on until there is prac- 

;. nothing left cf it. and I want 

!io commSittee to ascerain wheher it 

' • I racticabie to give relief. The 

s of the rourt have been on the 

fcioui.a that the aw interferes with in- 



:■- I 



it 



:Jial botim 

rf- :^" ' " ■:■ .. iji ^-j , _ __ _ 

•i^* ''Va dele- ! ters J a I* oommt-r« e and it is on this ac- 

i:s it. IT. tnat respe . asked to have th.? 

v fr<;un" Former Gov: . ,.; ty the interstate 

< often slated tha; ^i ;. jiit i xt c> iKnossion."' 

•.ion in entering the: Mr. TUinan h .Ids the express com- 

- in his own state. . j.anies res^ponsible for the evasion of 

va politicians that j the slate laws. He says they are flood- 

;td the governor ing the local i ption part of South 

the conference j Carolina and other local option South- 

niiich attention foi ;trn states with v hisky which is sent in 



of discus»:ng j.resi- ' f.- 



I<rs are maKirx;/ 

• ver the lotttr 
V, :. ■ ~ :■ has prc^luced. 

\\! r t.i W. H. Tor- 

\^■ r: 'I 1 :ir people who read 

t« t •• . • . - - ;iave no difficulty ii: 
d that the letter is nbt a pledge 

» i:,.,r. T-.u... ». /,ij]d never be a 

<ig-ain»t Allison. 
-M - f states, he waa 

I.' • Allison at that 

■\.>ne save 

^>>jrtpn:ty 

1 vert ji. - ci.ii l.iid in It a 

V •* th;it -ver oppose Mr. 



•at. '. "c. o. d." 
T: ... court of the Unite! 

.Siatt - Mas lit.d that suoli traffic can- 
not be int€ rfere 1 w*4h because of its 
inters^tate charat ter. 



ENDS LIJ E IX SALOftX. 
Denvti. Dv-c. S.— Walter Gray, who 
gave his addrt-se as Chica^. last night, 
just beforo the closing hour. walke<l 
into a saloon, in the center of the 
busine^is district and. after writing his 
nan~ie and add: ess upon a piece of 
t^per. stepped a%ay from the bar and 
Si nt a bullet in o his brain. He wa> 
dtad whe.: the l.ospital ambulance ar- 
rived. iNothing lefinite is known here 
of Gray'b businti»s or connections. 




yachts. The conditions of the chal- 
lenge for the cup are as follows: 

That the race shalV be open to any 
yacht enrolled in a foreign yacht club 
of not more than 80-foot waterline, If 
a schooner, or of not more than 63-foot 
water line, if a sloop. 
"I King 

C>f CO 

own bottom and under her own sail. 

That the race shall be started from 
the Sandy Hook lightship, and shall be | 



That the challencing yacht must pro- 
ceed to the place c>f competition on .ler 



(.Contlnufd on page 16, first column.) 



JOHXSOX IN DEMAND. 



Boston Merchants Want fiovernoiv 
to Talk There Dec. 30. 

Washington. I>ec. 18.— The Merchant's: 
association of Boston is anxious to have 
Governor Johnson of Minnesou\ deliver 
of not les^ than thirty miies and not i an addre*.s before it on l>e.c. 80. and 
more than forty miles in length on tho 
open sea. 

That the race shall be sailed undei 
the rules of the Brooklyn Yacht club 
in force at the time of challenging or 
under such other rules as shall be mu- 
tually agreed upon. 

The other conditions have been drawn 
up but afe Jield subject tc revision at 
another meeting of the cup committee 
to be held today. 



CAB DRIVERS 
ORDERED BACK 

Men, However, Object 
Seriously to Commit- 
tee's Decision, 

New York. Dec. IS.— After twelve 
hours of strike, the executive commit- 
tee of the Cabmen's union agreed to a 
wmpi-omise with the owners, and or- 
dered the men tiack to work. The mer. 
objt<led seriously to the oomprc>m:9.-, 
and a grea.; majority demanded that 
the strike continue until they go: 
everything they had a«ked for. Th^r 
•: cm r>rom-i.'?<? pro\'ides the men shall 
receive Jlo a week, instead of $14 whic^i 
they now get, and that the nvatter o' 
hours be left to arbitration. The mei; 
want iwe'.ve hours off every day. whik* 
the employers are willing to grant 
tht-m only ten. When the ag^reemer.t 
wa.<v announced, the men becajne so 
violent in their objections to the com- 
promi.'?e that the police- were ca'.led to 
drive them out of the hall, which was 
done with muc-^h difficulty. The drlver.«, 
however, insisted that they would i^- 
muin out in spite of the agreement 
nvaue by their committee. 



representatives of the assc>cianon today 
wred here, asking if the gov«rnor was 
still in Washington, and if not. where he 
could be reached. 



I GERMANIZATION Of 
PRUSSIAN-POLAND IS 



STRONGLY OPPOSED 




STEEL PASSENGER CARS. 
Pittgburg. Dec. 18.— More than 100 ali 
steel passenger cars will be in use on 
the Pennsylvania railroad, between 
Pittsburg and New York, shortly after 
Jan. 1. The cars are being built at 
the plant of the Pressed Steel Car com- 
pany here and are the first to replace 
the wooden equipment on any railroad. 






SIENKIENWITZ. 



Paris, Dec. i8. — Henryk Sien- 
kienwitz, the Polish author, has 
published a protest and appeal 
to the intellectual world gainst 
the Germanization of Prussian- 
Poland, especially the recent 
proposition made by Prince Von 
Buelow, the German chancellor, 
fcr the expropriation of land be- 
longing to Poles. M. Sienkien- 
wntz acknowledges the debt to 
the press of all countries for 
condemning this attempt to 
crush out a noble people, but 
he says the work of the press is 
not sufficient and calls on emi- 
nent persons in science, litera- 
ture and art individually to ex- 
press their opinion. Such a step, 
he declares, will show the ver- 
dict of the universal conscience. 







m^^ 



^ 











2S5 




\ 
















THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1907. 




















WIOATHER - Partly 
cloudy tonlsht and 
Thursday; 10 to 15 above. 






Store Will Be 
Open Evenings 
Until Christmas 

















See the Comlorls ot H ome One of Oar 

$5.00 Smoking Jackets 




Christmas Gifts 

That Men Will Appreciate! 

Serviceable, Sensible Things That a Man Would Choose for Himself. 






•ADORATION OF THE SHEPHERDS," 
By W. A. Bougereau. One of the Most Sympathetic Recent Treatments of 

the Supject. 



STATEMENT 
ISjSSUED 

State Federation of Labor 

Interested in Local 

Trouble. 




Smoking Jackets 

Handsome, comfortable smoking jackets of al - 
wool c!"ths in plain colors and fancy effect . 
..f brocaded silk and silk S'^ fO SI ft 



velvet, 



Bath Robes 



Fancy Vests 

Here are new and exclusive patterns in fancy 
vests from the world's best makers, silk, wool 
and wash materials in ^4 |^ ^O (^A 
many styles ^i W ^0*0\M 

Knox Hats 





Rath robes of German terry cloth, and loungin.; ; What's the matter with a hat as a Christ- 
r.>bes of blanket fabrics, eiderdown, etc., i;i I mas gift? Here are good Q"^— **^"o^ J^^ts 

1;',1 . ""' . . .''"'.^ . . ":. $3.50 to $ia I :'ef,'h°?tr.'. .'r.'"?rf. ,''?!; ... $3 and $5 
Fine Neckivear 

Handsome Cravats— made expressly for our trade — 
Beautiiful INeckwear In all the seasons's colors— 

50c to $2.50 

Mufflers , Umbrellas 

In plain and fancy colors Handsomely Decorated 

75c to $3.00 $3.50 to $20 




Canes, Bags and Suit Cases 



Suspenders 

Beautiful Silk In Holiday Bo.xes 

25c and 50c 
Ralston Shoes 

In bvery Size and Leather 

$4.00 









Oak Hall Suits $15 to $35 

Oak Hall Overcoats $15 to $60 

Surely no gift could be more pntctical and serviceable, and our label on 
clothes is like the sterling mark in silver .vare. 





TAKE 

A LOOK 

AT 

orR 

WINDOWS. 



THE REAL CHRISTMAS STORE. 
Superior Street at Fourth Avenue West. 




VISIT 

Ol R 

STORE. 

IT'S A 

TREAT. 







HALPIN (JOT A YEAR. 

Montanian, Arrested in Minneapolis 
After Fight, Pleads (iuilty. 

Mlnnear>rtli>4. Minn.. Dec. 18.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Oeorge Halpln. who 
put up a desperate fignt with a couple 



of detcetives in . 
recently, while b 
tradition papers 
has been sent ti 
that state, at Dee 
under a plea of 
first degree assai 
HaJpin was a t- 
and had lived in 



I local lodging house 
iing arrested on ex- 
from Billings, Mont., 
the penitentiary of 
r Lodge, for one year 
fuilty to a charge of 
It. 

antbler by profession 
Billings and in Buttd. 



lie became Involved in a difficulty with 
Walter Clifton, his former partner, 
about a year ago. and emptied his- re- 
volver at him. He was arrested and 
placed under $5,000 bond, which he 
forfeited to the state by leaving Mon- 
tana, and wa.s not heard of again un- 
til located La Minneapolis 



No Development of Any 

Consequence In LocK- 

out Situation. 



Tli> Minn-'sota State Ft-'derafJon of 
Labor Is taJting an aoiive interest \i\ the 
loc'aii tight betwei-n organized lalxjr on 
I ho one aide and the Builders" exchange, 
Ueal Estate exchange and Commercial 
rlut> on the other. Tlie executive council 
of Httf organization has !.-«sued a state- 
M'.eut varninu Uuluth ngaint<t the alUged 
i1 angefs il an oppn-shop town. Aside 
rruirt this dtatoment. given m full b-Mow. 
ili»?rs are no new developments In the 
laboj; situation today; 
"To the Public of Duluth— Ladies and 

gentlemen ; 

"We deem it a duty to you and our- 
selves to call your attention to a seri>ua 
ilanger threatening the growing city of 
Duluth. and esi)ecially your economic in- 
t.r^sts am a producmg and consuming 

public. 

• We presume that it i-s well known to 
you that the National Manufacturt-r.s' a.s- 
soclation and aoni^^ others have decided to 
rout tile unlon.s of Duluth. They do not 
say .so in the .sauie language, but <xp<'rJ- 
cnce has proven that whenever a so- 
called manufacturers' association has 
l>fen organized, such a.s lh«* Large luanu- 
lacturois of your city have planned. th'>ir 
aims and oljj'-cts hav.? been to destroy the 
l:il)or unions and replace well-paid nie- 
, !i luics and union men with cheap and 
lit graded labor. 

■ The contention of the memher-i of the 
manufacturers' association and its allied 
.uicrests that tlfy propos • to run their 
business as they please, on the 'pabllc be 
ilatnned' plan, is absurd and d»*tiimenlal 
to the public interests, if not. tiien regu- 
lation of public servic corporations is 
equally ridiculous. For without the in- 
[►■rventlon on the part ot the public in 
our modern method of prodiiotion. we are 
sure to have a reign of anarchy by the 
possessors of the national wealth. 

"In cities wiiere the menil)ers of the 
manufacturers' :is.sociatJon have undir- 
lalven to oppose union laljor they virtually 
ruined the small business men by tlietr 
methods b<:!fore they got their eyes 
opt-ned to the .selrl.sh and ruinous policies 
of the as.soclation. 

"In the state of Colorado they instituted 
a reign of terror, and. as is well known, 
at that time met with a complete defeat, 
which carrie^l with it an exposure of the 
greid. avarice and unprincipled action of 
the association which hypocritically roses 
as the friend of the public. What the 
manufacturers' associations and all em- 
ployers' associations above ail desire is 
cheap, ignorant labor, lower wages. 
ior»ger houni, and more abjt-ct conditions 
generally tot the wage-earners. 

"It can certainly not be said that the 
Duluth population has suffered from 
tlie presence of union men. nor from 
the fact that tlie unions have produced 
humane treatment for the workers and 
raised the standard of wages to a high- 
er level. 

For a long time it has been said 
by the traveling pijl>lic that Duluth 
waa a thriving and prosperous town. 

"Do you want this reputation to be 
malntaine<l? Then lend your aid and 
continue your friendly attitude toward 
org uiixed labor. 

"If not. you will see your population 
augmented with a degraded scab class, 
clieap foreign labor and possibly 
Asiatic coolie lal)or. and with it the at- 
tending strife, disorder and public men- 
are which 4ire coxiimonly found in the 
slum districts of tlie la.rgo cities 

• We hope that we h.ive not addres.sed 
you in vain, but tliat you will see the 
logic and truthfulness of our argu- 
ments, and if s<^. wc rest assured that 
you will not approve of the plans of 
the notorious National Manufacturers* 
associations to iindormine the advant- 
ages of organized American workmen. 

'Thanking ydu in aavance for any 
favors you may confer In this matter. 
W(> are very resp^'Ctfully your.s. 
■ FXECtTTIVE »Y>UNOIi- MINNESOTA 

STATE FEl>EiKAT10N OF LABOR " 
(.Seal St.ate Fcd'-ration of Labor.) 

George B. Hawley,. president; W. E. 
McEwen secretary-treasurer; P. J. 
Warren, "vice president. Winona; Henry 
Hartung vice president, Mankato; 
James E. Logue. vice president. Fari- 
bault T. F. Thom»as. vice president, 
St Paul; J. J. M< HVigh. vice president. 
St' Paul; A. F. Kelllngton, vice presi- 
dent Minneapolis; E. G. Hall, vice 
president. SoutIS Mfnner^polis; John M. 
Taylor vice president, Brainerd; Edward 
. L<,we. ' vice president. Duluth; B. F. 
battirop, vice president, Fargo, N. D. 



SNUFF BLOWER 
HEAVILY FINED 

Playful Young Man 

Causes Trouble in 

Bijou Theater. 

Arthur J. Barker was in a playful 
mood la.st night. He visited the B lou 
theater with a lady friend and another 
couple, and thousht he would have a lot 
of fun by setting them sneezing. He 
wrapped a little snuff in his program, 
and. when they weren't looking, blew it 
in thcii- direction. 

It may have been all right, but snuff 
has a properly of refusing to remnin In 
one locaXion. It liiffuses rapidly, and in 
its progre.--s throiitjh the air last night 
set several people .sineczing aini coughmg. 
Sergt. Kenna was called, the moving- 
picture operator pointe<l out Baker a.s 
the man who had b -en blowing the snuff, 
and he was taken to tha station, where 
he deposited ^ lor appejirance this nurn- 
ing. 

\n court. Baker, who holds a responsible 
position with a whoJesale company and is 
a nice-appearing young man, deniid all 
intentions of annoying people with th-.; 
.snuff, other than his friends. He pleaded 
guilty to the disorderly charge, however, 
and paid a hue of J'iS and costs. 

It was the first prosecution for snuff- 
blowing this year, the vigor witit which 
the practice was attacke<l last spring, 
having served to make people wary. The 
managers of amusement placeg .are set to 
stamp it out altogether, and they have 
been very successful in checking It. 



Opera tjllass (iifts. 

(.")ur line includes the leading makers. 
Prices will be found right. M. Henrick- 
ann Jewelry <>). 



(( 



DRY" ELECTION DAY. 



The Lid Was Apparently Fitted on 
Duluth Tightly. 

Election day was "dry," yesf^rday. 
There may have been one or iv.'o l^aks, 
I ut they must liave been veritable pin- 
lioles, and drunks on the street, yester- 
day, were very few and far between. Tiie 
police court grist Is always a pretty good 
indication of the fit of the "lid" and this 
niorning, two lonely drunks were in court. 

One of them hud been picked up yes- 
terday nioriung. The other came in on 
a train yesterday afternoon, so, to all 
apijearanc.es, Duluth wa.s entirely dry. 

Ernest Guyenet could hardly hobble 
a'.ong on his crutches. He is crippled up 
with rli^umatLsm and claimed the fact 
that he was drunk was an accident. He 
promised to reform and sentence was sus- 
pended. John Maki came in on a train 
ye.sierday afternoon and h.ad a return 
ticket. He promised to make good use 
of it and an officer accompanied him to 
the depot to see that he took the traan. 
* • * 

The trial of William Burgess, the elec- 
trical contractor, charged with pointing 
a revolver at M. J. Harney, a union labor 
leader, was on call for this niorning. but 
it was continued until tomorrow morning. 



Baking insuranc-e oan be bought any 
day with a can of Hunt's Baking Pow- 
der and Extracts. Thoy invsure success. 



AT VILLAJf ARIA. 

Evening's Program That G«ive Great 
Satisfaction to Audience. 

Frontenac. Minn.. Dec. 18. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— Owing to the exhilar- 
ating skating on the lagoon in the 

afternoon the girls at Villa Maria were 
In good humor for the evening's pro- 
gram of violin, piano, vocal and elo- 
cution numbers, which gave great sat- 
isfaction and pleasure to the audience. 
The program was given by Florence 
Webb, Nellie Collendar, Ruth Holli- 
day, Gladys White, Clarice RowJes. 
Clara Hensel, Anna Kaye, '08; Rhea 
Schneider, Mayme Hertl. Beulah Gar- 
rard. Mary Girling. Evelyn Garrard, 
Catharine Saul, Madeline Bungenve, 
Amy Girling and Harriet Witte. Some 
of the faculty closed the entertainment 
with spirited selections of national airs. 
A play. "Measure for Measure." by 
a member of the faculty, was recently 
Interpreted with ease and naturalness, 
by Misa Ro?e Plcha. '08. as lady prin- 
cipal of the boarding school; Beulah 
Garrard. Florence Webb. Anna Kaye, 
'08, Ruth Holliday, Ethel Mandler, 



Hood's Pills 

Aftor^lnnn piUi ptmlr veKetabla; prompt am 
pleAMUit: aMr to take aad easy to operat*. 2oo. 



Theb«t% 
LaxatlT* 
Cathartla 
id 



Peptiron Pills 

IronlM tha blood. fa«d tha narrat and brain, ton* 
tha stomach, and give r«stfal il'vap. 'TOc. 
PrnsgiaU or nudl. C. I. Hood Co.. LonraU. 
JXMitcto Vr Hood If « Oood. 



or$l. 



k TALENT WORTH 
CULTIYATING 




A PRESENT WORTH GIVING 




N the midst of the exuberant Christinas spirit it 
is easy to overlook the value of permanency in 
gift giving. If there be in your family a daughter 
6r son "with an appreciation of and love for 
music, to such an one a piano would be like the 
pearl of great price. The Knabe Piano is a present worth 
giving — it will last a lifetime — bring good cneer to the home, 
and can be paid for on easy terms. 

The Knabe Piano needs no introduction — for three gene- 
rations it has had no peer, and today the king in his palace, 
the artist in his studio, the critic in his paper, and the pub- 
lic in their homes, endorse it as the 

World's Best Piano 



S( 



H 



/' 




^her££ ^S^tUl 



tne 



-TS- 



To have the floors polished or the 
wocd\york retouched before Christmas. 

Finest XO orKmans hip 
'Best Materials 

Moderate Trices 

Wood Finishing. Wall Decorating. Floor Polishing. 



H.A.HaH(SbCo 

DECOKA TOTt^ 

119 Ra.8t S-up«riof- Street. 



<«<^ 



Rhea Schneider, Grace Gorhum, Cath- 
erine Lang, Clara Knox, Geraldine 
Flemming and Amy Girling as pupils, 
and Mary Stuart as negro maid. 

Mrs. M. Miller Wolff, Mrs. E. Han- 
kinson Horton, Miss Jessie Davidson, 
Minneapolis, and Mrs. M. Foreman 
Swatek, Chicago, heartily enjoyed a 
few days' visit with their former teach- 
ers. Classes close for the holidays on 
Dec. 21. 



SICKNESS CLOSES SCHOOLS. 



Tiiief River Falls, Minn., Dec. 18.— 
(Special to The Herald.)— An epidemic oC 
scarlet fever has broken out In this citjr 
and to stop its progress the schools have 
been closed until after the iJhrlstmaa 
holidays. There is no reason for think- 
ing that it will spread beyond the few 
families that are now under quarantine, 
but it was considered wise to check it la 
the early stages of the trouble. 






Only Pure Goods! 



We direct attention to our superb stocl< of pure, 
high-grade Wines and Liquors. An exceptionally 
fine showing for the holiday season. 

THE FINEST 
CHOP HOUSE 

in Duluth, in charge of an expert chef. This de- 
partment is at your service at all hours. 





I 




RICHARD DUBY 

"THE LYCEUM BUFFET." 





I 






a 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 18. 1907. 



Beginning with tonight ibis store will be open evenings. 





These Suggestions 
Will Aid You in What 

to Give Her: 



Articles of Dress, in 
every essential «'f liit- idc 
following summary will 
while the fact that "Gidc; 
store tomorrow. 



Separate pieces, sets 
of its respective kind; tht 
lutelv clever. Separate ] 
ments. $50.00 to $575.00. 



snch types aiid styles as are exhibited here, possess 
il Christmas gift. A few moments' perusal of the 

suffice to suggest many practical and acceptable gifts, 
ing's"' serve you best, should bring you directly to this 



Luxurious Furs 

and garments. Every skin used measures to the best 

linings and paddings are the best, and the stvles abso- 

.ieces $3.50 to $175.00; sets, $10.50 to $500.00; gar- 





Fur Lined and Fur Trimmed Coats 

Best Domestic or Imported Broadcloth Shells, lined with such furs as are 
suitable for the purpose ari<l >et off with deep roll collars and cuffs of mink, 
Ivnx, beaver, Persian lamb, blended squirrel and river mink. Prices $25.00 to 
$175.00. 

High Class Tailored Garments 

Coats — Suits — Skirts. Finest materials perfect tailoring and nobbiest 
styles. 

Sweetly Dainty Afternoon and Evening Dresses 

Artful conibinations of materials and trimmings, in the newest shades and 
beautiful rich colorings. Sheer or firm stuffs; some over taffeta and others in- 
dependent of foundations. Prices $25.00 to $150.00. 

Handsome Evening Wraps 

Domestic or imjortid, in coat or cape styles. Prices $25.00 to $150.00. 

Dainty Waists 

Of messaline, taffeta, lace, net, lingerie, and wool. Fancy blouse or tail- 
ored styles. $3.50 to $25.00. 

Prettv House Garments 

Kimonas, Sacqius rnd Robes — some of home origin, while others w^ere con- 
ceived and wrought by he clever little Japs, or traditional Chinese. 

Hand Made Lingerie 

Separate pieces or sets, trimmed with very beautiful hand-worked designs 
or plenty of airy lace. Dainty enough to please the most fastidious. 

Misses' and Children's Wear 

Dress-Up or Gener: 1 Utility Coats, Suits, School Dresses, Peter Thomp- 
sons and Separate Skins — at ^•^.ry moderate prices. 

Girls' and Children's Furs. Prices $2.50 to $25.00. 

Sweaters — Form-f.tnng, Blouse or Straight styles. 

Umbrellas. Gloves. Marabout Sets. Opera Bags. Head Scarfs. 

Leather Goods. Neckwear. Jeweled Trinkets. Fancy Combs. 



I.- 



T 






^ 



Dulutb 



"CORRECT DRESS FOR WOMEN" 



First Avenue West and Superior Street 



Cina'nuat: 




DOWLING 
FOUNDERS 

Duluth Tug Sinks as 

She is Leaving 

Ashland. 



All Members of Crew 

Fortunately Escape 

With Lives. 




A bad catastrophe was avoided last 
night when the tug Tom DowHng of 
Duluth sank, at 12 o'clock, in the slip 
at Washburn, just as she was starting 
on her return trip to Duluth. Had ir 
happened half an hour later, she would 
have been out on the waters of Lake 
Superior, and probably every man of 
the cix-w would have been drowned. 

The Dowling left here at 8 o'clock 
yesterday morning for Washburn, 
where she laid up until last evening, 
when she started home at 10 o'clock. 
While going through the slip she 
sprung a leak, through which the water 
poured so rapidly that when it was 
discovered, the tug was half full of 
water and aast being saved. 

Every one on board got away before 
the tug sank, taking down with it most 
of tbe men's pei.sonal belongings, but 
in half an hour later the little vessel 
would have bten well on her way out 
in tho lake, and nothing could have 
saved the men. 

The Dowling. a small craft of about 1 
fett btam and 17 feet in length, is 
owned by Albert Field, and was saaleu 
by Capt. William Jones. The slip is 
not deep, and it will be a comparatively 
easy matter to raise the tug. 

ELECTION BETS 
ARE CASHED 

Christmas Presents Will 

Come Easy for Tess- 

man Plungers. 

There was a joyous crowd of money 
collectors around the lobby of the tst. 
Louis hotel this morning. To the vic- 
tor belong the spoils, and the citizens 
who were fortunate enough to get down 
a roll on the successful issue of Tess- 
man's chances in the primaries wer<*" 
doing a little collecting. 

Added to the bitterne.«s of defeat was 
the knowledge that Christmas was near 
at hand and that when you pay your 
monev at odds of 2 to 1 and lose, you 
probably have caused a depletion iu 
the bank account that will cause the 
Christmas stocking to look gaunt and 
emaciated. 

Over $1,000 was placed during the 
morning at the hotel counter. So con- 
fident were the Cullum supporters that 
they were offering odds of 2 to 1. Sev- 
eral heavy wagtrs were made at this 
figure, while some more were tabulated 
at odds of 3 to 1. 

There was a rumor that one bet was 
placed at $1,00« to $400 on Mayor Cul- 
lum's chances. The man, who is^ said 
to have met the wager, did not care to 
have his name made known, but he is 
a well known man about town. 



FOfiGERS WILL 
PLEAD GUILTY 



Claveau and Gordon Wi 

Not Attempt to 

Stand Trial 

Opcar Clavt-au and Georg« Gordon 
two young men who have been arrested 
recently for passing worthless checks 
on Duluth merchanu«. were expected to 
plead guilty, before Judge Ensign, this 
afternoon, about J o'clock. Both men 
bave signilied their d<-.sire to plead 
guilty to information by the county 
attorney, on :he charge of forgery in 
the second degree. 

Claveau admits f<.rging the name of 
E. J. Bur.ker, a local lumber dealer, 
to a check for $25. and of passing the 
same on L>. Frankfort. 

Gordrm was one of the two men 
caught by the k>cal p<:ilice a few days 
ago, afttr they had pa.ssed pome forged 
check-s of the Johnson-Went worth 
Lumber company on a Bowery mer- 
chant. 



Selected real estate mortgages for sale. 
W. M. Prlndle & Co. 



INDIGNANT^FATHER 

Declares Vaeeination is Violition 
of Moral Law of God. 

Chicago. Dec. 18.— What President 
Bchr^* • •• of the board of education 
cal. trangest of hU the attacks] 

on vai (J i nation came to the president*.* 
notice yesterday. It v.as contained in 
the following letter: 

*Tr«Bterday the principal of the 
Oladstone school turned my little 6- 
year-old daughter out of school, declar- 
ing that the board of health requires 
tliat she be vaccinated, and further, 



that she cannot return to school until 
this rule is comj lied with. This is a 
terrible blow to J». It puts us In a 
trying position. In order to comply 
with this order w.- would have to forco 
our conscience to break two command- 
ments of the moial law of God. This 
means, according to the Christian faith, 
sacrificing one'.« children to the horrid, 
abominable idol <nown better by the 
name of 'vaccii ation.' It's putting 
trust or faith in man or In man's in- 
vention, and the Bible says: "Thus 
saith the Lord, cursed be tne man 
that trusteh in n an and maketh flesh 
his arm.* 

"Now I am requested to bring a 
human sacriftce \'hich 1 am bound by 
nature and the law of God to protect 



at all hazards. This homed Idol made 
and then worshipped by the sophist 
demands nothing less than the torture 
of our own children— a painful sore 
arm, and fever for at least a week. 
Isn't this a terrible punishment?" 



GARST BROIGHT OUT. 

Iowa's Lientenant Governor a Can- 
didate for First Place. 

Des M<rlne€. Iowa. Dec. 18. — Governor 
Cummins and k^ading progressives held 
another secre; conference at the Hotfl 
.Savery. ye«tei^ay, which Smith of 
Mltciaell, Garst, Keltz, Maytag, Chas- 
sell and others attended. The meet- 
ing was followed by th« annour^ce- 



ment of Gaj-st as a candidate for gov- 
ernor, and although none of those pres- 
ent would disclose the topic under dis- 
cussion, rumor has it that Garst's an- 
nouncement was the result of confer- 
enoe The governor's presidential 
boom and the Dolllver-Cummins con- 
troversy wco^ unquestionably discussed. 

TO PROPOGATE SALMON. 
Washington, Dec. 18. — Pre.^ldeni 
Roosevelt Indicated today that he 
would 8?t aside Wood river, in Alaska, 
for salmon propagation. The order 
will prohibit .^almdn fishing in this 
river. TWs action was taken on repre- 
sentation to the president by a dele- 
gation of Alaska fisiiermen, presented 
by Senator Fulton of Oregon, and Dele- 
gate Gate of Alaska: 



COPPER STOCKS 
CLOSE FIRMER 

Market Has a Good 

Rally During the 

Day. 

The copper stocks showed good recov- 
ering jMiwers today, by closing a little 
stronger. The market was quiet and 
soft at the opening. At no stage was it 
lively, but the demand for the better 
issues improved toward the end of thfc 
session. 

North Butte opened at 137 bid and 
$37.50 asked, advanced to $38.12J;4 and 
closed at $37.S7>4 bid and $38.25 asked. 
Amalga/nated opened at $43, sold as low 
as $42.12'-.>. rallied to $43.75 and closed 
at $43.25 bid. 

Greene-Cananea was Inactive and 



IMPORTED 
XMAS GOODS 

Chin«='Be and Japanese dishes, genuine 
fancy Japanese silks and other beautiful 
Oriental goods. 

Charles Sing Lee, 215 E^st Superior 
■treet. 




3 



THE ONLY STORE 

NOT OPEN EVENINGS 



Bargain Gifts. 

Every item mentioned here has been material- 
ly reduced in price. We want to make Thurs- 
day a day long to be remembered for the great- 
est values yet offered by any Duluth store. 



Ckiia 



Sets. 



Sep 



ren s Fur 

Muffs and Boas to match, of Lynx, Angora, 
Lamb, Thibet, White Astrakhan, Imitation 
Moleskin and Chinchilla — were up to $?.50, $3.75. 

arate Muffs. 

Of Near Seal, River Mink, Lamb, Imitation 
Ermine and Muskrat — were up to $6.50, $1.00. 

Fur Sets and Separate Fur Pieces. 

Of Lamb, Siberian Rabbit, Moufflon, Otter, 
Near Seal, Squirrel and Beaver — were up to 
$12.50, $5.00. 

Lingerie Waists. 

Beautiful Embroidered and Lace Trimmed 
Waists, regularly $0.75— for $3.75. 

Wonderful values in pretty White Waists that 
were $3.75, $1.75. 

Silk Petticoats. 

Full $8.75 values, deep flounce and under ruffle, 

of heavy taft'eta, in black, white and all colors, $5.00. 

Dennison s Cnristmas Novelties. 

The entire line will be thrown TTn the market 
tomorrow at just half original prices. 
Includes Letter Holders, Silk Cases, Laundry ^' 

Lists, Twine Holders, Hair Receptacles, !Match ^' 
Holders. Scrap Books, Sealing Wax Sets, Paper 
Doll Sets, Holley' Lunch Sets. Crepe 
Holly Rolls, and Candy Canes. Everything 
tomorrow, at Half Price. 

All Xrimmea Hats. 

Offered at exactly half price. Nothing in stock 
excepted. Includes our handsome imported 
models, our strictly Tailored Hats, our Street 
and Dress Hats, from $50 down to $5, for ex- 
actly Half Price.' 



i. 



ancy 



Ritt 



ons. 



Beautiful wide, fancy effects of heavy Taffeta, 
some inches wide, sold before at $^.50 to $4, 
for $1.00. 

rland-Maae Neckwear. 

Every piece a de.«=irable gift, and all handsome. 
Of Lace Embroidery, Silk and Chiffon : all 
styles, Half Price. 

liana Bags. 

Of Pin Seal, Matt Seal, fancy Calf, in pocket- 
book and bag styles; a variety to choose from, 
at less than Half Price. 

1 ke Bargain Table. 

Included on this table are a variety of gifts— i^ 
Opera Bags, Toilet Sets, Desk .Sets, Ink Wells, 
Indian Baskets and Sewing Boxes, at half and 
less than Half Price. 




closed at $5.87»/2 bid and $6 a*ked. Calu- 
met & Arizona opened at $y2."i0, ad- 
vanced to $33.25 and closed at $93 birt 
and $?4 asked. Andconda ojv^ned at 
$27, went off to $26. 37 ',2, rallied to $27 
and cloi^td at $27 bid. 

Superiar & Pittsburg .sold at $8.75 an1 
$8.62'i and closed at $8.r.O bid and $8.62'i 
asked. Globe sold at $6 and $"..8714 an;3 
clo.sed at $5.75 bid and $6 asked. 

Denn-Arizona advanced from $3.37'^ 
to $3.75 and clc?ed at $3.62i'2 bid and 
$3.75 af-ked and Butte & .'Superior sold 
at $1,121^ and closed at $1 bid and $1.12i/2 
asked. 

Black Mountain sold at $4.25 an 1 
closed at $4.12'/^ bid and $4.25 asked. 



wards where the Republican candidate* 
had no opposition. 



IRREGULARITIES 
ARE SUSPECTED 

Men Arrested for Re- 
peating—Republicans 
Vote Democratic. 

Though there is no positive evidence 
of irregularities, and, con.sequently no 
prosecutions, there were murmurs Hsl 
night and this morning of illegal prac- 
tices in some of the wards of the iiy. 
The registering of n^ore people from 
certain boarding houses than the 
houses can contain, the voting of the 
Democratic ticket by. known and ac- 
knowledged Republicans, and "re- 
peating" was charged, but the charges 
could not be substantiated by facts. 

Fcur nien giving their names as 
Thomas J. Bague, George Gosolene, 
Clarence B. Perkins and Barney- 
Wagner, were arrested last eveniji?', 
charged with "'repealing.' Charles An- 
derson of the First precinct of tbe 
Seventh ward, made tlie cor pla.int, out 
he could not positively identify the 
men and they were released. 

The abnormal Democratic vote in the 
First and Second wards, which are 
norinal'y R'^puV'lican by large major- '■ 
ities, was the subject of considerable ■ 
comment, and taken as proof of the | 
statements that the voting of the 
Democratic ticket was not confined to 
members of that party. 

In the Fifth ward, it is said, two 
different precincts registered people 
from an obscure hotel, or boarding 
house. Others, who presented them- 
selves In precincts of the Fifth ward, 
it is claimed, could not remember their 
own addresses and had to be prompted. 

There were few challengers out and 
the Republicans were left to their ow.i 
sweet will. Nobody disputes the fact 
that they voted the Demo'^ratic ticket 
•U over the city, especially In tne 



POWERS DENIES 

Reported Conversation He is Said 
to Have Had With Cecil. 

Georgetown, Ky., Dec. 18.— Caleb 
Powers, former «-CTeta.ry of state, was 
Egiiin on the sta.nd t<><]ay In his ov.n 

defense ag-aJnst the cJiarge of com- 
plicity in the murder of Wiiliam Goe- 
btfl. The most impcrtaju fact brc-ught 
out was Powtrs' (mphatic denial of a 
rept>rte<l coriVtrsation with Frank Ce«cJl, 
in v.hich it was allegeii that the kill- 
ing of Goebetl was freely discussed, and 
Powers had said to Cecil: 

"If you will find the man to kill Goe- 
bel, I wiil find a maji who will furmsli 
the money." 

Powers admitted writing a letter to 
Mi.«;s Sudie .Sniffer, his sweetheart, at 
Wi<lliamsburg, Ky., thi-ee days before 
Gotbel was «*hot, that he (Powers) was 
mainly instrumental In I ringing the 
mountain army to Frajikfcvrt. and 
would rather fig-ht than be robbed. 



Let Vii Frame 

Your picture. It will be done neatly ml 
promptly and at a reasonable price. 
Decker's Art Store, 16 ^second avenu* 
west. 



TEHERAN HITUATKfN 

CONTINUES STRAINED. 

Teheran, Dec. 18.— Out.«ide of a few 
Isolated killings and robberies, there 
have been up to the prtsent time, no 
disturbances of public order in this 
city; nevertliele^s the situation contin- 
ues most strained. The Constitutional- 
ists are quiet, but determined to fight 
if attacked. Th^y are v/ell armed, 
while the supporters of the Reaction- 
aries, n>ft.«tly rnuleteerr: and laborers 
who have c-ome in from 'neighboring 
villages, have few effective weapons. 



Smith & Smith. 

Special Christmas candies. 



ZENITH CAFE 

OUR SPECIALTIES 
FOR THURSDAY DINNER 

SPARE RIBS and SAUER- 
KRAUT . . 25c- 

IXDIVIDUAIi CHICKEN PIE. . .80c 

Including tea, coffee, or milk, soup, 
two vegetables and pudding. 

OPEX NIGHT AND DAY. 

206 West Superior Street. 

D. 11 . WHITE, Propi»' 



"1"-^ 



w^*- 



THE. DULUTH EVENING HERALD: WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 18/1907. 



GOOD YEAR 
FOR^THEL 

Annual Report Shows 

Progress of a Great 

Work. 



*^^ 



The Sale ol Neck Ruffs 

The table was crowded all day. It was eKp«>«ted. The price they are 
selling at neans almost something* for nothing, we have enough left 
to last ton orrow. Come early. They're a worVliy bargain'- 



iii^n silk 
ft" «»«> rMr'r 

9S.50 Silk 



^H-X-iT'"." :::::::::::^ At UsS Than 

Chiffon Hnffa at »8c ?** «<^»^i-» »»■••»■ 




Open Evenlnsa till 10 o'clock. 



. .>t the !;■ ih' I. f.iur.il- 
•^.. b\ U.v. L)r. C. C. 



Past Twelve Months Busy 
. Ones With Working 
Corps. 



The year's* work of good by the Dn- 
luth Bflhel society is rt-vleweil in ih-v 
lliirty-i'iurth iituiuul n-port of tho .;a- 
ptrinltndtnt. published In ttie curr-iii 
numbif .if th€ Bethel Ili-Liuril. i 

Th€; ! i~' twelve months luiv,> bi-n 
busy uiits witli the niembtrs of ttte ' 
s.rit-tv's WorklnR corps, and with the 
ail of the organization. hu.sy 

u, a of atiairs, ulio turn aside from 
tin ir lusiii, ■.-•.-! cvt ry liltle while to 
fur! li- 
ed 111.. 
SillU;-. 

'Eviry depart miU and each insti- 
tution iiis t....'ti richly blesstd. whiea' 

WAS dut to ine fad tiiat we had mon-y 
and workers— tlu- iwo great essentials 
In A work of ttiis kind," says Supt. 
Moody in hi.« report. 

Mr. Moody devotes a considerable 
portion of his report to an account of 
the i)n>{;rt>ss in the nightly gospel 
meeting braiicii of the work, upon 
wliirh sreat stress has l>t'en laid r-'- 
Ct'Uily. These gatherings are held at 
the Branch Bethel si.x nights in ihe 
English lanj?uage and one night in the 
Sntdish t'->njfue. 

The atienuance at these meetings 
raiuts from tv\enty to 150 person.s and 
a Class of people is reached thai is 
not reached iiy any oi the churches or 
by any other organization. "The le- 
sulls obtained have been exceedingly 
gratif\ iiij;. " say.s Mr. Moody. 
♦ The liotjiel lluiiie. 

The report shows that great service 
and .spiritual encouragement was 
given many unfortunate women .lur- 
ing tile year tiirough the Bethel Home. 
an- important factor in the general 
w;ork of the society. Fifty-eight adults 
Were admitted to the institution dur- 
iug the year and twenty-eight babies 
were born there. Of the adults, thirty- 
four were admitted as regular in- 
mates, having forsaken lives of sin 
with the idea of tilting themselves lo 
f\li honiwable positions in the com- 
munity. Some, says the report, have 
mJlrried and established homes for 
HieruselveSfc while others are working 
aj»dL making an honest living. 

'deferring lo nnances. the superinten- 
dtfilil's report says: 

"Th. past year lias Ix. ii an t-xoetd- 
irHfly pro.-:perous one from a financial 
Wandiioint. and had it not been for the 
financial trouble of the last few weeks, 
we would havfe dosed the year without 
a deticit. for ih^re is money enough 
pledged to pay off the entire deticit, 
by men who were forced to defer pay- 
ment on account of the money market. 
We beKati thi- year. Nov. 7. 19U(i, with 
a dehcit of $l.r>.'.l.S9, and clos<d the 
year Nov. 5, 19(»7. ulih a deiicit <)f .fGlO.32. 
Ho. while we paid $1,041..")7 on the de- 
ficit of the previous year, we start the 
neu y ir with |t)liJ.32 worth of unpaid 
hils Tru..' there is nmney enough 
;)' i.-;-'! to pay th.'m. I)ut. until these 
ill im- are pain, the bills will he a 
burden." 

The 1 harity Work. 
Til. iiaritable work of the .society, 
says the report, lia.s be.-n systematically 
carried on. 

Durinsr tiie year. 2,046 garments were 
distributed, l.r>27 meals were given 
away, free lo isiiiKs furnished to 764 
and 1.'.2 needy families i^iven aid. 

The total attendance at Ihe Bethel 
.'Sunday .schools, fur the year, was 14,- 
547. The school at the Branch Bethel 
is the largest. In the emidoyment de- 
I'artui 111 of the .•^ociely, positions were 
found for 4i>2 women and r>14 men. 

The restaurants at both the Bethel 
and the Branch Bethel have been well 
pa[roniz..«l. the Branch Bethel being 
particularly fortunate. .Mthough thf 
rent for tht Branch is .so high as to 
preclude ,my pcirlit for tb.. serving of 
meals to paying guests, the imiiortance 
of the place is stronwiy emphasized by 
the superintend'-r, t -is it is oo.-s.i)ie to 
carry a great \\'<'k tin-re. 

The caini' ■(■ funds foi a new- 

Bethel, to 1., .h>' old on<' on Lake 

avenue, was d ferrerl V>y the money 
.stringency, but uill be- resumed now. 

The report of t!ie treasurer, shows 
the society to be in good financial con- 
dition. 



A Bcmflful Fur Set for a 
Christmas Gift 

Cannot be outdone as a practical, com»creating and al- 
ways appreciated gift for motlicr, sister or fianA The 
quality uf our fur pieces can be depended on a3 the 
best. Evey skin selected and every pi^ce made up by 
-killed fur lers. 

^ ^ /^ Ef A f'"" ^ bcairtifnl squirrej set, tie throws 

^ I ^ tII or Zaza with large size pillow muff, 

'r ^■^•■*'^' the actual value is $17.50 — our price 

..nly $12.51 . 



Here ¥ 



Where Stale, (^utiUli/ and ValueJi Harmnnize 

Superior St. — Lake Ave. — Michigan St. 



Baby Carriage Robes 

Extr^ fine pocket robes— the best value in Duluth at $5.00— a ^M ff A 

dandy present for the baby — each .....' ^^ 

A large collection at prices ranging from $1.98 to $19.50- 




uAre! 



The Bigf Special Purchase 
of Dainty and Dressy 



Lace and Net Waists 



for a rich and dressy Isabella or 
sable fox set — full skin scarfs and 
large muff — newest shapes — regular 
$19.50 vah e — here only $15.00. 

for Persian Paw sets, with long 
titrows and full pillow muff — very 
stylish and e*iual in wear to any fur. 
.\ regular $30 value — for only $14.75. 

$37.50 and up to $60 for the hand- 
some Jap mink sets — almost exact 
copies of the natural mink set and 

made in t le same .styles — every one of these sets arc 

c'tfcrcd you at greatly reduced prices. 

Gifts a Woman likes 



$15.00 

$10. 50 vah e — hei 

$14.75 

.\ regular $30 va 

$25.00 



On Sale Tomorrow Morning 

Over 200 of them to select 
from, and all on sale at one 
price — 



Ladies' btautiful silk stock collars, pu up in 
neat boxes, cheap at 35c, tomorrow 



25c 

15c 



Children's initial bandkcrcheifs, put up 3 in a 
pretty box, cheap at 25c, tomorrow, a box 

Ladies' hnndkerchiefs, put up 3 in a fancy Christmas 
tit>x, either lace or embroidered, cheap at $1.00, ^tZp 
tomorrow, a box " Vv» 

PERFUMES — put up in attractive ba.skets or 
fancy box -s — cheap at 39c, ti>morrow 

LEATHER HAND BAGS, with extra heavy frame, 
inside pu-sea, cheap at $1.39, tomorrow ^4 AA 

Children's fancy beaded handbags, worth 75c, 
at 

PIN CUSHIONS, in large variety of styles, all prettily 
trimmed villi lace, ribbons and embroidered in pink, 
blue, red ;ind green, tomorrow at less 
than 




25c 



50c 



CHILDRSN'S SEWING SETS— large variety 
of styles, cheap at 38c, tomorrow , 



54 Price 
25c 



Paint} Gifts in Men's Furnishings 

50c 



-Men's Ox'ord sik mnfflcr.s, large variety of pat- 
terns, che ip at 75c, tomorrow 

MEN'S HOLIDAY NECKWEAR, all new colorings 
of russet-, browns, garnets and pretty light CAa 
evening ci dors, each tfVV 

MEN'S FINE SUSPENDERS— put up in pret- 
ty Chrisiiiuis boxes, worth /'5c, 



50c 




CMldrcn's Fur Sets 

Make beautiful and very useful presents for the little 
girls. 

White Angora fur sets for children, flat ^-l QO 
muflF with shawl collar, worth $2.50 <4?i««riJ 

Child's dark fur sets— in blended river JO '^(l 
mink and coney at $3.50 and V*'**'" 

Children's and misses' fine Thibet sets— Moufflon, Kim- 
mer. Beaver and Opossum sets, with large tlat muffs 
and throws olr shawl scarfs — the price $5 to $25 per set. 

- Gifts For Men 

CUFF AND COLLAR BOXES— very attractive styles 
— celluloid and plush finish — regular value ^4 AA 
$1.35, tomorrow «I>i»W 

MEN'S SHAVING SETS— silver mugs anil ebony 
handle brush, put up in a pretty bo.K— ^-1 ^A 
cheap at $2.00, tomorrow. ^X» V" 



UTTIE PRICES FOR ATTRACTIVE 



XMAS GIFTS TOMORROW 



Regular $6.50. 
$8.75 and $10 
Values. 



These waists a/^^he exhibit numbers of a big manufacturer who was 
clearing his show -^Jes preparatory to inventory. We secured this lot at a 
great sacrifice and ar^ able to offer you the choice of a striking display at the 
ridiculous price of $i.85 each. 

They are made up of plain net, floral nets, and all-over lace waists, in 
a large variety of stales and late models. The colors — white, tan, ecru, cream 
and butter colors. Sizes 3-1 to 44. Here's a chance to buy a waist for the 
price of the makings 



58c 
50c 
75c 
65c 



Ladies* Tailored Suits at Half Price 



The entire stock vp^ ladies' tailored suits are still selling at half price. No reserve— nothing ex- 
cluded. The clY>ice. comprises blacks, red, blues and mixtures and fancy — including fine broadcloth and 
cheviots. -» 

FUR COATS — a number of fine fur coats at 
reduced prices. 



$19.50 SUITS at...*:...: - $9.75 

$29.50 SUITS at...j^ $M-75 

$32.50 SUITS at...* $16.25 

$3950 SUITS aC. .;,.,, $19-75 '.. 

$45.00 SUITS at $22.50 

And upwards at satn« pro^»if'ii*ft of di*touf»f. 



$39.50 and $42.50 fine near seal and astrakhan 

jackets — all Skinner's satin lined — tf Off A A 

on sale at ^Oel.UU 

$6500 blended river mink blouse 
-^*ekets at. . r. 



$50.00 



BEAUTIFUL SILVER PIN CUSHIONS, 

with velvet tops, cheap at 75c, tomorrow 

SILVER HAT PIN HOLDERS, bright or 
gray finish, usual price 65c, tomorrow 

SILK OPERA BAGS, beautifully mounted, 
regular price $1.25, tomorrow 

BRUSH AND COMB SETS— silver mounted, 
ebony finish, regular value $r, tomorrow 

TOILET SETS — silver mounted mirror, brush and 
comb sets, ebony finish, cheap at $1-39. ^"i AA 
tomorrow «||J.«W 

BOYS' MILITARY HAIR BRUSHES, silver mounted, 
ebony or mahogany finish, cheap at 89c, to- 
morrow 

Crystal glass tobacco and cigar jar with nickel 
plated tops, cheap at 88c, tomorrow 

Crystal glass pufif jar, with nickel plated tops, 
worth 48c, tomorrow 

Gun metal jewel cases, silk lined, regular price 

75c, tomorrow 

GOLD FINIHSED CANDLE STICKS, very 
pretty design, regularly sold at 85c, tomorrow.. 
SILVER CANDLE STICKS, finest gray ff 1 A A 
finish, regular price $1.25. tomorrow «pi.»VV 

Children's silver •knile, spoon and fork sets, VHp 
regular value 38c, tomorrow fc^*/!/ 



65c 
65c 
25c 

58c 
65c 



14 



Waist Patterns In Xmas Boxes 

A large assortment in silk and dainty mercerized fab- 
rics—divided into two lots, and an extra .special feature 
at the prices— a nice gift for your wife, mother or sister. 
LOT I. * LOT 2. 

$1.50 $2.00 




CONCERNING 




l\An. 



T\M) N. i).. BANKRUPTS. 



Farpo. X. P.. D.-c. IS.— (Sp cial to 
The Herald.) -A iii-Tchfcnl and a farmer 
from Ward county have fik>d petitions 
•of V »Int;t'irv bankniplcv in the federal 
1-1 ;:-r. Fi-. 1 ■: ?5cII, a Minot 

HI- :j!i-i ,:. i»l.iv- d h;> M:il>Uitii^s at 
S1.T;n.H7 and hL^ .a«sei - S41.78. F. 

C i^tKjekM-, a farnitM .,. , ■ (unybrfxik. 
pJae-d his llahilitif s at $3,isi.i."> .uul Isi.'^ 
assets at $2,T91.3a. 



Cuff Tins. 

New and attractive d<;5ig:n.^. .\.sk to 
8*e th**m. M. H*-nrickS':n Jewchy t'o. 



is^i 



Christmas Gifts! 

Hfiv» .\ i Viouerht that Christma.s 
prei'pnt lor your boy yet? Didn't you 
^ay h>- wanted to play in the band? 

LOOK AT THIS! 

Fin.i H'^w B flat rornot. flrst-rl.^.'i.i 
mako. highly polished brass, Ught 
action, wattr key. attachments In A 
and B flat; German silver mo'ith- 
piec'^. two-prong mii-sic ru'.k Regrular 
price. iir>.00; now for Christmas only 

$10^50 

Ingvald Westgaard, 

"The Mu.=ilc Store that ae!ls< B.ind In- 
struments, the right Idnd. 
and lots of them.' 



The rhristmai season has fully ar- 
rlvi'd. Then' are methodical peopl-? 
who know along about July 1 that 
I'hribtmas Is coning and then there are 
plenty of peep e who cannot realize 
till' fact until u least a week befor.' 
thf grtiU day. The wonderful spirit 
of the time do .'s not penetrate thor- 
oughly until th< hurry and bustle and 
delight and mystery of the last week 
Ju.«!t makts them v.ake up to the fact 
that I'hirstmas is coming. The very 
most delightful time of the entire sea- 
son is ju.st at twilight of Christmas 
eve and that en irely mystic hour must 
bo the time whi n every heart, no mat- 
ter how hard or callous or seltish it 
may be, me ts temporarily — melt.s 
enough to last at least over the tvventy- 
tifth even if it hardens up again on 
the tweaty-sixt i for another year. If 
people only ha 1 time or would take 
lime at the Christmas season to be en- 
tirely permeate! with that Christina.^ 
eve feel'r.g. the time would be Infinitely 
more beautiful. 

But the world goes on just the sam* 
and the stores ronlinue to be the place 
where the greatest amount of human 
nature is di.splayed in less time than 
any other plac.j. 

m * * 

The young man leaned over tho 
counter in a confidential manner. 

"1 want one jf them thir>gamajigs.'" 
he said with in air of imparting a 
state secret. ' A kind of pinkish one 
that is sort of soft looking, and—" 

"O-oh, yes!" said the young woman 
clerk. "I kno V. But everytliing we 
have at this -ounter !> white. You 
might try at tl e counter one row back 
and at the oth« r side of the st'^re." 

The young nian lifted his hat in a 
very polite way. "Thank you." he said 
and passed on "I want one of those 
kiekups. sort ol bluish pink in color and 
kind of v.lde with insertions in them," 
he ended triumphantly to the young 
woman he found at the ix-xt counter. 

"Humph!" si e .said. "You try at the 



counter over on the other side of Hie 
store, and youU find one there — may- 
be." 

The young man was getting slightly 
exasperated. "Such a bother over get- 
ting such a simple little thing," he 
muttered to liimself. The young wo- 
man at the next counter was tired 
looking. 

• How do you do," said the young 
man cordially as he might have gretted 
his dearest acquaLnlanc^. The young 
woman retained a stony silence. She 
was too tired to tell him how she was 
and anyway she knew he didn't care 
a cent whether she told him or not, 
so she looked at 1dm in an irritatingly 
calm and freezingly cool way that 
rather rattled the young man. It Is 
easy enough to get along with a per- 
son who will talk, no matter how much 
of a .stranger she i.s. By this time the 
young man. who is ordinarily very 
precise and correct was wearing his 
hat on the back of his head and his 
brow was puckered. It gave him a 
rakish look. "I want one of those 
what-d'ye-call-'ems" he said. " Aklnd 
of pinky color and—" 

The young woman waited to hear 
no more. "UTiat size." ."he asked with 
admirable terseness. 

"Oh. I don't know. Just a regular 
size," he explained, with much pre- 
cision. 

The youns woman turned her back )n 
him. She reached to a shelf and drew 
forth a long, slender box. She opened 
the box and unrolled fnuu tissue paper 
tlie thing which was retained therein. 
Slie unrolled the thing and spread it 
before him. It was pmk satin and aad 
clasps in fnnt and it laced in the back. 
She took the thing by either side and 
held It up to herself. 

The young man gasped. Then he 
thought he'd take another look before 
he gasped again. He took the look. 
Then he spoke. 

"That isn't what I want," he said. 

"Oh. isn't it?" ln<4Uired the clerk. 
She rolled up the thing, re wrapped it 
in tissue paper and put it back in the 
long, slender box and put the box back 



on the shelf. She turned around. The 
young man was still there. The cleik 
placed a hand on eltner side of the 
counter and leaned forward in a very 
alluring manner. He noticed that abo 
had very tine eyes and a right good 
complexion. Then he noticed that there 
was some scorn In be*- eyes ana ob 
was afraid to ask her t-. • tie U out. 
The po.se she hud assumed and Ler 
nearness to him reminded him of the 
picture entitled "His Move," and he 
was just taking off his hat to do the 
thing which her pose suggested, when 
she spoke and he slammed his hat 
back on. She said "Do you know 
what you want?" 

"Why, yes," he said. 

'Well, if you would just say It In 
plain EnglL^h, <n If you can't say It, 
If you will sp'.'ll it. " The clerk st<jppevl. 
The naiity littlt; way she said "spell" 
suppested that that was the right 
place to stop. 

The young man was pink with chag- 
rin. "Well, I guess it isn't at this 
counter," he said with as much dig- 
nity as he could muster. 

"No, I guf»ss it isn't," she said, stdl 
In a cool V(dce that was maddening In 
its aloofness^ 

man wandered off dis- 



The young 
consolately. 



They were marooned in a sea cf 
shoppers. The woman looked triumph- 
ant. The man looked helpless. "Now," 
she said, in that happy voice which a 
woman assumes w hfrn she gets her 
husband to go shopping with her. 
•'What do you think we ought to get 
Mary? Do you think she would like a 
gold link enameled chatelaine or a 
figured crepe de chene dress pattern io 
scroll design?" she inquired. 

"The gold link i-nameled chatelaine," 
he said. "What is it?" 

'You are a real help in the time of 
danger and troubulous worries," .she 
said. "How could I 
you? " 

"I'm doing my best 
sure she would like 
dress pattern best." 

"I guess you better 



liie vacation in fhe city are: Fred 
Buck, J;imes Mauley, Laird Groodman, 
Harold (?ant, Reynolds Suffel and Ar- 
thur Ti-aphagen. 

Miss Frajices Swift will return Sat- 
urday fiv)m Smith college, and Misa» 
Carolyn Swift from Burnham. 

Miss Marjorie Morrow and* Miss Bar- 
bara Patrick wiH return fn^m Dana 
Hall. Miss Helen Dstrom will spend 
ChrisLmas with her aunt, Mrs. A. D. 
Thomson, returning from Smith col- 
lege. 

Misses Su.<»an and Harrlel Stryker 
and Miss Elsie Crassweller will return 
from .school in the East. 

Miss Gene vera West and Miss Madgo 
Millar, who are attending the Mary- 
land college at Baltimore, will return 10 
Duluth to speivd the holidays. 



Jf 



"MESSIAH 

Friday Night 

At 8:15 Sharp. 

tickf:ts .\rk g«i\g fast. 

Secure yours at Chamberlain-Taylor 
Co.'s and avoid the final rush. 

PnHES, 9IJ;0. »1.00 nnU ."JO CENTS. 



evening at Elks' hall. The affair was 
the first of a .series to be given during 
the winter season and was largely at- 
tended and much enjoyed by the mem- 
bers and their guests. Card tables 
were provided for those who did not 
dance. The series promises to be among 
the most delightful of the informal af- 
fairs of the winter, 

* * * 
The members of the Kodapha club 
have issued invitations for the first an- 
nual ball to be given Friday evening, 
Jan. 3 at the old Masonic Temple danc- 
ing hall. 



Bridge Party. 

Mrs. Frederick B. Spelman was host- 
ess at a delightful afternoon yesterday 
at her home, 1205 East Second street 
in compliment to Miss Rosamond Pat- 
rick. The rooms were most attractive 
in decoration of American beauty roses 
and white hyacinths and bridge was 
played at four tables. The guest prize 
was presented Miss Patrick, and the 
favors were won by Miss Richardson 
and Mrs. B. B. Patrick. The guests 
were: 



leave soon after Christmas for a trip 
abroad. 



De LIT Tin Hon. 



Sho 'ez you bo'n, , . , 

Dex gwlne ter be fun wid de li'l tin ho nl 
En" some folks 11 growl in de ol'-fashion 

way 
•Raze ii rouse "um f'um res' at de break- 
in' IT day. 
But de li T folks say dat dey never shill 

keer 

"Chrus'mus des come once a year!" 

Sho" ez you bo'n, 

Dar'.s de life er de worl' in dat 11*1' tin 

ho'n. 
En de fines' er sights en de purticst. too. 
Is dom rosy red regiments marchin' luf 

you I 
Some folks dey may growl, but de cbillun 

don't Iceor— » 

"Clirismus des come once a year:" 

—Atlanta Constitution. 



Babv's Bath-WHITE LILY. 
LAUNDRESS' Delight— White Lily. 



shop without 



' he 
tiie 



said. "I'm 
enameled 



said. "I'll finish 
And he went. 



go now, 



she 



this alone. 



WKat Retail Markets Offer. 



Christma.^ trres. 

Pop corn, 4 cents a pound. 

SlulUd. 10 cents a pound. 

Cranberries, 2''i cents a quart. 

Mixed nuts, IS cents a pound. 

Table raisin?, 40 cents a pound. 

Turkeys. Ha nburger steak, 15 cents 
a pound. 

Popcorn and cranberries and Christ- 
mas trees are the only things in the 
market in which one can display the 
slightest interest. The really good 
cranberries aro beautiful. They range 
in shade from a nice pink through 
scarlet into a leep red. All that rang- 
ing is on each berry and although pe^ 
pie do not caie for pink and red .in 
combination, ihe way nature has 
managed it 01 the cranberry is a 
real joy and y^u can get nothing that 
will look any nicer on the Christmas 



tree, to say nothing of their looks 
when they are cooked all up together 
with sugar and some water. Th«?y 
lo<-»k beautiful then. 

Popcorn is also one of the Christmas 
things in which there Is great interesu 
When you come to think of it die 
phenomenon of popping corn is one of 
the wonders of any age. Think of tne 
transformation which the least gifted 
person can accomplish. Just hold those 
little hard tan-colored kernels over a 
hot fire and burn your face half off and 
sliake your arms until there isn't a 
shake left in them and see 
the beautiful white fluffy interesting 
things as a result. And yet after all 
when one remembers the heat of one's 
face and the weariness of one's anas, 
it isn't such a very great phenomenon 
after all. 



COLLEGE PEOPLE 

Will Arrive Latter Part of 
Week for the Holidays. 

The college people will return lhi> 
latter part of the w^k, and the two 
weeks of the Christmas and New Year 
holidays will be crowded full of delight- 
ful affairs in honor of the home-conaing 
( f the young i>eople. Any number of 
•affairs are being planned, and much of 
the gaiety will be of the most lnforma.1 
kind, Kinrfply thai incident to Christmas 
and home-coming. 

Among thos^e who will spend the 
Christmas hoHdays in the city are 
Misses Mary Reed, Mary Ober, Ruth 
Rlngsred. Marie Erd. Ruth Doremus 
and Margaret Den f eld and Helen 
Mooney, who will all return Saturday 
from the University of Minneapolis*. 
The Duluth young men who are atte«d- 
ing the unlvei-sity, and who will spend 



The Christmas Shop. 

There remai!i five more shopping davi 

before Christmas. 

• * * 

Dong silk embroidered gloves, in th.- 
delicate evening shades, are among 
the nicest tilings in the shop. They cost 

$3.50 a pair. 

• « • 

Silk stockings are just as nice. They 
cost from $l.M to almost any price a 
pair. 

• i^ * 

Daily gems of thought fi-om Tenny- 
son, or Loiigfellow, or .^nhakeapeare. or 
George Ade. are to be had for 50 cents 

or so. 

• • * 

Moccasins nr^ among the most de- 
sirable of Ohrietnias gifts. Moccasin."> 
ar^ the only drawback to snowshoeing. 
They are .=:<.> shapeless. In one of the 
hardware stores there are some very 
well shaped moccasins, and extra high 

at the same time. 

• • • 

Suede slippers and very swagger 
ieather ones, in a new cut and with 
delightfully high heeds. 

Birthday Party. 

Mrs. William Nissius of 712 East 
Fifth street entertained yesterday aft- 
ernoonSit her home. The affair was in 
honor of the birth annivensary of the 
hostess and an informal afternoon was 
enjoyed by the following guests. 
M< sdames 



Mesdames— 

F. B. Patrick, 

Warren &• Greene, 
Misses— 

Isalxl Patrick, 

Hubbell, 

Hartman, 

Richardson, 

Effte Smith, 

Sell wood. 



John Pugh, 
Carroll Graff. 

Berenice Qfrowley 
d'Autremont, 
Ruth Markell, 
Mary Morris. 
Marion Sherwood. 



Personal Mention. 

Mr.s. Melvin J. Forbes and Mrs. Rob- 
ert Ray left this afternoon for Cali- 
fornia. Mrs. Ray is returning to her 
home in the West and Mrs. Forbes will 
be her guest for some time. 

* * * 

Miss Mary E. Felton of Minneapolis 
is the guest of friends in the city. 

• * * 

Misses Jessie and Irma Hartley will 



The Chmtmas Guest. 

Whoso shall come my way this night. 

By moor or hill or shore. 
For him the blessed candles' light. 

For him the open door. 
(Oh, Mary, thi-s for thy Son's sake, 

'I'hough mine comes In no more!) 

My hearth is swept, my Yule logs bum. 
My board is deekc d and spr.-ad; 

For any who may come In turn 
Are warmth and wine and bread. 

(Oh. Mary, grant my .son this night 
Be housed and comforted!) 

Bid banned or beggared come for guest. 
My heart shall share his woes. 

And" on his head my hand shall rest 
To blesfT him ere he goes. 

(Oh, Mary, grant my son thi^night 
That ble.ssing and repose!) 

This night for thy one Son's d^ar sake 

Wail light and warmth and wine. 
Oh. Marv we be mothers both. 

Take these my tears for sign. 
And this I do for thy sweet Sdn 

Wilt thou not do for mine? 

— THEODOSIA GARRISON In Broad- 
way Magazine. 



It makes you 
longp for ' 
dinner time 



CALUMET 

BAKING POWDER 



H. M. Gerson, 



LADIES' TAILOR 

Duluth. Minn. 

OU Pliane 171/.— i. 



/522 Jefftfion St. 



P. Berchenbossel, 


Stubler, 


C'ollatz. 


Shu man. 


Fiske, 


Boettcher, 


Barowsky, 


Todd. 


Ott, 


Summer, 


Dom, 


Shubi.sky, 


Link, 


Stock, 


Neipp, 


Zuck, 


Weber. 


Gnifke, 


Miller, 


Phltzemier. 



Dancing Parties. 

The social club of North Star Lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias entertained 
at a delightful dancing party last 



Best for flaky pastry, 
wholesome bread and bisctiit 
— best for crisp cookies — 
best for delicious cakes, tooth- 
some mtiffins, doughnuts that 
will melt in your mouth. 

Everything; yon make frell^ 
it will help to make better, 
because it's **best by test.*' 

Anybody can cook wen If they na* 
Oaliunet Bakliifir Powder. PaUorewitb 
It is almost impossible. 

It Is cbemlcally correct and makes 
Pore, Wboleaome Poodu 

Price 10 Moderate 



Siiiiii'.iiuunB 



\-.- 



v_ 





t ■ 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1907. 





'^»ijmmmttms!^(»m0mm ine Christmas Store w^mmsmsm^imitmmftm. 




Store 
Open 

Till 10 o'clock 

evcr>- evening: be- 
fore Ciirisunas. 



Gift Box es Fr^ 1 

with every purthase of 
tl In Ladles' an^Men's Glovn. 
$1 In Men's Ties and Furnishlnfi . 
SOc In Hen's and Women's Rant - 

kerchlels. 

$1 Hi leys' Fnrnl hinf Goods. 

SOc tai Women's BMi:r> and I'ndei 
wear. 




rtail Orders: ^^TtV^l ^'.f 



Carcfttll/ Allied. 



THE GLASS BLOCK 



A Day f pr Girls 

We've got a surprise for 
the erlrls — for Saturday. 
We want every grfrl in t)u- 
luth to share It. Be pre- 
pared to come to the store 
Saturday foren^n. Watoli 
the papcrp. 



Live 
Bears 

Will amuse the 
children all day 
Saturday. 
^i^ 








f=:^ 




Drive Fast, Sanfa! 5 More Shopping Days! Hurry, Xmas Shoppers! 










THURSDAY! 



Perfumes 



Woodworth's 
dainty per- 

fiiTii' •^ -- assort' <} »"i'">rs — 

bottles, in fancy Holi- 

,,X'-s — we seil '*'m rtg- 

ulaily • r.Oc — (olsfwh^re 

they're and 

7 5e I — Thursday 

for. n<H jx — (drug 

mt-i 1 — 1 only 

: ;i cu.--tniTit*r, at . 



I ois«:-v\n«.re 

39c 



Hat Pins 



Thur.«day morn- 

ini.' iit the .V'^v- 

virv C'l'unter, 'av'U ^w- \"ur 

ihoice of "ur STKIII.I.Xt; 

top hat {ins— assorted, fancy 

— -emb" ->■ il tops. 

!- • ;. -. h.a.i- 

r • ; .If pric- 

..irrow — 

— t ach . . . 



leu. lancv 

15e 



Stockinos 



A .snap! Wo- 
men's nier.' -r- 
■ u'- ii.--li:- thread. t;i-:. 
^l<>ckin.^■■^ — line, siie^'rv 
...... seamless — a quality 

■ 'Th 35c a pair — Thursday 
at the 
■unter. 
pair> in n fam-y 
box — I lirtiit 1 Lox, 
— <■•■•■. I- : t. 



r — I nur-ciav 

?89c 




0>."T Delay another day. Every day you wait will render gift-buying that much less satisfactory. If you buy now — here, 
where Xnias stocks \\*ere never before so large, so beautiful and so temptingly priced — you'll still enjoy fine selections, unbroken 
assortments and the absence of the '*eleventh-hour" crowding. Shop in the forenoons, if possible. It pays in every way. 



Slippers for Xmas Gifts. 



.Men'a C«« Mllrr Sllpprn* SS.rtO 

.Mrn'M Roineun $2.50 

Opera SliiporM fS.oO and 9:t.r»0 

M^n'i* Ku!l I>re«m Piimpx . . II.'. '4M 
>leii'H KeS r Slippem MNr to $2.00 
W nmen'n Boadoir Mippcrn 

from $1.^.'> to |i2.r;0 

%\(>mrn*N Pur Trimmed 

JulietN I roni 

InfantH* •loccasinn. 



.92.25 to n*<c 
fi8c 



Mlnaefi* Slippera 8f*<> to ft.RO 

.MlndeM Moe<-ai<laH I.OO to ft2.50 
Woiiien'M ^T»ell Party and 

KvrnInK ''llpperN $4 to $7 '• 
\% omen'pi Stvell t arrinxe 

BootM from ft:{.()0 lu 97.00 ; 

AVomen'M Bath SllpperM 7.%c 

W onien'n I'limpn. $3.50 to iX*.M\ i 
Men's Kid Iloune Slipperx 9l.«'M) 

>ien'ii Carpet Mippen* 4J»c 

Men'M Bath »>llpperM 75c 




Give Gloves 



No matter if you don't know the 
size she wears, or ro'.or she prefers 
—give a Glove certificate (we furnish 
'en:*, and let htr-t.elect them h«-rs>-if. 

I.adlen' 2-clnKp Kid, 91 to 92.25. 
l.ndlcM' F:veniae <;to\ en WId 93.75 
I.nrtieM' elbo>v lenelh Moehim. 
I.iidieH' ellKtw lenKth Hochao. 9:{.:;5 
Rlb»«v leutfth MIk (;Iovon. $r;,«M». 
LadieM* Kid MittenM, 91 and ^L.'.O. 
Ladles' and .MinMeN' UauntletM. SOc 

to »HH*. 
LadleM' Unit f^loven. 25<- to 91. (>0. 
riilldren'H Kid >littenM. TAW ti» 91. 
C'hildrrn'a \\ ool .Mittentt, 25c- to 

.'>o<-. 
Faas for C>Ifta. 50e to 95.50. 
(.Main Aisle, Main Floor.) 








Cut Glass. 



f iar.>< are 

priit-^ in th'' 



w 





the lowest 
city— and 

the great ;'*Jt 
varo-ty "f the finest 
.■ut g-l'a-s.s to be seen in 
the i-Ity or out of it. 

« Wine Bets «4.:i5 to i«2«.:.-> 

Va!*t*». 85c to !itl0.r>(>. 

CMrrj Trnjs. $3.75 to $lS>.r>0. 

Water J'et-. $0.75 to »:U.r>0. 

ftli^e lti-he>.. .<!.r>n to S7..-.<l. 
I tiipiK'd ice Itowl-. .Si!.!»5 to 

SlO.."»t». 
Coloune Bottles, S 1.25 to .S«.50. 
\ ineaar t rtiet*. »5c to $.">.!».■). 
Satad Bonis. S1.25 to S11.75. 
Compotes. SI. 19 to S29.5n. 
Sugar and Cream s< t^ !!>t>.25 to 

•SI 2.50. 
rnn< li Bowl-*, S;i2..->(> to 8«5.00. 
Water Bottler. SI. IS to S.9.75. 
SlMHiu Tray>. S2.iS to $7.95. 
( Ea'^enient.) 



Toilet Cases and Articles! 



Yi 1! ra:. t fail to please with a gift 
s. itcted f:om our showing of toilet 
ai tiiles. C'tme and see them. 

Toilet Sets (in ca.»iest, f2 to S8. 

Collar asui Cutl Boxes. SOc to $1.19. 

.Mani<'ure .*^«ls. Sti.50 to $8.00. 

.M Hilary Brushes. S2.25 to S5 pair. 

Sliavint; (da>r>< s. $1 to $10. 

Fancy Box Perfumes. 2.V' to $5.00. 

IFair Br isluw.. 25e to $5. 

llaud Mirrors, 75c to $3. ' 

(Drug Dept. — Main Floor.) 




Xmas ^ Sale oi 

Silk Stockings! 

VV great opportunity to buy gifts 
that always please — and (juite rarely 
given. A one-day sal^. 
S6 STCKKIXGS $2.95 — Ladies' French 
silk .stockings. In handsome dfsipns — 
worth $4.50 to $6 — one ^O QC^ 

$4 STOCKINCiS $1.98 — Fine thread 
•=i]k, hand-embroidered — d? "I QO 
worth to 14 pair — for V * '^^ 

I-JMlles' pure thread 8llk — dji Cri 
black, while and coU.r*; «pi.iJV/ 

LadkV liaiid-enihn>UlertHl ^^Or* 

sheer lisle thread hose iJvft. 

SOc — liadles' colored ll^Ie thread , 

stockings — in best street and evening 
shades and white — very fine C/\^ 
and sheer iJvC 

Doll Sale — Friday! 

A Hummer: Don't Miss It! 

Wattii tomorrow's papers. 



Gifts of Hammered Brass 

The big window display suggests dozens of suitable gifts— 
here are a few pricts: 



Jardinler*. fZ^S to 935.00. 
Ferneries. 91.39 to 93.75. 
Srottta. 93.48 to 96.75. 
Candelabra. 92.48 to 9».50. 
!>m(ikinK ^'etn, 92.48 to 9l.'>.!!,'{. 
( bampaKne Sets, 97.50 to 937U»0. 
AndlronH, 914.SU to 945.00. 



Fire Screenii, 9C.50 to 932..">0. 
I'mbrella ^tand.-i, •7.V5 to 

922..''>(.. 
Wood BoxeN. 9l0..'»0 to 929, 
>Vall Plaques. 91.25 to 

90.1»5. I 

Tea Set*, 93.48 to 915.95. 
VaseR, e»c to 916.50. | 

(In the Baneinent.) 



Fancy Box P ape 

And Other CJIftn in (Stationery. 
FAXC V BOX .8TATIO.\EnV — Eaton 
Hurlbufs celebrated papers in fane 
gift boxe.s— 25e to 93.5U. 

FAXCY INKSTAXD.s — glass, brass, etc. 
— 2.V to 97.00. 

FOr?rr.\IX PE.NS — The "Glass Block." 
91.00; Waterman's and Mercantile up 
to 94.5C. 

E:NCiR.%VI.<VG — Cards and mono- 

gru.n-<eJ stationery a ppeeiaUy. 

Come and see the samples and 

get prices. 
X.MAS NAPKI.VS — In new hnlly 

aiitl .Siiiit.i Claus d' signs— 5e a 

doxen. or 30e per hundred. 
East Center Aisle — Main Floor. 





Travelers' Traps 

We are sure you couldn't better 

please one who travels than by giving 

a good case, bag or trunk — such as 
ours. The largest line at tlie lowest 
prices in the city. 

Tr links of every description, $3.50 to $75. 

Silk Hal Cases, $8 lo $25. Traveling Bags, 7i>c to $3.50. 

Suil Cases, $1.25 to $35. Fitted Suit Cases, op to $75. 

Fitted lia^rs — complete with all necessary toilet receptacles — 
up to $45,00. (Trunk Dept.— Third Floor.) 




it into a 

33c 



Gauntlets 



THURSDAY ! 

Sofa Pillows ";'„"„„p'^i3 

Boston pillows — jmre white 
cotton filled with soft, pure, 
clean feathers, (guaranteed) 
— all ready to put into a 
fancy Chri:;tma« 
pillow top — regu- 
lar price 49c — 
(draptry dept.) — 
3rd floor) — only. . 

Gifts for boys! 
About 6 doz. 
pair big boys' fringed gaunt- 
lets, with fancy trimmings — 
all fine soft leathers — a 
, dandy Xmas gift. Our 

regular price is 
50c — Thur.=day 
forenoon (limit 2 
pairs) — special at 
only 

Women's Julicttes— 

{Special lot of just SO pairs 
Women's black felt. fur- 
trimmed Juliettes — hand- 
turned sf.les — a swell house 
slipper for Xmas gift — actu- 
ally worth $1.'. a pair — 
in the shrte 
•uBnex. Thurs- 
day forenoon 
— (limit one 
pr. ) — only . , . , 



It. our 

39e 




A 



I 



I 




Christmas Sale of Gift Umbrellas! 



Our Clirl..tmas trade in l'mhr«-Ilas has aluays been very large — this year we're Roiiig 

that reason, we'll offer toniorrt)\v. four .vu< li l»ar^ain.<. in sift unt!:rellas as you're ->.>. 

value exactly as we here tell you — and even then you'll be ^urpri-icd when you see Uiem 



to make It break all re 'ords. For 

never >:een before in Dulutli. Every 

Kead: Don't fail to eonu': 



On safe In the east 

center nlsle— on main 

floor. 



LOT 1 — .\hnnt 50 Mei»'s and 

■\Voin« n's Gk>ria Silk I'm- 
i)r»'lla.<, strong and servlc - 
able, with natural wo -d anl 
various fancy handles — some 
silver mounted — 
reeular prices up 
$1.50 and $2,00 
your choice 



111 J vs s^^jiiix:: 



LOT 2 — 100 Men's and 

Woman's Fine Gloria .'^ilk 
I'mbrellas, ma,le on steel r<>d 
and i>aragon fram. — natural 
wood and silver-mounted 
handUs — reg- 
ular prlce.^ to 
$2,50 — choice 
for only 




LOT 3 — 50 Ladles' Fine Silk 

Umbr<.lla.«, black and ct^lors 
— natural wood and fancy 
silver-trimmed 

Ivory handles — ■ 
actual values up 
to JC — choice of 
the h.t 



horn 



and 



$3.75 



LOT 4 — Only 25 Ladies' ex- 
tra fine, idain and fancy silk 
umbrellas, wit'n various 

fancy handles of walrus, 
ivory, pearl, sterling and ox- 
idized silver — 
some of them 
art- reg. $9 and 
$10 umbrellas 



ling and ox- 

$4.75 




Note wain on sale 
in the east center 
aisle— main fl. 



Fancy C hina 

L.%>IP.S. Etc. 

Hundreds of gifts 
will s u g g e t^ J 
t h e m s e Ives if 
you'll visit out 
fancy china de- 
partment (base- 
ment.) 

Clips and Saucers, 

Celery Tray.'^. 75c 

Syrup PittluTs. 75c to $2.00. 

Steins, 69c' to §3.00. 

Salad Btmls. 5(k' to $12.00. 

Rail Plans. 69c to $2.50. 

Fancy Plates. 25c to $3.00, 

Chocolate Pots. SI. 50 to S45, 

Sets, up to .<22..50. 
•Hffar an I Cream Sets. ?,Zc to $8 
IJerry and Irult Sets $2.50 to 

$8.00. 
Wat< r Sets, $1.25 Jo S.1.50. 
Parlor Lanip,.. $2 to $15. 
Electroliers, $2.75 to $80. 



1 





to 7Dc. 
S2,98. 






NEXT CITY COUNCIL MAY 
HAVE "LID" MAJORITY 



Law Enforcement Can- 
didates Came Through 
Primaries Safely. 

Party Now Has Candi 

dates in Seven of 

Eight Wards. 



OlKHK^CKXH>Oa<HXM><KH><K>CK>CHa<>0 

O A C, MrKnlKlit no <>pp<«<ll!on, O 

O ■'. I- < rouiweJI \A. OettrKr U . O 

O titoetlel. 

O Frunk J«;r(!(in V!». ( barlen Ra- O 

O «j*«irK;e \ an llarKmn vn. Thuinno Q 

O Tr«"»t:ien. q 

O .Iclin Hiijinn \ ■«. !.>> "». >irii<ler. o 

O ( hnrleH ^Itirk ^ m. i'eier OIhod, O 

O l-'r»nk *«<-liaffer » «. .!«.in J, y\ur. q 

■O W. J. i.«t*vrle \%. J. K. FuublMtcr. C 

O 

ik^ch>o-0Ch>o<>ch>ch:^o<k>{kjo<kk><! oo 






: .:t = 



■■)',1 



were endorsed by 

utrirfn. C. S. AVi 



. .1 -Ml .Ml Knight 

tight on his hands 

lisa an inUependeii 

Messiii. Csomwel 

h.'iVf.: a:i.'tlit.r fight 
r\ « r 

Aldtiman Tessm 
the Third w.ird if i 
his successor will 
by the ctmneil. Th 
ov rs. Tliey are Al 
ier. Shaitel, Riben 
trault iind Foubi^ 
two. Aldtrnitn Mo< 
known iis slaunen 

But the lid party 
dldale in every w 
;it the corning ele» 
*veiy oa<r ol ihei 
least an even ehai 
-Vlcivnight is faiilj 
he will offset the 
U.iVUlg six eonle!' 
lid party could el 
'lid.ites they would 
'"fU.v i:i tlie coun 
n*.t liring over s« 
■ •;• s frora the opi 
will hf their obj< 
!•: F- hrM'iry is ilk* 
tests. Ti 
.11 pullln 
lurvuKu the prim 
turn tlie liiek at 



loy nre 



Tl: 
of 

111. . 
w h o 



is 



least Stat 

it. and 

. ,\.^ woe liwi 

terivicted i 

iiig law. 

ift In th 

.il aldern 



the First ward al- 

son and Watson S. 

• would stand for 

.\ ere all nominated. 

later will have no 

at the election, un- 

t files. 

1 and Meader still 
on their hands, bow- 

in win resign from 
1« cUd as mayor, and 
ia\" to be appoints J 
8 leaves sewn hold- 
derint-n Moore, Muel- 
ick, Kenn.dy, Filia- 
ter. Of these only 
re and Kejin»-dy, are 
iJd supporters, 
has jin avowed can- 
ard but the Fourth, 
lion, and practically 
I has ii^Tarently at 
ce for election. Mr. 
suri' of election, so 
Fourtii ward man. 
ts In doubt. If the 
ct all of thtir can- 
have a straight ma- 
il, even If th-y did 
me of tbe doubtful 
■ositlon. To do that 
ct and the election 
ly to see some w^arm 
e' lid nun w» re suc- 
K their candidates 
iries. and they may 
the coming election, 
td a fighting chance 
if they land all of 
ide the saloonkeeper 
•f vlcdating th*- Sun- 
le would te given a 
! council with nine 
en. 



man. D. H. Murphy, was daught by 
Drafter, and it is Ixlieved one robber 
was wounded. 

The bloodhounds followed the men 
five miles. Under a bridge near Trent 
the ot^cers found five dynamite bt>mbs, 
some fuseis and safe-cracking applian- 
( es. 



WANTED 

Competent CarpT-ters. rimrli'^rs. Electri- 
c'-a";--. Shtet Metal Workers, Roofers anl 
Pias'-frfrs; steady wnrit; g'od wages: 
open shop. Apply Emr. E'ept.. Duluth 
builders' Exchange, .'•Ol Lyceum building. 




Can Yoii? 



JC («» of these 

.1 h;ive for 

•. y-one 

d get 

! .\ ' iity-tivt ._ij lOc Ci- 
i- . . t s !»•♦. 

Ximas Ci?:.!;;. sre.-i.il brands by the 
boir. Pif s 2« IVr Ont Off. 

BLA8KW0D0 QR03. 

TWO sT«mi:«. 

27 na«l -l.'* West Stryorit.r street. 



ROBBEFS F.ULED 

To Hftld Ip NoMhtTU Pacific Train 
\\ est o! Spokane. 

Sr>okane. \Va.'?h . Ix-e. IS.— An at- 
itmpt was made o hold up the west- 
bound Xorthtrn Pacific train eleven 
miles east of Spok ine yesterday. 

Three men attt mpled to teg the 
traJn. but the eng neer refused to stop. 
Harry Draj>eT. wjtb a pixiiae of blood- 
hounds, hurritd U the station of Trent 
to foHow them. 

A fr. ght train w»s stopp.-d and 
Uiree men started to floe from it. One 



IMPROVING THE 
INDIANA LANDS 

Reclamation Service Co- 
operates With Bureau 
in Western Reserves. 

Washinsfbn. Dec. 18.— .\ section of the 

annual report of the commissioner of 

Indian affair.*, recently made public, deals 
with the mlscellanfous work of the 
bureau. It Includes Irrigation on Ind an 
r»s<-rvation8, proKi»'Ss in makiiig allot- 
ments, logging oj>erallont:, and the opera- 
tion of tht leasing pol'cv. 

The Indian bureau has been co-operat- 
ing closely with the reclamatioa bureiu 
In establishina: irrigati m projects on 
Indian rest A'ations* an J in Miintana W. 
U. Hdl, the agent of the bureau, has i on- 
ductid his investigaticrs in conn^ctit n 
with Cyrus C Babb •? the rec'amation 
service. Good progress has bfen made on 
th,fe Blackfeet, Crow and Flathead reser- 
vations. Where actual consttu: t:on has 
b«gun, Indian labt'r is being ut.l.xtd to a 
large extent. 

Lo{j}rinjr I*roflts I..arge. 

t'nder the opt ration of th? Burke law 
f^e.^patents have been Issued to a number 
of Ind'ans whom the secretary of the in- 
terior was .satisfi'd could adniinlster thi.ii- 
own affairs These include seven at 
Leech Lake and sixteen at White Earth, 



Abbett's Drag Stores 

We can save you 25 per cent on the 
famous W. I>. C. Pipes. Leading brand 
of Cig.irs, 60c per box and upwards. 201 
"West Superior street. 101 West Fourth 
street, 932 East Second street. 



i:i Minnesota; two at Crow Creek, tiilrty- 
one at Sisscton, two at Lower Bn:lf, 
thirty- four at Rosebud and fifty-seven at 
Yankton, in South I'aknta, and sev« n ut 
La Pointe and 171 at Cneida. in t\'iscon- 
sin. The total number Issu* d is let^s than 
the number of applications acted up' n 
favorably by the Indian bureau, owing 
to the delay in getting the patents out in 
the land office. "The result.'- of the opera- 
tion of this feature of the Burke law are 
wholly satisfactory," tays Commissioner 
I>urp. 

I'nder contracts approved by the Indian 
bureau, logging opeiations wire conducted 
on allotments occupied by Indians under 
the lurisdictlon of the La Pointe age- cv 
in Wi.'-consin, and the prticei ds deposited, 
under bond, in national V»a:.ks In Minne- 
sota and Wisconsin. The banks in whi.-h 
thesf. funds are deposited are: City Na- 
tional, I»uluth. Minn.. $1>.3''C First Na- 
tional. Bayfield. Wis.. J6t.ll6": Northern 
National. Ashland Wis.. t-i:f.,4K»: Fiist 
National, Hud.'^on, Wis.. JliV'^.Tla; Ashland 
National, Ashland, Wis.. t:3'',W.9. 

I->ee<Ioiii for Good Indians. 
No timber contracts covfrin-^ .allotted 
lands under the Jurisdiction cf the Leech 
I^ke agency in Minnesota were ap- 
proved la.st year. Prior lo that time and 
during the year, however, $6it.22.T was col- 
lected for timber cut under contracls ap- 
proved In ISKi. and $1.K:7 collected for 
timber trespass. 

I'nder the plea of giving progres8;ve 
Indians greater freedom in the manage- 
ment of their la.ids. the conimissloMer ap- 
proved a number of leasing agreements, 
including thirty on the Crow Cieek reser- 
vation in South l^a'icota. 

Sales of inhfrited Indian lands ha\\ 
b'jen made on all reservations d-irin^ the 
year, the numb'-r of acres and the total 
proceeds in the Northwestern states being 
as follows: 

Minnesota— I^eech Lake and White 
Earth, 957 acres for $14,312; North Dak ta. 
Dtvils Lake. 3.253 acres for K:3.:44; South 
Dakota, Crnw Creek, Lower Brule, 
Sissfton and Yankton, 71,i 16 acres for 
JC29.711; Montana, Crow, 1.4&3 acres for 
$3e,i&i. 



WK.\T GRANPP.\ knows: 



D.\IRYING^BJE(TS 

To be Considered at .Agrieultural 
Soiiety Meeting. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. Dec. 18.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— E. K. Slater, state 
dairy and food commissioner, has pre- 
pared a program for the dairy meeting 
at the annual convention of the Minne- 
sota State Agrlculti.ral society, which 
will be held" in Minneapolis, Jan. 13. 14 
and 15. The afternoon of Jan. 14 will 
he devoted (Xf-lusively to the dairy In- 
dustry and the exercises will be In 
charge of the state commi-ssion. The 
prineipal papers on the program are as 
fr.llows: •'Dairying as a 'Part of Diver- 
.^ifled Farming." J. R. Morley, Owa- 
tonna; "Profitable Milk Productl-»n, ' 
Prof. J. L. Haecker of the State Agri- 
cultural college, St. Anthony park: 
"Our Head of ^alry Cows." W. F. 
Schilling, Northfield; "Raising Calves,' 
A. J. McGuire, Grand Rapids, 



Some folks say 'at Red Riding Hood 

She didn't live at al nor go 
Down where th' wolf was in 'at wood, 

B-jt grampa .says 'at it is so! 
An" some folks say 'at Goldilocks 

L»on't meet th" bears an' run away, 
A-bumpin" into trees an' rocks. 

But grampa's seen her many a day. 

My grampa takes me on his knee 
An" tells me all 'bout Puss in Boots 

An" 'iKiut th' fairies ^ju can't s»e 
For their in-vis— their funny suits. 

An" he knows where the beanstalk Is 
At Jack th" Giant Killer chrnb" 

To get 'at gold an' things o' his, 
'Cause grampas seen it many a time. 

An' Cinderella, too, my pa 

1st laugh an' say 'at he don't know. 
But grampa— wy, my granij-a saw 

Her slip 'at slipper on hc-r toe' 
An" Simple Simon- would you think 

He never was like some folks say? "^ 
But grampa only laugh an" wink. 

"Cause he has seen him many a day. 

"At Alfred Brown, 'at lives nex' door 

To us, I don't like him, 'uhcaiise 
He say "at he din't think no more 

'At there can be a Stanta Claus, 
But grampa whi